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MacEngineer

The

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

VOLUME 29

NUMBER 1

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

WINTER 2004

Planning for growth See page 5


A message from the Dean Faculty growth post double cohort

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his fall, the halls of our Faculty buildings bustled with students, some 800 new admissions. We are experiencing an unprecedented population growth in Engineering. Even though the average entering grade was about 85%, the number of students with at least 95% average has tripled. In other news, the University Senate has approved two new M.Eng. programs: Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and Engineering and Public Policy. The Faculty has approved in principle the creation of the School for Bioengineering which will provide a focus for graduate education and research in this emerging field. Several colleagues in the Faculty are responsible for the creation of

inside this issue Building Campaign .................5 Alumni Profiles .....................11 MES News ............................18 Engineering Career Services ................................21 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. Publication Number 40063416

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these new programs. I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank all of them, particularly Dr. Andy Hrymak, Dr. Brian Baetz and Dr. John Brash and their teams. Long term enrolment targets for the Faculty are the subject of current debate and discussion at various levels. These discussions are focusing on the question: What should be our “optimum” size, post double cohort? On the positive side, growth means an increase in number of students, faculty and staff allowing us to react to future needs of society. As well, this allows us to develop new programs in a number of strategic areas of interest such as bioengineering and environmental engineering, thus creating a critical mass of research capacity. Under certain conditions we will actually be able to reduce class size by being able to divide large classes into sections. At the same time, we must be mindful how an increase in size may translate into the quality of student intake; how this will affect our research enterprise; and how this will affect our resources such as laboratories and student services. All of this will change the culture of the Faculty. Clearly, the Faculty plan must also fit within the University’s overall vision and plan as they are currently being articulated in the “refining direction” exercise. One factor that is making these discussions even more difficult is the uncertainty surrounding government funding. For example, the provincial government has recently decided to freeze tuition fees at their current levels for two years. It is not clear, however, whether this will be accom-

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

panied by increased funding to the universities to meet increasing costs and improve the student’s educational experience. Rest assured that McMaster’s Engineering is making every effort to ensure that all possible avenues are explored as we journey through this series of new and exciting changes. Again, I wish to emphasize that we welcome the views of all concerned – students, staff, faculty, alumni and our neighbors in community and industry – to help us discern our direction and fulfill our goals.

Mo Elbestawi

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A message from the Associate Dean A kaleidoscope of ideas and skills

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very so often, I like to stand back and contemplate the rich and complex environment that we have in the Faculty of Engineering. The 130 professors and 110 full-time staff members work as a team, with each contributing his or her unique skills to the enterprise. Some explore beyond the limits of conventional thinking and methodology, while others focus on optimizing the performance of existing systems. This diversity leads to a kaleidoscope of ideas that enriches each of our lives. It is very rewarding when I see the same characteristics in our undergraduate students. Nowhere is this more evident than in student initiatives, conceived and run by the students themselves. Two such initiatives are the Solar Car Team and the Formula SAE Team. The Solar Car Team has about 90 student members spanning the entire University. They are currently working on updating the current version of their car, Fireball II, in preparation for the Formula Sun Grand Prix in Topeka, Kansas, in May 2004. In the last competition, they had one of the lightest and most aerodynamic vehicles, but its reliability was disappointing. They are now testing the car in an effort to overcome the problems. Next summer, they plan to start work on Fireball III, to be used in the Chicago to Los Angeles American Solar Challenge 2005. Planned improvements include higher-voltage batteries and a new motor to reduce current consumption, and a new higher-efficiency solar array. Over the past few weeks, the Solar Car Team developed a delightful car-chase video with the assistance of our Security Services to help recruit new team members. The SAE Formula Team consists of over 20 Engineering students. Their car is an open-wheel single-seat racer with a

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on weekends. Even so, at the 2002 competition in Pontiac, Michigan, the McMaster team placed 17/144 in the Design category. The Team also attended for the first time the 2002 competition in Leicester, England, and placed tenth overall and sixth in Design. This was an outstanding performance for a group of students for whom the SAE competition must take a back seat to their studies. For the next version of the car, the Team plans to improve performance by adding superchargers and increasing the rigidity of the frame. The Team members are also trying to find other creative ways to improve the performance of the car. When the Dean asked what we could do to assist the Team, the immediate response was, “It would be great if you could help us buy more books on car design!” If you have any special expertise in the many aspects of car design, or even if you don’t, these highly enthusiastic students would more than welcome your involvement. Contact names and more information can be found on the teams’ web sites at http://www.solarcar.mcmaster.ca/ and http://sae.mcmaster.ca/.

Dr. Peter Smith, Associate Dean of Engineering

600 cc Honda motorcycle engine. The McMaster team competes against most large universities in North America and some from overseas, many of which have Automotive Engineering programmes that use the SAE competitions as the focus for class projects. Some of these teams also have extensive track facilities to test their cars, while the McMaster team is restricted to using the Zone 6 parking lot

2003 Enrolment High But Manageable McMaster seems to have successfully accommodated the dreaded double cohort which threatens at times to overwhelm classrooms and cause severe traffic flow in hallways, according to a report to the Senate in mid-September. As of September 10th, full-time undergraduate enrolment stood at 15,811, with 5,357 students enrolled in Level 1. This is slightly higher than the University’s projected figure of 15,361. Undergrad enrolment for the 2002-2003 academic year was 14,692. Associate vice-president academic Fred Hall says this is a good position for McMaster. Some other universities are struggling to meet enrolment targets. “Their shortfalls could affect their long term budget situations.” Noting that the University’s average entering grade was increased this year, Hall adds that this could be “one of the best entering classes we have ever had at McMaster.” Dean of graduate studies Fred L. Hall reported that as of September 8th, 2,098 fulltime graduate students were enrolled and the number was increasing daily. “This is the largest number of graduate students that McMaster has ever had.”

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Engineering news Opportunities for Alumni to “Get Back to Mac”! by Pat Stevens

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uring fall 2003, I had the opportunity to participate in several activities involving McMaster University and Engineering Alumni. Let me share with you what has brought me and many of my former classmates back to Mac. The Engineering Alumni Advisory Committee met in September and midDecember to plan alumni events for 2004. This Committee is an eclectic group of MacEng graduates, Carm Vespi and others who are dedicated to creating opportunities for alumni to ‘Get Back to Mac!’ If you have ideas of activities which would entice you and your former classmates to return to the campus, or if you are interested in being a part of the Committee, please let me know! In October, the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineering held its annual conference in Hamilton. As usual, the Dept. of Chemical Engineering hosted its alumni event at the same time; a good number of alumni and many faculty members attended the reception. It was a wonderful opportunity to renew old friend-

Pat Stevens

ships and visit with the professors who helped shape our futures. A group of us from the class of ’80, along with Dr. Cam Crowe, headed out afterward for an enjoyable dinner. Several of us departed that evening with a commitment to get together again early in the new year. In November, the MacLab Extravaganza was held at the CIBC Hall in the new McMaster University Student Centre. It

Dr. Barber Receives Engineering Award The Ontario Society of Professional Engineers honored nine of their own on Friday November 14, 2003 at the annual Ontario Professional Engineers Awards gala in Toronto. The awards are presented to individuals for engineering excellence and community service. Dr. Douglas Barber, one of those recognized at the awards ceremony, was the recipient Dr. Douglas Barber of the organization’s gold medal. Barber, a former part-time professor of engineering physics at McMaster, is just completing a three-year term as Distinguished Professor-in-Residence in the Faculty of Engineering. He received his PhD in electrical engineering from Imperial College, University of London, in 1965. In 1973 he was a founder of Linear Technology Inc, later renamed Gennum Corp. More recently, he helped found eMPOWR Canada, an organization dedicated to lobbying Ottawa for funds to help ease faculty shortages in the hightech disciplines. He has also served as Chairman of the Board of Governors at McMaster University.

was a wonderful evening to renew more acquaintances and hear an excellent presentation by Vince Smith, President and CEO of Dow Chemical Inc. and a McMaster chemical engineering graduate. The event also provided participants with the opportunity to view this magnificent new building which is now the hub of student life on campus. The common thread through these activities is opportunity – opportunity to speak with former classmates and professors, opportunity to network both professionally and personally, and opportunity to tour the campus to experience the growth of the past few years. There is also the opportunity to give some degree of support back to the University and the Faculty. There are many ways to ‘Get Back to Mac!’ The events that I participated in over the fall are just a few examples. Think about it….what would entice you?

Researcher to Create University’s First MEMS Lab Engineering physics professor Rafael Kleiman is one of the world’s leading researchers studying MicroElectro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) – transforming static silicon chips into minuscule machines that can feel, smell, see, hear and act. A futuristic example of such a “machine” is a sensor worn by a patient that will conduct a test of his or her biochemical levels and allow doctors to analyze the results – without shipping samples off to a lab. One day, Kleiman’s research lab may well be home to the development of such a device. “As we start to miniaturize everything, we need to understand how the forces behave on a small scale,” said Kleiman, who joined McMaster in July. “Things work differently as we make them smaller and because of that we need to understand how they work so we can exploit them fully.” continued on page 7

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Faculty of Engineering creates two new schools

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cMaster University is home to one of Canada’s most researchintensive faculties of engineering. We are highly recognized for the quality and innovation of our academic programs. From the very beginning, our Faculty of Engineering has emphasized research excellence as the central theme to our academic mission and service to the wider community. Excellence in research continues to be reflected in the Faculty’s focus on scholarship at the undergraduate and graduate levels. We have always cultivated strong partnerships with industry as a means of expanding our educational objectives. The links we continue to develop encourage professionalism in engineering, and enhance the relevance of the learning experience to existing and emerging fields. Our multi-stakeholder investment in innovation recognizes and responds to future needs in education and in R&D. With leadership fundamental to the learning environment, McMaster Engineering is determined to provide the highest quality education to the next generation of leaders.

The Faculty of Engineering has launched a capital campaign that focuses on our fundamental obligation to continue delivering the latest and best possible programs in engineering education and research. Two new schools are being created by the Faculty: the McMaster School of BioEngineering and the McMaster School of Engineering Practice. Both schools involve firsts in education and research in M

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Source MIT: conceptual drawings of design centre

The McMaster School of BioEngineering will provide a unique collaborative environment that takes full advantage of our existing expertise in medical sciences and engineering and links current and emerging areas of molecular, medical, and bioengineering research. This timely and major undertaking has the potential for a transformative impact on the University much as the establishment of the medical school did throughout the 1960’s and 1970’s. The tremendous conceptual and technological advances in biological and medical sciences over the past decade, coupled with parallel advances in information technology, instrumentation, bio materials, and nano-technology, have revolutionized the way we think about and investigate biological problems. Future advances in medical research and application of new technology will increasingly rely upon multi-disciplinary ‘systems-wide’ approaches and new ways of thinking about biological problems. This in turn will require convergence of biomedical and clinical scientists, engineers, physicists, chemists and many others at the interface of medical molecular biotechnology and engineering. Currently there is a wide gap between researchers trained in life sciences and those trained in engineering – a gap that represents an impediment to progress in many health related areas. Major academic, research and development opportunities will present themselves to universities that

Canada. A new 40,000 square foot engineering building will house these schools, and it too will be a first of its kind: the first facility designed and built to be an environmentally-friendly institutional facility in the Hamilton area. Support from our alumni, friends and industry will help the Faculty reach its goal of $6 million by March 2005. Every gift will help build McMaster Engineering’s future and secure its place as a premier institution in education and research.

Campaign Priorities McMaster University’s new Engineering building will be dedicated to realizing the Faculty’s vision. The new facility will exemplify collaborative, multi-disciplinary partnerships and commitment to the broader community and will allow us to foster innovative technical education programs. The Faculty of Engineering is committed to creating a comfortable place to learn and work while simultaneously demonstrating state-of-the-art environmentally conscious design and function. The impact of our building and its operations will ensure minimum impact on the environment by means of “green” features such as reclaimed and recycled building materials, passive air exchange, computerized climate control, and optimal use of natural light. As a model facility, this building will showcase environmentally responsible and sustainable design and will reflect the important leadership role that engineers play in creating sustainable communities. U

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Honorary Degrees Conferred on Local Businessmen

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community groups such as the ichael Lee-Chin (B.Eng United Way and local hospitals, Civil ’94), Joe Ng (not and is a major benefactor to the a grad from Mac) and Faculty of Engineering. Patrick Tan (Chemical B.Eng. ’70 Patrick Guong-Ching Tan, M.Eng. ’72) were recipients of permanent secretary of the honorary Doctor of Laws degrees Singapore Ministry of Home at McMaster’s fall convocation Affairs, received his honorary ceremonies in November 2003. degree at the afternoon convocaLee-Chin also gave the address at Michael Lee-Chin Joe Ng Patrick Tan tion where he was the guest the morning convocation for the AIC Institute of Strategic Business speaker. Tan obtained both his undergraduates from the Faculties of Business, Studies. graduate degree in chemical engineering Humanities, Social Sciences and the Arts & Electrical Engineer Joe Ng is the and a Masters of engineering in environScience Program. founder of JNE Consulting Ltd., a local mental pollution from McMaster. In his Lee-Chin is chairman and chief execucompany that has partnered with major position as permanent secretary, he has tive officer of AIC, Canada’s largest firms on both national and international overseen the implementation of stricter privately-held mutual fund company. The projects. The company employs 300 engisecurity measures to counter terrorist successful businessman is known for his neers, technologists, designers, constructhreats to Singapore and assisted the generous philanthropy including a $5 Ministry in dealing with the SARS tion managers and support personnel. Ng million gift to the University’s Michael G. outbreak. has supported many Hamilton-based DeGroote School of Business to establish

McMaster’s Engineering & Science Olympics

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ore than 500 students from southern Ontario high schools congregated at McMaster in mid-October for the annual McMaster Engineering and Science Olympics and Open House. Students participated in a friendly competition of events based on engineering and science principles. This year, a new remote event concept was introduced along with the traditional on-campus competition. This remote activity involves students

working on a chemistry problem in a lab at their home school with results submitted online. The open house program offers these students a chance to meet with university students, faculty and professional engineers as well as seeing the on-going daily activities at the University. A variety of displays, special presentations and tours were featured. “McMaster Faculties of Engineering and Science, known for innovation and

education, excellence in research and quality of student life, offer the Olympics as an innovative opportunity for students to actively participate in applying engineering and science principles through friendly competition and activities,” says Bob Loree, Director of Engineering 1. Awards were presented to the top teams in each event. More than $20,000 in McMaster entrance awards were also distributed.

Engineer-in-Residence Program an Inspiring Success A program that puts engineering professionals into Ontario classrooms has quickly become an educational success story. Launched in 1998 as a pilot project in the Toronto area, the Engineer-inResidence (EIR) program has expanded to include over 40 schools throughout the province. Volunteer engineers who are matched with a school in their area work with teachers to develop a custom program of hands-on activities, presentations and competitions that will engage the students and increase their awareness of the role of engineering in society. “School and

education today are complicated, and kids need inspiration,” says EIR Project Leader Jeffrey Crelinsten. “My experience with science and technology awareness has shown me that the successful people have had role models.” Crelinsten is co-founder of The Impact Group, consultants on science and technology awareness. The Impact Group administers the EIR program in Ontario. The students are not the only ones reaping the benefits of this program. Research shows that innovative countries actively develop strong links between industry and education. Employers are

looking for people who are team players and who can communicate as well as develop and execute a project plan. These are all components of the EIR program. In addition, the volunteer engineers say they receive tremendous satisfaction from their participation in the program. Mac engineer grad Lee Watson, Civil ’96, was a volunteer during the 2002-2003 school year. He worked with teacher Michelle Gioskos and her students at Pauline Johnson Public School in Hamilton. For more information, visit the EIR website at www.eir.ca or call the program office at 416-481-7070.

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Researchers Win National Innovation Award

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cMaster engineers John MacGregor and Theodora Kourti, along with Canadian manufacturers Dofasco Inc. and Tembec Inc., have won a 2003 Synergy Award for Innovation from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Conference Board of Canada. The partnership was one of seven presented

with awards for 2003. Launched in 1995 by NSERC and the Conference Board, the annual Synergy Awards for Innovation recognize outstanding achievements of university-industry collaboration. The Mac researchers and their partners were awarded the prize for their pioneering methods of recovering and interpreting data. Their methods – advanced statistical

modeling techniques known as multivariate statistics (MVS) – manage many variables simultaneously and extract valuable information from manufacturing process data flows. These methods have lead to major economic benefits and process and product improvements. MacGregor, a chemical engineer and an expert in process control, says he recognized that “many companies created ‘massive data graveyards’ – databases loaded with millions of bits of information about their industrial processes – yet more than 99 per cent of the information was never used.” The researchers designed a system to retrieve and analyze key bits of information to measure performance and ultimately improve productivity. Both Dofasco and Tembec have used the methods to provide operators with the information they need to work more effectively. In the end, both companies say that the system resulted in major cost savings and substantial quality improvements. This is the fifth time McMaster researchers and their partners have won this award.

Mac Prof Receives Alumni Award Dr. Gary Purdy, a former Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, is the 2003 recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award. The award was presented during the Fall 2003 Convocation ceremonies. Dr. Gary Purdy graduated in 1962 with a PhD in (Metallurgical) Engineering. During his forty years as a faculty member at McMaster, Dr. Purdy has also served as Departmental Chair and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. He is currently the Director of McMaster’s Interdisciplinary Centre for Peace Studies. Dr. Purdy has been recognized with a number of honours and awards over the span of his career including a Foreign Associateship with the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a Diplom de Docteur Honoris Causa from the Insitut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, a Fellowship of the Royal Society of Canada, fellowships of two

Dr. Gary Purdy

international materials societies, the Canadian Metal Physics Medal and an Honorary Professorship at the University of Science and Technology, Beijing P.R.C.

2nd Annual McMaster

E ngineering Golf Tournament Thursday, May 27, 2004 Tyandaga Municipal Golf Course Burlington, Ontario

University’s First MEMS Lab continued from page 4

“Shotgun” Start at 12 noon Cost: $125 per participant

There are few MEMS universities here to increase researchers in the world with support of scientific research. a better understanding of this Kleiman, who holds the tiny technology than Kleiman. Canada Research Chair in After starting his undergradMicroElectroMechanical uate degree at the University Systems, comes to the of Manitoba, the Winnipeg University from Bell Labnative moved to the United oratories where he was a States to study at MIT. senior researcher. He plans to He then went to Cornell to work closely with colleagues complete his PhD. His deciin McMaster’s health sion to return to Canada was sciences faculty to study Dr. Rafael Kleiman influenced, he says, by a biomedical applications for micro-machines. renewed commitment by government and

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Contact: Carm Vespi 905-525-9140, ext. 24906 vespi@mcmaster.ca or register online at: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni BOOK EARLY, SPACE IS LIMITED!

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Alumni news Three Mac Friends Tackle a Marathon

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n October 12, 2003, MacEng 2000 grads Sarena Goldstein, Jess (Angus) Shulman, and Tina Traini donned their running shoes and Canada flag t-shirts to join 39,997 others in running the Chicago Marathon. Sarena Goldstein, Mech&Mgmt ’00 and former ESSCO VP Finance, lives near Milwaukee, Wisconsin and works for GE Medical Systems as an R&F Systems Engineer. She had never done a major road race before. Living so close to Chicago, however, it’s pretty difficult to avoid hearing the hype about the marathon – one of the largest in the world. This was the 26th year for the Chicago Marathon; the annual event draws over a million spectators. When a friend at work convinced her to run and she heard her old Mac buddies were planning on racing too, she knew she couldn’t back out. Former MES President Jess (Angus) Shulman always hated running as a teenager. After graduating from Elec & Society in 2000, she took a job with GE Medical Systems (where she works today in Mississauga as a Six Sigma Black Belt) and joined their on-site fitness centre. The staff at the fitness centre convinced Jess to enter a 5K race in the fall of 2000, and

though it was pretty tough, she became hooked. Over the next three years, she competed in progressively longer races. When this year arrived and she’d already done a half-marathon, she knew her next step had to be the full distance – 26.2 miles, or 42 kilometers. Tina Traini, ESSCO President for 1999-2000, has also been developing her athletic prowess over the last few years, drawing Marathon runners (from left to right) Jess Angus, Sarena upon her high-school swim- Goldstein and Tina Traini ming skills to become a triathlete. While confidence. They took off just after 8 a.m. working as a consultant with Accenture in under sunny skies and ran their hearts out Toronto, Tina trains regularly with running, for more than four-and-a-half hours. Along swimming, and biking groups. She has the way there were pains, dizzy spells, competed in several triathlons since gradwalk-breaks, periods of elation and periods uating from Elec&Society in 2000, most of depression, snacks, drinks, pain-killers, recently completing a Half-Ironman in blisters, a brief trip to the medical tent, lots Ottawa on Labour Day. This left Tina in of smiles and a few tears. All three came great physical shape, and though it running across the finish line, tired and sore reduced the time she was able to put into but thrilled! The three friends from Mac dedicated training for the marathon itself, had truly come a long way! she felt ready. It goes to show what you can do with a The three women arrived at the starting little determination – so put down this line in various states of preparedness and magazine and go outside!!

Mac Alumnus Receives PEO Honour Dr. Mohamed Khattab was named Engineer of the Year by the Professional Engineers of Ontario (PEO) during Engineering Week 2003 (HamiltonHalton), held the week of October 20, 2003. Dr. Khattab received his B.A. from Cairo University, his M.Eng in mechanical engineering from McMaster University (1972) and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Waterloo (1981). He has extensive industrial experience in the design of mechanical structures and equipments, and developed many computer routines in design and optimization. He has delivered

training courses in CAD/CAM and Finite Element Method, is widely published, and holds many patents in Canada and the United States. In 1972 he joined National Steel Car Ltd, the biggest railroad freight car builder in Canada. He left the company in 1991 to establish his own firm, M K Engineering. A dynamic speaker and lecturer, Dr. Khattab also participates in a wide range of community activities including giving sermons at mosques and Islamic schools in Canada and the United States, organizing fund raising initiatives, and lecturing with his wife on Islam in local schools and churches in the Hamilton area.

Engineer of the Year is conferred in recognition of outstanding contributions to engineering and service to the community. The theme of this year’s event was “Engineering in the Commonwealth” and attracted keynote speaker Cecilia CarterSmith, a member of the Commonwealth Games Bid Committee. Engineering Week 2003 also attracted a number of parallel events including meetings of the Canadian Geotechnical Society (Southern Ontario Section), the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, the Institute of Transportation Engineers (Hamilton Area Section) and the Hamilton Chapter of the PEO.

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A jug of wine, a loaf of bread and...

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n September 25th, the McMaster Engineering Alumni were the guests of Kittling Ridge Winery. Eileen Hall, one of the owners, graciously welcomed us and shared with us the fascinating history of Kittling Ridge. Kittling Ridge was the dream of John Hall. As an experienced wine maker, his talents for many years served and undoubtedly benefited his employers in the winemaking industry. However, he wanted to produce and market his own wines. The decision to do so involved the whole family and with the support of his wife and daughters, John set out to find a location for his winery. The Grimsby area has a rich history for wine making in the Niagara Peninsula. In addition, Mr. Reider, a European spirits maker, built his distillery just west of Grimsby but after several years, was forced to close his facility. Canada was not quite ready to appreciate his variety of distilled products. The closure proved to be a wonderful opportunity for John Hall. Research showed that the area had just the right weather conditions for a winery; the escarpment, lake and a ridge of land in between, provided very good conditions for grape growing. Grimsby is also known for an unusual annual event. Thousand of hawks, peregrines, and other related fowl migrating north in April spend time resting in the area. The wind currents coupled with the lake and land temperatures produce air currents that provide the perfect conditions for the birds to rest on their northward trek. This is called a kittling. The name Kittling Ridge seemed a natural one for the newlyfounded winery. John wanted to do something that hadn’t been tried before in Canada – combine a winery with a distillery. To get approval for such a venture proved to be a real challenge. After lobbying all levels of government, he finally received approval. Now, the real work of producing good-tasting, marketable wines and spirits began. After Eileen’s entertaining and informative talk, we were given a tour of the facility, followed by a delicious meal at which we were served two of Kittling M

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Enjoying a sample of Kittling Ridge Wine are (from left to right) Donna Cripps, Paul Cripps, Mary Crockett, Bob Drysdale, Peter Crockett, Cheryl Moore and Gary Moore.

Ridge’s fine wines. After the meal, we retired to the gift shop and tasting room for more samplings offered by John who was able to take time from his busy schedule and work behind the bar. He was quite at home serving samples of his products and chatting with the group. A special thank you to Carm, Iwona, and Linda for their untiring efforts to

make these wonderful occasions available for the Engineering Alumni members to enjoy. Everyone had a good time reconnecting with old friends and colleagues, touring the facility and enjoying the hospitality of our hosts, John and Eileen Hall. Reported by Carol Palombella

Engineering Alumnus Receives Hamilton Honour William H. Filer, a professional engineer with a consulting firm in Hamilton, was inducted into the City of Hamilton’s Gallery of Distinction at a gala ceremony in November 2003. The Chief Warden of Camp 13 at McMaster University, Filer supervises the traditional Iron Ring ceremony every year for Mac’s graduating engineers. Filer, who is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, has been

responsible for the construction of many landmarks in the city including the University’s nuclear reactor, the YMCA and Hamilton Place theatre complex. Filer, who graduated from the University of Toronto in 1951, was one of eight 2003 inductees. The Gallery, established in 1984, honours lifetime achievements of citizens who have made a contribution to the community.

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca U

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MacLab Benefit a Resounding Success

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acLab Extravaganza 2003, held in the CIBC Hall of the McMaster University Student Centre (MUSC) in November, attracted over 100 alumni, current students and representatives from industry.

Guests joined McMaster faculty and staff, along with University President Peter George and Dr. Mo Elbestawi, dean of the Faculty of Engineering, in enjoying a delicious meal and an inspiring speech by keynote speaker Vince J. Smith. Smith, who graduated from McMaster in 1972 with a B.Eng in chemical engineering, spoke on “Making the Connection: Linking Chemistry to the Quality of Life” – a timely and informative talk. The President and CEO of Dow Chemical Canada Inc., Smith has responsibility for over 2,000 employees and $3 billion worth

of sales. He works out of the company’s Fort Saskatchewan manufacturing site, maintains an office in Calgary and lives in Edmonton. The MacLab (McMaster Laboratory Advancement Benefaction) fund was initiated by the McMaster Engineering Society (MES) in 1997. All in-course engineering students pay a $50 fee for the renewal of equipment and labs. The annual Extravaganza event provides alumni and industry with an opportunity to participate in the fund. All proceeds go towards MacLab.

Ottawa Connections Remain Strong – & Growing

Engineering Graduate Honoured for Leadership Dan Olsen, who graduated in the spring of 2003 from the five-year Engineering & Management Program, is the recipient of the President’s Award of Excellence in Student Leadership. A former president of the McMaster Student’s Civil Engineering Society, Olsen was instrumental in establishing the Engineers Without Borders (EWB) chapter at the University, providing leadership in the development of engineers with social responsibility. Through EWB, he has worked with a rural development agency in India to design a rainwater harvesting system. In other humanitarian projects, he worked in Mexico and Nicaragua building houses, and in Bolivia at an orphanage.

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Lucky business card draw winners (from left to right): Rick Ellas (Eng.Phys. ’81), Ken Smith (Elect. ’77, M.Eng. ’80) and Glen Thurston (Eng. Phys. ’87).

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ngineering alumni were joined by alumni representing almost every other Faculty at McMaster University in the 2nd annual Ottawa Alumni/ Industry Night. The event, held at the Corel Centre in Kanata on October 21, 2003, attracted attendance from grads of chemical, computer, electrical, materials and mechanical engineering as well as engineering physics. Forty-five people enjoyed a delicious

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meal and the speech by Dr. John Brash of the Department of Chemical Engineering on “Bioengineering – The Next Technology Frontier”. Guests, faculty and staff were joined by Dr. Peter George, president and vice chancellor of McMaster University, and Dr. Mo Elbestawi, dean of the Faculty of Engineering, both of whom spoke briefly about the importance of maintaining connections between alumni and their alma mater. N

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Alumni profiles Roy Bot – continues the family business

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f I had realized then the day to day business pressures of today, I would have had a lot more fun at university!” As President of Oakville-based Bot Construction Limited, Roy Bot can be forgiven for feeling that perhaps he was a bit too serious during his years at McMaster. That sense of dedication and resolve followed him as he worked his way up in the family-owned business, founded by his father in 1957. The company is involved in all aspects of construction from roadway and bridges to dams, railways and airports. In the past 20 years, Bot Construction has completed well over $200 million in civil construction projects in the Hamilton-Halton region alone. The company has and continues to work throughout the Province of Ontario on major heavy civil engineering type projects. A 1981 graduate of the Civil Engineering Program together with some management courses, Bot admits that this branch of engineering was the logical step to take, given that he was expected to enter the family business. “You definitely apply what you learn immediately after gradu-

construction organizations like the Ontario Road Builders Association (ORBA) and the Ontario Sewer & Watermain Association (OSWA), was granted the Gold Seal Certificate from the Canadian Construction Association, and is a member of the Associations of Professional Engineers for Ontario, Alberta, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. After attaining his degree, he worked as Assistant Project Manager on the massive James Bay Hydro Electric Project in northern Quebec, building dykes and dams. In the late 1980’s, he was the company’s Chief Engineer and General Manager, overseeing projects that the company was handling for the transportation departments of federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. He was Project Manager from 1989 to 1991 on the construction of the Zone 1 Short Range Radar Project in the Canadian Arctic (previously known as the DEW Line), an initiative that involved building 10 radar remote sites for the Department of National Defense. Having a family business to go to after completing an education has its advantages

Roy Bot

ating,” he says, but adds that the management courses have been a huge help now that he has responsibility for overall company matters. As President, Bot is involved with the financial and business management side of the company. He also takes an active role in

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Bright Future for New Program Rooted in Industry

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hen compared to Xerox Corporation, McMaster likewise offers an innovative approach to its offerings. With a wide array of products and services, and with an outlook for solutions to improve the education and research endeavours, the Faculty of Engineering is boldly looking to influential people in corporations for guidance. With the help of Dr. Rafik O. Loutfy, corporate vice president and centre manager of the Xerox Research Centre of Canada in the Xerox Innovation Group for Xerox Corporation, McMaster’s Faculty of Engineering includes Xerox among its top industrial contacts in the development of future programs. Dr. Loutfy was instrumental in assisting with the development of M

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Xerox’s current President & the School for Engineering CEO, Douglas Lord, is a Practice. His advice and wisdom McMaster alumnus – a graduate has enabled the Faculty to create from the Faculty of Social a truly innovative program. Loutfy was recruited to serve Sciences in 1973. Speaking at a on the Dean’s Vision Committee recent McMaster Toronto Branch about 16 months ago, to help alumni event, he expressed shape future engineering educaXerox’s corporate responsibility tional and research programs. to provide education and social His current responsibilities at Dr. Rafik O. Loutfy service efforts. This reflects Xerox’s belief that a successful Xerox include the long-term corporation must be an active participant in materials research and technology society. Xerox freely gives back, whether strategy for the corporation, including new digital document media and organic through financial contributions or through electronics. He joined Xerox in 1974, and advice to the communities and universities has held a variety of management posifrom which they draw their employees, their customers, and their freedom to tions in materials research and business conduct business. development. U

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From engineer to physician! Dr. Anthony Adili – phenomenal

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ne word sums up Anthony Adili’s Mac engineering experience – “phenomenal”. A 1989 graduate of the electrical engineering and management program, Adili says combining business and engineering is a good move for today’s professionals. “Regardless of your (engineering) specialty, you need some management/business background. I would recommend it to everybody.” The Hamilton native decided on an engineering career in part because of his interests in math and science. Nevertheless, he appreciated being able to take more general and varied courses the first year before having to decide on his field. After graduating, he worked for five years then returned to university to study medicine, graduating as an MD in 1997. He laughs when asked about such a radical change. “I didn’t make a career change; it was more of an evolution.” His specialty, orthopaedics, involves hip and

knee replacements and working with bone fractures. “It’s both a mechanical and mathematical process,” he notes. Because his engineering background helps him understand how things work, he adds that the B.Eng. degree provides him with a different perspective from the majority who enter medicine. “I definitely think it has helped me be a better doctor.” From 1997 to 2002, Adili’s residency was spent at McMaster’s Health Sciences Centre. He then experienced a one-year orthopaedic fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, specializing in adult lower extremity reconstruction. Currently he is assistant professor at McMaster’s Faculty of Health Sciences in the orthopaedic division of the Department of Surgery. He also supervised fourth-year biomechanical thesis projects with mechanical engineering undergrads. Adili, 37, is married to Elisa and the couple have three children. Family time is spent with the children and their various

Anthony Adili

sports activities. The much-published researcher is a member of both the Ontario and Canadian Orthopaedic Associations and the Ontario Medical Association (OMA). He also maintains his membership in the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario (APEO). “Engineering is still a part of me I don’t want to give up.”

Dr. Myles Sergeant – more of a ‘people’ person

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lame it on a fourth-year design project. Myles Sergeant, mechanical engineering undergraduate, and three other students set themselves the task of designing an artificial elbow for amputees in Nicaragua. The catch was that it had to be made from materials easily available to the people of that war-scarred country. It was not only a great learning experience but may have been the catalyst for his eventual move into medicine. “Although I enjoyed engineering at McMaster, I gradually got the sense that engineering was not what I wanted to do long-term. I’m more of a people person than a technical person.” Following graduation in 1988 with a B.Eng., Sergeant worked for two years at Dofasco in Hamilton as an operations technology engineer. But as he puts it, “I was always looking for ways to make my education relate to people.” He enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine at McMaster and

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Myles Sergeant

obtained a Doctor of Medicine in 1993. His residency was spent in family medicine at Queen’s University, Kingston. Currently, he is a family physician with the c

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Hamilton Urban Core Community Health Centre in downtown Hamilton, and assistant clinical professor of family medicine at McMaster University. Until a year ago, he was also an emergency physician at the Douglas Memorial Hospital in Fort Erie. One might have thought that his medical courses would lean towards limb design, but Sergeant says he decided against specializing. “It’s been a good choice. I’m very happy with family medicine.” He has traveled extensively throughout Canada, most notably in the north where from 1995 to 1998 he practiced rural family medicine in Inuvik (NWT), Churchill (Manitoba) and Moose Factory, Wawa and Sioux Lookout (Ontario). At 37, Sergeant is married to Sonia, who is also a doctor, and the couple have three young children. In addition to regular workouts to keep fit, he relaxes by painting in oils. N

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Dr. Steven Szarka – it all began with biomedics

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s a youngster, Steven Szarka loved to build things and always thought he would become a scientist. After visiting Expo in Montreal and seeing a laser beam in action, he built one of his own. In high school, he was a frequent winner of science fair awards. Electrical engineering was a natural choice for this Ontario Scholar. However, a medical career was not yet in the picture. Hospitals, he recalls, were “gross” and filled with that pervasive hospital smell that most children find hard to deal with, even frightening. Engineering was a more “practical” choice and McMaster Faculty of Engineering was a logical option, since his family was living in Brantford at the time. The University’s engineering courses in the 1970’s were difficult and involved a lot of hard work, he says. Despite this, he was on the Dean’s Honour Role and received his B.Eng in computer and electrical engineering in 1977, and a M.Eng. degree in 1980. It was while working on his Masters that Szarka took some biomedical engineering courses during his final year. Suddenly he realized engineering and medicine could be combined to make an interesting career. An in-class viewing of a film on open heart

to electrical engineering, he maintains. “Both are concerned with pressure, flow and resistance.” Engineering definitely had a positive influence throughout his medical career, he adds. “You are a more critical thinker. (Engineers) are trained to look for solutions, for answers, and not to take things for granted.” Szarka is a member of the Canadian Society of Phlebology and since 1998, has been a member of its Board of Directors. He is also the Director of the Hamiltonbased Venous Medical Cosmetics clinic which specializes in sclerotherapy, a method of eliminating varicose veins by injecting a solution to destroy the vein walls. He also holds a faculty position at McMaster University as an Assistant Clinical Professor. He is married to Margaret and enjoys the company of his grown son and daughter. When not tinkering with new technologies and instruments relating to the workings of veins, he edits holiday digital pictures into family videos and builds remote-controlled airplanes. When asked which course of study was harder – engineering or medicine – he doesn’t hesitate. “Engineering was harder. Those math courses are a killer!”

Dr. Steven Szarka

surgery helped to confirm this interest. “At first, my goal was to do research in prosthesis,” he says, and his Masters’ thesis did in fact have a bio-medical slant. But since graduating with his M.D. in 1983 from McMaster’s Faculty of Medicine, he has specialized in phlebology, the working of the veins. He has become quite wellknown in medical circles for his treatments of varicose veins. This area of specialty is closely related

Dr. Laura Stover – cardiothoracic anesthesiologist

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fter graduating summa cum laude from McMaster’s Engineering and Management Program in 1992, Laura Stover joined Ontario Hydro as an assistant system planning engineer. Soon however, other horizons beckoned and she undertook graduate studies at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, graduating with a Master of Applied Science in electrical engineering in 1995. An enthusiasm for physiology, discovered during her graduate coursework, led her to consider studying medicine. She returned to Hamilton, obtained her medical degree in 1998, and began specialist training in anesthesia. She passed her anesthesia certification examinations in June 2003. Stover is currently completing a fellowship in cardiothoracic anesthesia at the University of Washington in Seattle. M

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Anesthesia as a medical specialty, she explains, involves the assessment and care of patients requiring surgical procedures. The provision of life support during surgery and the treatment of pain are two of the most important roles of the anesthesiologist. Cardiothoracic anesthesia as a subspecialty involves care of patients requiring surgical procedures on the heart and/or lungs. Her typical caseload includes patients having coronary bypass surgery, heart valve surgery, surgery for lung cancer, and surgery for heart and lung transplantation. Technology plays an important role in the monitoring of patients under anesthesia. In keeping with her bioengineering background, Stover is interested in the devices used in her work. One example of the monitoring technology used in this field Dr. Laura Stover

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The Honourable Maurice F. Strong Presents The 20th Hodgins Lecture – March 2004

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e are truly honoured to have Maurice Strong present the 20th annual public Hodgins Lecture on March 11th, 2004 at McMaster University. Maurice F. Strong, Senior Advisor to the Secretary-General and Under SecretaryGeneral of the United Nations, is special envoy to North Korea. He is President of the Council, University for Peace, affiliated with the United Nations. He is one of the world’s most influential political and environmental activist. Mr. Strong’s career began in the oil industry. He worked for Dome Petroleum and re-built Ajax Petroleum into the Canadian Industrial Gas and Oil Co. In 1975, Prime Minister Trudeau made Strong the president of the state-owned gas company, Petro-Canada. Mr. Strong is the former President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Ontario Hydro as well as former President of Power Corporation of Canada. Mr. Strong is perhaps most well-known

Maurice Strong

for the role he played in organizing the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro (Earth Summit), where he served as Secretary-

General. He organized the original Earth Summit in 1972 in Stockholm. In April of 2004, Mr. Strong will be honoured with the Public Welfare Medal, awarded by the National Academy of Sciences, a prestigious award given for the first time in its 89-year history to a non-American. “He is an idealist who can translate vision into action and is truly a citizen of the world,” said academy president Bruce Alberts. He was chosen for his leadership of global conferences that became the basis for international environmental negotiations. The Hodgins Lecture commemorates McMaster’s first Dean of Engineering, Dr. J.W. Hodgins, who died in 1983. In recognition of the breadth of Dr. Hodgins’ interests and contributions, the focus of the Lectureship is “the engineer in society”. If you wish further details please contact Terry Milson at 905.525.9140 extension 27391 or email: milstont@mcmaster.ca.

BioEngineering & Engineering Practice Building Campaign continued from page 5

have the vision, commitment and innovation to bridge that gap today. The McMaster School of Engineering Practice (MSEP) will comprise three new research and academic centres: Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Engineering and Public Policy, and Engineering Design. The three centres aim to provide a much needed interdisciplinary education that is informed by engineering problem-solving expertise. Their principal activity will be to offer professional education at the Master’s degree level, the programs of which will complement the undergraduate engineering programs in Engineering and Management, Engineering and Society, and the existing design curriculum. Each centre will emphasize interdisciplinary education and research in its area of specialization. Together, they will offer a dynamic, integrated learning experience for undergraduate and graduate students of

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all engineering disciplines. The Faculty of Engineering has established partnerships with the Faculties of Business and Social Sciences. This platform of true, interdisciplinary knowledge will form the educational programs of the MSEP. These programs will be unique in Canada, compete favorably with existing international research centres, and will attract the best faculty and students to McMaster’s Faculty of Engineering.

Contributing As a McMaster alumnus, you will know by experience that the University’s goal is to prepare students to be among the intellectual, cultural, scientific and professional leaders of tomorrow. McMaster does this by providing a learning experience that builds on the pioneering, inquiry-based approach that distinguishes McMaster from other leading research universities. Among those who give back to Mac, our c

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Engineering alumni show strong support for their alma mater through excellent representation. You care about the future of Engineering at McMaster, and it shows. Each gift is a testimonial of support for which we are very grateful. • 14% of engineering alumni gave a gift to McMaster in 2002 • 44% of engineering alumni have given at least once To continue to offer the best possible education to those who come after us, we cannot rest on past successes. Gifts of every size are important to achieving our goals. With your help, our Faculty will remain among the very best in Canada and our alumni will continue to be leaders and significant contributors internationally and close to home. Please support McMaster Engineering. To give contact: Terry Milson, Faculty Advancement Officer at 905.525.9140 ext. 27391 or email: milsont@mcmaster.ca. N

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New Faculty Members Chemical Engineering Dr. Kim Jones joined the department in July, 2003. She recently completed her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in Biomedical Engineering. She also holds an M.Sc. from the University of Kim Jones Guelph in Plant Agriculture (1987) and a B.A.Sc. from the University of Waterloo in Chemical Engineering (1995). Kim will be a welcome addition to our Chemical and Bioengineering program. Her research interests are in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune and inflammatory responses to biomaterials.

Electrical & Computer Engineering Dr. Steve Hranilovic joined the department in September 2003. Dr. Hranilovic received the B.A.Sc. degree with honours in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo in 1997 and the M.A.Sc. Steve Hranilovic and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Toronto in 1999 and 2003 respectively. His research interests are in the areas of communication and information theory applied to the design and implementation of communications algorithms for wireless optical channels. More specifically, he is interested in the design of optical intensity modulation, coding, spatio-temporal coding on MIMO optical channels, optical channel capacity well as in the implementation of experimental wireless optical channels to verify modem designs. Dr. Shiva Kumar joined our department in July, 2003, from Corning Incorporated located in Corning, New York. Dr. Kumar received a B.S. in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Shiva Kumar Mysore University, India, and both a M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Electrical Communication Engineering from the Indian M

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Institute of Science in India. Dr. Kumar went on to complete a second Ph.D. degree in Communication Engineering, specifically in high-speed fiber-optic communication from Osaka University in Japan. His research interests are fiber-optic communication and photonic devices and systems for applications in communication networks. When not hard at work in the Communications Research Laboratory, Dr. Kumar enjoys tennis, karate and classical music.

Ph.D. (2003) from the University of British Columbia, all in electrical engineering. Dr. Sirouspour’s research interests are in the broad areas of robotics and control systems. These include tele- Shahin Sirouspour operation control, application of sensor fusion and management to robotic systems, medical robotics, and advanced control for robot manipulators. He is a very welcomed asset to the department, particularly at this time as we build upon our strength in biomedical engineering.

Dr. Shahin Sirouspour joined the ECE Department in April 2003. He received his B.Sc (1995) and M.Sc. (1997) from Sharif University of Technology (Iran), and his

Engineering Advisory Board The Faculty of Engineering Dean’s Advisory Board, established in early 2002, was formed to provide the Dean with informed opinion. It includes forward-thinking, experienced university graduates who act as a bridge from today’s students to future possibilities. Currently, sixteen alumni and friends serve on the Board which meets twice a year, in the spring and fall, to share their experience and wisdom with the Dean. “Meeting with the Board has been a stimulating experience,” says chairman of the Dean’s Advisory Board, Doug Barber. “The members come to make a contribution. They are deeply committed to helping the Faculty achieve excellence in new initiatives or in changes in engineering teaching or in research programs. They want the students in engineering programs to experience a superior learning environment.” Members include: Mr. Joe Ng Dr. Doug H. Barber (Chair) President, JNE Consulting Limited Gennum Corporation (retired) Mr. Michael Pley Dr. Andrew Benedek President, COM DEV Space CEO & Chairman of the Board Zenon Environment Inc. Dr. John Reid Strategy & Business Development Mr. Walter Booth JDS Uniphase Chairman & CEO Timberland Equipment Limited Mr. Dietmar Reiner Chief Information Officer Ms. Maryann Combs Ontario Power Generation General Director of Engineering & Product Planning, GM Dr. Claudine Simson Corporate Vice President & Chief Mr. Bob Crow Technology Officer, Motorola Inc. University & Government Relations Research in Motion Limited Mr. Vince Smith President & CEO, Division Manager Mr. Mike Fielding Dow Chemical Canada CEO, StrataFlex Dr. Norman Toms Dr. David J. Litster Chief Technical Officer, Sierra Wireless Professor, Department of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Dr. Joe Wright President & CEO, Pulp and Paper Mr. Norm Lockington Research Institute of Canada Vice President, Technology, Dofasco Inc.

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Departmental newsbriefs Chemical Engineering PROTEIN BIOSEPARATION USING ULTRAFILTRATION Theory, Applications and New Developments Raja Ghosh (McMaster University, Canada) Imperial College Press. ISBN: 1860943179 Ultrafiltration is a pressure-driven, membrane-based separation process, which is used for a range of applications: from processing of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids to wastewater treatment. It has significant advantages over competing separation technologies. Biotechnology and food processing are fast emerging as major application areas for ultrafiltration. This book focuses primarily on protein bioseparation using ultrafiltration which has relevance in both these areas. Readership: Graduate students, academics and researchers in biotechnology, biochemistry, bioengineering and chemical engineering. Dr. Andy Hrymak presented the 2003 Bayer Lecture Series at Carnegie Mellon University in September. The lecture series is given by speakers of international recognition on state-of-the-art research work in the area of Process Systems Engineering. Hrymak’s talk was entitled, “Computational Transport Phenomena and Optimization in Materials Processing”. Congratulations to Gord Slater on his 20 years of service to Chemical Engineering. Gord is the Department’s Technical Services Coordinator. Congratulations also to Lynn Falkiner on her 25 years of service to McMaster. Lynn worked in the Geology Department before joining Chemical Engineering as Departmental Secretary in 2000. Professor John Vlachopoulos was recently voted president-elect of the Polymer Processing Society (PPS) for the years 2003-2005. He will succeed Dr. T.

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Sakai, of Japan, as president during 2005-2007. The Polymer Processing Society is an international organization of university professors and research and process engineers involved in the production of polymers used in the automotive, packaging and housing industry. There are PPS members in nearly 50 countries around the world. During Dr. Vlachopoulos’ terms of office, conferences are being planned in USA, Korea, Brazil, Germany, Canada, Singapore, South Africa, Poland and China.

Dr. Ray Findlay, Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering (right) is greeted by Princess Elettra Marconi Giovanelli, the Ambassador of Italy and Mr. Pascal Couchepin, President of Switzerland.

Civil Engineering In December 2003, the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) presented Dr. Ahmad Hamid and his co-authors Dr. Hany Elshafie and Dr. El-sayed Nasr with the 2003 Alan H. Yorkdale Memorial Award for the paper “Strength and Stiffness of Masonry Shear-Walls with Openings”. The award recognizes the most outstanding English-language paper dealing with manufactured masonry units published between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. Professor Hamid’s paper was selected from over 230 peer-reviewed papers published world-wide during that time period.

Electrical & Computer Engineering The Department congratulates Colin Campbell, Professor Emeritus, who recently was awarded the Will Portnoy Prize by the IEEE Industry Applications Society for best paper. Titled “Technology for integrated RF-EMI transmission line filters for integrated power electronic modules”, the paper was co-authored by P.J Wolmarans, J.D. Van Wyk and J.D. Van Wyk Jr. It seems that Colin has kept himself just as active and with the same amazing standard of excellence in his retirement! In his capacity as the past president of IEEE, Professor Ray Findlay was in Salvan, Switzerland in September to inaugurate a plaque commemorating the first c

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known experiments by Marconi which demonstrated that the reception of wireless signals could be accomplished without a direct line of sight. The plaque is installed on a rock where in 1895 Marconi sent a message further than a kilometre away. Attending the ceremonies were Pascal Couchepin, President of Switzerland, the Princess Elettra MarconiGiovanelliand (Marconi’s daughter), the Ambassador of Italy, the Consul General and the Mayor of Salvan. Dr J.W. Bandler, professor emeritus, has been selected to receive the 2004 Microwave Application Award of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S) for “application of optimization technology, design with tolerances and yield-driven design to microwave devices, circuits and systems.” This award recognizes an individual or a team for an outstanding application of microwave theory and techniques that has been put into practice at least 10 years before the award is given. The award consists of a recognition plaque and an honorarium of US $1,500. The award will be conferred at the annual Society Awards Banquet to be held during the International Microwave Symposium in the week of June 6-11, 2004, in Fort Worth, Texas. Dr. Jamal Deen was elected a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) for his scholarly contributions to modeling, noise and parameter extraction in silicon transistors and high speed photodetectors. This recognizes his research contributions in microelectronics and optoelectronics that are documented N

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in the scholarly literature (278 papers of which 47 are invited, 14 invited book chapters, 10 edited books/conference proceedings and 6 patents). Professors Chih-Hung (James) Chen and M. Jamal Deen recently won the Best Invited Paper Award from the premier international integrated circuits conference, the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC), for the year 2002. The award was presented to them at the 2003 CICC in San Jose, California on Monday 22 September 2003 and it was for their invited paper titled “MOSFET Modeling for Low-Noise RF Circuit Design”. The Department extends congratulations to Dr. Xiaolin Wu who is a world expert in video compression. He has received final approval for his NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Digital Cinema. Xiaolin Wu

Engineering Physics The Department is pleased to congratulate Dr. Andy Knights on receiving an award of $120,000 from CFI-New Opportunities. The grant will be used to build critical infrastructure for his research

program in silicon-based highly integrated optical components. The Photonics Seminar Series, held in the fall of 2003 and jointly organized by Engineering Physics, Ontario Photonics Consortium (OPC), Centre for Electrophotonics and Materials Devices (CEMD) and Photonics Research Ontario (PRO), welcomed two well-known researchers: Dr. J. Misiewicz, Wroclaw University of Technology and Dr. Kenton White, Bookham Technology. A workshop on “Optical Fiber Sensors and their Applications”, hosted jointly by PRO, the Department of Engineering Physics and OPC, was held here at McMaster University in October 2003. There were 115 attendees including participants from several overseas countries.

engineering. The objectives of the memorial lecture are: to bring information on advanced materials science and engineering research or development to the attention of members, and to honor generally recognized achievements in materials science and engineering research of the highest order. Prof. Embury is only the third Canadian to win this prestigious honor. We all join in congratulating him!

Dr. Stover profile continued from page 13

is transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) a method of looking at the heart using an ultrasound probe inserted into the esophagus/stomach. Using TEE, the anesthesiologist can assess the structure and performance of the heart, including muscle and valves, during surgery. “My professional interests include transesophageal echocardiography, medical education and anesthesia simulators,” Stover adds. She is involved in the anesthesia simulator program at the University of Washington. The simulator, she explains, “allows us to expose anesthesia residents to a range of critical events that occur so infrequently in actual practice that they – the residents – may not actually experience them during their years as residents.” The manikin-based system simulates the patient and operating room environment with convincing realism. “Many sweat-soaked residents attest to this realism after a simulator session,” she adds with a smile. She is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Stover is a former Air Force Reserve officer who holds both glider and private pilot licenses. She enjoys a busy life “in my spare time.” Her down time activities include mountain biking, kayaking, surfing and running. She is looking forward to the day when she will have the finances - and time - to fly again. For now, she is enjoying living in the same city as her twin sister and family. She is unsure just what will transpire when her current fellowship is completed in June 2004. “Who knows?” she says. “I’m looking at my options now.”

Materials Science & Engineering The Department is pleased to announce that David Embury will be the 2005 Edward DeMille Campbell Memorial Lecturer for ASM International. The lecture will be delivered at ASM International’s Annual Meeting during the week of October 3, 2005. Each lecturer is chosen on the basis of high stature and achievement in the field of materials science and

Three New Engineering Programs Approved by Senate

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tudents of a new Professional Master’s Program in Engineering and Public Policy will acquire an enhanced understanding of public policy and its effects on technological, social and ecological systems. The program was developed to reflect the fact that in today’s complex world, engineers are called upon to design technical systems that provide goods and services to society in a safe, efficient and environmentally sound manner. Advanced engineering studies, innovation and entrepreneurial skills development and engineering enterprise, are the three components of a new Master’s Program in Engineering in Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Students taking this program will graduate with

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leading-edge engineering skills combined with business know-how. An engineering enterprise project will run throughout the entire study period and will result in both a business and technical plan for an engineering prototype project, with an identified customer base and a plan outlining the way to commercialization. Offered through the engineering departments of McMaster, Queen’s University, the University of Toronto, the University of Waterloo and the University of Western Ontario, a new Master’s Program in Nuclear Engineering was prompted by the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering. The self-funded, full-cost recovery program combines nuclear science with technology.

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McMaster Engineering Society news

A Message from the President of MES

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hat a great year it’s and compete with any other been so far. I’m faculty by winning overall proud to say that at the McMaster Student the McMaster Engineering Union Faculty Olympics, a Society has been running very University-wide competition smoothly thanks to the contriagainst other Faculties. Engibution of all our council neering won Gold in Soccer members. Their hard work has and Academic Pursuit, and obviously paid off in a strong Silver in Ultimate Frisbee, council this year. I am proud to Billiards, Volleyball, Basketsay that the year got off to a ball, Ping Pong and Water polo. great start and things will only Our Semi-Annual General get better. Josh Wong Meeting presented new initiaWe held an excellent Welcome Week, tives, such as an Accountability session introducing another 800 students to from the Executive Committee and Engineering at McMaster. The incoming Productions. Our Teams – McMaster students proved to have the same spirit Formula Racing Team, Concrete Toboggan and vigor as those of previous years, and and Solar Car – presented their collaboraare a great addition to the Engineering tive plans for creating competitive teams student body. for upcoming events. Earlier this year, Engineering students Also, we held the Sixth Annual MacLab proved that they can handle any challenge (McMaster Laboratory Advancement

A Champion Scholar and Wrestler Chemical engineering Lulu Bursztyn, who admits she chose engineering because it is challenging, was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Gold Medal at the fall convocation on November 14, 2003. The medal is awarded to an undergraduate student in his or her final year of study who ranks highest in scholarship, leadership and influence. Bursztyn, 21, who has made the Dean’s Honours List every year, is in her fifth year at Mac because she did a 12-month internship at Dofasco. She hopes to pursue post-graduate studies and one day be a university professor. She has received many awards and scholarships during her Lulu Bursztyn course of study at McMaster. In addition to distinguishing herself academically, she has realized successes in her favourite sport – wrestling. In November, she placed first in the 2003 McMaster Invitational competition in the 65-kilogram category. Bursztyn took up wrestling in high school. “There’s no other sport like it,” she says. “It’s just so intense – it’s very aggressive.” She practices five or six times a week and attends tournaments across the country. The multi-lingual student, who was born in Zimbabwe, also enjoys basketball and soccer, and has tried skydiving and scuba diving. She is actively involved in student life as well and in October 2003, she helped organize a five-day conference at McMaster that attracted 450 chemical engineering students from across Canada. She is a member of the McMaster Engineering Society, the Chemical Engineering Club and the Redsuits Orientation Committee.

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Benefaction) Extravaganza dinner on Thursday November 6th, 2003. I had the honour of hosting the event as emcee. Our keynote speaker was Mr. Vince Smith, McMaster engineering graduate in Chemical Engineering, and President and CEO of Dow Chemical Canada Inc. Other continued on page 23

Solar Car Project Ignites Alumnus Response Unable to capture the top prize in this year’s U.S.-based solar car race, the University’s Solar Car Team caught the attention of one local resident who became so enthused, he promptly made a financial donation. After meeting business manager Tammy Hwang and two members of this year’s team, Les Jarrett, Soc Sci ’71, contacted Alumni Advancement to say he feels this project needs the support of alumni. “My suggestion is that we get the solar car project team to do a ‘show and tell’ (presentation) because I know that in listening to the young people, they caught my attention. Perhaps we can also make a pitch to our alumni ... to support this group (financially).” Fireball II and its team of 10 headed by project leader Claire Braden was unable to complete the 220 km qualification race at Evanston, Illinois in July. As a result, it could not compete in the American Solar Car Challenge’s 10-day, 3,700 km race from Chicago to Los Angeles. [see article, MacEngineer Fall 2003.] The Mac Solar Car Team now has its sights on the 2005 ASC race. Alumni wishing to assist McMaster’s solar car project can send donations to Rm. 261, JHE, in care of Ms. Hwang. N

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Engineering Graduates Leave Distinctive Legacy

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echanical engineering graduates Patrick Burton, Braden Kurczak, Michael Paddags and Peter Whitred have donated a unique gift to the University – an electrically-powered clock in the shape of the engineer’s iron ring. The shape is symbolic of the traditional ring worn by engineers to remind them of their ethical obligations to society. Originally part of their final year thesis project, the 1.5 metre-high clock sits atop the door frame of the north entrance to the student centre, overlooking the food court. Its two numbered stainless steel rings, which encircle a shield emblazoned with the McMaster coat of arms, rotate to mark the changing hours. In order to complete the project, the students designed the clock, raised over $15,000 and obtained donations from several companies including Dofasco, which donated the steel, and the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute, which donated labour. Each of the rings on the clock is one meter in diameter and weighs over 100 kg. With volunteer labour and donated supplies factored in, the clock’s estimated value is about $100,000.

Clock designers (from left to right): Braden Kurczak, Patrick Burton, Peter Whitred and Michael Paddags.

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The partners admit that designing the clock was not easy. Their efforts were finally successful and, as a bonus, the design won second prize at the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering design competition in May 2003, netting the group $1,500.

The Iron Ring Clock presides proudly over the food court in the new Student Centre.

“In 20 to 30 years to come, students will look up at this clock and admire its beauty and workmanship.”

we love McMaster and engineering,” says Whitred. Peter Smith, Associate Dean of Engineering, believes the clock will become a symbol of McMaster. “In 20 to 30 years to come, students will look up at this clock and admire its beauty and workmanship.” Tim Nye, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and the students’ project supervisor, says he is very proud of the team. “They have done something to benefit McMaster University and beautify the campus.”

In addition to needing a project for their thesis, the students say they were also looking for a way to give something back to the University. “We all had such a great experience over our five-year degree, and

The Venture Kids Club is a Hit!

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enture Engineering and Science is proud to present a new and exciting addition to our program. The Venture Kids Club was created in 2003 by two dedicated engineering and science students to give kids an opportunity to explore Venture year round. The objective was to create a kids program that educated children about the ideals of science, engineering and technology in a fun, interactive club environment. The VK Club is held for two 8-week sessions during the school year, with start dates in October and January. The Club, which meets each week on Saturday mornings in JHE from 9 am to 12 noon, has been a huge hit with the grade 4 to 6 members. For example, Session One VK Club members (fall 2003) visited the McMaster Planetarium, received a Solar Car and St. John Ambulance demonstration, and much more. Every week, the kids are actively involved in hands-on activities such as dissection or motorized boat building, which encourage them to discover engi-

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neering and science on their own. Session Two, which begins January 17, 2004, is shaping up to be close to full capacity since almost all of the first session members are returning for the Session’s brand new curriculum! The excitement and enthusiasm shown has raised thoughts of expanding our program into two classroom sessions next year. The interest from both instructors and children has been overwhelming! For more information and registration details, check out the VK Club website at http://venture.mcmaster.ca/vk.

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Y0U ARE INVITED AS OUR GUEST TO AT TEND....

An Evening with

Stephen Elop

MCMASTER ENGINEERING CONNECTION

Computer Engineering Management ‘86

Executive Vice-President, World-wide Field Operations Division of Macromedia Inc., San Francisco

Date: February 26, 2004 Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Place: Royal York Hotel, Toronto, Territories Room

Stephen Elop speaks on Macromedia..... "At Macromedia, we are motivated by the belief that great experiences build great business. Macromedia provides the industry-leading software that empowers web developers and designers to create and deliver those effective, compelling, and memorable experiences." Stephen compares his Macromedia experience to that of his school days at McMaster University. "One of the best McMaster experiences,"says Stephen Elop, "was the opportunity to work on a part-time basis under former Dean of Engineering, Dr. Art Heidebrecht." The work included preparing and presenting a business plan and following through on the University's first campus-wide Ethernet installation. "This was fantastic training for the need to take a business approach to complex technical problems in the world at large," he says. "Dr. Heidebrcht had the single most profound impact on my future in the business world." Macromedia products like Dreamweaver and Flash, empower designers to think outside of the box.

Join Stephen Elop for an evening of insight, innovation and inspiration. For more information contact: Phone: (905) 525-9140 ext.24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 email: vespi@mcmaster.ca

Donations Appreciated If you wish to make a donation in support of this event please contact us. Donors who contribute $100 or more will be recognized in the next issue of the MacEngineer distributed to all of our alumni, industry and friends. All donations will receive a tax receipt.

http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/ E VE N T S P O N S O R E D B Y T H E FA C U LT Y O F E N G I N E E R I N G

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Engineering Career Services

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ngineering Career Services (ECS) works hard to coordinate events that offer students opportunities to interact with employers. Some of our sessions have focused on employment; others have helped students gain a better understanding of just what it is that engineers do. Our goal is to bring even more employers to campus. As Alumni, you can help students in two distinct ways just by visiting your alma mater. First, you can let students know about your company. Information about the company’s goals, its successes and what projects are in the works will help students make informed decisions in their quest for employment. It will also help your company build a reputation on campus as an employer of choice. This reputation will ensure that you receive applications from the best and the brightest Mac has to offer. Secondly, you are actual proof that McMaster graduates go on to great successes in all sectors of industry! Graduates often feel overwhelmed at the choices that lay ahead of them. By telling students about your career path and personal success story, you will be a living example of how life after graduation works. Students love nothing more than to talk to McMaster graduates working successfully in their chosen fields. If you would like to give back to the University by helping out McMaster engineering students, please contact us about attending our networking breakfasts, resume workshops or information sessions.

students who would like to work in a research-oriented environment both on campus and in industry. The goal of the program is threefold: to offer students insight into graduate work and to assist with future career planning; to enhance the relationship between students, professors, research staff and industry; and to provide exposure to research environments generally only experienced by graduate students. McMaster is the only university in Canada to offer a program of this kind and it has been a huge success. In the first year ECS had 20 positions and in 2003 – only UROP’s second year in existence – we more than doubled that number to 50.

Students have shown great enthusiasm for this program and we currently have more students then positions. By opening up the program to industry, we are hoping to offer more students the chance to participate as well as supply companies with a unique service – enthusiastic, intelligent students who want to participate in the research field. To find out how your company can participate in UROP, or for more information about our Internship or Coop programs, please contact Anne Markey, Engineering Career Services Manager, at 905-525-9140 x22571 or visit the Engineering Career Services website at www.eng.mcmaster/ecs.

Roy Bot profile continued from page 11

and disadvantages, he notes. “On the one hand, you know your destiny and don’t become confused by questions of which direction to take. However, you don’t get an opportunity to see or learn from other companies.” Either way, he says, engineers in general come out of university with abilities that will open up a variety of wonderful opportunities. “Engineering courses train you in the thinking process.

You become very disciplined.” Bot, who also has a private pilot’s license, is married to McMaster grad Marina Mercanti (B.Comm. ’86) and they have three children, Michael, Christopher and Kassandra. Roy’s brother Steve, also a civil engineer, is Vice President and sister Nancy with her bachelor of economics is executive administrator of the company – which is now on it’s second generation.

Change of address card: Name:_______________________________________________________________________________

New Initiatives

Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________

One of the main goals of ECS is to ensure that students compliment their academics by graduating with work experience in their field of study. This is a continuous goal and ECS is proud that each year we are able to help more students gain work experience. Now we are expanding our Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) to research and development departments of industry. UROP provides paid summer employment opportunities for 1st and 2nd year M

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New Address: _________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________ Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________ Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions). ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Alumni Grapevine Hey Alumni! Have you moved, taken a new job, got something you would like to say, any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906, E-Mail vespi@mcmaster.ca

MacChemEng Katotakis, Stamos ’69: Is the founder and President of Toronto-based Financial Models Co. Inc, a publicly-owned corporation traded on the TSE, that is involved in business services and software for investment companies. His company employs some 500 people and has offices in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, with annual revenues of $70 million. Stamos can be reached at: stamos@fmco.com. Park, Julian M.Eng. ’70: Time sure has flown since I arrived in Hamilton from Melbourne is 1968! I have been with Honeywell for almost 10 years, starting in Calgary and moving to Phoenix 4 years ago. I’m currently the Program Director for our new DCS offering. We love the city; the weather is great once your blood thins out. Our biggest problem was keeping the pool below 90°F! Phoenix is a great city: all major sports teams are covered and it’s within driving distance of the California wineries we love to visit. Housing is less expensive here than on Vancouver Island, which is where we plan to retire. Our children are living in Calgary and Winnipeg, but we see them more often than when we lived in Toronto! E-Mail: julian.park@honeywell.com Rincon, Alberto ’99 (PhD): My new address is: 2440 Sunflower Lane, Beaumont,

To:

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Tx, 77713, USA. At the present time, I hold the position of Regional Manager for Latin America, Spain and Portugal at Cloeren Inc., the world largest manufacturer of flat extrusion dies and coextrusion feedblocks for the plastics processing industry. e-mail: arincon@cloeren.com

MacCivEng Gemmell, Greg ’01: I am working for Richardson Engineering Ltd., a small to medium sized consulting firm that specializes in Land Development in my hometown of Barrie, as a Project Manager. I recently became a partner with the firm and look forward to the new opportunities that this presents. I recently had the opportunity to hire a Mac Grad to help in our stormwater group.

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Chung, Paul ’93 (B.Eng.), ’95 (M.Eng): Married to Susie Lu in September 1999. They are proud to announce the birth of their first child, Katelyn Elizabeth, born on August 5, 2003 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Hamilton and weighing in at 8 lbs and 6 oz. Paul met Susie after she graduated from Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. Susie works as a Pharmacist and was a former Associate/ Owner for Shoppers Drug Mart and Paul works as a Management Consultant for the Chicago office of BearingPoint (formerly known as KPMG Consulting). They live in Oakville and can be reached at pchung.mba2003@ivey.ca.

Panagiotakopoulos, Christos D. ’99: Working for the Ministry of National Defense in Greece, Department of Environmental Protection of the Hellenic Army General Staff since March 2002. Current address: 29 Andromachis St., 17564, Palaio Faliro, Greece. E-mail: panagic@hotmail.com.

Lee, Michael, ’83: Since graduating, I have moved many times and finally ended up in Hong Kong. I have lost all my contacts at Mac and I want to get back into the circuit. Here is my updated info: 55 Palm Drive, Redhill Peninsula, Tai Tam, Hong Kong. michael@silver.com.hk. Currently I work as co-CEO at Silver Manufactory Holdings. (www.silver.com.hk)

MacCompEng

MacMechEng

Quick, Philip ’96: I am currently working at a German face recognition company after finally finishing my PhD at Mac. E-mail: quick@cognitec.com

Hosler, Karen ’92: Karen and Brian are thrilled to announce the birth of their twins, Nathan and Paige, in August 2003. All is well, but sleep is a rare commodity now!

Ms. Carm Vespi Managing Editor The MacEngineer Faculty of Engineering John Hodgins Building, Room A 201D McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 E-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer

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Kuhne, Brad ’01: I am now living in Calgary and own cowboy boots and a hat! Since May 2003, I’ve been working for Hitachi as Project Engineer in power generation sales and service. I came to Calgary in the summer of 2002 to build a power plant for Siemens Westinghouse, but I left that job in January to get off the road and start a new life in Calgary. My Calgary girlfriend Cathy loves to see me in my cowboy hat! brad.kuhne@hitachi.ca

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Vlahovic, Ann-Marie (Jakopin) ’94: Peter and I are thrilled to announce the arrival of Maja Vlahovic, born on July 1st, 2003, Canada Day, at 10:15 p.m. EST, weighing 7 lbs. 4 oz., and a full 20 inches – our own bit of fireworks!. Mom & Dad are delighted with their little girl. E-mail:. vlahovic@rogers.com

MacMetEng Trefzger, Roger ’81: Spouse Deborah Philips and daughter Emma (born 1997) are happy to announce the birth of Niall Jeremy on June 23rd, 2003 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in London, ON. Roger is Chief Metallurgist at GKN Sinter Metals in St. Thomas (for past 8 years). The family lives in London. Home email philipstrefzger@execulink.com.

MacChemEng&Mgmt Gagne, Melissa (Missy) ’97: I am now teaching math in Delhi and loving it. I got married earlier this year so I’m now Melissa O’Donnell. Gaspari, Jerome ’01 and Gaspari (Crowley), Janine ’03: Married on July 19, 2003 in Richmond, they are now living and working in Sarnia for Shell Canada and Imperial Oil Ltd.

Gregoriou (McDonald), Iris Chemical & Mgt. ’97. congratulations to Iris who got married on September 27 at the Ancaster Old Mill. She still works at Accenture and lives in Mississauga.

assistant sales manager for the Cyprus, Turkey and South African sales areas. I’ve had to learn a lot really fast, but I’m enjoying it. I might actually get to go on my first business trip soon – probably to Cyprus. Also, I’ve started my MBA.

MacEngPhys& Mgmt Hill, Ted ’90, Nancy (Burham) Hill ’90: Both still working at Data Works. Living in California. They have a new addition to the family (Sarah) who is now 13 months.

MacMechEng& Mgmt Price, Richard ’94: Living in Cleveland, Ohio for the past 6 years and working in the area of marketing. I have worked for several industrial companies and found my engineering and business education invaluable. I recently started a new job at Tremco Inc., a manufacturer of roofing and weatherproofing materials. My current responsibilities are to lead the marketing activities for the Roofing and Building Maintenance Division. I have been married to Sarah for 5 years and we are the proud parents of our first child, Madeline Ruth, born August 14th just before the big blackout. I can be reached at richprice98@yahoo.com.

Other Goldstein, Haim ’82: Construction Manager for IKEA was relocated to Japan in August 2003 to look after the construction of the first Japanese IKEA store, slated to open in 2005. Kids Jeremy and Jasmin attend an American school in Tokyo, while wife Kim (Social Work, 1982) takes tai chi and enjoys shopping and the outdoors.

Tehrani, Cyrus ’98: Congratulations on new baby boy. Yust, Andrea ’03: Things are going really well at work. I love Zenon. Right now I’m working in the international division as an

Engineering

MES Pres. message

Memories

continued from page 18

MacEngineer

The

The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, The Daily News, Carm Vespi, Judy Mair, Graham Dickinson, Susan Fekecs, Josh Wong and Eugene Martinello

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guests included Dr. Peter George, who has never missed an Extravaganza, as well as our own Dean, Dr. Mo Elbestawi. The MacLab endowment dinner is held every year to benefit the MacLab fund; the money is used to renew and update laboratory equipment used by students in their studies. Thank you to everyone who supports our fund. As always, the McMaster Engineering Society looks forward to improving itself to demonstrate the professional standards of McMaster Engineering students, both current and alumni. We invite you to participate in our upcoming events such as another outstanding production from the Engineering Musical. For more up-to-date information, check out our website at http://mes.mcmaster.ca/. We hope to see you soon.

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Key Chain leather and goldplated fireball

$35.00 Fireball Pin gold-plated fireball

$25.00 Golf Shirt with fireball embroidered on sleeve

$35.00 If you would like to purchase one of these memorabilia, please send a cheque payable to “McMaster University” and we will mail it to you.

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You’re invited...

Reunion Classes of

Alumni 1964 Weekend 1979 Saturday June 5, 2004 For more information contact: Ms. Carm Vespi Phone: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 email: vespi@mcmaster.ca www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/

1984 1964

1979

1984

MacEngineer Winter 2004  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni

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