Page 1

C SMITH A

1665

635

1833

1197

550

A

SIDE ELEVATION

FRONT ELEVATION

1665

SECTION AA

note: - all finish details oulined in attached work breakdown structure WBS materials

details

quantities

pine solid doors

2040 x 820 x 35

4

635

550

FSC 3mm sapele

2400 x 1200 x 12

1

tube steel

3.6 x 40 x 40

1

livos transperent wood

2.0 L

1

beha wood treatment

0.75 L

1

issue

BOTTOM VIEW

ply

PC-003-MCS PC-002-MCS PC-001-MCS

flow

date

revised item

13/05/12

drawing No: PC-001-MCS measured drawings

A3

scale 1:20 @A3 date:13/05/2012

drawn: matty smith

sheet 1 of 4


conte affordance, flow and form

semiotics

flow, place and home affordance

emotional design

reflective

management

cv

s+arck


ents

building on my previous career in manufacturing and project management, my studies have resulted in a design philosophy strongly focused on the benefits design can have in the areas of human and social capital. through research into the micro and macro interactions formed between people, objects and environments, my designs are aimed at supporting activities linked to theories developed by mihaly csikszentmihalyi, with the result being design that encourages achievement and happiness.


2010

short 540

01 utas school of architecture and design 02 salvaged timber 03 fcs plywood 04 special object 05 visual mill cnc software 06 2D cnc machining 07 industry focused construction techniques 08 hand finished 09 low voc paints and finishes 10 tasmanian design centre permanent exhibition

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objects play a key role in shaping who we are, as a designer growing up in a consumer culture it has become more apparent that our current ‘needs’ are geared around the buying of ‘things’ for pleasure, it appears this addiction to buying can surely bring us no joy. but what of the objects we possess that contain memories and confirm goals and relationships within our society, the objects that remind us of family goals. these are the objects that are the most special to us and the ones that symbolize who we truly are and remind us of where we are going. short division is an object designed around a series of considered spaces that look to accommodate the special objects we have in our lives.

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shortdivision shortdivison With line as a starting point, an investigation of quality and the potential of form was undertaken. These findings gave weight and anchored a design strongly motivated by environmentally conscious elements. Shortdivision is a concept which explores this notion along with capturing and reinterpreting the potential already existing within the spirit of objects.

Balance, movement, proportions and placement are considered and extracted from an existing design (Butterfly cabinet by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec), reinterpreted and outwardly expressed to form a new design that gives homage to the original object.

The capturing of movement and implied motion, translated into the intersection of two objects to form new spaces. Spaces of varying sizes which might look to accommodate the special objects that form part of our lives. A functional design crossing over both modern and hand crafted construction methods with a focus on sustainability in production with component sizes being in tune with manufacturing requirements, hence minimizing waste. An object designed to be repaired easily and economically, further adding longevity to the life cycle of both materials and object. Materials selected from companies with a proactive wholistic sustainable model [within manufacture and use] and if possible the utilization of discarded materials was given preference. forest stewardship council plywood

salvaged tasmanian timbers

toxic free finishes free from voc’s


2011

additi what are our current needs? the addition project was the outcome of questioning what we take for granted. the mid century sideboard is a very functional object but is it still relevant in meeting our current routines? instead of producing another archetype design, shouldn’t design be investigating routines and forming new ways to accommodate these needs? design is to question the current systems we work within, to challenge the very things that form our world and respond to these needs in an informed creative way. are doors on a cabinet needed or does the answer simply lie within the ability to turn a space sideways to obtain privacy? 11 idea 12 timber waste off cuts 13 replaceable parts 14 local manufacturing 15 visual mill cnc software 16 2D cnc machining 17 timber veneers 18 laminated leg forms 19 micro considerations 20 enjoy

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1580

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ion addition cabinet

work breakdown structure [wbs]

demond nut fixing

1. summary

1.1 storage cabinet

2. objectives

337

450

notes:

- drawings to be read in conjuction with work breakdown structure [wbs] - all works undertaken are to comply with current workplace health and safety act - any conflicting information is to be reported to the designer [matty smith]

550

3. project description

leg structure 3.11 salvaged or certified tasmanian blackwood1mm veneers, radial cut +/- 0.5mm. 3.12 pressed to form as per attached jig. 130mm x 25mm. 100mm taper cut. 45o shampher cut to back of legs, 1mm arris to all edges 3.13 30mm, m6, demon nut fixing 3.14 solvent free adhesive to all joints 3.15 beha low voc treatment oil finish [5 applications] main carcase 3.16 fsc 15mm sapele plywood components with all parts machine produced via sawn or cnc cut as per cutting sheet +/- 0.5mm 3.17 grain direction to continue around carcase and aligned, all joints to be 45o cut and dominoed fixings. back dominoes into gables +/- 0.25mm. 3.18 pva adhesive to all joints with NO external fixings or fillers 3.19 sanded to 400 grit finish, 1mm arris off all edges 3.20 beha low voc treatment oil finish [5 application coats]

fsc plywood

95

- cover sheet / notes / wbs - measured drawing / materials - joinery details - jig details - cutting sheet - schedule of works

°

secondary carcase 3.21 fsc 12mm sapele plywood gables with all parts machine produced via saw or cnc cut as per cutting sheet +/- 0.5mm 3.22 grain direction to continue around carcase and aligned, all joints to be 45o cut 3.23 beha low voc treatment oil finish to internal components before assembely [5 application coats] 3.24 pva adhesive to all joints with NO external fixings or fillers 3.25 sanded to 400 grit finish, 1mm arris off all edges 3.26 beha low voc treatment oil finish [5 application coats]

83 .2 5

a

- all timber materials sourced from fsc or licensed salvaged resources - low-zero paints and finishes

leg detail [1:5 scale]

ethical statement:

salvaged tasm

1mm timber laminations

450

document detail list:

sustainability:

2.1 design and produce with minimal environmental impact taking into consideration efficient manufacturing process

front elevation

low voc paint finish [white]

[1:2 scale]

top 3.27 salvaged tasmanian blackwwod, 1200 x 380 x 35mm produced via saw or cnc cut as per drawing +/- 0.5mm 3.28 13o mitre, butt join, with no external fixings 3.29 11o back cut to all edges from face. 10mm top line to continue around all sides of top. +/- 0.25mm 3.30 pva adhesive to all joints with NO external fixings or fillers 3.31 sanded to 400 grit finish, 1mm arris off all edges 3.32 beha low voc treatment oil finish [5 application coats] 3.33 top fixed to legs with 40mm demond nuts and inserts

leg fixing detail [1:2 scale]

195

jigs 3.34 fsc 16mm mdf or ‘off cuts’ to be used as outlined within joinery detail drawing and cutting list

225

- the design outlined within has taken into consideration the full life cycle of the parts and product. all parts are designed for repair and with the least amount of impact on the environment, the maker and the end user. for more information please contact the designer.

15mm fsc sepele plywood

environment, the maker and the end user. for with the least amount of impact on the

-

salvaged tasman

450

90

.0 0

°

d

10.73°

25m PC-002-MCS PC-001-MCS issue

13/05/2011

03/05/2011 date

leg detail

draft drawing revised item

addition-cabinet

salvaged tasmanian blackwood

drawing No: PC-002-MCS cover sheet

top and cabinet detail [1:5 scale]

[1:2 scale]

A3

all mesurements in millimeters unless otherwise stated scale [AS] @A3 date: 03/05/2011

drawn: matty smith

sheet 1 of 5


2011

little

do you remember the time you built a cubby house under your kitchen table? paper sticky taped to the underside of the table so that you could draw whatever you wanted. or the times you measured your height on the wall and marked it with a pencil, your name proudly displayed for everyone to see. the little pig series is an object derived from these concepts, a semiotic response linked to a narrative of a baby pig seeking protection under its mother. emotionally the object explores the connection we as children and guardians have with each other. a child’s perspective. an object that promotes human capital, a safe space to play and be creative, small enough to be moved around yet big enough to hide under. an object that links us to the past [reminiscing] with an ability to store the memories created in the ‘now’. 21 rhino 3D modeling 22 project managment 23 human capital 24 salvaged tasmanian blackwood 25 system design 26 visual mill cnc software 27 3D cnc machining 28 local manufacturing 29 flat packed 30 enjoy

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pig


flow 1665

1833

2012

home has been described in the non design world as a reflection of the occupiers, their past, their present and their future, all displayed and embodied within the spaces and the objects within and around the home. a designer may design a house but the occupier truly makes it a home. the idea of home has a very special place in my world, and those who have no link to home must surely feel the negative effects of such a situation. the phenomenology of the home and understanding our relationship with spaces and objects must surely form the ground work from which to design from, to design objects for the home a designer must understand the core primal drivers that our objects and spaces support and help to form. through the unearthing and drive to understand the unconscious behind the routines linked with the home one can then reinforce positive relationships between, objects, home and people which must truly embody the core ideas of design. 31 vector works cad 32 hollow core construction 33 human capital 34 project management 35 steel fabrication 36 x3 reclaimed solid core doors 37 2D cnc machining 38 re-design 39 re- build 40 enjoy

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BODY IN SPACE MATTY C SMITH 123690

window thresholds are both 2 dimensional [vertical surfaces of glass] and 3 dimensional [window frames and components that extend beyond and into our homes]. these elements not only frame up the outside world from within but they also give a ‘through the looking glass’ insight into our homes from beyond. the collision and fusion of artificial and natural light establishes how far through the looking glass we are permitted to see.

our ever changing primal needs are sort within these thresholds. a seesawing effect, back and forth between warmth and cooling, are ever present within our minds. these needs are elements outside of the control of ones self., for they are purely primary.

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supporting activities linked to the ‘flow’ theory and human capital [reading, education, creativity, learning]. bay window/window sill extraction of forms [qld state library] child like proportions of space. a room inside a room. threshold space determined through echo [senses outside of site] interaction through sound confirms the threshold. curved forms mimic the human body [leaning and touching with hand] spaces to play and hide, a cubby house inside. a vehicle that allows the end user to balance both light/ warmth and shade/cooling. designed around to movements that happen ‘in between seating’ positions. the movements and interaction with the object and body that take place when we actively and sub consciously transfer between positions when seeking out comfort. we will always seek comfort, design should enable the end user to find their own individual comfort with little resistance [physical or mental]. dream, live, hide are echoed within the form. frame and skin construction. light weight portable design encourages movement and ability to seek warmth and cool through repositioning. incubator for memories. a prop that supports our basic human needs [sunlight and warmth] through the looking glass. visual assurance of safety

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2012

parce 380

320

a street gutter gives us the affordance to rest our leg in a position more in tuned to our human needs. its primary intention is to channel water but it affords us other functions within our environment. this almost natural adoption seems right and leads us to think ‘why wouldn’t it be this way’. another example to consider are steps, a designer and end user might consider steps as platforms for allowing us to navigate between various levels within our environment. but when we skip down these platforms they take on a new role. whether a deep consideration of affordance has been considered with the design process or not, the design of the last 20mm of each step gives us the affordance [or not] to navigate the steps at our preferred pace. the achievement of negotiating our environment as we see as acceptable and right is an achievement to strive for within every design.

41 rhino 3D modeling 42 z printing prototype 43 body & semiotic design response 44 project management 45 visual mill programing 46 3D cnc machining

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affordance

‘parcel’ is an object that looks to incorporate affordances that go beyond the functions we see and understand within objects and our environments. an object that affords us a link to activities associated with happiness [‘flow’] and positive emotions on a conscious and sub conscious level. from a function perspective, ‘parcel’ allows us to transport our meals from home and supports the idea of taking time out to stop and eat. on a reflective level, it allows us to reconnect with the activity of cooking a meal or the loved one[s] involved. visceral signs explore the connection we have with safety and childhood memories of transport [buckel up for safety].


projec Michael Hill Jeweller Calamvale

Shop # 50 Calamvale Village Shopping Centre 668 Compton Rd Calamvale Qld 4116 ID

Task Name

1

Pre start works

Sun 7 Oct Mon 8 Oc Tue 9 Oct Wed 10 S M T W

Thu 11 O Fri 12 Oct Sat 13 Oc Sun 14 O Mon 15 O Tue 16 O Wed 17 T F S S M T W

2

Load Shopfront Joinery

Load Shopfront Joinery

3

Plastering works (erect new walls & ceiling grid)

Plastering works (erect new walls & ceiling grid)

4

Pre start works completed

Thu 18 O Fri 19 Oct Sat 20 Oc Sun 21 O Mon 22 O Tue 23 O Wed 24 T F S S M T W

Thu 25 O Fri 26 Oct Sat 27 Oc Sun 28 O T F S S

8/10

Fitout

2004-9

6

Site Induction (7am)

7

Unload Shopfront into tenancy

Unload Shopfront into tenancy

8

Hire tools delivered

Hire tools delivered

9

Fit shopfront

10

Air Conditioning works (above ceiling)

Air Conditioning works (above ceiling)

11

Sprinkler works (above ceiling)

Sprinkler works (above ceiling)

12

Tiling

13

Alarm pre wire

Alarm pre wire

14

Electrical pre wire

Electrical pre wire

15

Install new safe

16

Sheet & set ceiling

17

Back office joinery

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Painter

19

Sand all plaster

20

Wall displays & pictures

21

Plumber

Plumber

22

Feature wall

Feature wall

23

Cutting in of A/C registers

24

Service and re-install fire ext

25

Fire installation of escutcheon plates

Fire installation of escutcheon plates

26

Load counters

Load counters

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Bi fold door installation

28

Unload counters

29

Plumber

Plumber

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Structural Engineer

Structural Engineer

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Electrical

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Alarm fit off

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Fit counters

34

Make good

35

Install glass

36

Carpet

37

Cleaner

38

Painter touch up's

39

Council inspection

40

Fitout completed

41

Hand over store to MHJ

Site Induction (7am)

Fit shopfront

Tiling

Install new safe

Sheet & set ceiling

Back office joinery

Painter

Sand all plaster

Wall displays & pictures

Cutting in of A/C registers

Service and re-install fire ext

Bi fold door installation

Unload counters

47 microsoft office project 48 work breakdown structure 49 client relationships 50 scheduling 51 budgets 52 111 retail stores nation wide 53 interstate on site construction meetings 54 set milestones 55 certification 56 hand overs

Electrical power points and feeds

Alarm fit off

Fit counters

Make good

Install glass Carpet

Cleaner

42

Hand shop to MHJ @ 8am

43

Stock shop

44

Open shop

45

Hand over completed

Project: Calamvale-1 Date: Tue 2/10/07

project management. is it to simply achieve set mile stones, to organize, to arrange? these tasks are the somewhat obvious business focused requirements of the pm world. but to dig deeper, one might expose a project management world that informs the routines that shape our behavior. for most this happens unknowing, we are constantly being organized within our lives, there are systems in place that are managing what we do and how we do it. these systems have a great influence and impact on how we go about or daily lives and our happiness. the importance of designing and managing routines is an important one; it has the ability to empower people. to project manage is to apply ‘design thinking’ to the way we undertake tasks with a goal towards achieving improved social and human capital both within projects and outside.

Painter touch up's

b

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Leading Hand: Craig Voss Site phone: 0407 674 109 (green) Project Co-ordinator: Matthew Smith Ph: 07 3205 4188

Council inspection 22/10

Hand shop to MHJ @ 8am

Stock shop

Open shop 26/10

Task

Summary

Rolled Up Progress

Project Summary

Progress

Rolled Up Task

Split

Group By Summary

Milestone

Rolled Up Milestone

External Tasks

Deadline

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c[v]t education/training

ba env des [furniture major] gpa 6.6 cert IV in project management cert IV in training and assessment cert III in off site construction [shopfitting] cert I in furniture making

experience

5 years + project management experience retail/office fitouts 5 years + manufacturing and site installation work within shopfitting retail industry

exhibitions 2012

prototype [146 artspace. tasmanian museum and art gallery] discovering design through furniture [new gallery] workshopped 11 [sydney design week] city of hobart art prize finalist [tasmanian museum and art gallery] design institute of aust student design awards [designex] ten days on the island [DOT furnished exhibition] tasmanian wood design collection’s [biennial acquisitive exhibition]

d

2011

c

4.

a

1.

1. replaceable components, ability to self customize 2. hand crafted construction 3. natural soup finish, no VOC’s 4. carbon sink materials [wood], able to be ‘onsold’ after use

3.

b

d

object: code: item: on: informati product product: r: designe brand: range: size: h: colour/finis top: finish: legs: finish: fixing: e: lead-tim supplier: quantity: cost:

details: contact : address phone: email: web: hours: opening

ure inu it furnit red les café tab

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2.

awards/acquisitions

designex dia student awards: shortlisted [furniture design] tasmanian design centre wood design potentials award [recognizing the work of emerging designers] footprint award [most innovative approach to ‘sustainability’] acquisition [‘shortdivision’ accepted into tasmania design collection]

media

home beautiful magazine [designer profile] june issue green architecture and landscaping magazine, issue 19

memberships

design objects tasmania [2010-current] design institute of australia [2010-current] golden key international honour society [2012]

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Objects play a part in allowing us to understand the environments we occupy. To help do this objects contain signs and visual clues that are considered to be a visual language that helps define in our consciousness what something might be [or what we might use it for]. We are exposed to this language from a young age with childhood toys teaching examples of this thinking. We learn early on that round objects go into round holes1, square objects go into square holes. This pattern of thinking is repeated in the objects and environments we design. These patterns are demonstrations of signs within objects that help to form ‘affordance’. Perception theorist J. J. Gibson suggests that ‘affordance’ within objects is key to us understanding our world2, the default settings we learn in childhood are the result of us perceiving possibilities from objects, [handles are for pulling, surfaces for walking, tools for manipulating]. Gibson implies that our whole evolution has been geared towards us seeing multiple possibilities within objects and environments [a book can be used for reading and education, but it also affords us protection from the rain if we place it on top of our heads]. Hence the signs within the objects enable us to understand it’s vast possibilities for use. But what if the signs are distorted? The affordance is unclear? Examples of this distortion can be interpreted within the design work of Philippe Starck. Starck has one trick, but he does this trick very well. Starck has the ability to view the world through his inner child and to then express this through his objects3. On one hand his process is a playful insight into his childhood, on another semiotic level it affords an end user to reflect back on ones own past. This is design affordance not based around use, but reflection that reconnects us to memories deep in our sub conscious. Starck’s narratives expressed within his objects distort our reflection through the construction of unlikely paired signs4. There are countless ways that a designer [or and artist] can achieve this, one is through function, and another is though the visual signs within the object. A visceral example being an orange nose. In the deer like motorbike design by Starck for the Italian company Apillia, Starck asks us to consider this object for more than just a transportation device [the affordance to transport ourselves from point a to point b], he is prompting us to consider this object in the same light as a living animal or childhood pet, or maybe a favorite stuffed toy from our childhood? The signs within the object dig deeper than an understanding of its use, it looks to communicate on an emotional level.+ 1.

InObjects contrast, playDonald a partA in Norman allowing claims us an to opposing understand the environments we occupy. approach To help can do this be seen objects in objects containthat signs look andtovisual defeatclues that are considered to emotional be a visual attachment languagethrough that helps visual define redundancy, in our consciousness as what something expressed might be within [or what thewedesign might work use it of for]. Marco We Zanuso are exposed to this language from This approach however,examples has and a young Richard ageSapper with 5. childhood toys teaching of this thinking. We learn been somewhat by the go current generation early on thatdefeated round objects into round holes1, square objects go into square This pattern of with thinking is design, repeatedasin the objects and environments we ofholes. technologies merging object design. by These patterns of signs within objects that help to outlined Deyan Sudjic,are ‘A demonstrations merging of functions form ‘affordance’. Perception theorist J. J.have Gibson suggests that ‘affordance’ and categories has taken place and the signs 6 . A watch and phone within is and key changed’ to us understanding our world2, the default settings we now been objects distorted are learn now in forever childhood connected, are theand result the routine of us perceiving of possibilities from objects, checking [handlesthe aretime for is pulling, now linked surfaces with for communication walking, tools for manipulating]. outside Gibson of implies telling that theour time. wholeSigns evolution are dissolving has been geared towards us seeing and multiple new signs possibilities and understandings within objects are created, and environments [a book can be used along for reading with newand emotions education, linked buttoitthe also object. affords This us protection from the rain if approach we placealso it on blurs top and of our reconstructs heads]. Hence the education the signs within the objects enable one us might to understand have had it’s from vast past possibilities understandingsfor of use. But what if the signs are signs distorted? and messages The affordance that in turn is unclear? allow us to connect with an object on an emotional level. It isExamples somewhatofhard thistodistortion feel any attachment can be interpreted to a black within the design work of cube, Philippe but it Starck. is notStarck uncommon has for one wristwatches trick, but hetodoes be this trick very well. Starck handed has the down ability through to generations. view the world Thethrough same function his inner child and to then express . On very one hand his process [of this telling through thehis time] objects but 3with different signs is a playful insight into his childhood, semiotic level affords an end user to reflect back on and meanings on areanother expressed through the it object ones own past. This is design affordance not based around use, but reflection [mobile phone]. that reconnects us to memories deep in our sub conscious. Starck’s narratives objects distort our reflection through the construction Inexpressed the same within way oldhis object signs are rapidly being . There are countless of ways that a designer [or and of unlikely paired signs4[or swallowed up by new signs the understanding artist] can achieve this, oneand is expires through emotional function, and another is though the those signs], Starck consumes visualsigns signsand within the on object. A visceral being an orange nose. In the design touches all three levels example of deer like motorbike design by Starck the Italian company Apillia, Starck object design, visceral, behavioral andfor reflective. 7 Stark asks usantounderstanding consider thisofobject for more than just a transportation device [the Through syntagmatic signs explores waystointransport which to ourselves remove andfrom add point syntagems affordance a to point b], he is prompting us from existing this objects to create [and to consider object in the new sameobjects light as a living animal or childhood pet, signs], yeta still embodies thetoy existing affordance. or maybe favorite stuffed from our childhood? The signs within the object + dig deeper than an understanding of its use, it looks to communicate on an emotional level.+ 2.1.

InIndoing so, this process aligns itself Ettore Sottsass bookcase for contrast, Donald A Norman claims an with opposing the Memphiscan group whichinneither to to typical approach be seen objectsconforms that look defeatlayouts or materials when considering designs that pre-date it. redundancy, Starck manages emotional attachment through visual as to again undermine our understanding of signs, objects andoftheir expressed within the design work Marcomeanings, Zanuso that help to form our understanding of our5.world This8.approach The question however, thenhas could be asked, does Starck’s and Richard Sapper objects been somewhat now allow defeated for other by the objects current to do generation the same? Can his redefined extracted syntage’s of technologies that have merging carefully with and object thoughtfully design, asbe re-signed be re-signed again? And outlined again? by HowDeyan far can Sudjic, one get ‘A merging away from of the functions core signs before a total loss ofand understanding categories has occurs? takenStarck’s place and ‘juicy the signs salif’have has already pulverized our 6 . juicer A watchmight and phone understanding now been distorted of whatand an changed’ archetype be. It’s important to note are by nowmoving forever connected, of that away from the and ideathe of routine design based on function it is only the checkingleft the within time isthe nowobject linkedthat withgives communication function us an understanding of what it outside the time. Signsfactors are dissolving might be. of Buttelling maybe there are other such as place that look to give and new signstoand are created, understanding theunderstandings object. The placement of an object within an environment along new emotions linked to theare object. This factors to consider9. and its with relationship to other objects important This however is blurs relying the notion that a reinterpretation of signs has approach also andonreconstructs the education not takenhad place, currently understand the meaning of the onealready might have from that past we understandings of space objectthat and in we turn are in, a ‘default’ [round things go into round signsthat and the messages allow us to holes] setting to object analogize objects against. Hence connect with an on an emotional level. It relying on environment to communicate be a fail-safe approach to understanding is somewhatunderstanding hard to feel may any not attachment to a black objects, it it only us to understand the object within the context that it cube, but is helps not uncommon for wristwatches to be currently resides and generations. this is always to change. handed down through Thesubject same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs Starcks ‘juicy are salif’, is unlike any the other kitchen product, it is as alien and meanings expressed through object as[mobile its shape might suggest. Because of this, the juicer is not something phone]. immediately identifiable, it’s form is removed enough away from its default juicer becomes intriguing, andbeing hence when understood gives In thelanguage same waythat old it object signs are rapidly the viewer aupfeeling accomplishment knowing that swallowed by new of signs [or the understanding of they have understood. A designer might be tempted to layand down a bread trail of semiotic clues to help those signs], Starck consumes expires emotional the end-user understand [surface finish in orange or washable plastic, design signstoand touches on all three levels of clear links to juicers frombehavioral our memories experiences], but by avoiding object design, visceral, and and reflective. such narratives Starck’s object becomes something else entirely. The form on Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark in which remove and add syntagems a explores somewhat ways abstract leveltodoes reflect signs that link it to other kitchen from tools existing to create based suchobjects as knifes, so on new one objects hand the[and material feels correct within signs], yet environment, still embodies affordance. its intended yetthe it existing is somewhat alien at the same time. Emotions + connected with confusion and fear are expressed through the object’s form, emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is just as confusing regardless of education, culture or background. + 3.2.

While some objects notaligns teach the endwith userEttore In doing so, process bookcase for Objects play athis partmight in allowing usitself to understand the Sottsass environments we occupy. anything new, some however express signs the Memphis group which contain neither conforms to typical layouts or materials To help do this objects signs andthat visual clues that are consideredwhen to afford us to language play withthat the pre-date idea that theStarck considering designs it. to again undermine our be a visual helps define inordinary our manages consciousness what something can be be transformed into the extraordinary understanding of signs, objects their meanings, that form our might [or what we might use itand for]. Wethrough are exposed to help this to language from 8 design. objects who have been of childhood our asks worldall . The question then could be asked, does We Starck’s aunderstanding young These age with toys teaching examples of this thinking. learn 1 exposed them to consider un-expected in same? , square go intoextracted square objects allow for otherthe objects to do holes the Can objects his redefined early ontonow that round objects go into round the everyday and have gives light to and new objects that holes. Thisthat pattern of thinking is thoughtfully repeated in the objects and we syntage’s carefully be re-signed be environments re-signed again? allow forThese newHow affordances where there design. patterns demonstrations of signs withinbefore objects that help And again? far can are one get previously away from the core signs a total loss to were none. Being that for the majority of the has suggests form ‘affordance’. Perception theorist J. us, J. Gibson that ‘affordance’ of understanding occurs? 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On one hand his process is a playful insight into his childhood, on another semiotic level affords an end user to back on Starcks ‘juicy salif’, is unlike any it other kitchen product, it reflect is as alien ones ownshape past.might This suggest. is designBecause affordance not based aroundis use, reflection as its of this, the juicer not but something that reconnects us to memories sub conscious. Starck’s narratives immediately identifiable, it’s deep form in is our removed enough away from its default expressed within that his objects distort our reflection through the construction juicer language it becomes intriguing, and hence when understood gives 1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and 4 .accomplishment There designer [or and A of paired signs the viewer a feeling ofPress, knowingways thatthat theya have understood. theunlikely Self [Cambridge: Cambridge 1981].are countless 2. J.J Gibson, Theachieve Perception of the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton artist] can this, one is through function, and isclues though designer might be tempted to lay down a bread trail of another semiotic to the help Mifflin, 1950]. visual signsThewithin the object. A visceral example being an orangeplastic, nose. In the the to understand [surface finish in orange or washable 3. Deyanend-user Sudjic, Language of Things [London: Penguin Books, 2008]. deer like motorbike design by Starck for[New the Italian companybut Apillia, Starck 4. George Baird, La to Dimension Amoureuse inour Architecture York: clear links juicers from memories and experiences], by avoiding George Brazller, 1970]. asks us to consider this object more something than just else a transportation device [the such narratives Starck’s object for becomes entirely. The form on 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday affordance to transport ourselves from point to point b],to heother is prompting athings.[New somewhat abstract level does reflect signs athat link it kitchen us York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. Deyan Sudjc, The Language Things [New Penguin Books, to consider this object in the same light asthe a2008]. living animal orcorrect childhood pet, based tools such as ofknifes, soYork: on one hand material feels within 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product or maybe a favorite stuffedyet toyit from our childhood? Thethe signs within object its intended environment, is somewhat alien at same time. the Emotions design [Switzerland: AVA Publishing,2009]. 8. dig Charles deeper Jencks, than Signs, anSymbols understanding and and Architecture ofare [New itsexpressed York: use,Wiley, it looks to the communicate an connected with confusion fear through object’s on form, 1980] emotional level.+ emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 1. just asEmotional confusing 3. 10.Norman, Design:regardless Basic Books. of education, culture or background. + 4.

While some objects not claims teach the end user In contrast, Donald might A Norman an opposing anything can new, express approach besome seenhowever in objects thatsigns look that to defeat afford us attachment to play with the idea that the ordinary emotional through visual redundancy, as can be transformed the work extraordinary through expressed within theinto design of Marco Zanuso 5 design. These objects asks all whohowever, have been . This approach has and Richard Sapper exposed to them to consider un-expected in been somewhat defeated by thethe current generation the everyday and gives light to new design, objects as that of technologies merging with object allow for affordances where previously there outlined bynew Deyan Sudjic, ‘A merging of functions were none. Being for the majority of us, the and categories hasthat taken place and the signs have visceral plays a large role in 6.our understanding, A watch and phone now been distorted and changed’ signs are communicated to the us through are nowthat forever connected, and routine visual of aesthetics our environment. checking thehelp timeus isdefine now linked with communication Communication through outside of telling the signs, time. when Signspurposely are dissolving distorted in turn prompts us to question all and new signs and understandings are created, defaults our world and ask us to seek out along withwithin new emotions linked to the object. This new affordances. When signs are destroyed and approach also blurs andthe reconstructs the education have to be re-learnt then new affordances within one might have had from past understandings of objects possible. signs andare messages that in turn allow us to connect with an object on an emotional level. It is somewhat hard to feel any attachment to a black cube, but it is not uncommon for wristwatches to be handed down through generations. The same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs and meanings are expressed through the object [mobile phone]. In the same way old object signs are rapidly being 1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and swallowed up by new signs Press, [or the the Self [Cambridge: Cambridge 1981].understanding of 2. J.J Gibson, The Starck Perceptionconsumes of the Visual [Boston: Houghton those signs], andWorld. expires emotional Mifflin, 1950]. design andLanguage touches on all three levels of2008]. 3. Deyan signs Sudjic, The of Things [London: Penguin Books, 4. Georgedesign, Baird, La visceral, Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture [New York: object behavioral and reflective. George Brazller, 1970]. Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday explores ways inBasic which to 2004]. remove and add syntagems things.[New York: Books, 6. Deyan Sudjc, Theobjects Language of [New new York: objects Penguin Books, from existing toThings create [and2008]. 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product signs], yet still AVA embodies the existing affordance. design [Switzerland: Publishing,2009]. +8. Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.


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+Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,1958. +Ball, R. Naylor m. Form Follows Idea, an introduction to design poetics. London, Black Dog. 2005. +Baird, George. La Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture. New York, George Brazller. 1970. +Brooks Gramem. Stone Sally. Elements and Objects, AVA Publishing, Switzerland. 2008 +Butter R. Krippendorff. Product Semantics: exploring the symbolic qualities of form. The journal of the industrial designers society of america. 1984. +Csikszentmihalyi, Milaly. Rochberg-Halton, Eugene. The Meaning of Things, Domestic Symbols and the Self. Cambridge: Cambridge Press, 1981. +Gibson,JJ. The Perception of the Visual World. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1950. +Istedt Hjelm s. Seniotivs in Product Design, Stockholm: Royal Institute of Technology. 2002. +Jencks, Charles, Signs, Symbols and Architecture, New York. Wiley, 1980. +Norman A Donald. Emotional Design Why We Love or Hate Everyday Things. Basic Books, New York. 2004. +Parsons Tim. Thinking Objects, Contemporary Approaches to Product Design. AVA Publishing, Switzerland. 2009. +Sudjc Deyan, The Language of Things. New York: Penguin Books, 2008.

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On one hand his process is a playful insight into his childhood, on salif’, another is semiotic it affords end userittoisreflect back on Starcks ‘juicy unlike level any other kitchenanproduct, as alien past. This is design affordance notthe based around use,something but reflection asones its own shape might suggest. Because of this, juicer is not that reconnects us to memories deepisinremoved our subenough conscious. Starck’s narratives immediately identifiable, it’s form away from its default expressed within hisitobjects our reflection the construction juicer language that becomesdistort intriguing, and hence through when understood gives 1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning4 of Things: Domestic Symbols and .1981]. There are countless waysthey thathave a designer [or and ofSelf unlikely paired signs the viewer a feeling of accomplishment knowing that understood. A the [Cambridge: Cambridge Press, 2. J.J Gibson, The Perception of the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton artist] can achieve this, isdown through function, andsemiotic another clues is though the designer might be tempted toone lay a bread trail of to help Mifflin, 1950]. visual signs the object. A visceral example an orange nose. In the the end-user towithin understand [surface finish orange being or washable plastic, 3. Deyan Sudjic, The Language of Things [London: Penguin Books, in 2008]. deerBaird, likeLa motorbike design by Starck forand theexperiences], Italian company Starck 4. George Dimension Amoureuse Architecture [New York: clear links to juicers fromin our memories but Apillia, by avoiding George asksBrazller, us to 1970]. consider thisobject objectbecomes for more than just a transportation device such narratives Starck’s something else entirely. The form on [the 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday to transport ourselves fromsigns pointthat a tolink point he is kitchen prompting us a affordance somewhat abstract level does reflect it b], to other things.[New York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. Deyan The such Language Things in [Newso York: Penguin Books,the 2008]. to Sudjc, consider thisasof object the as amaterial living animal or childhood based tools knifes, onsame one light hand feels correct withinpet, 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product or intended maybe a favorite stuffed from our childhood? withinEmotions the object its environment, yet toy it is somewhat alien at The the signs same time. design [Switzerland: AVA Publishing,2009]. 8. Charles dig deeper Jencks, Signs, than Symbols an understanding and Architecture [New of its York: use, Wiley, it looks to on an connected with confusion and fear are expressed through thecommunicate object’s form, 1980] emotional level.+ emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. just as confusing of education, culture or background. + 10.Norman, Emotional Design: regardless Basic Books. 4.3. 1.

While some objects might not teach theanend user In contrast, Donald A Norman claims opposing anything however expressthat signs that approachnew, can some be seen in objects look to defeat afford us toattachment play with through the ideavisual that the ordinary as emotional redundancy, can be transformed intodesign the extraordinary expressed within the work of Marcothrough Zanuso 5 design. These Sapper objects who have been has . asks This all approach however, and Richard exposed to them defeated to consider the current un-expected in been somewhat by the generation the and gives light new objects of everyday technologies merging withtoobject design,that as allow for new affordances previously there outlined by Deyan Sudjic,where ‘A merging of functions were Being has thattaken for the majority us, the and none. categories place and theofsigns have 6 visceral a large in our . understanding, A watch and phone now beenplays distorted androle changed’ signs thatforever are communicated through visual are now connected, to andusthe routine of aesthetics helptime us define environment. checking the is now our linked with communication Communication throughthe signs, purposely outside of telling time.when Signs are dissolving distorted in turn us to question all and new signs andprompts understandings are created, defaults within world linked and asktousthe to object. seek outThis along with new our emotions new affordances. When and the reconstructs signs are destroyed and approach also blurs the education have be re-learnt then past new affordances within one to might have had from understandings of objects are messages possible.that in turn allow us to signs and connect with an object on an emotional level. It is somewhat hard to feel any attachment to a black cube, but it is not uncommon for wristwatches to be handed down through generations. The same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs and meanings are expressed through the object [mobile phone].

In doing so, this process aligns itself with Ettore Sottsass bookcase for the Memphis group which neither conforms to typical layouts or materials when considering designs that pre-date it. Starck manages to again undermine our understanding of signs, objects and their meanings, that help to form our understanding of our world8. The question then could be asked, does Starck’s objects now allow for other objects to do the same? Can his redefined extracted syntage’s that have carefully and thoughtfully be re-signed be re-signed again? And again? How far can one get away from the core signs before a total loss of understanding occurs? Starck’s ‘juicy salif’ has already pulverized our understanding of what an archetype juicer might be. It’s important to note that by moving away from the idea of design based on function it is only the function left within the object that gives us an understanding of what it might be. But maybe there are other factors such as place that look to give understanding to the object. The placement of an object within an environment and its relationship to other objects are important factors to consider9. This however is relying on the notion that a reinterpretation of signs has not already taken place, that we currently understand the meaning of the space that the object and we are in, a ‘default’ [round things go into round holes] setting to analogize objects against. Hence relying on environment to communicate understanding may not be a fail-safe approach to understanding objects, it only helps us to understand the object within the context that it currently resides and this is always subject to change.

In the same way old object signs are rapidly being

1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and swallowed up by Cambridge new signs [or the understanding of the Self [Cambridge: Press, 1981]. 2. those J.J Gibson, The Perception the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton signs], Starckofconsumes and expires emotional Mifflin, 1950]. signs touches on[London: all three of 3. design Deyan Sudjic, The and Language of Things Penguinlevels Books, 2008]. 4. object George Baird, La Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture York: design, visceral, behavioral and[New reflective. George Brazller, 1970]. Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday explores in which to remove and add syntagems things.[New ways York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. from Deyan Sudjc, The Language of Things [New York: Penguin Books,[and 2008]. existing objects to create new objects 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product signs], yet still the existing affordance. design [Switzerland: AVA embodies Publishing,2009]. 8. +Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.

4.2.

Starcks ‘juicy salif’, is unlike any other kitchen product, it is as alien as its shape might suggest. Because of this, the juicer is not something immediately identifiable, it’s form is removed enough away from its default juicer language that it becomes intriguing, and hence when understood gives the viewer a feeling of accomplishment knowing that they have understood. A designer might be tempted to lay down a bread trail of semiotic clues to help the end-user to understand [surface finish in orange or washable plastic, clear links to juicers from our memories and experiences], but by avoiding such narratives Starck’s object becomes something else entirely. The form on a somewhat abstract level does reflect signs that link it to other kitchen based tools such as knifes, so on one hand the material feels correct within its intended environment, yet it is somewhat alien at the same time. Emotions connected with confusion and fear are expressed through the object’s form, emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is just as confusing regardless of education, culture or background. + 3.

While some objects might not teach the end user anything new, some however express signs that afford us to play with the idea that the ordinary can be transformed into the extraordinary through design. These objects asks all who have been exposed to them to consider the un-expected in the everyday and gives light to new objects that allow for new affordances where previously there were none. Being that for the majority of us, the visceral plays a large role in our understanding, signs that are communicated to us through visual aesthetics help us define our environment. Communication through signs, when purposely distorted in turn prompts us to question all defaults within our world and ask us to seek out new affordances. When the signs are destroyed and have to be re-learnt then new affordances within objects are possible.

1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self [Cambridge: Cambridge Press, 1981]. 2. J.J Gibson, The Perception of the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1950]. 3. Deyan Sudjic, The Language of Things [London: Penguin Books, 2008]. 4. George Baird, La Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture [New York: George Brazller, 1970]. 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday things.[New York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. Deyan Sudjc, The Language of Things [New York: Penguin Books, 2008]. 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product design [Switzerland: AVA Publishing,2009]. 8. Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.


Objects play a part in allowing us to understand the environments we occupy. To help do this objects contain signs and visual clues that are considered to be a visual language that helps define in our consciousness what something might be [or what we might use it for]. We are exposed to this language from a young age with childhood toys teaching examples of this thinking. We learn early on that round objects go into round holes1, square objects go into square holes. This pattern of thinking is repeated in the objects and environments we design. These patterns are demonstrations of signs within objects that help to form ‘affordance’. Perception theorist J. J. Gibson suggests that ‘affordance’ within objects is key to us understanding our world2, the default settings we learn in childhood are the result of us perceiving possibilities from objects, [handles are for pulling, surfaces for walking, tools for manipulating]. Gibson implies that our whole evolution has been geared towards us seeing multiple possibilities within objects and environments [a book can be used for reading and education, but it also affords us protection from the rain if we place it on top of our heads]. Hence the signs within the objects enable us to understand it’s vast possibilities for use. But what if the signs are distorted? The affordance is unclear? Examples of this distortion can be interpreted within the design work of Philippe Starck. Starck has one trick, but he does this trick very well. Starck has the ability to view the world through his inner child and to then express this through his objects3. On one hand his process is a playful insight into his childhood, on another semiotic level it affords an end user to reflect back on ones own past. This is design affordance not based around use, but reflection that reconnects us to memories deep in our sub conscious. Starck’s narratives expressed within his objects distort our reflection through the construction of unlikely paired signs4. There are countless ways that a designer [or and artist] can achieve this, one is through function, and another is though the visual signs within the object. A visceral example being an orange nose. In the deer like motorbike design by Starck for the Italian company Apillia, Starck asks us to consider this object for more than just a transportation device [the affordance to transport ourselves from point a to point b], he is prompting us to consider this object in the same light as a living animal or childhood pet, or maybe a favorite stuffed toy from our childhood? The signs within the object dig deeper than an understanding of its use, it looks to communicate on an emotional level.+ 1.

Objects play a part in allowing us to understand the environments we occupy. To help do this objects contain signs and visual clues that are considered to be a visual language that helps define in our consciousness what something might be [or what we might use it for]. We are exposed to this language from a young age with childhood toys teaching examples of this thinking. We learn early on that round objects go into round holes1, square objects go into square holes. This pattern of thinking is repeated in the objects and environments we design. These patterns are demonstrations of signs within objects that help to form ‘affordance’. Perception theorist J. J. Gibson suggests that ‘affordance’ within objects is key to us understanding our world2, the default settings we learn in childhood are the result of us perceiving possibilities from objects, [handles are for pulling, surfaces for walking, tools for manipulating]. Gibson implies that our whole evolution has been geared towards us seeing multiple possibilities within objects and environments [a book can be used for reading and education, but it also affords us protection from the rain if we place it on top of our heads]. Hence the signs within the objects enable us to understand it’s vast possibilities for use. But what if the signs are distorted? The affordance is unclear? Examples of this distortion can be interpreted within the design work of Philippe Starck. Starck has one trick, but he does this trick very well. Starck has the ability to view the world through his inner child and to then express this through his objects3. On one hand his process is a playful insight into his childhood, on another semiotic level it affords an end user to reflect back on ones own past. This is design affordance not based around use, but reflection that reconnects us to memories deep in our sub conscious. Starck’s narratives expressed within his objects distort our reflection through the construction of unlikely paired signs4. There are countless ways that a designer [or and artist] can achieve this, one is through function, and another is though the visual signs within the object. A visceral example being an orange nose. In the deer like motorbike design by Starck for the Italian company Apillia, Starck asks us to consider this object for more than just a transportation device [the affordance to transport ourselves from point a to point b], he is prompting us to consider this object in the same light as a living animal or childhood pet, or maybe a favorite stuffed toy from our childhood? The signs within the object dig deeper than an understanding of its use, it looks to communicate on an emotional level.+ 1.

In contrast, Donald A Norman claims an opposing approach can be seen in objects that look to defeat emotional attachment through visual redundancy, as expressed within the design work of Marco Zanuso and Richard Sapper5. This approach however, has been somewhat defeated by the current generation of technologies merging with object design, as outlined by Deyan Sudjic, ‘A merging of functions and categories has taken place and the signs have now been distorted and changed’6. A watch and phone are now forever connected, and the routine of checking the time is now linked with communication outside of telling the time. Signs are dissolving and new signs and understandings are created, along with new emotions linked to the object. This approach also blurs and reconstructs the education one might have had from past understandings of signs and messages that in turn allow us to connect with an object on an emotional level. It is somewhat hard to feel any attachment to a black cube, but it is not uncommon for wristwatches to be handed down through generations. The same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs and meanings are expressed through the object [mobile phone]. In the same way old object signs are rapidly being swallowed up by new signs [or the understanding of those signs], Starck consumes and expires emotional design signs and touches on all three levels of object design, visceral, behavioral and reflective. Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark explores ways in which to remove and add syntagems from existing objects to create new objects [and signs], yet still embodies the existing affordance. + 2.

In doing so, this process aligns itself with Ettore Sottsass bookcase for the Memphis group which neither conforms to typical layouts or materials when considering designs that pre-date it. Starck manages to again undermine our understanding of signs, objects and their meanings, that help to form our understanding of our world8. The question then could be asked, does Starck’s objects now allow for other objects to do the same? Can his redefined extracted syntage’s that have carefully and thoughtfully be re-signed be re-signed again? And again? How far can one get away from the core signs before a total loss of understanding occurs? Starck’s ‘juicy salif’ has already pulverized our understanding of what an archetype juicer might be. It’s important to note that by moving away from the idea of design based on function it is only the function left within the object that gives us an understanding of what it might be. But maybe there are other factors such as place that look to give understanding to the object. The placement of an object within an environment and its relationship to other objects are important factors to consider9. This however is relying on the notion that a reinterpretation of signs has not already taken place, that we currently understand the meaning of the space that the object and we are in, a ‘default’ [round things go into round holes] setting to analogize objects against. Hence relying on environment to communicate understanding may not be a fail-safe approach to understanding objects, it only helps us to understand the object within the context that it currently resides and this is always subject to change.

In contrast, Donald A Norman claims an opposing approach can be seen in objects that look to defeat emotional attachment through visual redundancy, as expressed within the design work of Marco Zanuso and Richard Sapper5. This approach however, has been somewhat defeated by the current generation of technologies merging with object design, as outlined by Deyan Sudjic, ‘A merging of functions and categories has taken place and the signs have now been distorted and changed’6. A watch and phone are now forever connected, and the routine of checking the time is now linked with communication outside of telling the time. Signs are dissolving and new signs and understandings are created, along with new emotions linked to the object. This approach also blurs and reconstructs the education one might have had from past understandings of signs and messages that in turn allow us to connect with an object on an emotional level. It is somewhat hard to feel any attachment to a black cube, but it is not uncommon for wristwatches to be handed down through generations. The same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs and meanings are expressed through the object [mobile phone]. In the same way old object signs are rapidly being swallowed up by new signs [or the understanding of those signs], Starck consumes and expires emotional design signs and touches on all three levels of object design, visceral, behavioral and reflective. Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark explores ways in which to remove and add syntagems from existing objects to create new objects [and signs], yet still embodies the existing affordance. + 2.

Starcks ‘juicy salif’, is unlike any other kitchen product, it is as alien as its shape might suggest. Because of this, the juicer is not something immediately identifiable, it’s form is removed enough away from its default juicer language that it becomes intriguing, and hence when understood gives the viewer a feeling of accomplishment knowing that they have understood. A designer might be tempted to lay down a bread trail of semiotic clues to help the end-user to understand [surface finish in orange or washable plastic, clear links to juicers from our memories and experiences], but by avoiding such narratives Starck’s object becomes something else entirely. The form on a somewhat abstract level does reflect signs that link it to other kitchen based tools such as knifes, so on one hand the material feels correct within its intended environment, yet it is somewhat alien at the same time. Emotions connected with confusion and fear are expressed through the object’s form, emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is just as confusing regardless of education, culture or background. + 3.

While some objects might not teach the end user anything new, some however express signs that afford us to play with the idea that the ordinary can be transformed into the extraordinary through design. These objects asks all who have been exposed to them to consider the un-expected in the everyday and gives light to new objects that allow for new affordances where previously there were none. Being that for the majority of us, the visceral plays a large role in our understanding, signs that are communicated to us through visual aesthetics help us define our environment. Communication through signs, when purposely distorted in turn prompts us to question all defaults within our world and ask us to seek out new affordances. When the signs are destroyed and have to be re-learnt then new affordances within objects are possible.

1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self [Cambridge: Cambridge Press, 1981]. 2. J.J Gibson, The Perception of the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1950]. 3. Deyan Sudjic, The Language of Things [London: Penguin Books, 2008]. 4. George Baird, La Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture [New York: George Brazller, 1970]. 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday things.[New York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. Deyan Sudjc, The Language of Things [New York: Penguin Books, 2008]. 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product design [Switzerland: AVA Publishing,2009]. 8. Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.

4.


In doing so, this process aligns itself with Ettore Sottsass bookcase for the Memphis group which neither conforms to typical layouts or materials when considering designs that pre-date it. Starck manages to again undermine our understanding of signs, objects and their meanings, that help to form our understanding of our world8. The question then could be asked, does Starck’s objects now allow for other objects to do the same? Can his redefined extracted syntage’s that have carefully and thoughtfully be re-signed be re-signed again? And again? How far can one get away from the core signs before a total loss of understanding occurs? Starck’s ‘juicy salif’ has already pulverized our understanding of what an archetype juicer might be. It’s important to note that by moving away from the idea of design based on function it is only the function left within the object that gives us an understanding of what it might be. But maybe there are other factors such as place that look to give understanding to the object. The placement of an object within an environment and its relationship to other objects are important factors to consider9. This however is relying on the notion that a reinterpretation of signs has not already taken place, that we currently understand the meaning of the space that the object and we are in, a ‘default’ [round things go into round holes] setting to analogize objects against. Hence relying on environment to communicate understanding may not be a fail-safe approach to understanding objects, it only helps us to understand the object within the context that it currently resides and this is always subject to change. Starcks ‘juicy salif’, is unlike any other kitchen product, it is as alien as its shape might suggest. Because of this, the juicer is not something immediately identifiable, it’s form is removed enough away from its default juicer language that it becomes intriguing, and hence when understood gives the viewer a feeling of accomplishment knowing that they have understood. A designer might be tempted to lay down a bread trail of semiotic clues to help the end-user to understand [surface finish in orange or washable plastic, clear links to juicers from our memories and experiences], but by avoiding such narratives Starck’s object becomes something else entirely. The form on a somewhat abstract level does reflect signs that link it to other kitchen based tools such as knifes, so on one hand the material feels correct within its intended environment, yet it is somewhat alien at the same time. Emotions connected with confusion and fear are expressed through the object’s form, emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is just as confusing regardless of education, culture or background. + 3.

bjects play a part in allowing us to understand the environments we occupy. o help do this objects contain signs and visual clues that are considered to e a visual language that helps define in our consciousness what something ight be [or what we might use it for]. We are exposed to this language from young age with childhood toys teaching examples of this thinking. We learn arly on that round objects go into round holes1, square objects go into square oles. This pattern of thinking is repeated in the objects and environments we esign. These patterns are demonstrations of signs within objects that help to orm ‘affordance’. Perception theorist J. J. Gibson suggests that ‘affordance’ ithin objects is key to us understanding our world2, the default settings we earn in childhood are the result of us perceiving possibilities from objects, handles are for pulling, surfaces for walking, tools for manipulating]. ibson implies that our whole evolution has been geared towards us seeing ultiple possibilities within objects and environments [a book can be used or reading and education, but it also affords us protection from the rain if e place it on top of our heads]. Hence the signs within the objects enable s to understand it’s vast possibilities for use. But what if the signs are istorted? The affordance is unclear?

xamples of this distortion can be interpreted within the design work of hilippe Starck. Starck has one trick, but he does this trick very well. Starck as the ability to view the world through his inner child and to then express his through his objects3. On one hand his process is a playful insight into his hildhood, on another semiotic level it affords an end user to reflect back on nes own past. This is design affordance not based around use, but reflection hat reconnects us to memories deep in our sub conscious. Starck’s narratives xpressed within his objects distort our reflection through the construction f unlikely paired signs4. There are countless ways that a designer [or and rtist] can achieve this, one is through function, and another is though the isual signs within the object. A visceral example being an orange nose. In the eer like motorbike design by Starck for the Italian company Apillia, Starck sks us to consider this object for more than just a transportation device [the ffordance to transport ourselves from point a to point b], he is prompting us o consider this object in the same light as a living animal or childhood pet, r maybe a favorite stuffed toy from our childhood? The signs within the object ig deeper than an understanding of its use, it looks to communicate on an motional level.+ 1.

In doing so, athis aligns with Ettore bookcase for Objects play partprocess in allowing usitself to understand the Sottsass environments we occupy. the Memphis group which contain neither signs conforms typical layouts or materials To help do this objects and to visual clues that are consideredwhen to considering designs that pre-date it. Starck to again undermine our be a visual language helps define in our manages consciousness what something

In contrast, Donald A Norman claims an opposing approach can be seen in objects that look to defeat emotional attachment through visual redundancy, as expressed within the design work of Marco Zanuso and Richard Sapper5. This approach however, has been somewhat defeated by the current generation of technologies merging with object design, as outlined by Deyan Sudjic, ‘A merging of functions and categories has taken place and the signs have now been distorted and changed’6. A watch and phone are now forever connected, and the routine of checking the time is now linked with communication outside of telling the time. Signs are dissolving and new signs and understandings are created, along with new emotions linked to the object. This approach also blurs and reconstructs the education one might have had from past understandings of signs and messages that in turn allow us to connect with an object on an emotional level. It is somewhat hard to feel any attachment to a black cube, but it is not uncommon for wristwatches to be handed down through generations. The same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs and meanings are expressed through the object [mobile phone]. In the same way old object signs are rapidly being swallowed up by new signs [or the understanding of those signs], Starck consumes and expires emotional design signs and touches on all three levels of object design, visceral, behavioral and reflective. Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark explores ways in which to remove and add syntagems from existing objects to create new objects [and signs], yet still embodies the existing affordance. + 2.

understanding of signs, objects their that form our might be [or what we might use itand for]. We meanings, are exposed to help this to language from of childhood our world8toys . Theteaching questionexamples then could be asked, does We Starck’s aunderstanding young age with of this thinking. learn 1 , square go intoextracted square objects other go objects to do holes the same? Can objects his redefined early on now thatallow roundfor objects into round holes. Thisthat pattern thinkingand is thoughtfully repeated in the objects and we syntage’s have of carefully be re-signed be environments re-signed again? design. These patterns of signs withinbefore objects that help And again? How far can are one demonstrations get away from the core signs a total loss to form ‘affordance’.occurs? Perception theorist J. salif’ J. Gibson that ‘affordance’ of understanding Starck’s ‘juicy has suggests already pulverized our 2 , It’s the default settings within objects of is what key to understanding world understanding an us archetype juicer our might be. important to notewe learn in moving childhood are thethe result perceiving possibilities objects, that by away from idea of of us design based on function it from is only the [handles for pulling, surfaces forgives walking, tools for manipulating]. function are left within the object that us an understanding of what it Gibson implies that our whole has been towards us seeing might be. But maybe there are evolution other factors such geared as place that look to give multiple possibilities within The objects and environments [awithin book can be used understanding to the object. placement of an object an environment 9 . if for and education, but objects it also are affords us protection from the rain and reading its relationship to other important factors to consider This however relying the notion reinterpretation of signs has we place it onis top of ouron heads]. Hencethat the a signs within the objects enable not taken place, we currently the meaning of the us toalready understand it’s vastthat possibilities forunderstand use. But what if the signs are space that The the affordance object and is we unclear? are in, a ‘default’ [round things go into round distorted? holes] setting to analogize objects against. Hence relying on environment to communicate understanding a fail-safe approach to understanding Examples of this distortionmay cannot be be interpreted within the design work of objects, Starck. it only Starck helps us understand the within the very context that it Philippe hasto one trick, but heobject does this trick well. Starck currently resides always subject change. has the ability to and viewthis the is world through his to inner child and to then express this through his objects3. On one hand his process is a playful insight into his childhood, on another semiotic level affords an end user to back on Starcks ‘juicy salif’, is unlike any it other kitchen product, it reflect is as alien ones ownshape past.might This suggest. is designBecause affordance not based aroundis use, reflection as its of this, the juicer not but something that reconnects us to memories sub conscious. Starck’s narratives immediately identifiable, it’s deep form in is our removed enough away from its default expressed within that his objects distort our reflection through the construction juicer language it becomes intriguing, and hence when understood gives There are countless designer [or and A of unlikely paired signs the viewer a feeling of 4.accomplishment knowingways thatthat theya have understood. artist] can achieve this, one is through function, and isclues though designer might be tempted to lay down a bread trail of another semiotic to the help visual signs within the object. A visceral being an orangeplastic, nose. In the the end-user to understand [surface finish example in orange or washable deer like motorbike design byour Starck for the companybut Apillia, Starck clear links to juicers from memories and Italian experiences], by avoiding asks to consider this object more something than just else a transportation device [the such us narratives Starck’s object for becomes entirely. The form on affordance transport ourselves from point to point b],to heother is prompting a somewhat to abstract level does reflect signs athat link it kitchen us to consider in the light asthe a living animal orcorrect childhood pet, based tools this such object as knifes, so same on one hand material feels within or maybe a favorite stuffedyet toyit from our childhood? Thethe signs within object its intended environment, is somewhat alien at same time. the Emotions dig deeper with than confusion an understanding ofare itsexpressed use, it looks to the communicate an connected and fear through object’s on form, emotional level.+ emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is 1. just as confusing regardless of education, culture or background. + 3.

While some objects might not teach the end user anything new, some however express signs that afford us to play with the idea that the ordinary can be transformed into the extraordinary through design. These objects asks all who have been exposed to them to consider the un-expected in the everyday and gives light to new objects that allow for new affordances where previously there were none. Being that for the majority of us, the visceral plays a large role in our understanding, signs that are communicated to us through visual aesthetics help us define our environment. Communication through signs, when purposely distorted in turn prompts us to question all defaults within our world and ask us to seek out new affordances. When the signs are destroyed and have to be re-learnt then new affordances within objects are possible.

1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self [Cambridge: Cambridge Press, 1981]. 2. J.J Gibson, The Perception of the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1950]. 3. Deyan Sudjic, The Language of Things [London: Penguin Books, 2008]. 4. George Baird, La Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture [New York: George Brazller, 1970]. 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday things.[New York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. Deyan Sudjc, The Language of Things [New York: Penguin Books, 2008]. 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product design [Switzerland: AVA Publishing,2009]. 8. Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.

While some objects not claims teach the end user In contrast, Donald might A Norman an opposing anything can new, express approach besome seenhowever in objects thatsigns look that to defeat afford us attachment to play with the idea that the ordinary emotional through visual redundancy, as can be transformed the work extraordinary through expressed within theinto design of Marco Zanuso

In doing so, this process aligns itself with Ettore Sottsass bookcase for the Memphis group which neither conforms to typical layouts or materials when considering designs that pre-date it. Starck manages to again undermine our understanding of signs, objects and their meanings, that help to form our understanding of our world8. The question then could be asked, does Starck’s objects now allow for other objects to do the same? Can his redefined extracted syntage’s that have carefully and thoughtfully be re-signed be re-signed again? And again? How far can one get away from the core signs before a total loss of understanding occurs? Starck’s ‘juicy salif’ has already pulverized our understanding of what an archetype juicer might be. It’s important to note that by moving away from the idea of design based on function it is only the function left within the object that gives us an understanding of what it might be. But maybe there are other factors such as place that look to give understanding to the object. The placement of an object within an environment and its relationship to other objects are important factors to consider9. This however is relying on the notion that a reinterpretation of signs has not already taken place, that we currently understand the meaning of the space that the object and we are in, a ‘default’ [round things go into round holes] setting to analogize objects against. Hence relying on environment to communicate understanding may not be a fail-safe approach to understanding objects, it only helps us to understand the object within the context that it currently resides and this is always subject to change.

design. These objects asks all whohowever, have been . This approach has and Richard Sapper exposed to them to consider un-expected in been somewhat defeated by thethe current generation the everyday and gives light to new design, objects as that of technologies merging with object allow for affordances where previously there outlined bynew Deyan Sudjic, ‘A merging of functions were none. Being for the majority of us, the and categories hasthat taken place and the signs have visceral plays a large role in 6.our understanding, A watch and phone now been distorted and changed’ signs are communicated to the us through are nowthat forever connected, and routine visual of aesthetics our environment. checking thehelp timeus isdefine now linked with communication Communication through outside of telling the signs, time. when Signspurposely are dissolving distorted in turn prompts us to question all and new signs and understandings are created, defaults our world and ask us to seek out along withwithin new emotions linked to the object. This new affordances. When signs are destroyed and approach also blurs andthe reconstructs the education have to be re-learnt then new affordances within one might have had from past understandings of objects possible. signs andare messages that in turn allow us to connect with an object on an emotional level. It is somewhat hard to feel any attachment to a black cube, but it is not uncommon for wristwatches to be handed down through generations. The same function [of telling the time] but with very different signs and meanings are expressed through the object [mobile phone]. 5

In the same way old object signs are rapidly being 1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and swallowed up by new signs Press, [or the the Self [Cambridge: Cambridge 1981].understanding of 2. J.J Gibson, The Starck Perceptionconsumes of the Visual [Boston: Houghton those signs], andWorld. expires emotional Mifflin, 1950]. design andLanguage touches on all three levels of2008]. 3. Deyan signs Sudjic, The of Things [London: Penguin Books, 4. Georgedesign, Baird, La visceral, Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture [New York: object behavioral and reflective. George Brazller, 1970]. Through an understanding of syntagmatic signs7 Stark 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday explores ways inBasic which to 2004]. remove and add syntagems things.[New York: Books, 6. Deyan Sudjc, Theobjects Language of [New new York: objects Penguin Books, from existing toThings create [and2008]. 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product signs], yet still AVA embodies the existing affordance. design [Switzerland: Publishing,2009]. +8. Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.

4. 2.

Starcks ‘juicy salif’, is unlike any other kitchen product, it is as alien as its shape might suggest. Because of this, the juicer is not something immediately identifiable, it’s form is removed enough away from its default juicer language that it becomes intriguing, and hence when understood gives the viewer a feeling of accomplishment knowing that they have understood. A designer might be tempted to lay down a bread trail of semiotic clues to help the end-user to understand [surface finish in orange or washable plastic, clear links to juicers from our memories and experiences], but by avoiding such narratives Starck’s object becomes something else entirely. The form on a somewhat abstract level does reflect signs that link it to other kitchen based tools such as knifes, so on one hand the material feels correct within its intended environment, yet it is somewhat alien at the same time. Emotions connected with confusion and fear are expressed through the object’s form, emotions that bridge cultural gaps. One could argue that the ‘juicy salif’ is just as confusing regardless of education, culture or background. + 3.

4.

While some objects might not teach the end user anything new, some however express signs that afford us to play with the idea that the ordinary can be transformed into the extraordinary through design. These objects asks all who have been exposed to them to consider the un-expected in the everyday and gives light to new objects that allow for new affordances where previously there were none. Being that for the majority of us, the visceral plays a large role in our understanding, signs that are communicated to us through visual aesthetics help us define our environment. Communication through signs, when purposely distorted in turn prompts us to question all defaults within our world and ask us to seek out new affordances. When the signs are destroyed and have to be re-learnt then new affordances within objects are possible.

1. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self [Cambridge: Cambridge Press, 1981]. 2. J.J Gibson, The Perception of the Visual World. [Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1950]. 3. Deyan Sudjic, The Language of Things [London: Penguin Books, 2008]. 4. George Baird, La Dimension Amoureuse in Architecture [New York: George Brazller, 1970]. 5. Donald A Norman, Emotional Design, why we love or hate everyday things.[New York: Basic Books, 2004]. 6. Deyan Sudjc, The Language of Things [New York: Penguin Books, 2008]. 7. Tim Parsons, Thinking Objects, contemporary approaches to product design [Switzerland: AVA Publishing,2009]. 8. Charles Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture [New York: Wiley, 1980] 9. Jencks, Signs, Symbols and Architecture: Wiley. 10.Norman, Emotional Design: Basic Books.


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matty c smith  

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