Page 1

coverA3 191:Layout 1 23/09/2013 12:44 Page 1

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

NOVEMBER 2013

OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

NOVEMBER 2013 ISSUE 191

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

KEEPING LONDON MOVING

SCOTLAND EXCEL THE CENTRE OF PROCUREMENT EXPERTISE

WORKING TO A CLEAR PLAN

LAND SECURITIES


IFC:Layout 1 24/07/2013 10:23 Page 1


forward 171:feature 2 23/09/2013 13:51 Page 1

EDITOR’S COMMENT

OUR DUTY TO BE SAFE his month in Building Design and Construction

T

halfway stage it revealed that a number of sites contained

magazine we once again celebrate health and

material breaches leading to the issuing of a Notice of

safety best practice by profiling some of the

Contravention. Other sites were also served with Enforcement

winners from this year’s RoSPA awards. Yet, even

Notices.

with the prestigious Royal Society for the

Steve Murphy, General Secretary of UCATT, said the “fig-

Prevention of Accidents accolades highlighting businesses in

ures demonstrate the dangers faced by construction workers

our industry exhibiting health and safety excellence, there still

on a daily basis. Failure to ensure a sites safety could lead to

seems to be a somewhat careless attitude towards the safety of

the death or injury of a worker. The next time a Government

staff in some quarters.

minister complains about red tape strangling business they

With regulations in place, fantastic training available and the

should be reminded of these figures.”

obvious incentive to ensure staff awareness towards safety is a

Findings like these highlight why it so important for com-

central part of any project, it is baffling to read some of the lat-

panies in our industry to continue looking at ways to improve

est figures from a Health and Safety Executive (HSE) report

health and safety practices in house. Training is one thing,

issued this month.

management and supervision is another, but importantly, as

In it, having visited 1,000 sites in the construction refurbish-

exampled by Pride, John Sisk and Son, Parkstone Group,

ment sector, nearly half revealed serious safety defects. It is an

Costain and Consultant Cleaners in this month’s magazine, it

astonishing number given the focus the industry has placed on

is about engendering a culture of well-being where staff are

this subject over the last few years.

encouraged to take responsibility for own safety as well as that

Understandably, construction union UCATT has renewed

of their co-workers.

their call for greater funding of construction inspections following the HSE’s findings. Throughout the month, HSE has

.

been undertaking a major inspection and enforcement initia-

DANIEL STEPHENS

tive targeting the construction refurbishment sector. At the

EDITOR

MAGAZINE MANAGER: KEN BOOTH TRAINING MANAGER: JONATHAN SEALE FEATURE MANAGERS: VAUGHAN WILKS LUKE ROBINSON ADAM PATCHELL WESLEY DAVIES JOHN HENSON DANIEL BEARDSLEY MARK BRITTEN MATTHEW TERRY EDITOR: DANIEL STEPHENS ART EDITOR: STEVE WILLIAMS DESIGNER: KATE WEBBER

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS: JEFF SENIOR ROB SAMUELS MATT WARING PRODUCTION: VICKI LINDSAY LISA POLLINGER ACCOUNTS: NICK CHARALAMBOUS ADMINISTRATION: CHARLOTTE LEWIS

BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION IS PUBLISHED BY: CPL (HUDDERSFIELD) LTD 3 Brook Street, Huddersfield HD1 1EB TEL: +44 (0)1484 411 400 E-MAIL: info@bdcmagazine.co.uk

LTD

Building Design and Construction magazine is published by CPL Ltd. Company registered in England & Wales. All material is the copyright of CPL Ltd. All rights reserved. Building Design and Construction magazine is the property of CPL Ltd. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form whole or part without the written permission of a director of CPL Ltd. Liability: while every care is taken in the preparation of this magazine, the publishers cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of information herein, or any consequence arising from it. In the case of company or product reviews or comments, these have been based upon the true and honest opinion of the Editor at the time of going to press.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

1


contents191:feature 2 24/09/2013 14:09 Page 2

CONTENTS

INSIDE... SECTIONS:

NEWS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT BUILDING SERVICES LOCAL AUTHORITIES PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT SUSTAINABILITY ROSPA AWARDS HEALTH & SAFETY RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES CULTURE & HERITAGE OFFSHORE CONSTRUCTION LOGISTICS & WAREHOUSE DEVELOPMENT

4 8 22 32 44 62 70 100 110 116 136 144 146

SUPPLEMENTS AND SPECIALS:

10

OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES RoSPA AWARDS 2013 Going for gold

70

PRIDE (SERP) LTD Pride in their work

72

JOHN SISK & SON Building Excellence

84

COSTAIN OIL, GAS AND PROCESS LTD Award winners

90

HOME RETAIL GROUP Unrivalled convenience and value

94

CONSULTANT CLEANERS Committed to quality

96

Follow us on

@BDCMagazine 2

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE


contents191:feature 2 24/09/2013 14:09 Page 3

CONTENTS

FEATURES:

38

NEWS This month’s top stories

WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

4

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT BIFM This month’s top stories OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES Optimum services HYTRAC LIFTS A lifting experience

8 10 20

BUILDING SERVICES B&ES Fresh approaches P J SERVICES An enviable reputation NP HIRE LTD Customer satisfaction TRUEDEAL BUILDING SERVICES Quality service

22 24 28 30

LOCAL AUTHORITIES LOCAL AUTHORITY NEWS This month’s top stories PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL Promoting Perth WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL Warrington regeneration

32 34 38

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT WEST MIDLANDS PROPERTY ALLIANCE Improvement and efficiency VALUEWORKS Making e-commerce happen SCOTLAND EXCEL The centre of procurement expertise WELSH PURCHASING CONSORTIUM Delivering competitive procurement arrangements CRESCENT PURCHASING CONSORTIUM Value for money

44 46 48 56 60

SUSTAINABILITY THE GREEN APPLE AWARDS 2013 For the built environment BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES Places to live in SIMONS GROUP Building greener

62 64 68

HEALTH & SAFETY

64

PARKSTONE GROUP A reputation built on solid foundations

BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES

100

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY THE BRITISH PROPERTY FEDERATION BPR welcomes flood solutions LAND SECURITIES Working to a clear plan

110 112

CIVILS, TRANSPORT & UTILITIES

100

PARKSTONE GROUP

INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS Celebrating extraordinary engineers TRANSPORT FOR LONDON Keeping London moving TRANSPORT SCOTLAND Keeping Scotland moving FORESTRY COMMISSION Managing our woodlands MCPHILLIPS (WELLINGTON) LIMITED Innovative solutions

116 118 122 126 134

CULTURE & HERITAGE ROYAL PARKS A haven in the heart of the city

136

OFFSHORE CONSTRUCTION CRC EVANS OFFSHORE Pioneering excellence

142

LOGISTICS & WAREHOUSE DEVELOPMENT GOODMAN UK LOGISTICS Thinking beyond the obvious

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

144

3


news 191:feature 2 22/09/2013 10:36 Page 4

NEWS

800,000 NEW HOMES NEEDED FOR LONDON MORE than 800,000 new homes need to be built in London by 2021 to keep up with housing demand, according to the body that represents the capital's councils. London Councils, which represents 33 local authorities, said London’s “future status as a global city” was at risk if the homes were not built. A spokesman said costs for the London economy would continue to spiral if the demand was not meant. London’s population is expected to top nine million by 2021, he said. According to London Councils’ analysis of housing statistics from the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and Greater London Authority, 526,000 new homes are needed to be built between 2011 and 2021 in London just to keep up with current housing demand. A further 283,000 homes would also need to be built to meet both new demand and the backlog of housing need in London, it said. However, according to London Councils'

research, only 250,000 homes will be built on current projections. Sir Steve Bullock, London Councils' Executive Member for Housing and the mayor of Lewisham, said: “The news that London needs almost a million homes by 2021 is a scandal – the last time we faced such an acute housing supply crisis was after the Second World War. This is a long time coming and the capital's future prosperity is on the line. “Rising housing costs are not only a problem for those struggling to rent but for any Londoner wishing to buy their own home. “If the housing crisis is not solved, costs for the London economy will continue to spiral. More working families will struggle to rent and to buy, more people could be forced out of the capital and homelessness is very likely to go up.” London Councils has suggested a number of policies to boost housing supply including lifting the “housing borrowing cap” which prevents councils investing in housing. Other policies include increasing investment in the rental sector, supporting smaller scale

SKANSKA WINS £1.5M CAMBRIDGE DEAL

THE UNIVERSITY of Cambridge has awarded Skanska a £1.5m contract to undertake enabling works for its £1bn development at North West Cambridge. The contract could be a vital footin-the door for Skanska and involves earthworks, drainage, building roads and a temporary junction alongside installing a 4.5km security fence. Covering 150 hectares, the £1bn North West Cambridge development will combine residential housing, academic and research facilities,

4

a local centre and public amenities. The development includes substantial investment in new publicly accessible parkland, sports pitches and open spaces. Gavin Heaphy, construction director of the development said “Skanska’s appointment marks an important milestone in the operational delivery phase of the North West Cambridge development.” The works will start immediately and should be complete at the end of January 2014.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

builders, and promoting sustainable development near London’s Tube and rail network. In February London Mayor Boris Johnson said all stamp duty on property sold in the capital should be retained by London and not go to central government, to help build the new homes it “desperately needs.” He said: “If we do not come up with a new plan to build the homes we need, this great city will suffer and the whole country will feel the consequences.” A spokesman for the Department for Communities and Local Government said builders, investors and local councils were being encouraged to increase the supply of both newbuilds and repurposed empty homes. “A number of schemes are in place covering England to help create more homes such as an investment fund for developers to help build homes on development sites that have stalled," he said. “We’ve introduced the New Homes bonus, which is a grant to local councils for increasing the number of homes and their use and we’re offering new loan guarantees for housing developers.”


news 191:feature 2 23/09/2013 15:08 Page 5

NEWS

IDEAS FOR OLYMPIC STADIUM SEATING SOLUTION NEEDED

PIC

THE LONDON Legacy Development Corporation has published a contract notice in the EU Official Journal calling for bids to modify the stadium for future use by making the seating retractable or relocatable. The contract requires that the stadium’s lower seating tier is made movable while protecting the athletics ‘mondo’ track and maintaining the total stadium seating capacity of 54,000 spectators for pitch sports and up to 58,100 for athletic events. Bidders are invited to propose

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

their own solutions for how to achieve this, within a £10m to £20m funding envelope. As a first stage, the chosen contractor must build a prototype. If this is accepted, a works contract will be novated to the appointed Tier 1 shell-and-core main contractor. The contract also includes responsible for maintaining and operating the relocatable seating tier, together with the storage and installation of temporary seating stand and access bridges, for 10 years.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE 5


news 191:feature 2 22/09/2013 10:37 Page 6

NEWS

BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE BEGINS A MULTI-MILLION pound development of Elstree Studios to provide new media facilities for the film and television industry and an economic boost to Hertsmere has taken a major step forward this week. The beginning of works on four acres of land at the Studios which is to be levelled to allow the construction of new media production facilities on the world famous site was marked by a ceremony on Tuesday 10 September. Studios’ Managing Director Roger Morris and Leader of Hertsmere Borough Council and Chairman of Elstree Studios, Morris Bright, launched the beginning of the works. Roger Morris said: “The industry needs more production space. Elstree Studios has re-established itself as one of the top UK Studios attracting work from across the film and television industry including many major Hollywood productions. This new development at our site will allow the studios to take advantage of an expanding market. Over the past four years, Elstree has managed to capture many of the major television productions in the UK and a number of major international feature films. We look forward to having more space to meet our clients’ needs in the years ahead.”

Morris Bright added: “This work will increase the size of the studios by 25% and is the first major development at Elstree in over 15 years. The mound has been at the back of the site for 30 years and the investment from the local authority and Local Enterprise Partnership reflects the importance the studios site to the Borough of Hertsmere. I am looking forward to the Studios moving ahead with this exciting project for the benefit of both the media industry and the residents of Hertsmere.” Studios-owner Hertsmere Borough Council accepted a £2 million loan towards the £4.5 million project from the Hertfordshire Local Enterprise Partnership’s (LEP) Growing Places Fund at the end of last year. The remaining £2.5 million for the project is being invested by the council. Elstree Studios is known as London’s leading film and TV studios, and attracts many top feature films and television shows including Oscar-winning film The King’s Speech and BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing, but a lack of studio capacity has meant business has previously had to be turned away. As well as creating jobs for the local community, the project will bring in additional monies to the national and local economies.

VINCI FACILITIES SECURES FIVE YEAR CHARITY DEAL

VINCI Facilities, the strategic outsourcing and social housing services company has secured a five year contract with Cancer Research UK the world’s leading charity dedicated to beating cancer through research, whose groundbreaking work in finding new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer has saved millions of lives. This contract will run over a five year programme and will see VINCI Facilities deliver a flexible and integrated hard FM solution within a charity retail environment to the current nationwide retail estate, and residential premises. VINCI Facilities will work collaboratively with Cancer Research UK to

achieve the desired results for their corporate vision and aspirations. Work started on 1 August 2013. The programme includes a range of planned and reactive works, external building fabric repairs and installations. The contract was awarded to VINCI based on its partnership approach, self-delivery capabilities and understanding of local issues. Commenting on the partnership, Tony Raikes, Managing Director for VINCI Facilities, said “This is a fantastic project to secure and it is great to be working so closely with such a wellknown charity delivering these works. We have extensive expertise in this area and are looking forward to making a difference within their estate.”

6 BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

GALLIFORD TRY PROFIT UP 17% ON HOUSEBUILDING BOOST CONSTRUCTION and housebuilding firm Galliford Try reported a 17 percent rise in full year pretax profit, boosted by higher housebuilding margins, and said its prospects for the coming year were encouraging. Galliford Try said pretax profit for the year to the end of June rose to £74.1m from £63.1m. Group revenues, which excludes joint venture revenue of £92.1m, fell 2 percent to £1.47b. The company also raised its dividend payment by 23 percent to 37 pence per share.

“We have made excellent progress as a group in the financial year and delivered a record profit before tax,” Chief Executive Greg Fitzgerald said. “Both businesses are, against a background of some labour and supply challenges, maximising production to respond to strengthening customer demand and improved conditions. The board is optimistic that the improved opportunities being experienced will continue through into 2014.”


news 191:feature 2 22/09/2013 10:37 Page 7

NEWS

JULY CONSTRUCTION OUTPUT STRONG A RISE in house building helped to boost construction output in July, adding to the picture of a recovering economy, official figures have shown. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said building activity rose by 2.2% between June and July. Further recovery is in the pipeline, with new orders growing strongly. There were 33% more new orders in the April-June period compared with a year ago, the biggest increase since records began in 2005. Also fuelling the better figures from the construction industry was an increase in the building of new wind and solar farms. The construction industry accounts for about 6% of national output. Steve McGuckin, UK managing director of the global construction and project management consultancy, Turner & Townsend, said: “The construction industry is running, not walking, back to health. “There is always a lag between wider economic growth and a surge in construction, and this recovery is no different. Construction is back, with pressure already growing on its supply capacity.

“Output is creeping up, but the pipeline is racing ahead – in the second quarter it jumped nearly a third on the same time last year. “While the industry is now more upbeat than it has been for a few years, the best players are facing a new challenge – how to respond to rising demand. “Should they go for volume or margin? Following years of consistently weak demand, this is a positive dilemma to have. “After a week dominated by talk of the danger of another house price bubble, these numbers show that the construction industry is responding to the surging demand for homes. “New orders for housebuilding grew by a fifth in the second quarter – faster than at any time since 2010. “While the residential sector is the star performer, infrastructure and commercial construction are recording strong order books too. Such an impressive pipeline of work is the best indication that the recovery will be sustained. “The construction sector has seen two false dawns already in its slow recovery.

The momentum and hugely improved sentiment suggest that we are not about to witness a third.” The National Federation of Builders (NFB) said is sees the construction output as the beginning of an overall trend in industry growth. Julia Evans, chief executive of the National Federation of Builders, said: “The growth figures are encouraging. However, what is more important is the increase in new orders. This increase tells us that the rise in construction work will continue. This will not only benefit the construction industry, but other parts of the economy which benefit from investment and activity in construction.” In contrast to the growth in new work was the 3.6 per cent year on year decline in repair and maintenance work in July. This is an area where the Green Deal programme of energy efficient home improvement should be making its mark. Julia Evans added: “Everyone wants a warmer home and lower energy bills, but the Green Deal is yet to grip the public’s imagination or the industry’s interest to the degree required. There is still a huge public education task ahead if the Green Deal is to work.”

TRAVIS PERKINS STAFF CHARITY TREK

BUILDERS and plumbers merchant group Travis Perkins has raised £10,000 for charity after staff completed a 25 mile trek across the Yorkshire Dales. A team of 49 Staff members from branches across the Midlands trekked across the three peaks of the Dales – Whernside, Ingleborough and Penyghent, with teams finishing five to 12 hours after the start. The group was joined by customers and suppliers to climb to heights of 2415 feet. The money raised will be donat-

ed to Cancer Research UK and children's hospice charity Together for Short Lives. Ian Ellis, business development manager at Travis Perkins, said: “Taking on the three peaks was a tough trial for all involved. The length of the walk and the steepness of the track tested everyone's fitness, but we pulled together and crossed the finish line. “Many thanks to everyone who donated and supported us, we exceeded our target by around £3,000.”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

7


coverA3 191:Layout 1 23/09/2013 12:44 Page 1

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

NOVEMBER 2013

OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

NOVEMBER 2013 ISSUE 191

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

KEEPING LONDON MOVING

SCOTLAND EXCEL THE CENTRE OF PROCUREMENT EXPERTISE

WORKING TO A CLEAR PLAN

LAND SECURITIES


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 09:55 Page 10

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

IN THESE TIMES OF FALLING MARGINS AND A SHORTAGE OF BUSINESS, OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES HAS EXPERIENCED A ‘PHENOMENAL GROWTH’

10

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 09:56 Page 11

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

W

hilst most companies have been struggling with falling margins and a shortage of business, Optimum Group Services has experienced what Managing Director Tod Harrison describes as ‘phenomenal growth’. That’s no exaggeration because turnover has more than doubled over the last three years and it’s all been achieved with no salesmen. “We have grown by pure reputation, by word of mouth,” says Tod. “We only want to promise what we are able to deliver. We want to say what we can do, how we can do it and know that, if we win that job, we can actually back it up.” What Optimum does deliver is full building services, having diversified from being an air condi-

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

tioning company when it started in 1989. It’s now organised into four divisions that comprise Projects, Mobile, Building Services and Special Services & Energy. The Projects team handles installations and acts as principal contractor on larger projects. The Mobile division deals with air conditioning and boiler maintenance, electrical and mechanical works and providing preventative maintenance and reactive repairs through a 24/7 web-enabled help desk. Building Services is a traditional facilities management business and, as Tod explains, typifies the Optimum approach of having a clear business model: “We focus primarily on hard services with no soft services. We’re proud of that because we’re very much an engineering company formed by engineers and we’re clear on our strategy to provide hard services. Many companies in our sector are diversifying and doing some security, cleaning and trying to bundle that into a package

of services. Sometimes, in doing that, they’re losing their way whereas we’re very clear we provide hard services only. We carry a lot of technical resource to back that up and some customers welcome that approach and don't want to be part of the wider facilities management element. They want to be involved in hard services maintenance contracts.” The Special Services & Energy business provides support across other divisions and is a major growth area for the company. That growth is being fully backed by Optimum because it’s able to enter into partnerships with customers on energy saving projects. “We’ll undertake capital replacement and fund it, getting our money back from the savings and then gaining further benefit from a shared savings scheme,” remarks Tod. “We’re doing that with a few customers now. In one example, we’ve paid the capital cost of the

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

11


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 09:56 Page 12

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

IN EFFECT, OPTIMUM CAN TAKE ON THE RISK OF ANY ENERGY SAVING PROJECT BUT THEN SHARES IN THE LONG-TERM PROFIT FOR DOING SO, MEANING BOTH IT AND ITS CUSTOMERS BENEFIT. scheme and the savings have been up to four times the value. So we take back our capital outlay from that and then we'll share the difference with our customer.” SHARED PROFITS In effect, Optimum can take on the risk of any energy saving project but then shares in the longterm profit for doing so, meaning both it and its customers benefit. It has developed a methodology to accurately predicted savings by ensuring every project is properly benchmarked and has a reporting mechanism to monitor it. The process is to assess the existing system, looking at the chillers and other equipment to see what needs to be actioned, using special software to handle the diagnostics and the technical team to determine performance over a period. Tod says: “They'll assess it and may either recommend that we change the settings of the chiller or replace the whole chiller, then work out a payback period. For one customer, we've replaced most of their mechanical infrastructure and the payback period was between sixteen to twenty-four months, so they’re now reaping the benefits.” He continues: “Our project team members are properly CDM qualified, principal contractor qualified and they're heavily supported by our technical team of mechanical and electrical engineers

12

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 09:56 Page 13


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 09:56 Page 14

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

who work very closely with projects. The Special Services & Energy team does an assessment and, if a project is there, puts together a proposal and the project and technical people deliver it.” MANAGING AIRFLOW In some cases, energy savings may be achieved simply by adjusting the controls, changing basic components and/or optimising the airflow rather than any major capital expenditure. That’s achieved through an airflow management technology that’s particularly useful in the many sites where Optimum work. “We’ve put together a seven stage process on how to track airflow to determine the difference between designed and actual airflows,” comments Tod. “The process is bespoke and was designed under the direction of Optimum’s Technical Director, Mick Brooker. It takes the technical engineering team right through to improving the flow and how to measure the differential in order to calculate the savings. It’s possible to make a lot of saving through adapting and changing settings. We deliver that in-house and we've trained all our engineers in these environments so we can do that. It keeps the engi-

neers motivated and updated with the new technologies and we’re doing a lot with condition-based monitoring.” This type of approach can save clients an appreciable amount of money by reducing capital costs in the shortterm and cutting energy usage over a longer period. This in turn helps to create long-term relationships based on a principle of trust. As Optimum has to rely on a promise of cost savings made, it therefore demonstrates its long-term commitment to its customers. CORE BEHAVIOURS Trust is one of the company’s core behaviours and extends to its customers and employees. The trust is based on an honest and transparent approach that includes open book finance for all contracts, making information freely available to customers and using independent auditors on some of the contracts, with the resulting reports made available to the customer. The second core behaviour, Tod explains, is visibility: “We have a structure to allow visibility of all our managers, whether technical, project or contract managers. We do not overburden them and we’re prepared to invest where

TRUST IS ONE OF THE COMPANY’S CORE BEHAVIOURS AND EXTENDS TO ITS CUSTOMERS AND EMPLOYEES. 14

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 09:56 Page 15

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

REACH THE PEOPLE

WHO MATTER ADVERTISE IN

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION

CALL 01484 411400 www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

15


optimun :feature 2 23/09/2013 14:35 Page 16

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

16

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 10:00 Page 17

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES needed to ensure our managers are visible on the sites they are responsible for. We really believe that, if you're visible with your contracts and customers, you get to know them and you therefore deliver better results.” Visibility leads to the company’s third core behaviour of responsiveness — it goes without saying that staff who are visible can quickly respond to customers’ needs (which often change unexpectedly). This responsiveness is further assisted by the fact that Optimum has a higher proportion of technical managers than many of its competitors, all of whom are available to offer advice and support on engineering and other issues. Optimum’s whole operation and the principles behind it are supported by a heavy investment in technology. The company has developed its own bespoke management system, known as OptiMIS, which has had a very positive feedback from clients. It is an online portal used to manage maintenance contracts and can be made available to customers to enhance their service offering. Tools available can handle all aspects of work, such as logging and progress tracking of jobs by customers, production of quotation tracker, risk registers, training plans, audits and KPI performance. VISIBLE RISK “Opti-MIS has a risk register so any risk we inherit in a building is recorded there to make it visible to all,” explains Tod. “Notifications of any new risks, such as when a boiler has broken down or if there is a UPS fault discovered, are emailed out to the relevant client-designated contacts. There is also a maintenance schedule so a customer can look at maintenance documents and feedback sheets from anywhere. There’s a financial tracker to record all the quotes, which go through the client’s approval process, and all customers’ financial reports and elements are available. There's also a mobilisation planner and numerous other features; as a bespoke system, it

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

is specifically tailored to meet the customer’s requirements.” Opti-MIS continues the company’s tradition of being open and honest. Since every piece of equipment for each customer and its maintenance schedules are recorded, details of any missed services are instantly notified to the customer so there’s no attempt to hide any omissions or failings in service. This open approach is backed by an extensive training programme which requires all members of staff to go through the company’s customer service training course (run in partnership with LeSoCo) to ensure they deal with customers appropriately. It has resulted in a 100% customer retention rate in building services as well as a very high engineer retention rate. Aside from the investment in training and development that includes putting people through MBAs, degree courses and apprentice

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

17


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 10:00 Page 18


optimun :feature 2 20/09/2013 10:00 Page 19

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES training schemes, there’s also an emphasis on the social side for the company’s 200 plus staff. This includes regular hiring of venues for informal gettogethers for all employees. NON-INTRUSIVE MAINTENANCE Many of Optimum’s clients are blue chip companies that include financial institutions and data centres, which have a big influence on ensuring all the company’s processes are robust enough to suit such critical environments. This has prompted Optimum to put together a non-intrusive maintenance techniques package that avoids interrupting the flow of work while undertaking maintenance. “Just as importantly, we can predict failure before it happens,” says Tod. “That’s crucial to some of our investment banking customers, data centres and the NHS. If we can predict the failure and be proactive in replacing those parts so it doesn't cause any disruption, it avoids a potential loss to the customer’s business. We’re very successful in being able to identify a single point of failure with monitoring software and can often have a proper shutdown and replace a defective part with no interruption to production or any consequential loss of brand and reputation.” Reduction in infrastructure failure is helped by Human Factor training which is given to engineers. This concentrates on human interaction with the plant, addressing the fact that a large proportion of failures are caused by people. A lot of work has been done to make employees aware of the consequences of human caused failures by using real-life situations such as the Zeebrugge and Piper Alpha disasters as examples. The aim is to install sufficient skills and knowledge for engineers to be risk-aware, for them to have enough confidence to point out and prevent unacceptable risks and to ensure the correct processes are in place and applied diligently. DEVELOPMENT PLANS Diligence combined with Optimum’s core behaviours has enabled it to grow quickly. As a result, it remains a largely London-centric business which is concentrating on the work it knows best and does well, although with plans to continue its growth nationally in the future. It has recently moved into new offices and is currently in the process of refreshing its image with a new logo, uniforms and website. “We're going on a steady, managed growth curve,” confirms Tod. “We want the right type of work and we want it to naturally come on board through organic growth and retention. But what enables the growth is the retention strategy allied to winning new business. We’ve had a lot of growth where we start small with a customer and then develop the business with them because they're impressed with our capability and the way we do business. Many of our contracts have arisen like that and there isn’t a better way to grow.” www.weareoptimum.com Tel: 0870 8503131

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

19


Hytrac Lifts :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:15 Page 20

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: HYTRAC LIFTS

A LIFTING

EXPERIENCE HYTRAC LIFTS IS AN INDEPENDENT LEADING LIFT COMPANY IN THE UK CARRYING OUT LIFT SERVICE AND LIFT MAINTENANCE WORK AS WELL AS NEW LIFT INSTALLATION

D

issatisfaction at the service provided by their old company led to Andrew Penny and fellow Director John Boyer setting up Hytrac Lifts in 1994. “We were appalled by what was happening within the industry,” recalls Andrew. “Customers with service contracts only get inspection visits and engineers are simply checking floor levels and doors. That’s not a service and not something we want to be associated with.” The reasons for starting the company have driven the way it’s operated throughout its near twenty years. It provides thorough lift services and restores a lift to the appropriate standard irrespective of how long it takes. It also, as Andrew points out, goes beyond the basics of the job: “We’re here to help

20

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

customers as much as possible. If anyone has an issue, whether our customer or not, we’ll try to resolve it. We’re happy to give people information because we believe the industry should be open.” To achieve its aims, Hytrac ensures engineers are trained beyond minimum standards so they can deal with anything asked of them. The aim is to do what’s best for the customer, which means always quoting the best price, not replacing items unnecessarily and using tried and trusted components. It also means keeping things simple, not tying clients to long contracts or trying to keep them by setting passwords on equipment. “If a customer’s not happy, they should be able to go elsewhere,” comments Andrew. “Our retention rate is incredible and we rarely lose anyone. If we lose someone on price, we almost always get them back.”

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Hytrac Lifts :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:15 Page 21

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: HYTRAC LIFTS

LONG TERM AIMS The company’s main business is maintaining and modernising lifts, the latter often a better alternative to a new lift since it gives the appearance of one while retaining the solid build of the original at less cost. Hytrac has almost 1,500 lifts on service and the principle is they receive the frequency of service they need and no more. Andrew says: “If a customer uses a lift infrequently, we might advise fewer services. It may lose us money but we’re there for the long term.” A concern is lifts are often more complex than they need to be, which is costly for the customer when repairing faults. Although the company hasn’t majored on lift installation until now, it has the chance to simplify matters through a tie-up with a manufacturer to be the sole supplier of its lifts in the UK. That arrangement should deliver plenty benefits since Hytrac has had input to ensure the products are UK-compliant and meet its needs. It’s also dealing directly with the manufacturer, ensuring cheaper prices for customers and the ability to request changes. The outcome, as Andrew confirms, allows Hytrac to expand into new areas: “We’re looking to grow at a nice steady pace so we retain the personal side. We want customers to still be able to speak to the directors so we’re not hidden and everyone’s welcome at any time. That’s the type of company we are.” www.hytraclifts.co.uk Tel: 01530 832155

BE BETTER INFORMED For Just £59 you can have BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE delivered to your doorstep EACH MONTH

SUBSCRIBE TODAY CALL 01484 411400 www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

21


BSES:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:48 Page 22

BUILDING SERVICES: B&ES

22

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


BSES:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:48 Page 23

BUILDING SERVICES: B&ES

FRESH APPROACHES: HVCA BECOMES B&ES

THE B&ES IS THE PREMIER PROFESSIONAL BODY FOR BUILDING ENGINEERING SERVICES CONTRACTORS

T

he Heating and Ventilating Contractors’ Association (HVCA) has rebranded and is now known as the Building & Engineering Services Association (B&ES). The HVCA, established in 1904 as the National Association of Master Heating and Domestic Engineers, adopted the HVCA name in 1963. Bob Shelley, President of the HVCA comments, “Back then, of course, that’s exactly how the majority of the members would have described themselves – as h&v contractors – with the result that the name of their representative body accurately reflected the services they provided to the marketplace. “These days, however, things are very different. The term ‘h&v’ barely scratches the surface of the diverse, sophisticated and highly complex nature of the work our members now undertake. “Nor does it even hint at the increasingly central role they play in the integration of engineering services in buildings – and especially in the incorporation of the renewable technologies that are clearly here to stay in our increasingly environmentally-conscious age.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

“It is also the case that, today, our membership embraces many other specialisms – ventilation hygiene, heat pumps and facilities management, to name but a few – all of which sit comfortably under the ‘building and engineering services’ identity”. Looking to the future, Mr Shelley said, “Rebranding is just one element in a re-positioning exercise that will enable this Association to provide its members with a wider range of services, enhance its influence with Government, and provide a natural home for all building engineering services specialists. I am convinced that, as B&ES, we shall be ideally placed to become just such an organisation”. The B&ES identity was formally adopted in March. The organisation’s membership comprises over 1,500 companies with 2,000 offices throughout the UK, a combined turnover of in excess of £4 billion and a workforce of 55,000. Association members are subject to regular, third-party inspection and assessment of their technical competence and commercial capability. www.b-es.org Tel: 020 7313 4900

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

23


PJ services:feature 2 22/09/2013 12:01 Page 24

BUILDING SERVICES: P J SERVICES

AN ENVIABLE REPUTATION BASED AT MARKET DEEPING, P J SERVICES HAS DEVELOPED A STRONG REPUTATION IN MECHANICAL SERVICES FOR THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

24

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


PJ services:feature 2 22/09/2013 12:02 Page 25

BUILDING SERVICES: P J SERVICES

P

J Services, based at Market Deeping, Lincolnshire, has developed a strong reputation over the last three decades in mechanical services for the built environment. Led by managing director Malcolm Smith, the level of experience in house has engendered trust amongst P J Services’ customers, with the company delivering expert services by engineers that care. Specialising in low temperature hot water heating systems and water conveyance, P J Services has been in the business since 1979 working predominantly in the commercial sector. It is this experience that has seen the company develop long term relationships with clients based on reliability, high standards and, most importantly, value for money. Its main areas of work include but are not limited to major projects such as a full plant room installation; design and consultancy including design and build, desk reports, feasibility reports and technical reports; and maintenance such as planned preventative, reactive and scheduled servicing. Customers know they can rely on P J Services to carry out work that not only meets expectations but is tailored to individual needs. The company’s track record over the last thirty-plus years highlights its effectiveness and professionalism. Yet, it goes one further with key accreditations to a number of industry organisations including The Contractors Health and Safety Assessment Scheme (CHAS) and Constructionline. This commitment to ongoing standards is complemented by regular staff training. Whether it is P J Services’ own in house staff or its preferred subcontractors, every engineer is up to date with the latest methods, equipment and regulations. Particular emphasis is placed upon continual training where career development is encouraged. This ensures staff have the required skill set to meet the demands of customers’ understandably high expectations but it also drives performance and engenders pride in the job. In order to maximise the potential of training and CPD, P J Services closely monitors the types of

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

training undertaken and the effectiveness of that training so that staff can achieve their goals. Over the years P J Services has grown from a firm specialising in water treatment to a very well respected and established mechanical contractor. Certainly, it is a mark of the company’s professionalism and attention to detail that it has developed an enviable reputation with a strong relationship to many clients in the education sector. However, despite its growth it has remained a small, attentive business, currently employing ten people on a full time basis. Due to its large involvement in the education sector, work can be seasonal, with school holidays often being periods of peak activity. During these times it is not unusual for P J Services to employ sub-contractors with whom the company has worked before in order to provide continued quality of service.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

25


PJ services:feature 2 22/09/2013 12:02 Page 26

BUILDING SERVICES: P J SERVICES

Elsewhere, the company draws from the experience and expertise of its key suppliers. For example, Chimney and Canopy Systems Ltd has provided invaluable support. The company is capable of complete in house design, supply and installation services for all types of commercial chimney and canopy requirement. Products are manufactured specifically for each project, combining standard chimneys and canopies with bespoke products as necessary. Likewise, Scott Heating and Ventilation Ltd is also a key supplier with its expertise in the design, manufacture, installation and commissioning of bespoke ventilation systems. Its services include a range of solutions for all industrial applications such as sustainable heat recovery, odour control, noise attenuation, fume extraction, fresh air supply and dust collection. In addition, CPS Ltd has brought its

26

wealth of knowledge in the design and manufacture of heating, ventilation and air conditioning control systems to P J Services where both companies have completed many successful projects. Distinguishing itself from competitors, P J Services has become a specialist in providing solutions for difficult situations, providing the client with the options that are best tailored to individual needs. This has seen the company develop a long standing track record working in historical buildings, providing sensible engineering solutions without promoting technology that is not suited to the building. This reputation is something P J Services is very proud of and one that provides further evidence of the holistic approach of this professional mechanical services company. www.pjsltd.com Tel: 01778 348200

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


PJ services:feature 2 01/10/2013 09:16 Page 27

BUILDING SERVICES: P J SERVICES

DESIGN, MANUFACTURE, INSTALL AND COMMISSION BESPOKE VENTILATION SYSTEMS SCOTT HEATING & VENTILATION LTD Unit 20, Brookside Industrial Estate Sawtry, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 5SB Tel: 01487 831 735 Fax: 01487 832 465 Email: info@scottventilation.co.uk Web: scottventilation.co.uk

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

27


NP Hire Ltd :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:24 Page 28

BUILDING SERVICES: NP HIRE LTD

CUSTOMER

SATISFACTION

NP HIRE LTD HAS QUICKLY GROWN ITS REPUTATION FOR VALUE FOR MONEY, EXPERT GUIDANCE, AND OF COURSE, RELIABILITY IN A RANGE OF BUILDING SERVICES 28

N

P Hire Ltd, based in Hull at the Sutton Fields Industrial Estate in the eastern part of the city, has quickly grown its reputation for value for money, expert guidance, and of course, reliability in a range of building services. Significantly, it has done so in a short space of time having been established just a few years ago. In an economic climate that turned global projections upside down, NP Hire Ltd’s founders had the courage to take their skills and establish themselves during the darker days of the recession. As the economy in Britain now looks to turn the corner, NP Hire Ltd is well-placed, having already developed an enviable reputation and a long list of returning customers, to enjoy the benefits of a brighter financial climate.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

Danny Haley, NP Hire Ltd’s Electrical Contracts Manager, told Building Design and Construction magazine how the company has enjoyed success by marrying expertise with tailored solutions to varying client needs. Danny, who has been with NP Hire Ltd for over three years, is responsible for the management of the electrical department with duties involving estimating and project supervision. He is also the company’s NICEIC qualifying supervisor. Importantly, the company has taken its corporate social responsibility very seriously. It has looked to reduce its carbon emissions where possible, reducing journeys times and using new vehicles, and has introduced modern technologies to make this more possible. In a time of financial pressures, efficiencies wherever you can find them are vital. NP Hire Ltd has recognised this so that it can remain competitive in the market and provide cost-effective, affordable

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


NP Hire Ltd :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:25 Page 29

BUILDING SERVICES: NP HIRE LTD

prices to its customers while providing the expert service it has built its reputation on. The service offer at NP Hire Ltd is all-encompassing. No stone is left unturned. The added benefit of using the company is that all trades are represented in house including plumbers, electricians, heating engineers, coded welders and sheet metal workers. All staff are well trained, motivated and overseen by a dynamic, experienced management team with many years of experience. Indeed, all staff have relevant qualifications from Gas Safe, NICIEC, CHAS and Constructionline. Complementing the nationwide service (the company was also tasked to work in Slovakia recently) is NP Hire Ltd’s own manufacturing workshops for pipe work, sheet metal manufacture and electrical panel building. All in all, NP Hire Ltd can provide the following services: Plumbing, Heating & Ventilation; Metal Fabrication & Welding; Plasma Profile Cutting; Electrical Engineering; Gas & Oil Services and Maintenance; and Landlord Safety Checks.

BE BETTER INFORMED

SUBSCRIBE TO BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION CALL 01484 411400

Tel: 01482 828585

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE 29


Truedeal Building Services:feature 2 16/09/2013 13:39 Page 30

BUILDING SERVICES: TRUEDEAL BUILDING SERVICES

QUALITY SERVICE TRUEDEAL BUILDING SERVICES IS A MECHANICAL SERVICES CONTRACTOR, PROVIDING TURNKEY SOLUTIONS TO CLIENTS

“M

ost projects we do now have some form of energy saving or sustainable element,” comments Managing Director Tony Murphy, reflecting how Truedeal Building Services’ business has changed since starting in 1973. It still operates as a mechanical services contractor, providing turnkey solutions to clients or working through a main contractor on bigger projects where building work represents a large proportion of the contract. On most projects, it has the capability to handle the whole job, either through its own resources or using subcontractors for specialist work such as building management systems and ventilation ducting work. Its own staff include GasSafe engineers, underground gas engineers and specialist welders so it

30

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

can handle most things it’s asked to do. These extend to design work where necessary and, although most projects are based on consultants’ designs, Truedeal invariably makes a contribution in that area. “We often rationalise designs to give the client economic engineering solutions,” explains Tony. “We’re always looking to provide economic options, even suggesting a different type of plant. It might have a bigger capital value but a better whole life cost and we’ll always be involved in that because we want to offer the client a good service.” Good service is what sets Truedeal apart from many competitors and that’s helped by the company being small enough to react quickly, adapt to clients’ needs and provide a personal touch. Tony says: “We don’t have a massive bureaucratic machine to go through. We find our clients like that and, as a result, most of our work is repeat business.” That business includes a turnkey contract for Dumfries and Galloway NHS Trust that comprised

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Truedeal Building Services:feature 2 01/10/2013 09:20 Page 31

BUILDING SERVICES: TRUEDEAL BUILDING SERVICES

six biomass plants and a combined heat and power (CHP) plant and Stranraer Hospital where it built an external compound to house a CHP. One of its biggest projects has been Cables Wynd House in Leith, a block of 220 flats where it installed energy efficient condensing gas fired boilers and a highly efficient distribution system throughout the building. INVESTMENT IN TRAINING Much of the company’s success is built on the importance placed on training, which includes having one apprentice on the books at all times and a training matrix for everyone to ensure their skills are up-to-date. All employees have come through the ranks and the investment in training is impressive for a company of only twenty staff. An Investors In People bronze award and successful completion of B&ES assessments testify to Truedeal’s commitment and standard of work. Despite the economic climate and margins remaining tight, Truedeal has maintained its turnover through the downturn and is preparing for better times. “We’re just trying to consolidate our client base, ensuring the current clients are served properly and we continue to get opportunities from them,” says Tony. “We’re always looking to expand, not necessarily in terms of increasing our turnover but grow the number of clients. We’ve started working for Highland Council within the last two years and already have some repeat business from them.”

BUILD YOUR BUSINESS ADVERTISE IN BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

CALL 01484 411400

www.tbs-ltd.com Tel: 0141 7711015

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

31


LA news:feature 2 20/09/2013 15:01 Page 32

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: NEWS

HOUSING BENEFIT REFORMS LEAVE OVER 50,000 IN RENT ARREARS

NEARLY one in three council housing tenants have fallen behind on their rent following introduction of the bedroom tax, according to research. Over 50,000 social housing tenants have been pushed into arrears since April when housing benefit changes came into force, data published by False Economy suggest. Figures were provided by 114 local authorities across the country in response to Freedom of Information (FOI) requests made by the campaign group. In Barrow, over three quarters of council house tenants affected by the bedroom tax have fallen into arrears since reforms in April. In Barrow, Cumbria, research suggests 76% of council house tenants affected by the bedroom tax have been pushed into arrears since April. Clackmannashire in Scotland, Tamworth and South Kevesten have

seen over half of all affected council housing tenants falling behind on their rent since introduction of the bedroom tax – which penalises tenants for having ‘spare’ bedrooms. False Economy and the Trades Union Congress (TUC) voiced concern that only one in ten local authorities responding to the FOI were found to hold a ‘no eviction’ policy, and suggested that thousands ran the risk of losing their homes because of the bedroom tax. Campaign manager for False Economy, Clifford Singer, said: ‘Together with the raft of other benefits cuts the government has forced through both this year and previously, the bedroom tax is driving tenants and families who were just making ends meet into arrears, and pushing those who were already struggling with the cost of living into a full-blown crisis.

COUNCIL CLAMPS DOWN ON BASEMENT EXTENSIONS

A LONDON borough has announced it will clamp down on basement extensions, as property prices in the capital continue to rise. Brent LBC has warned homeowners who dig out new basements that they must follow new guidelines or face the consequences. The London borough has introduced the guidance following a six-week public consultation in the summer. Brent LBC launched guidance on basements following a six-week public consultation.

32

“It’s all well and good if residents want to create some extra space for a kitchen or gym but we have to think about the people living beside that home and how that work may impact on neighbouring properties,' said lead member for regeneration and major project, Cllr George Crane. “It is only fair that residents living alongside a basement construction know how long the works will go on for, when they can expect increased construction traffic and how developers intend to mitigate problems.”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

‘The worst part is that these figures have been collated while councils' emergency Discretionary Housing Payments are still available; they are being used up at record speed and when they run out, these figures will only get worse.’ TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady said: ‘'The bedroom tax is not saving money. Instead it is pushing up rent arrears which will force councils to waste more cash on evictions, debt collection and emergency support for homeless families. ‘The bedroom tax has also exposed the scale of the UK's housing crisis as councils up and down the country are unable to provide suitable accommodation for tenants affected by it.’ The Government has said it is ‘monitoring carefully’ the policy, yet suggested the figures did not represent ‘long term’ changes.


LA news:feature 2 20/09/2013 15:01 Page 33

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: NEWS

STANDARDISING PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT THE GOVERNMENT has outlined plans to further standardise public sector procurement in a bid to support smaller businesses. A consultation launched today outlines plans to create a small and medium sized enterprise (SME) ‘single market’ for public procurement, simplifying and standardising how contracts are advertised, bid for and paid across the sector. Government proposals include a banning of pre-qualification questionnaires for low value public sector contracts. Proposals include a requirement for all public sector contracts over £10,000 to be accessible on the same site and a banning of pre-qual-

ification questionnaires for low value public sector contracts. Cabinet Office minister, Chloë Smith, said: ‘Removing barriers and setting out a consistent, single set of SME-friendly principles for the whole public sector will provide the right support to encourage significant business and growth opportunities for SMEs, and help give the UK a better starting position in the global race.’ Lord Young, the prime minister’s enterprise adviser, said: ‘We need to improve small businesses’ access to the public procurement market by removing the bureaucratic processes and poor payment practices which stop and discourage SMEs from making winning bids for contracts.’

GOVERNMENT URGED TO HELP ELDERLY DOWNSIZE BILLIONS of pounds of housing stock could be freed up if older people received more help to downsize, according to a report. People over the age of 60 who are interested in downsizing are ‘sitting on £400bn of housing wealth’ which could be unlocked through greater supply of retirement properties, the report from think tank Demos said. The publication – which was funded by the Home Builders Federation – claims the Government has focussed support on those get-

ting onto the housing ladder while greater action should have been taken to provide appropriate properties for older people. Provision of appropriate retirement properties for the elderly would assist everyone on this housing ladder, think tank Demos said. A survey found that if just half of the 58% of over 60s looking to downsize or move house were able to do so, around £356bn of properties would be released, nearly half being three-bedroom and 20% fourbedroom homes.

GOVERNMENT LAUNCHES TOP SLICE COULD FORCE COUNCIL TAX RISE SELF-BUILD SUPPORT GOVERNMENT support has been launched to help those on a lower income enter the self-build market. Announcing the measures, communities minister Don Foster said he aimed to ‘end the misconception’ that self-building was an option only open to people with ‘deep pockets and endless spare time’. Community self-build and community-led affordable housing projects will now be able to apply for a share of £65m from the Affordable

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Homes Guarantees Programme, while new planning guidance will force councils to establish local demand for self-build. Communities minister Don Foster said he was determined that people on low incomes had the opportunity to build their own homes. New council tax discounts will be introduced for self-build family annexes and self-builders will be exempted from Section 106 tariffs and the community infrastructure levy.

COUNCIL tax will have to rise by more than 2% if the Government pushes ahead with plans to top slice the New Homes Bonus, the LGA has warned. The government intends to take away £400m from the bonus and give it to local enterprise partnerships from 2015/16. Members of the LGA executive were told yesterday that this was equivalent to 35 per cent of the total value of the bonus to local authorities in 2015/16.

The LGA will comment as part of a consultation on the plan. A report to the LGA executive read: ‘The LGA response explains that the proposals for pooling are a further £400m spending cut to local authorities. ‘Councils have already committed income expected from the New Homes Bonus to long-term investment projects to support economic growth. ‘Council tax would have to rise, on average, by just over 2 per cent to recoup this loss.’

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

33


Perth & Kinross Council :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:56 Page 34

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL

PROMOTING

PERTH

THE REGAINING OF CITY STATUS FOR PERTH GAVE PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL THE OPPORTUNITY TO BUILD

34

T

he regaining of city status for Perth gave Perth & Kinross Council the opportunity to build on that situation. However, as Executive Director of Environment Service Jim Valentine emphasises, that wouldn’t last long: “We realised we had eighteen months at most to maximise the opportunity. So we’ve really been trying to sell the city and the towns and burghs that lie across the area. It’s not all about the city because we’re also providing employment land and opportunities in the major towns surrounding it so we’re not just a Perth-centric council.” The council sees its role being to promote the city and surrounding area, with the benefits of a central location and an economy largely founded

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

on agriculture, food and drink manufacturing and tourism. That’s safeguarded the region from high unemployment but has resulted in a lower wage economy outside Perth so the aim is to attract more higher-value jobs. Perth is the HQ location of energy giant SSE and transport company Stagecoach, is a global centre of excellence for insurance company Aviva and would like more companies like these. GROWTH FOCUS With a focus firmly on growth, the council’s £250 million construction programme has seen major investment in education, with three primary schools and one secondary school being built plus several school upgrades. The last two budgets have concentrated on regeneration and building the econo-

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Perth & Kinross Council :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:57 Page 35

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL

revamped City Hall or a new city square in its place. In the meantime, many surrounding streets have been upgraded and there are plans for the rest. “We’re linking the cultural quarter, including the museum, theatre and concert hall, with new landscaping and public space surrounding them,” says Jim. IMPROVING TRAFFIC CONNECTIONS A major aim is to open up the west side of Perth, with a £23 million junction off the A9 recently approved by the council and a major developer already interested in the area. That’s necessary, as Jim explains, for the city to grow: “The historic heart of the city is constrained by its transport connections via two bridges over the river. So we’re looking for growth by developing a link road as a by-pass to the west and north to take some traffic out of the city centre, improve connections across the city and con-

nect residential areas better to some industrial areas.” There’s also development of a food and drink park on the eastern side, that type of industry seen as offering growth potential by adding value to the traditional farming and tourism base. Added to that is an ambitious housing programme, with Perth and Kinross being one of the first councils to restart building new council housing in partnership with housing associations. The area has a good supply of development land available and a local development plan that partly resulted from discussions with developers to ensure infrastructure is available. For procurement generally, the Council has a mixture of methods, spreads the workload across several contractors and uses a combination of local and national firms. With a heavy reliance on tourism, care of the environment is essential and affects everything the

my, including investment in business parks and city centre regeneration for Perth. The latter has involved the council working with local businesses through a city centre development board to improve the built environment, an original intention being to demolish the City Hall and create a city square. “We wanted to put the heart back into the city,” recalls Jim. “The City Hall was erected in the 1900s and overshadows St John’s Kirk, a historic building of national importance. The council’s ambition was to open up the centre of the city and provide a focal point but Historic Scotland wasn’t keen on the hall coming down without further evidence there was no market interest in it.” There’s now a tendering process underway to identify developers interested in making use of the building and the outcome will produce either a

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

35


Perth & Kinross Council :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:57 Page 36

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL

council does. “We have one of the best recycling rates in Scotland for domestic waste and deal with construction waste in a sustainable manner to minimise our impact on the environment,” remarks Jim. “We were one of the first councils to recycle roads and pavements and do a lot of recycling of demolished buildings.” The care extends to emissions and energy, the council working with Scottish and Southern Electricity to provide insulation using housing grants. The aim is to roll that out to commercial properties meeting the base standards to attract grants. The main push, however, is to grow the city of Perth and surrounding areas through new and

36

emerging industries. That will involve looking to the clean technologies sector that continues to provide job opportunities in the east of Scotland as well as further emphasis on food and drink businesses. “We think there are huge opportunities,” says Jim. “If we can provide infrastructure to allow companies to take a step forward, that’s what we’re here to do. We are considered a good council and, when the government’s looking for examples of good practice, they’ll often look to Perth and Kinross, which I think is the best accolade we can have.” www.pkc.gov.uk Tel: 01738 475000

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Perth & Kinross Council :feature 2 24/09/2013 09:22 Page 37

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: PERTH & KINROSS COUNCIL

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS CPL Design is a multidisciplinary design consultancy offering a complete range of cost effective design and print solutions to a range of clients. We specialise in branding, design for print, promotional materials as well as on-line and digital work translating your ideas into innovative visual communications with real impact. For more information call Kate or Steve

01484 411 400 www.designcpl.co.uk

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

[CPLDESIGN] PRINT AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

37


Warrington Council :feature 2 18/09/2013 16:47 Page 38

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

W

arrington is poised for significant economic regeneration. Steve Park, managing director of Warrington and Co, the public/private partnership comprising the key agencies and actors who will shape Warrington’s economic future and drive forward this programme, is excited about the road ahead. The programme aims to develop the region in order to encourage future economic prosperity and to lay the foundations for business growth and urban regeneration. Titled Warrington Means Business, the council has put together a programme to drive economic growth and realise what it terms the “true potential of the place and its people”. The programme updates the borough’s regeneration framework, which has progressed successfully following its publication in 2009.

WARRINGTON

REGENERATION STEVE PARK, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF WARRINGTON AND CO IS EXCITED ABOUT THE PROGRAMME FOR REGENERATION

38

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Warrington Council :feature 2 18/09/2013 16:48 Page 39

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL The aspiration that underpins Warrington Means Business is to “unleash the potential of Warrington’s people, its businesses and its places, to accelerate economic growth and reinforce Warrington as a strong national driver of prosperity.” Councillor Terry O'Neill, Leader of Warrington Borough Council, said, “I am proud to endorse and support Warrington Means Business, it provides a comprehensive framework that sets out the methodology and intent to drive, progress, encourage and facilitate future business growth in the town. “It is a live working document which reflects the current status, plans, opportunities, aspirations and desire to maximise Warrington’s potential. We are at the start of a new journey for our town. Warrington will soon be a place transformed with our waterfront revealed, the town centre revitalised, our parks and green spaces given new leases of life, our transport and supportive connectivity infrastructures in place and our local people with access to top class education, skills and training.” This vision is echoed by Warrington and Co managing director Steve Park. “This framework seeks to unleash the potential of Warrington's economy and accelerate its growth. In doing so, Warrington & Co’s agenda covers urban regeneration, inward investment, business support and engagement, skills and partnership development,” he says. Warrington has several strategic sites that will bring substantial improvements in terms of new and retained jobs, retail and leisure offers and improved infrastructure. “The development of the sites will remain a key priority for Warrington & Co over the next few years,” explains Steve. “However, we will be redoubling our efforts in terms of ensuring that employers and learners are able to access the right skills needed to support the growth of the local economy. In addition to the skills agenda, Warrington & Co will be developing a more structured and ‘content rich’ business support offer that is

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

integrated with other local authorities across our subregion and with the Local Enterprise Partnership.” Recent developments include the council playing a key role in facilitating the development of the Omega employment site that straddles the M62 motorway. The council has been able to exploit its position as a local authority to intervene in unlocking this strategically important site and continues to play a major role in the onward developments and investments. Elsewhere, the council is driving forward the Town Centre regeneration agenda working with development partners Muse on the Bridge Street scheme and Iliad on the Stadium Quarter Scheme. These two sites are complimentary and together will radically improve the vibrancy of the town centre. The strategy is to rebalance the dynamics of the town centre to be one that demonstrates a mix of residential schemes, new leisure offers (e.g. 10 CONTINUED ON PAGE 424

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

39


Warrington Council :feature 2 18/09/2013 16:49 Page 40


Warrington Council :feature 2 18/09/2013 16:49 Page 41


Warrington Council :feature 2 18/09/2013 16:49 Page 42

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL screen cinema with associated restaurants), office accommodation (including new council offices), business incubator facilities and a University Technical College. “The Omega investment alone has seen investments in excess of £100m over the last year. £200m is expected to be invested within the next two years in regeneration of the town centre, the development of the southern access to the town, the sympathetic regeneration of sites with heritage value and infrastructure improvements,” remarks Steve. The Northwest’s largest strategic employment site Omega started on site in early 2013. Omega North is now home to logistics bases, totalling 1.5m sq ft, for Travis Perkins, Brakes and Hermes. Only two plots are still available which would cater for demand for 100,000sq ft of B2/B8 uses. Infrastructure works and construction on a 600,000 sq ft state-of-the-art 28 acre plot logistics unit are underway at Omega South. The aim is to deliver significant employment and regeneration opportunities for the area through a comprehensive Masterplan based on a deliverable, mixed-use development. Of a number of town centre developments about to break ground, the Stadium Quarter’s £190m revamp stands out. The council has approved an outline masterplan for the regeneration of the 36.43 Ha (90 acre) site and has appointed joint venture partner Iliad to deliver the scheme. The project will connect the bus interchange with the Warrington Wolves’ Halliwell Jones Stadium and create a new, vibrant development for educational, business, leisure and housing uses. A phased programme of development over the next decade will create up to 1,000 construction jobs and nearly 4000 new permanent jobs when fully completed in 2024. Phase one of the project, an £87 million investment, is now at an advanced stage and work will start on site in January 2014. Other developments include Bridge Street Quarter, a £130 million project that will breathe new life into the heart of the town centre, creating a new market and innovative retail and leisure opportunities.

42

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

The Southern Gateway will be part of a major mixed use development area at Wilderspool Causeway into the town centre. The council is working with Langtree to develop the plans for this area. Elsewhere, at Warrington Waters, the council hopes to rediscover and make use of its waterfront. A major development, it will bring new homes, parks, a school, shops and businesses along a vibrant promenade of walkways and cycle ways. The council will also refurbish the historic Transporter Bridge so that it will link seamlessly to the rest of the town through considered footpaths, roads and cycle routes. www.warringtonandco.com www.warrington.gov.uk Tel: 01244 405600 / 01925 443322

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Warrington Council :feature 2 23/09/2013 15:10 Page 43

LOCAL AUTHORITIES: WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

GREYFRIARS HOUSE, SIDINGS COURT, DONCASTER, DN4 5NU

Tel: 01302 366922 Fax: 01302 329025 EMAIL: admin@smithbrosuk.com

Smith Bros are proud to be key suppliers of electrical equipment and street lighting products to Warrington Borough Council Infrastructure Services and to be partners of the Warrington Early Payment Scheme

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

43


WMPA:feature 2 15/09/2013 12:35 Page 44

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: WEST MIDLANDS PROPERTY ALLIANCE

IMPROVEMENT AND EFFICIENCY WEST MIDLANDS PROPERTY ALLIANCE IS A LOOSE ALLIANCE OF 33 COUNCILS SET UP AND FUNDED BY IMPROVEMENTS AND EFFICIENCY WEST MIDLANDS, WHICH AIMS TO TRANSFORM LOCAL GOVERNMENT PROPERTY ASSETS FOR INCREASED EFFICIENCY.

44

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


WMPA:feature 2 15/09/2013 12:35 Page 45

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: WEST MIDLANDS PROPERTY ALLIANCE

S

avings of £640 million and carbon reduction of 35,000 tonnes over ten years are challenging targets the West Midlands Property Alliance was set up to achieve. So far, it’s delivered £70 million of savings between its start in 2010 and March 2013 but is now entering a new phase for future operations. WMPA is a loose alliance of 33 councils set up and funded by Improvements and Efficiency West Midlands, which aims to transform local government property assets for increased efficiency. “It’s about the configuration of the estates, flexible working and business transformation,” explains Assistant Director of Efficiency and Delivery Keith Gordon. “It's for the councils to deliver but we’ve created a network that’s available if people need to know something.” In effect, WMPA is the delivery vehicle for the transforming property assets programme and it’s commissioned several projects to support local councils in achieving estate rationalisation and effective facilities management. In many cases, it’s used the £2 million IEWM funding to start projects that might otherwise have stalled. Successful projects have included a move by Coventry City Council staff from several ageing and inefficient offices to a new site and Birmingham reducing its central property portfolio from 55 to eight buildings. That’s being achieved by rationalising the estate and takes advantage of increased mobile working and changes to council operations. Apart from providing initial funding for projects and monitoring progress, WMPA’s role is to help councils create supplier frameworks that will deliver savings, provide a forum for participants and share knowledge through an annual conference and other means. Energy audits at thirty councils, undertaken as part of a low carbon programme, have realised annual savings of £5 million for a £120,000 investment. WMPA is now entering a new phase since the initial funding has been invested, the original job is complete and the terms of reference have been fulfilled. The question now is how it moves forward. Keith says: “We’re likely to focus more on using local

authority assets to stimulate growth, deliver efficiencies and transform business, and a flow on from that is reducing carbon emissions. “We are highly regarded by government and viewed as the organisation to consult regarding property. We've had nine out of our fourteen upper tier councils participating in the Capital Asset Pathfinder beacons so we are well represented. We’ve hosted many visits from authorities to see what our individual councils have done, so it's those councils who represent our brand. Our energy audit program is the only one in the country so there are savings to be made if other regions implemented something similar. “We have some impressive savings but, for them to be delivered, councils have to do it and we can’t make them. We've been very grateful that a lot of people have been energised to participate. Other councils are welcome to have a look at what we’ve done because we’re all in this as one family and times are tough.” www.westmidlandsiep.gov.uk/WMPA Tel: 0845 3527016

“WE ARE HIGHLY REGARDED BY GOVERNMENT AND VIEWED AS THE ORGANISATION TO CONSULT REGARDING PROPERTY” www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

45


Value:feature 2 15/09/2013 12:43 Page 46

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: VALUEWORKS

COMBINING AWARD WINNING CLOUD BASED E-COMMERCE TECHNOLOGY WITH INNOVATIVE AND FLEXIBLE CLIENT SERVICE SOLUTIONS, VALUEWORKS HELPS ORGANISATIONS BUY AND SELL MORE EFFECTIVELY, ACCELERATING THEIR JOURNEY TOWARDS AN IMPROVED BOTTOM LINE

V

alueworks provides cloudbased spend management and e-marketplace solutions. That means helping clients build supply chains and managing them using web-based software to control costs. CEO Elizabeth Sipiere says: “We make clients more effective in managing construction budgets so they can spend more on social efficiency and social issues, new build or other missions.” The company grew from the Decent Homes programme when landlords needed to control prices and have accurate information, which it provided by developing a cloud-based marketplace. That’s since moved on into other planned maintenance programmes, reactive repairs and new build projects, with clients being social housing providers such as local authorities, RSLs and ALMOs, who may have different goals.

MAKING E-COMMERCE HAPPEN

46

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Value:feature 2 15/09/2013 12:44 Page 47

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: VALUEWORKS LOCAL SUPPLY CHAINS “Many use expenditure to improve local employment and skills rather than just save money,” comments Elizabeth. “We help them create effective local supply chains and provide better data for landlords to direct their decisions. Welfare reforms are reducing the money they have so managing things better means they can do a similar amount with less and the data helps that.” Valueworks is involved throughout so, when landlords have a project to get underway, it works with them to source a supply chain, creating a model that integrates with their procurement process and identifying works in the project. Those are loaded into the system together with net prices and rebate structures so the client can place orders, pay suppliers and receive rebates. To handle that, Valueworks has around 600 organisations on its books, around two thirds being service and material suppliers. Management of the process is through teams that handle every step of the process and deal with issues. Technology is crucial to the operation because it enables the often vast amounts of data to be recorded, presented and interpreted. Central to that are client dashboards, giving a meaningful view of data. “Using dashboards, clients see graphical charts that show their pattern of expenditure with each supplier, over time or by category,” explains Elizabeth. “They get a visual picture with dynamic views they choose and can drill through to transaction data.” FUNDING ISSUES The latest offering is an e-market dashboard that links transactions to suppliers and projects, enabling patterns to be established. Elizabeth says: “I can't stress enough the value in dashboards. Making decisions based on actual numbers is healthy for the industry as it tries to grapple with funding issues.” Having started helping housing providers in the northwest with their Decent Homes programme, Valueworks has expanded considerably, both geo-

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

graphically and in terms of service, and has plans to go further. The intention is to extend coverage throughout the UK and develop the technology further, including extracting additional intelligence from data. “We want to better structure the value we bring to local communities,” remarks Elizabeth. “Further forward, we intend to create cloud-based solutions to help clients with data requirements. Our strategies are aligned with what we already do and we have enough growth in those areas to keep us busy for the next few years.” www.valueworks.co.uk Tel: 01942 826788

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

47


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:20 Page 48

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL

48

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:20 Page 49

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL

THE CENTRE OF PROCUREMENT EXPERTISE SCOTLAND EXCEL DEVELOPS AND MANAGES COLLABORATIVE CONTRACTS ON BEHALF OF ITS MEMBERS, AND FACILITATES A NUMBER OF PROGRAMMES WHICH CHAMPION PROCUREMENT REFORM

S

cotland Excel was formed in 2008 to provide collaborative procurement services to the 32 Scottish local authorities. Over the past five years, the organisation remit has evolved into five strategic aims: delivering best value through collaborative contracts; improving procurement capability and sharing best practice across the sector; stakeholder engagement focusing on relationships with local authorities, suppliers and other organisations; corporate social responsibility covering all aspects of sustainable procurement; and organisational development to ensure an efficient internal structure that reflects its expertise. Scotland Excel is funded by all 32 local authorities and governed by them through a committee of elected council members.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Although securing best value for customers is a key focus for the organisation, Marketing and Communications Manager Maureen Robertson insists it’s not all about price: “It’s not about buying cheaply. It’s about buying the right things in the right way so it also includes sustainability, opportunities for smaller, local businesses, which requires highly developed strategies with social, economic, and environmental benefits rather than just the best price. We undertake analysis to understand the supply market and the different requirements of our local authority customers across Scotland to come up with the best approach for each collaborative contract.” Scotland Excel achieves this is by creating framework contracts. These enable local authorities to buy what they need while leveraging the collaborative purchasing power of the estimated £5 billion they spend annually on goods and services

to support the delivery of public services. However, as Strategic Procurement Manager Andrew Richmond outlines, that’s not always straightforward: “When you have 32 local authorities, you sometimes get a range of different views. To help us get it right, we operate a category management structure that aligns to a large degree with how councils structure themselves. We have construction, waste, transport, facilities, social care and education categories as these reflect the main spending areas of local authorities.” There’s a three-year rolling plan with six-monthly meetings with heads of procurement to ensure categories constantly reflect local authority needs, as well as spending analysis to identify potential opportunities. Any new framework has to meet a certain level of spending and commonality of needs between councils to qualify for national procure-

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

49


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:21 Page 50

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL

ASBESTOS REMOVAL SPECIALISTS 4ASBESTOS ABATEMENT 4REINSTATEMENT 4SURVEYING 4CONSULTANCY 4LICENSED WASTE

REACH THE PEOPLE

WHO MATTER ADVERTISE IN

DISPOSAL

ENVIRAZ (SCOTLAND) LTD Curran House, 23-29 Kelvin Avenue, Hillington Park, Glasgow, G52 4LT Tel: 0141 882 8440 Email: Enquiries@enviraz.co.uk Web: www.enviraz.co.uk

50

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION

CALL 01484 411400

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:21 Page 51

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL ment, otherwise regional collaboration may be considered more suitable. The content of frameworks is determined by the members themselves. “We’ve created User Intelligence Groups for each framework with representatives from every council,” explains Andrew. “They establish, alongside the Scotland Excel framework manager, what the requirements are in terms of the product range and specifications. They also become our forum when the framework is established to ensure we continue to get the best value from our contracts.” In addition, new framework opportunities are often the subject of Prior Information Notices to let the market know where collaboration is being considered. Responses from suppliers support early engagement with the market to help inform the strategy. This engagement with buyers and suppliers helps the organisation determine the products to be included, how they are to be described and the appropriate weighting to be placed on price, quality and other features. That leads on to the tendering process, with the bidders completing a set of qualification questions about their company and making their offers for requirements. The outcome will be a framework contract, approved by Scotland Excel’s governance committee, which mostly features multiple suppliers that meet the criteria but with no specific spend commitment at this stage.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

“Scotland’s not a huge country but can be geographically diverse,” recounts Maureen. “A framework encompasses all the needs under the one set of terms and conditions for consistency. But within that, mini-competitions can be run by councils or orders can be called off and that’s when the commitment comes in. There are examples of great successes where even quite small businesses have won excellent orders, and the collaborative tender process makes it easier for suppliers rather than dealing with lots of separate tender documents.” Each member authority can enter into a supply arrangement with any company in a framework and can choose what they’re looking for from each one. However, Scotland Excel continues to manage each framework, gathering product spend data and other management information for distribution to members. This allows Scotland Excel to monitor what’s happening and ensures it can react to a changing market, as it is doing now in respect to a framework for street lighting, which is being reviewed to respond to growing demand for LED lighting. SUSTAINABILITY The frameworks can also, as Maureen recalls, change the shape of the market: “For our building and timber contract, the local authorities decided that, even if there was a small financial hit, they wanted early adoption of the

“SCOTLAND’S NOT A HUGE COUNTRY BUT CAN BE GEOGRAPHICALLY DIVERSE. A FRAMEWORK ENCOMPASSES ALL THE NEEDS UNDER THE ONE SET OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR CONSISTENCY”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

51


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:21 Page 52

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL regulations on certified timber from a legal and sustainable source. So we decided the framework would only have that type of timber on it and one supplier who won business now only supplies sustainable timber to all its customers. They understood that’s the way the market was going and their decision has had an important knock-on effect.” Scotland’s local authorities have been commended by WWF for using the framework in response to their What wood you choose? sustainable timber campaign. There is an increasing emphasis on sustainability within all aspects of public procurement. However, it can be a challenge because sustainability is often linked to more than a finished product. “It is more straightforward when we are setting up material supply but there are many other things we can do such as on our new engineering consultancy framework, which is our big first foray into construction services,” comments Andrew. “Here, we looked for method statements from bidders about how they were going to build sustainability into projects. This meant that, when we were selecting consultants, we knew they had already embedded sustainability processes in their organisations.” Scotland Excel works closely with Zero Waste Scotland, the national body responsible for implementing the government’s sustainability targets, on its waste and environmental frameworks to help shape the evolving market in this area. It’s also including community benefits in its scoring criteria across a range of contracts and taking a leadership role in supporting sustainability within the sector.

SCOTLAND EXCEL WORKS CLOSELY WITH ZERO WASTE SCOTLAND, THE NATIONAL BODY RESPONSIBLE FOR IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT’S SUSTAINABILITY TARGETS, ON ITS WASTE AND ENVIRONMENTAL FRAMEWORKS TO HELP SHAPE THE EVOLVING MARKET IN THIS AREA.

SUPPORTING LOCAL AUTHORITIES Ongoing review of contracts and frameworks ensures they remain relevant and continue to deliver best value. There’s also engagement with suppliers to improve the value of contracts through their lifecycle.

52

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:21 Page 53


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:21 Page 54

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL

> Flyers, Leaflets > Posters > Exhibition Graphics > Merchandise > Banners > Brochures > Catalogues > Menus > Newspapers > Magazines

54

[CPL DESIGN ]

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS

For more information or a free quote call: Kate or Steve on 01484 411 400 www.designcpl.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

> Direct Mail > Packaging > Paper Table Tents > Websites > Branding

> Infographics > Annual Reports > Newsletters > Media Packs > Editorial

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Scotland Excel :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:21 Page 55

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: SCOTLAND EXCEL

The outcome is that Scotland Excel delivers £6 in cash savings for every £1 it receives in funding from local authorities, in addition to efficiency improvements, mitigation of price rises and other benefits. One of those benefits is the work led by Scotland Excel to help local authorities make improvements to their own procurement capability. The Procurement Improvement Programme features a mix of consultancy, projects, initiatives and training opportunities, and results are measured by annual Procurement Capability Assessments undertaken across the public sector. These form part of the Scottish Government-led Public Procurement Reform Programme that supports best practice and provides shared tools such as e-procurement to improve efficiency. “The vision is set at a high level and our job is to develop project initiatives with local authorities and to focus on the specific needs of our sector,” remarks Maureen. “For example, this year we are

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

undertaking some one-on-one consultancy and running projects on contract and supplier management and management information while supporting the government with the roll out of new eprocurement systems. We’re also continuing to offer our established programme of learning and development courses to organisations across the public sector, which has attracted more 3,000 delegates since it was launched in 2009. All of it adds up to continuous improvement at both a sector and national level.” www.scotland-excel.org.uk Tel: 0300 3001200

“THE VISION IS SET AT A HIGH LEVEL AND OUR JOB IS TO DEVELOP PROJECT INITIATIVES WITH LOCAL AUTHORITIES AND TO FOCUS ON THE SPECIFIC NEEDS OF OUR SECTOR”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

55


Welsh Purchasing Consortium:feature 2 16/09/2013 09:33 Page 56

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: WELSH PURCHASING CONSORTIUM

DELIVERING COMPETITIVE PROCUREMENT ARRANGEMENTS THE WELSH PURCHASING CONSORTIUM IS INVOLVED IN ELEMENTS OF THE PROCUREMENT ACTIVITIES FOR SIXTEEN UNITARY LOCAL AUTHORITIES ACROSS SOUTH, MID AND WEST WALES

T

he Welsh Purchasing Consortium (WPC) has made significant strides since it was expanded in 2008 following a successful bid to the Welsh Assembly’s Making the Connections Improvement Fund. Today, the WPC is involved in elements of the procurement activities for sixteen unitary local authorities across South, Mid and West Wales. In addition, the success of the WPC in recent years has seen six public sector organisations join the group as “associate” members. Benefiting from the WPC’s buying power and knowledge base, members enjoy competitive procurement arrangements that have brought significant cost efficiencies. As well as this, the sharing of best practice and the development and adoption of a suite of standard procurement documentation has greatly enhanced the purchasing approach of members. Since 2008, the WPC has seen financial efficiencies increase from £2.3m to £7.01m in 2012.

56

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Welsh Purchasing Consortium:feature 2 16/09/2013 09:33 Page 57

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: WELSH PURCHASING CONSORTIUM Rhondda Cynon Taf Council and Lee Williams, Head of Procurement at Blaenau Gwent Council Construction related procurement is one of the more challenging areas of procurement in which the WPC is involved. In Wales, there are a number of regionally based procurement frameworks in place .and the WPC is trying to fill in the gaps and expand the collaborative approach in related areas of construction and Building Maintenance. Interestingly the WPC itself, does not maintain any Approved Lists, its focus is always on putting formal and fully compliant procurement arrangements place . “It is quite a task coordinating WPC related procurement activities in construction across sixteen member organisations,” says Rob. “There can be differing views on the most appropriate approach to the market so increasing collaboration in non-traditional areas of WPC focus like construction is more of a challenge but is increasingly important.” Under the WPC organisational model individual Authorities take the responsibility of leading on each procurement exercise with a project team (made up of technical representatives and procurement specialists from member authorities) devising strategy and the approach to market. The WPC Officers Group made up of heads of procurement from the sixteen member authorities agrees this in the form of a “Business Case” before the lead authority then proceeds with the procurement poject and subsequently awards the framework. “Our default position for WPC procurement exercises is that we hold dedicated pre tender project specific supplier awareness events which are

generally run at a regional level and are facilitated by “Business Wales” which is an organisation within Welsh Governement providing support and assistance to Businesses. This is directly geared to understanding suppliers views and also and gives them clear information about our requirements and expectations and what their obligations will be, as well as how we go to market,” remarks Rob. The Tender related documentation provides comprehensive detail for suppliers in relation to the participating authorities and what role the WPC is playing in the procurement process. Detail is also given as to how the tenders are going to be evaluated, contract managed, and the expectations the WPC has for those suppliers admitted onto the Framework. All WPC tender opportunities are administered by the designated lead authority and advertised in OJEU via the Welsh Government sell2wales national procurement website. In order to be considered as a supplier for any specific WPC contractual arrangements, businesses should register their organisation on Sell2Wales where contractors will be notified of public sector tender opportunities when they are available. There are two clear advantages of being a member of the WPC. The basic driver for the consortium is that an Authority leads on four contracts, and has access to sixty. The other advantage is the vast bank of knowledge and expertise that has been built up within the WPC over many years. This has produced a standard tendering approach and a suite of legal guidance specifically targeted to, and relevant for, procurement in today’s marketplace.

“THE MORE JOBS WE CAN CREATE, THE MORE MONEY IS RECYCLED WITHIN THE ECONOMY, AND THAT IS A POSITIVE WAY FORWARD FOR WALES.” ROB JONES PROCUREMENT MANAGER There are currently over sixty currently in place with contracting activity being formally lead by individual member authorities on behalf of the whole membership on a reciprocal basis. Rob Jones, the WPC’s procurement manager, describes his primary role as managing relationships within the Group. This is achieved through coordinating engagement between the sixteen member authorities to ensure a consistent and equitable approach to collaborative procurement undertaken under the WPC banner. The WPC has adopted a “Category Management” approach to procurement. There are seven Groups made up of procurement professionals and product/service specialists . These Groups, in effect, determine the Consortium’s Forward Work Plan. Construction related procurement is covered by the WPC Construction Services Group and the Building Materials, Environmental Services and Highways Group. These Groups are chaired respectively by Vince Hanly, Service Director for Procurement at

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

57


Welsh Purchasing Consortium:feature 2 16/09/2013 09:33 Page 58


Welsh Purchasing Consortium:feature 2 16/09/2013 09:33 Page 59

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: WELSH PURCHASING CONSORTIUM Principally, the WPC has set out to ensure that member organisations get the best value from their procurement activity. This involves joint, collaborative contracts and framework agreements that enable access to improved quality of goods, services and works at optimal cost, greater volume of discounts through aggregating purchase volumes across the consortium, and process savings by reducing the number of procurement exercises. CONSISTENCY AND COORDINATION Within this aim, the WPC has also set out to achieve consistency and coordination and ensure areas for collaborative procurement are identified and prioritised. In recent years, within its construction related procurement activities, it has seen a number of successes. “Traditionally the WPC had a number of individual frameworks dedicated to specific types of product, for example, cement, concrete products and heavyside building materials,” remarks Lee Williams . “As part of a rationalisation programme our Building Materials, Environmental Services & Highways Category Group reviewed the portfolio and went to the market in early 2010 with a single consolidated General Building Materials Framework. “Specific Supplier Awareness Events were held in good time to consult with potential providers and prepare the market for this new approach. An excellent response was subsequently received and in the first year cashable efficiencies amounting to £180,000 were achieved for participating authorities.” More recently, in its endeavours to identify

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

potential frameworks for the long-term benefit of the consortium, an Electrical Servicing Framework was established in 2011. Vince Hanly comments “Following a focussed spend analysis across the WPC the Construction Services Category Group decided to scope the potential for a collaborative Electrical Servicing Framework. A project team consisting of technical specialists and procurement officers from member authorities was established to develop an approach that would be acceptable to individual authorities and which would be attractive to suppliers. The most beneficial outcomes, over and above the competitive rates achieved, were the development and adoption of common service specifications and a clear and timely mini-competition regime within the framework. “These, together with a sensitively thought out geographical lotting strategy, ensured consistency of process across the consortium and brought a vastly enhanced clarity which was widely welcomed by framework providers.” LEARNING Rob adds that procurement is often about having the courage to learn from practical experience and to build this learning into “next generation” arrangements. This is particularly true in terms of the first WPC Asbestos Services Framework which will shortly end. Valuable lessons have been learned over the last three years and the experiences of user Authorities are proving invaluable to the Project Team managing the procurement exercise for a

new and re modelled Framework which is being led by the City & County of Swansea “It is about having the courage and the convictions to say okay we can do this differently and better. So there have been successes but they’ve been drawn from lessons we are learning all the time,” says Rob, who explains that the consortium is increasingly focusing its attention on using in depth spend analysis data and gaining a much greater understanding of supply chains as it looks to make further improvements in future. Certainly, the success of the consortium can’t simply be measured in terms of efficiency gains. Welcoming six “associate” members into the group highlights the potential of the WPC as a strategic procurement partner for a number of public sector organisations in Wales. Within the country, this is important as the Welsh Government is placing increased emphasis on collaborative procurement. PIVOTAL ROLE The WPC’s procurement exercises have also played a pivotal role in supporting the local and regional economy. Between 2010 and 2012 it appointed 260 suppliers to formal WPC Arrangements, seventythree per cent of which were Welsh based. Rob says, “The more jobs we can create, the more money is recycled within the economy, and that is a positive way forward for Wales.” www.welshpurchasingconsortium.co.uk Tel: 02920 788 374

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

59


Crescent Purchasing :feature 2 24/09/2013 08:07 Page 60

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: CRESCENT PURCHASING CONSORTIUM

VALUE FOR MONEY THE CRESCENT PURCHASING CONSORTIUM IS THE ONLY PURCHASING CONSORTIUM OPERATED EXCLUSIVELY FOR INSTITUTIONS WORKING IN THE FURTHER EDUCATION SECTOR

B

eing a relatively small organisation hasn’t stopped the Crescent Purchasing Consortium achieving a lot, with 73 frameworks and around 600 supplier agreements in place accounting for £120 million of spending. It manages to do that by a process of collaboration with other organisations and not duplicating successful existing frameworks. CPC started thirteen years ago as a group of nine colleges operating as an enterprise organisation. It’s since become wholly owned by the Further Education sector and has charitable status. CPC membership has grown organically to over 2,300 members across the UK in the Further Education and Academy sectors. That growth has been driven by the increased focus on efficiency savings, although Contracting Manager Adrian Davies insists that’s only one area: “The aggregation of spend offers value but we also support members if any-

60

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

thing goes wrong and support suppliers by promoting frameworks to members. We want the frameworks to be successful so suppliers are happy and members get best value for money, compliance with EU directives and their own internal financial regulations.” The aim is to offer frameworks members want, which covers a diverse range of requirements for products and services. There’s ongoing activity to ensure those requirements are met, including member involvement in formulating and reviewing frameworks. The frameworks cover various commodity areas and are based on member requests and suggestions from the independent Procurement Advisory Group. “We advertise in the European Journal for frameworks accessible to our members and partner organisations,” recounts Adrian. “We run the tender, put the framework in place and market that to members via our website, supplier directory and by

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Crescent Purchasing :feature 2 24/09/2013 08:07 Page 61

PUBLIC SECTOR PROCUREMENT: CRESCENT PURCHASING CONSORTIUM emails and newsletters. We try to get as much information as possible to members about available frameworks and they can download user guide information on suppliers so they can liaise directly with them.” It’s a detailed process that includes a selection stage looking at finances and supplier background followed by the award stage with a range of criteria that includes price, customer requirements, added value and corporate responsibility. Those are assessed through questions against which suppliers are scored. There’s an increasing focus on sustainability with pre-qualification questions covering environmental accreditations and practices, members being keen to include local suppliers. That’s backed by membership of the Environmental Association of Universities and Colleges and working with other organisations to provide sustainability details for members. The consortium also works with suppliers to promote sustainable products and features them on its website. It’s part of the ongoing process of reviewing frameworks to ensure they’re relevant to members’ needs. And though the consortium’s area of work is expanding, Adrian emphasises that it is a steady and controlled development; “The academy sector is currently a growth area for CPC. We work with members to make sure we’re focused on their requirements and to further promote and develop frameworks for suppliers. We constantly review frameworks and, if one hasn’t been successful, we redevelop it in a different way or concentrate on another requirement.” www.thecpc.ac.uk Tel: 0161 295 5354

BUILD YOUR

BUSINESS

ADVERTISE IN BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

CALL 01484 411400

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

61


green apples:feature 2 20/09/2013 11:46 Page 62

SUSTAINABILITY: THE GREEN APPLE AWARDS 2013

FOR THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

The Green Apple Environment Awards were launched in 1994 by The Green Organisation and have become well established as one of the most popular environmental campaigns in the world 62

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


green apples:feature 2 20/09/2013 11:46 Page 63

SUSTAINABILITY: THE GREEN APPLE AWARDS 2013

T

he 2013 Green Apple Awards for the Built Environment and Architectural Heritage were presented at the National Self-Build & Renovation Centre, Swindon on June 24. The trophies were presented by Doreen Lawrence, OBE – the successful campaigning mother of murder victim Stephen Lawrence, who was studying to become an architect before his tragic death. Some of the best winning projects will feature in the next edition of The Green Book, the annual work of reference on environmental best practice that is distributed to environment professionals, businesses, governments, politicians, universities, reference libraries and media around the world – enabling others to learn from the experience and expertise of the Green Apple Award winners. The Green Apple Awards, which began in 1994, are free to enter, with categories for builders, developers, civil engineers, architects, materials suppliers, tradesmen and everyone else connected with the building and construction industries. Everyone can have a free entry, with gold, silver and bronze Green Apple Awards to win in each classification. All winners are given free tickets for the prestigious presentation ceremony, with food and drink also included.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

THE AWARDS ARE NOW IN THEIR EIGHTEENTH YEAR AND WELL ESTABLISHED AS ONE OF THE MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL RECOGNITION SCHEMES, BOTH IN THE UK AND INTERNATIONALLY. Previous winners include companies of all sizes, from sole traders to international conglomerates, and some of the better-known winners include Kier, Birse, Bovis, Canary Wharf, BAM Nuttall, St George, Balfour Beatty, CBRE, and NMC Nomenca. Winners also have the chance to represent their country in the European Business Awards for the Environment, as the Green Apple Awards is one of the few accredited feeder schemes with automatic entry into the Brussels-led campaign. The Green Apple Awards for Environmental Best Practice was The Green Organisation’s first initiative when it launched in 1994, and it has gone from strength to strength ever since. Initially aimed only at local authorities, the organisation was soon asked to provide a similar scheme for commerce and industry. The awards are now in their eighteenth year and well established as one of the major environmental recognition schemes, both in the UK and internationally.

www.thegreenorganisation.info Tel: 01604 810507

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

63


Balfour Beatty Living Places :feature 2 18/09/2013 11:30 Page 64

SUSTAINABILITY: BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES

PLACES TO LIVE IN BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES IS THE LOCAL AUTHORITY OPERATION FOR BALFOUR BEATTY

64

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Balfour Beatty Living Places :feature 2 18/09/2013 11:31 Page 65

SUSTAINABILITY: BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES

B

eing part of a large infrastructure group has, as Bid Manager Graham Price outlines, several advantages: “We work very closely with other parts of the business and contribute to some large projects such as junction improvements. At different times of the project cycle, we use the power of the group and it’s such a big organisation there are people who can do almost anything around asset management.” Balfour Beatty Living Places is the local authority operation for Balfour Beatty and is mainly focused on highway maintenance although increasingly involved in associated environmental work including grounds maintenance and street cleaning. Its flagship contract with Southampton City Council is a Highway Services Partnership that’s led to a City Watch contract covering CCTV and Intelligent Traffic Systems. “There’s the traffic side, looking at cameras and altering traffic light phasing to ease the flow through the city,” explains Graham. “Then there’s the public safety side with 320 cameras around the city centre. We have a 24/7 operation looking at that and working closely with the police and others to keep public order.”

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

A recent car park development in Southampton, instigated by Housing Services and undertaken through Decent Neighbourhoods funding, won the a joint Green Apple award for Balfour Beatty and Southampton City Council. The development was necessary for mainly local authority housing close to two busy arterial routes, with nearby fast food restaurants adding to the pressure on street parking. The designated location for the new car park was a disused garden suffering from fly tipping and other problems. Graham recalls: “We were involved in consultations, presented three designs for the different ways the parking could be done and listened to the concerns people had, such as disabled parking and access arrangements. The main focus of the award was the drainage we used in the car park because a planning consideration was we couldn’t drain onto the highway. We had to find an alternative means and ended up going for a soakaway drain after much testing of various options.” ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS A successful drainage scheme was necessary in a city that suffers from localised and tidal flooding in some areas. And it fits in with the environmental concerns that are an increasing feature of the com-

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

65


Balfour Beatty Living Places :feature 2 18/09/2013 11:31 Page 66

SUSTAINABILITY: BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES pany’s work. Balfour Beatty, in fact, has a sustainability vision of three parts looking at sustainability in the round. ‘Profitable Markets’ ensures work undertaken is practicable and sustainable for the company while ‘Healthy Communities’ aims to make a positive impact on the communities where it works and ‘Environmental Limits’ aims to reduce emissions, waste and fuel and water usage. Efforts in this area include trials of hybrid vehicles and the use of mobile devices by operatives to reduce paper and avoid unnecessary journeys. Different materials are being used to repair potholes, including a cold rolled asphalt product that requires less machinery to install and provides a permanent repair that reduces the number of repeat visits.

Some highways work is in sensitive areas of the country and the company has a means of avoiding harm. “Sometimes we work in high scientific areas like the South Downs National Park,” says Graham. “We’ve developed an app that can be used to produce a site specific risk assessment, taking into account any environmental concerns. Areas are mapped out to identify sites of special scientific interest, areas of outstanding natural beauty or similar and that information is combined with the paperwork going into the field.” There’s a big focus on health and safety, with a Zero Harm campaign to make sure everyone goes home in the same state they arrived at work. Although that’s driven at group level there are, as Graham confirms, risks and dangers specific to the

WORK CONTINUES TO GROW, INCLUDING A CLOSE RELATIONSHIP WITH SOUTHAMPTON CITY COUNCIL TO HELP DELIVER ITS CITY CENTRE MASTER PLAN. IT COMPRISES SEVEN PROJECTS AIMING TO INCREASE THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY, REINFORCE ITS MARITIME HERITAGE AND IMPROVE TRAFFIC FLOW IN AND AROUND THE CITY.

66

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

type of work the company undertakes: “We work close to live traffic and to heavy machinery and we use products that can cause damage to the skin if not properly protected. There’s a whole gamut of concerns we have to make sure we cover properly.” IMPROVING TRAFFIC FLOW Work continues to grow, including a close relationship with Southampton City Council to help deliver its city centre master plan. It comprises seven projects aiming to increase the economic development of the city, reinforce its maritime heritage and improve traffic flow in and around the city. That includes cruise ship traffic to help the city achieve its target of two million cruise passenger movements annually. It all helps the company expand the number and type of contracts. “We’re getting more into the street scene and environmental types of work, such as street cleansing, grounds maintenance and larger play facilities. We’ve recently won contracts for that type of work in Wiltshire, Herefordshire and elsewhere. We’re expanding on that and looking to consolidate the type of work we already do with the highways while the other big focus is on CCTV and intelligent transport systems.” www.bblivingplaces.com Tel: 01256 400400

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Balfour Beatty Living Places :feature 2 23/09/2013 13:15 Page 67

SUSTAINABILITY: BALFOUR BEATTY LIVING PLACES

[

]

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS

For more information or a free quote call Kate or Steve:

01484 411 400 www.designcpl.co.uk

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

[CPLDESIGN] PRINT AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

67


simons group :feature 2 18/09/2013 13:45 Page 68

SUSTAINABILITY: SIMONS GROUP

S

BUILDING GREENER

imons Construction has been awarded National Green Champion at this year’s Green Apple Awards. Established in 1994, the Green Apple Awards are the country’s major awarding body providing recognition for environmental endeavour among companies, councils, communities and countries. Simons competed against more than 200 other nominees in the Green Apple Awards for the Built Environment & Architectural Heritage. The company has been recognised for its sustainable ways of working, which include rigorous waste management on sites and at the company’s head office in Lincoln, raising the profile of sustainability on sites and with neighbouring communities and also in the form of the company's sustainability strategy Building Greener. Simons’ sustainable working was embodied in the form of M&S’ largest sustainable learning store at Cheshire Oaks, a seven year partnership between the client and Simons, from planning to completed construction last year, which has received national recognition for its sustainable achievements. SUSTAINABILITY PLAN Simons’ success at the Green Apple Awards has come following the development of a long term sustainability plan that was put into motion in 2010. The strategy combined the company’s existing carbon and waste targets with new areas of water and

SIMONS GROUP PROVIDE QUALITY, INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS TO BRANDS AND HOUSEHOLD NAMES IN THE PRIVATE AND PUBLIC SECTOR

68

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


simons group :feature 2 18/09/2013 13:45 Page 69

SUSTAINABILITY: SIMONS GROUP biodiversity. This has gone hand in hand with developing a group wide quality and environmental procedures manual which has been created in order to meet ISO9001 and ISO14001 for Simons’ design, development and construction functions and its Building Greener targets. The strategy involves seven core principles. This includes continuous improvement of process and product by eliminating environmental risks and bringing benefits by using its EMS to best effect. The strategy also looks at compliance reinforced by community and environmental benefits while complying with legal obligations and going beyond compliance to promote construction in communities. In addition, resource and value management will be enhanced, team performance and delivery will be driven by key performing indicators, and the company will strive to get the most out of its internal communications. The company also wants to share what it learns and will publish its carbon footprint while collaborating with academic teams to share knowledge and experience with the discipline of research. CARBON REPORT The company’s latest carbon report shows the strategy is working but that the process is far from easy. The report details the overall footprint and normalised rates for transport continue on a steady progress towards the overall target of being a zero carbon business. However, there have been some rises in certain areas.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

“We have recorded the first increase in our absolute carbon footprint since monitoring began on 2007,” reads the report. “The increase is solely in the amount of private car mileage our employees have recorded. We believe this is a symptom of the very difficult times which the construction industry continues to face in the UK. Our staff are working harder and covering wider regions of the UK in their day to day working lives

work at its sites and offices, providing quality, integrated solutions to brands and household names in the private and public sector including Tesco, Vodafone, M&S, House of Fraser and NHS Trusts. The business has established an in-house capability to fund schemes and unlock space alongside the full range of design and construction services, from complex new-build to all sizes of fit out, maintenance and aftercare.

THE COMPANY HAS BEEN RECOGNISED FOR ITS SUSTAINABLE WAYS OF WORKING, WHICH INCLUDE RIGOROUS WASTE MANAGEMENT ON SITES “We still hope to meet our long term targets to be a zero carbon business by 2020 but acknowledge that with each passing year the challenge to find innovative ways to meet the annual reduction strategy is greater and at some stage off-setting may become a necessity. “We actively look for ways to make each project more efficient on site through site office/overheads emissions, resource efficiency through lean solutions, or require less energy to excavate and construct the project. These actions all make for a better project for the customer; they also reduce unnecessary energy demand or embodied emissions.” Simons Group employs over 200 people who

Recently, Simons Group was named as the contractor of choice for a 675,000 sq ft extension for the John Lewis Partnership and Gazeley at Magna Park, Milton Keynes. It is the second project in a year at Magna Park for Simons. Earlier this year Simons completed the new 350,000 sq ft manufacturing plant and storage facility for AG Barr. The £19.6m project involves the construction of a warehouse for the John Lewis Partnership with offices, connecting to the existing warehouse via a 90-metre linking bridge. www.simonsgroup.com Tel: 01522 505000

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

69


rospa:feature 2 16/09/2013 09:36 Page 70

ROSPA AWARDS: RoSPA AWARDS 2013

GOING FOR GOLD NOW IN ITS 57TH YEAR THE ROSPA SAFETY AWARDS RECOGNISE HEALTH AND SAFETY SUCCESS AND OFFER ORGANISATIONS A PRIME OPPORTUNITY TO PROVE THEIR ONGOING COMMITMENT TO RAISING HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS

70

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


rospa:feature 2 16/09/2013 09:36 Page 71

ROSPA AWARDS: RoSPA AWARDS 2013

D

ating back 57 years, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) Occupational Health and Safety Awards scheme is the largest and longest-running programme of its kind in the UK and one of the most prestigious in the world in any discipline. More than 1,500 awards were presented faceto-face this year, and 4,000 winners and their guests were entertained at RoSPA’s daytime ceremonies and evening banquets in May. The ceremonies took place at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole Hotel, just a short walk from the Safety and Health Expo show halls. The RoSPA Awards programme recognises commitment to accident and ill health prevention and is open to businesses and organisations of all types and sizes from across the UK and overseas. It

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

not only looks at accident records, but also entrants’ overarching health and safety management systems, including practices such as leadership and workforce involvement. David Rawlins, RoSPA’s awards manager, said: “RoSPA firmly believes that organisations that demonstrate commitment to continuous improvement in accident and ill health prevention deserve recognition. Our winners have shown that they are committed to striving for such continuous improvement and we look forward to celebrating with them this week.” The majority of awards that RoSPA presents are non-competitive, marking achievement at merit, bronze, silver and gold levels. Organisations maintaining high standards can win gold medals, president’s awards and orders of distinction. Competitive awards are presented in more than 20 sectors, and competitive awards also recognise excellence in spe-

cialist areas, such as the management of occupational road risk (MORR). The headline sponsor for the RoSPA Awards 2013 is NEBOSH (the National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health). Sponsors of the specialist trophies are: The RoSPA International Sector Award – airsweb; The MORR Trophy – Allianz; The Occupational Health Award (Astor Trophy) – BHSF; The International Dilmun Environmental Award – GPIC; The Best New Entry Trophy – Safety and Health Expo; The Workforce Involvement in Safety and Health Trophy – Springfields Fuels; and, The MORR Technology Trophy – Tesco Dotcom. Comedian Patrick Kielty provided the evening entertainment at this year’s RoSPA Awards banquets. www.rospa.com/awards

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

71


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:33 Page 72

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

A PROUD SAFETY RECORD PRIDE, THE JOINT VENTURE BETWEEN INTERSERVE DEFENCE LTD AND SSE CONTRACTING, ONCE AGAIN HIGHLIGHTED ITS ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN HEALTH AND SAFETY BEST PRACTICE BY ACHIEVING THE ROSPA GOLD MEDAL IN 2013.

72

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:33 Page 73

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

P

riDE, the joint venture between Interserve Defence Ltd and SSE Contracting, once again highlighted its accomplishments in health and safety best practice by achieving the RoSPA Gold Medal in 2013. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents has recognised PriDE’s dedication to safety, as well as its ability to improve, by awarding the company its highest accolade seven years running. The consistent success is now merited with the prestigious Gold Medal, recognising the highest safety standards over the long term. Health and safety manager Fred Cooper is delighted with the award and says it was down to the hard work of the entire team. “Everyone says well done to the safety professional – in this case me – but safety isn’t just about me; a lot of hard work has been put in by all staff and contractors. Everyone who works for or with us recognises very quickly how seriously PriDE takes health and safety.” Now in its 58th year the RoSPA Safety Awards recognises health and safety success and offers organisations a prime opportunity to prove their ongoing commitment to raising health and safety standards. Sponsored by NEBOSH, the premier health and

“EVERYONE WHO WORKS FOR OR WITH US RECOGNISES VERY QUICKLY HOW SERIOUSLY WE TAKE HEALTH AND SAFETY” FRED COOPER HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGER safety examining body, the awards are open to organisations of all sizes and are one of the most sought after accolades in the industry. The Gold Medal achievement from RoSPA is given to those companies exhibiting the highest health and safety standards year on year for over five consecutive years. PriDE, in its commitment to the safety of its staff and contractors, has shown not only a reduction in its safety incidents but a proactive approach to improvement. This is exampled by PriDE’s rigorous auditing processes which, as part of its data analysis, measures accident frequency rates based on a simple algorithm. The company takes the number of RIDDORS (work-related injuries and deaths, cases of disease, and near misses) divided by total man-hours, times by 100,000. Over the last four years, and 2.5 million man-hours, this has shown accident rates have dropped by over fifty per cent from 0.5 to 0.23.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

NO ROOM FOR COMPLACENCY Fred believes success is down to PriDE’s ability to steer clear of complacency. The company, which was specifically created to manage the Defence Infrastructure Organisation’s South East Regional Prime Contract, is constantly reviewing its targets and objectives to drive health and safety forward. As Prime Contractor, PriDE is responsible for estate management and construction services at almost 100 Ministry of Defence sites throughout the south-east region, encompassing nearly 6000 buildings and facilities. These facilities include some of the MOD’s largest and most prestigious sites such as RMA Sandhurst, St James’ Palace, Cavalry Barracks and RAF High Wycombe. The high profile nature of PriDE’s work, in which it delivers land and property management, help desk services, planned and reactive maintenance, low value capital works, and environmental and

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

73


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:33 Page 74

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

74

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:33 Page 75

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

sustainability services, means it can’t afford to let standards drop. “We don’t look too far ahead,” says Fred. “We don’t, for example, look to meet targets ten years in advance and say we want a fifteen per cent drop in accident rates. What we do is the right thing for people at the right time. We will look at our accident statistics and ask ourselves how we can improve over the next twelve months. We are then constantly auditing internally to measure our performance.” One of the key ways PriDE monitors performance is through monthly Local

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Safety Groups. These take place on each of its active sites. A manager will run the meeting with representatives for staff and contractors present. The meeting will look at any accidents or near-misses, address queries and provide advice before this information is relayed to the health and safety management team. The information gathered is analysed by the health and safety manager, and overseen by the director. Areas reviewed include the type of work being undertaken and how current health and safety practices are working in this specific environment. If there are any problems these

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

75


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 15/09/2013 13:33 Page 76

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD will be rectified in an appropriate way. This information is then made available to all company employees and contractors. PriDE also conducts point of work assessments. To aid the relevancy of pre-work risk assessment, a project’s risk is checked again during the work and following completion. This helps to improve initial safety procedures in future, and highlights the best opportunities for further training. “Of course this all takes time,” admits Fred. “But when you consider an accident can happen in seconds and a point of work risk assessment takes no more than two or three minutes, we’d rather take that time to check we are doing things safely than rush through a job and cause an incident. “It might be a pun but we do pride ourselves on ensuring our people – employees and contractors – are safe when they are working for us. We want people to go home to their families in the same shape they came into work.” Training is obviously vital and staff attend regular training sessions three times per year in addition to a variety of toolbox talks and safety update meetings. This year a lot of work is being carried out on first aid and asbestos awareness. Another key area highlighted for improvement concerns how members of staff apply themselves to safety procedures. This has seen an increased emphasis on behavioural training in 2013 which is expected to continue into next year. MEETING THE CHALLENGE Of course, working with subcontractors on such a large-scale is a challenge for PriDE. However, like its

76

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

expectation of high standards in service, the company expects nothing less from its contractors in regards to health and safety. Communication is vital, explains Fred, as contractors are inducted into PriDE’s approach to a safe working environment for all. “Crucially no one is left unaware of our safety high standards,” he says. An example of the health and safety training for contractors is PriDE’s Stop For Safety scheme. “We bring in the contractors and explain to them the PriDE approach to safety – what we want, what we don’t want, examples of how we’ve improved over

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 01/10/2013 09:25 Page 77

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

77


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 16/09/2013 13:44 Page 78


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 16/09/2013 13:45 Page 79

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD the years and why we want them to work in a certain way. “Principally, it is about stopping the complacency. It is too easy for someone who feels they know safety rules and practices like the back of their hand to let their guard down. Of the top fifteen contractors we use, we insist a member of their senior management and their safety professional come to our Stop For Safety seminars so that health and safety is always at the forefront of their thinking.” Crucially, if an incident does occur, PriDE doesn’t accept a simple report but demands a full investigation. “It doesn’t matter if it is the most minor incident. For example, a cut finger may not impact on someone’s ability to carry out their job or go home to their families at the end of the day but it occurred because something wasn’t done correctly. We want to know why that happened (was the member of staff using equipment improperly, not wearing protective workwear, or wearing the wrong gloves) and prevent it from happening again,” remarks Fred. “At the end of the day it is about ensuring lessons are learned and that we’re proactive in our response to them. It is one of the ways we are able to constantly improve. Our accident rates last year were very good and that is down to ensuring our subcontractors work to the high level we expect. That is

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

79


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 16/09/2013 13:45 Page 80

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

PRIDE CARES ABOUT PEOPLE. FROM TEAM BUILDING ACTIVITIES LIKE FIVE-A-SIDE FOOTBALL TO FUNDRAISERS, THE COMPANY TAKES ITS SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY VERY SERIOUSLY.

partly due to investigations – why did something happen and what are you going to do to put it right.” CARING ABOUT PEOPLE Ultimately, these measures are in place because PriDE cares about its people. This is in evidence when considering PriDE’s work in the local community as well as its sustainability and environmental initiatives. From team building activities like fivea-side football to charity fundraisers, the company takes its social responsibility very seriously. Through a variety of events such as the Three Peaks Challenge, PriDE has raised around £20,000 for charities such as the Army Benevolent Fund and Great Ormond Street Hospital. Internally, staff benefit from Brainwaves, an initiative that reaches out to employees, giving them a voice within the company. Suggestions about improvement are rewarded, the best of which receive a cash prize. Training and development is also actively encouraged with PriDE maintaining a positive legacy from the education, training and qualifications it has achieved for site managers, supervisory and planning staff. PriDE has also reduced its carbon footprint and energy consumption in recent years. In 2007 it launched a campaign titled “Pride Goes Green” which introduced a number of initiatives such as energy surveys that helped customers to realise real money reductions and a contract wide sustainability incentive scheme. This was recognised in 2008 when PriDE won the British Institute of Facilities Management Award for Sustainability. Since then PriDE has helped many of its clients realise cost and environmental benefits such as RAF Northolt which saw carbon emissions reduced by fifteen per cent in 2011. This provided a cost saving of £200,000. Across the sites it works, PriDE is implementing a variety of measures such as the replacement of lights with LED and the implementation of a building management system. As health and safety manager Fred Cooper looks to the future he insists PriDE will never stand still when it comes to the safety of their workers.

80

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 19/09/2013 09:16 Page 81

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

81


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 16/09/2013 13:56 Page 82


priDE (SERP) Ltd:feature 2 16/09/2013 13:56 Page 83

ROSPA AWARDS: PRIDE (SERP) LTD

“WHAT MAKES US PROUD IS THAT TO WIN A ROSPA AWARD IN THE FIRST PLACE SHOWS OUR STANDARDS ARE HIGH. TO HAVE WON SEVEN ROSPA GOLD AWARDS IN A ROW IS RECOGNITION THAT WHAT WE’RE DOING AT PRIDE IN HEALTH AND SAFETY IS WORKING.”

“You can get complacent and that’s when accidents can occur. When RoSPA goes through our submission one of the things they want to know is that we aren’t getting complacent. Winning multiple RoSPA awards, year on year, highlighted by the Gold Medal for continuous success, shows the one thing we are not is complacent.” The award is a real accomplishment for PriDE and that is felt throughout the company. “These achievements are great for our people because without their commitment to our procedures we wouldn’t have been able to achieve the Gold Medal. It is a total team effort from senior management to midlevel management and all the way down. “What makes us proud is that to win a RoSPA award in the first place shows our standards are high. To maintain those standards, and to improve on them, highlights our determination to achieve best practice. To have won seven RoSPA gold awards in a row is recognition that what we’re doing at Pride in health and safety is working.” www.pride-serp.co.uk

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

83


John Sisk & son:feature 2 24/09/2013 14:37 Page 84

ROSPA AWARDS: JOHN SISK & SON

BUILDING

EXCELLENCE JOHN SISK & SON IS AN INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY WITH OPERATIONS IN THE UK, POLAND AND THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

84

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


John Sisk & son:feature 2 23/09/2013 16:23 Page 85

ROSPA AWARDS: JOHN SISK & SON

“W

e’re very much focused on the idea of trying to get the right information to the right people in a timely fashion and we are trying to do that by whatever means we possibly can,” proclaims Health and Safety Manager Greg Hamill. “We pride ourselves on being a very open organisation in that we are very keen to share information which is relevant.” That philosophy applies to all areas of the company and results in an open relationship with customers, suppliers and contractors as well as cascading the information down through the organisation. It’s also enabled this family run, long-established construction company to complete a number of major projects on landmark sites in its native Ireland, the UK mainland and further afield. Those projects include the Aviva Stadium and Croke Park Stadium in Dublin, a lot of clean room work for pharmaceutical companies and a growing

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

energy market where it has been involved with a number of waste to energy incinerators. The open approach is also part of Sisk’s ‘zero philosophy’ that aims to raise standards across the whole company. It started with health and safety and has since extended throughout the business to include quality and environmental matters. On the health and safety front, accident frequency figures have declined steadily to one tenth of what they were ten years ago, a period during which an estimated 116 million man hours have been worked. That’s led to a number of awards, including a RoSPA gold medal for the last two years and two silver awards in the Considerate Contractor scheme for a particular project. COMMON SENSE APPROACH Those successes, as Greg confirms, partly result from the company’s approach: “We have a commitment to practical common sense in health and safety which engages with the operatives on the ground. We’re very much into getting out there and engaging with people, moving away from the

old enforcement methods towards a more conversational based idea. By interacting with people, we try to encourage them to think about what they're doing. Every site almost works as an autonomous organisation so the site management will look after the site and report back to head office. We work with the clients and try to establish their expectations in terms of what they want to do on every site, according to our standard guidance, but very much tailored to suit the specific needs of the site.” Sisk’s open approach extends to its reporting structure so that information on all accidents and incidents is available, mistakes are admitted and solutions are put in place once the cause is established. In conjunction with the Health and Safety Authority in Ireland, the company is now developing its own behavioural safety programme. “We’re trying to change the mindset of people,” stresses Greg. “We still investigate all accidents and incidents but we are trying to move towards the ideal where we have zero accidents and zero incidents. That's very much a philosophical sort of aim but we’re also realistic when these things happen. We’re

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

85


John Sisk & son:feature 2 23/09/2013 16:23 Page 86

ROSPA AWARDS: JOHN SISK & SON Aviva Stadium

moving away from the old idea of having aggressively punitive activities and we’re trying to promote the good things that people do and reward them accordingly. It’s been going now about a year and we’re rolling it out as new sites open up. We’re trying to develop it more with the client base and adapt it to how they want these things to operate.” ZERO DEFECTS The zero philosophy spread from health and safety into quality partly as a result of the downturn in construction that prompted Sisk to look at the way it operated. A decision was taken to change and evolve by taking the momentum obtained in health and safety and extending it throughout the entire operation. The outcome was a determination to get rid of the practice of

having snag lists and retention money for contracts that has been commonly accepted in the construction industry. The reasoning behind that, as Greg recalls, is that it’s not acceptable in other industries to hand over a product that has faults: “We’ve expanded this idea of zero accidents and zero injuries to cover zero defects at handover. We have a system whereby there's a number of walk downs taking place with specific managers and trades once a site approaches practical completion. Those are followed by walk downs with the client team for familiarisation, the idea really being that, when we hand the project over, it’s as snag free as we can possibly make it. I suppose that’s a bit of a change of minds for construction.” The construction downturn led to a reduction in staff numbers and a decrease in stand-alone

Croke Park Stadium

86

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


John Sisk & son:feature 2 23/09/2013 16:23 Page 87

ROSPA AWARDS: JOHN SISK & SON

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

87


John Sisk & son:feature 2 23/09/2013 16:23 Page 88

ROSPA AWARDS: JOHN SISK & SON

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS CPL Design is a multidisciplinary design consultancy offering a complete range of cost effective design and print solutions to a range of clients. We specialise in branding, design for print, promotional materials as well as on-line and digital work translating your ideas into innovative visual communications with real impact. For more information call Kate or Steve

01484 411 400 www.designclp.co.uk

[CPLDESIGN] PRINT AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

REACH THE PEOPLE

WHO MATTER

A DV E R T I S E I N

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION

CALL 01484 411400 88

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


John Sisk & son:feature 2 23/09/2013 16:23 Page 89

ROSPA AWARDS: JOHN SISK & SON roles, persuading many people to become multiskilled. It was therefore perhaps a natural progression to spread the zero philosophy more widely and apply it also to environmental issues. That’s resulted in better control of waste streams, reductions in energy use and greater involvement in the communities where Sisk is working. INFORMATIONAL MODELLING “A lot of our projects have a very high international certification such as BREEAM so we're very much pushing that and working along with that,” comments Greg. “We’re very active in trying to take on new initiatives in terms of building informational modelling and things like that. We take on technology to see what we can use and make sense of. Like a lot of companies, the best solution for a long time would have been, when faced with a challenge, to create more paper and more procedures. “We're trying to work this in terms of knowledge management and the lessons we’ve learned from the past. So we have an internal knowledge management site whereby we try to capture knowledge in terms of our successes and failures and we make them available to all the site teams via the intranet. Construction is the sort of industry where there are a lot of people with a lifetime of experience but it’s often very difficult to get that out of them. We are trying to promote a way of capturing that latent knowledge but it’s very difficult to get that down on paper. When something works or doesn’t work, we try to understand why that is and to cascade the knowledge throughout the organisation.” The implementation of the zero philosophy is ongoing with the behavioural change programme

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

still being rolled out and a sizeable investment due to be made in training on the subject in the last quarter of this year. There are also, as Greg recounts, other changes afoot: “We are in the process of integrating the business models of the Irish and UK markets into one combined organisation. That’s been very much the focus since 2012 and we’re pushing towards that integration. The key focus area going forward will be the expansion of our work in the energy sector in the UK and Ireland, trying to develop and strengthen our position in those markets.” www.johnsiskandson.com Tel: 01727 875551

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

89


Costain Energy & Process:feature 2 16/09/2013 16:28 Page 90

ROSPA AWARDS: COSTAIN OIL, GAS AND PROCESS LTD

AWARD

WINNERS COSTAIN OIL, GAS AND PROCESS LTD HAS ACHIEVED THE HIGH PROFILE ROSPA ORDER OF DISTINCTION AWARD FOR ITS SUCCESSFUL AND LONG-RUNNING HEALTH AND SAFETY PRACTICES

90

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Costain Energy & Process:feature 2 16/09/2013 16:28 Page 91

ROSPA AWARDS: COSTAIN OIL, GAS AND PROCESS LTD

C

ostain Oil, Gas and Process Ltd has achieved the high profile RoSPA Order of Distinction award for its successful and long-running health and safety practices. The prestigious Order of Distinction is given only to those companies that have achieved RoSPA’s highest accolade for at least fifteen years consecutively. The company, part of the Costain Group, is an international process engineering contractor delivering safe, cost effective solutions for clients’ investments in the worldwide process and energy industries. It offers services appropriate to each stage of a project's development, maintaining a permanent indepth capability to undertake consultancy and conceptual studies, all levels of engineering and design, procurement and materials management, construction, commissioning, maintenance and training. This level of achievement was, unsurprisingly, seen across the Costain Group, with 35 RoSPA awards in total being handed to the civil engineering company’s various divisions. This included sixteen Gold, ten Silver and four Bronze, which all recognised Costain’s commitment to health and safety excellence. The awards also recognised the success of initiatives like Costain Behavioural Safety where everyone in the business – from employees, customers and the supply chain – understands the importance of taking responsibility not only for their own safety but also for those around them. The company’s Energy & Process sector team also won the President’s Award. Commenting on the success, Peter Fisher, Costain’s Group Safety, Health & Environmental Director, said: “We are delighted to be recognised for these RoSPAs which

again demonstrates how important health and safety is to everyone in the Group.” Across the Group, health and safety has remained at the forefront of everything Costain does. This was exampled recently by the team working on the Evaporator D project at Sellafield achieving one million hours without a Lost Time Injury. This is the second time over the life of the project that the one million hour milestone has been passed. The latest landmark represents an injuryfree period from October 2011, which is particularly notable considering the risk profile of the work undertaken over that period. The achievement – which would be significant on any project – has been reached against a backdrop of complex working conditions at the Evap D site.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

“We have significant heavy lifting using gantry cranes, we’ve got welding, pipe-fitting, steel erection, civil engineering and electrical works, all within very close confines,” explained Project Director, Rob Phillips. “It’s a huge project but it’s happening in a building just sixty metres long by thirty metres wide at its widest point.” Combined with the limited space is the large number of personnel working on the job – around 400 people. Costain’s attention paid to health and safety was further recognised by client Sellafield Ltd, whose Management & Oversight of Contractors Department handed Costain the Most Improved Safety Performance award in May. This was in recognition of year-on-year improvements in safety

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

91


Costain Energy & Process:feature 2 01/10/2013 09:27 Page 92

ROSPA AWARDS: COSTAIN OIL, GAS AND PROCESS LTD

92

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Costain Energy & Process:feature 2 16/09/2013 16:36 Page 93

ROSPA AWARDS: COSTAIN OIL, GAS AND PROCESS LTD performance since 2010 and the successful management of the multiple potentially high-risk activities. “This achievement has required a major effort from the team, taking into account the working environment in which they’re operating,” added Costain’s SHE Director, Peter Fisher. “It’s a testament to the skill and effort they’ve put in to cope with a notably complex worksite.” Elsewhere, Costain picked up a trio of titles at the 2013 Dwr Cymru Welsh Water Occupational Health & Safety Awards. In the glittering awards ceremony, held at the Liberty Stadium in Swansea, the Costain Welsh Water team won the ‘Most Improved’ performance category. It also took the Highly Commended slot in the Excellence Award, while Works Superintendent, Tony Kopec, was commended in the Outstanding Contribution category. “The team won the Most Improved award for its work on the Coed Dolwyd Service Reservoir scheme. The award was won not through recovering from a previous dip in performance but by a series of initiatives that led to continuous improvement on already high standards,” said Public Relations Manager for the Welsh Water AMP 5 framework, Sara Brady. In its submission in the ‘Most Improved’ category the team noted that a safety, health and environment (SHE) training programme had been offered to all operatives to ensure the creation of a culture that encourages and looks closely at changing behaviours. There was a significant increase, for example, in the number of safety observations.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

“THIS ACHIEVEMENT HAS REQUIRED A MAJOR EFFORT FROM THE TEAM, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH THEY’RE OPERATING. IT’S A TESTAMENT TO THE SKILL AND EFFORT THEY’VE PUT IN TO COPE WITH A NOTABLY COMPLEX WORKSITE” Sara added: “The safety record on-site had been excellent, with more than 120,000 man-hours worked without a RIDDOR up to 12th of April. The team regularly scored above 8.5 in the monthly scored inspection (legal compliance being a score of 7.0) and numerous incentives had been developed to ensure that the team was continually improving. “All operatives were coached to be accountable and take responsibility for their own safety and that of their peers around them. The Gang Supervisors Coaching programme had been a positive initiative which had been devised to increase responsibility for Health and Safety amongst the workforce.” The Highly Commended position was won for overall performance on the Framework, while Tony Kopec’s commendation was for rolling out the various SHE measures.

The ‘Most Improved’ and Excellence awards brought with them prizes of £1,000 and £500 respectively. This money will be donated to local charities, selected from suggestions by Costain Welsh Water staff. Framework Director, John Madden, commented: “Costain secured more awards than any other company and I would like to thank and acknowledge everyone’s efforts within the team for achieving these awards.” Matt Crabtree, Costain’s Sector Director for Water, added: “We have had some positive feedback from Welsh Water recently regards our fantastic safety record and it is great to see the success of John and his team reflected at these awards.” www.costain.com Tel: 01628 842444

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

93


Home retail group PlC:feature 2 18/09/2013 14:23 Page 94

ROSPA AWARDS: HOME RETAIL GROUP

UNRIVALLED CONVENIENCE AND VALUE HOME RETAIL GROUP ARE THE UK’S LEADING HOME AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE RETAILER, BRINGING TOGETHER SOME OF THE UK’S MOST RECOGNISABLE RETAIL BRANDS

94

T

he UK’s leading home and general merchandise retailer Home Retail Group enjoyed success at RoSPA’s 2013 health and safety awards by taking home the sector prize for Commercial and Business Services. The Group, which looks after more than a thousand retail outlets across the UK and Ireland for Argos and Homebase, has made significant steps in recent years to enhance its occupational health and safety practices for both staff and customers. Health and safety manager Abby Miller was delighted with the award, saying, “The health and safety of our customers and colleagues is always top of our agenda and we are delighted to have been recognised for our high standards.” The challenge for Home Retail Group is dealing with the safety of customers who haven’t been inducted into the stringent health and safety practices of the Group. While members of staff are trained and monitored, customers, some of whom

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

may not be able to read and write (such as children and those people whose first language isn’t English), don’t have that luxury. Abby says it requires a pragmatic approach. “We have to think of our retail outlets as wonderful playgrounds for children and base our health and safety measures for customers on that level. We are therefore making everything on the customer side as friendly and straight forward as possible.” One way Home Retail Group has tried to improve its safety procedures for customers is through an initiative called “Look Again”. This approach is about getting staff to assess possible hazards or risks from the point of view of a child or an elderly customer. This takes into account the customers at either end of the spectrum, both of whom are the biggest risk in terms of safety. This has seen, particularly in Argos stores, more staff on the shop floor in order to offer assistance to customers and identify hazards in order to prevent them. For the staff, significant strides have been made in manual handling with a focus on changing the way

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Home retail group PlC:feature 2 18/09/2013 14:23 Page 95

ROSPA AWARDS: HOME RETAIL GROUP

staff approach the movement of heavy items, such as by using their legs to lift as well as pivot points. Health and safety is constantly assessed through the use of “Trackers”, a process that enhances induction training through monthly audits to ensure staff are utilising the correct methods. David Rawlins, RoSPA's awards manager, was impressed with Home Retail Group’s consistency as well as the improvements it has made. He said, “RoSPA firmly believes that organisations that demonstrate commitment to continuous improvement in accident and ill health prevention deserve recognition. Home Retail has shown that it is committed to striving for such continuous improvement and we are delighted to honour it through the presentation of an award.” Abby Miller says she’s very proud of the achievement. “We have put in a lot of work so it is so pleasing to have been recognised by RoSPA. Our staff are encouraged because they can measure themselves against other companies which also makes them want to improve themselves. “It’s also great for me as health and safety manager because it shows that as a company we are doing things right, making the necessary improvements and moving forward.” www.homeretailgroup.com Tel: 0845 603 6677

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS CPL Design is a multidisciplinary design consultancy offering a complete range of cost effective design and print solutions to a range of clients. We specialise in branding, design for print, promotional materials as well as on-line and digital work translating your ideas into innovative visual communications with real impact. For more information call Kate or Steve

01484 411 400 www.designcpl.co.uk

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

[CPLDESIGN] PRINT AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE 95


Consultant Cleaners :feature 2 20/09/2013 14:03 Page 96

ROSPA AWARDS: CONSULTANT CLEANERS

C COMMITTED TO QUALITY CONSULTANT CLEANERS HAS OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN THE CLEANING INDUSTRY, AND PROVIDE SERVICES TO OVER 650 CLIENT LOCATIONS

96

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

onsultant Cleaners Ltd, the specialist family run contract cleaning company from West Yorkshire, has achieved the prestigious Order of Distinction award from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA). Bestowed upon those companies achieving an incredible fifteen consecutive years of health and safety excellence, the Order of Distinction celebrates sustained, industry-leading standards. The independent company with regional offices in the north and midlands provides daily cleaning and support services to a variety of sectors including business, industry, retail and education. It boasts over forty years of experience and now works at over 650 client locations. Health and safety training officer Sally Gorman, who has been with Consultant Cleaners for twentythree years, was overjoyed with the Order of Distinction award. “Because I’ve been involved with the awards for the full fifteen years it was especially pleasing to have reached such a high level of health and safety competence continuously.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Consultant Cleaners :feature 2 20/09/2013 14:03 Page 97

ROSPA AWARDS: CONSULTANT CLEANERS “When we first applied for the award we wanted to see how our health and safety policies rated when scrutinised by RoSPA. To firstly receive gold and then to sustain that level over the subsequent fourteen years is incredibly gratifying. It shows our commitment to the safety of our employees as well as their ability to carry out the practices we teach them,” she remarks. Sally has played a pivotal role in advancing Consultant Cleaners’ health and safety practices over the last decade. Working closely with RoSPA for over twenty years, Sally won a scholarship through the registered charity which enabled her to do the NEBOSH (National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health) course. This led to her obtaining the RoSPA health and safety inspector’s certificate which was significant given the recent introduction of the Six Pack regulations in 1992. These regulations standardised safety best practice across Europe and required companies to adhere to six main objectives which included workplace health and safety, personal protective equipment and manual handling. Significantly, Consultant Cleaners was one of the first companies

Receiving the RoSPA award

in the region to begin incorporating these regulations into its operation. Following her NEBOSH and RoSPA health and safety inspector qualifications, Sally incorporated a number of measures to help staff work more effectively with increased attention to safety and well being. This inspired the company to put itself into competition – to see how its health and safety procedures compared to other businesses in the UK. Applying for RoSPA’s elite safety awards Sally acknowledges that she would have been happy to have achieved bronze but Consultant Cleaners went far better than that. Indeed, in its first RoSPA audit the company was bestowed the highest accolade of Gold. “For us, it was hugely satisfying to win gold in our first year competing in the RoSPA awards. To have been able to maintain that standard every year since is an incredible achievement and one that we are so proud of,” says Sally.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Consultant Cleaners has every reason to celebrate as it is the only independent cleaning company to have achieved the Order of Distinction. However, RoSPA has yet to create an award for twenty years of gold-level success which is something Sally is eager to see changed. “They said they may look into it as I feel it’s important because it is vital that we don’t get complacent. We mustn’t presume that since we’ve achieved fifteen years of success that we have already attained everything that we can achieve. We must look to continual improvement and that’s why I use the phrase ‘to shine’. “That’s a word I use with all our staff. We’re a family run business and everyone who works here feels part of that family. That’s why we encourage everyone to shine, to be the best they can be. The RoSPA award is great recognition for the work the staff do and we’d like to think they know they are

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

97


Consultant Cleaners :feature 2 20/09/2013 14:03 Page 98

ROSPA AWARDS: CONSULTANT CLEANERS

98

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Consultant Cleaners :feature 2 20/09/2013 14:04 Page 99

ROSPA AWARDS: CONSULTANT CLEANERS

“IN A VERY COMPETITIVE MARKET, BATTLING UNDER THE STRAIN OF UNCERTAIN GLOBAL ECONOMIC PRESSURES, AWARDS SUCH AS ROSPA’S ORDER OF DISTINCTION ARE EVEN MORE SIGNIFICANT” working for a company that cares about them and that values them as individuals.” Working closely with staff, the company monitors health and safely through regular audits on site. Frequent toolbox talks help to keep staff up to date with the latest methods in using equipment and cleaning products. This is complemented through BICSc (The British Institute of Cleaning Science) training of which Consultant Cleaners is an accredited assessment centre/hub. In a very competitive market, battling under the strain of uncertain global economic pressures, awards such as RoSPA’s Order of Distinction are

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

even more significant. While price may be the deciding factor, the sales team at Consultant Cleaners is increasingly aware that to stand out over competitors you need to have a track record that speaks for itself. Alongside health and safety excellence, the company is accredited to CHAS and SafeContractor, and is certified to ISO9001 and ISO14001. With aspirations to achieve OHSAS 18001 and to continue its success with RoSPA, Consultant Cleaners is set to shine even brighter in future. www.consultant-services.co.uk Tel: 01924 418 057

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

99


Parkstone Group :feature 2 24/09/2013 14:43 Page 100

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

A REPUTATION BUILT ON SOLID FOUNDATIONS PARKSTONE FULLY UNDERSTANDS THE CLIENTS REQUIREMENTS TO ‘FAST TRACK’ THE DELIVERY OF A PROJECT, AND BELIEVE THAT THEY ARE IDEALLY POSITIONED AS A CONTRACTOR WITH ALL OF THE NECESSARY RESOURCES

100

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Parkstone Group :feature 2 19/09/2013 09:05 Page 101

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

A

ccess to a construction site generally requires the possession of an up-to-date CSCS card or its equivalent. In the case of the Parkstone Group, every one of its site personnel is CSCS or CPCS trained, which has earned it the CSCS Platinum Certificate of Commitment to add to its other awards. In 2000, The Parkstone Group was the subject of a management buy-in and it has Construction, Aggregates, Environmental and Surfacing divisions supplemented by plant hire and serviced site operations. The various divisions work together or independently to provide groundworks, civil engineering and infrastructure services using resources of 65 office staff and over 130 skilled site personnel plus a regular pool of 200-300 subcontractors. TYPICAL WORK The group generally works on larger construction projects such as office complexes, shopping centres, high rise blocks, schools and military bases for main contractors such as BAM Construction, Lend Lease, Carillion and Miller Construction. Typical of the work is a contract with BAM Construction on the refurbishment of the National Indoor Arena in Birmingham where it has been working on an extension to public lounges, pile caps for new steel frames for high level walkways and ground works to existing walkways. The development of a new Asda store in Worcester by Carillion involved Parkstone in ground works plus the permanent structural propping and underpinning of the 18th Century vinegar works cellars that consist of brick arched ceilings and blue brick columns. It’s also working with Lend Lease on a new radiology building at The Royal Worcester Hospital where it’s developing the infrastructure, several new build Leicester schools under the Building Schools for the Future programme with Miller Construction as well as the new Airbus UK offices in Filton, Bristol.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

That level of activity has led to a need for stringent attention to health and safety, which Colin Hailing has addressed since joining as Head of Group HSEQ in 2010. He says: “I’ve reviewed and updated existing processes and implemented new ones where improvements to activities could be realised. The group is expanding so the implementation of new policies and procedures is a requirement through that expansion, in addition to legislative changes.” Colin’s responsibilities are health, safety, environmental, quality and training management for the Parkstone Group. He also manages the group systems, standards and certification, which includes

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

101


Parkstone Group :feature 2 19/09/2013 09:05 Page 102

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

102

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Parkstone Group :feature 2 19/09/2013 09:05 Page 103

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

Achilles Building Confidence, CHAS, ISO 9000, ISO 14000 and OHSAS 18001, conducts site inspections and incident investigations, provides supply chain approval and delivers internal training courses among other tasks. To do that, he’s assisted by his team of IMS, HSE and training coordinators, HSEQ managers, internal auditors and safety coaches. RAISING STANDARDS The safety coaches are a recent innovation helping to raise safety standards and promote the idea of ‘Safety First’. “We used to have safety representatives whom operatives could contact but they weren’t necessarily on their site,” recalls Colin. “In every canteen, there would be contact photographs and details of the safety representatives so operatives could phone them. But, what I’ve introduced now is that every site will have a safety coach, an operative who has received health and safety train-

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

ing to work as a site based safety representative.” That’s just one of a number of initiatives that have contributed to Parkstone’s excellent safety record and it winning various awards that include the BAM Supply Chain Health and Safety Performance Award 2013 for achieving a good all round safety standard on BAM sites. Colin believes client awards are particularly important because they reward Parkstone’s efforts on sites and are recognised and appreciated by all involved. However, he’s also keen to enter for relevant awards from other bodies, including the CONSTRUCT trade association for the concrete structures industry, where he is a committee member. He says: “We won the Health and Safety Initiative of the Year 2012 Award with an initiative with a point of work risk assessment card. It’s a credit card style card that gives generalised details of work activities. It’s an aide-memoire that prompts operatives to ensure they’ve been

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

103


Parkstone Group :feature 2 19/09/2013 09:05 Page 104

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP briefed, have the right tools, training and working environment to complete a task safely.” REDUCING CABLE STRIKES An entry has gone in for this year’s CONSTRUCT Health and Safety Initiative of the Year 2013 awards based on another Parkstone initiative with its specific permit holder training that provides information, guidance and will train operatives on locating and avoiding underground services. This initiative has already reduced the cable strike rate by 50% since the training was introduced, which covers the management of the operation, documented guidance and is provided to operatives, site supervision and management as well as giving them the right equipment. There’s a day’s training course which highlights what they’re doing and why, how to do it correctly, how to record it and the actions to take when finding services. “As a groundworker, we dig a lot of excavations so the potential of hitting live services is quite high,” stresses Colin. “With all our training and equipment, service strikes are now at an all time low. On frequent occasions, unknown live services exist within our work zone but are not recorded on drawings and any damage could cause loss of vital services to local business and the community. We have reduced our service strikes and it makes a big difference.” CONSTANT PROCESS A big challenge is dealing with a diverse workforce that includes both the older and younger generations as well as operatives who do not speak English as a first language and those of sub-contractors. The answer is a constant process of education and involvement, keeping everyone informed and adopting a proactive and receptive approach with full support from senior management, including delivering training courses and briefings in more than one language.

104

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

Colin says: “We have weekly and monthly communications out to sites, generally through toolbox talks, safety alerts and safety posters. For senior and middle managers, we have a monthly construction meeting and a designated section covers health and safety, environment, quality, incident statistics, training requirements and new HSEQ initiatives to be introduced.” Although there’s understandably a big emphasis on heath and safety, environmental matters are also part of Colin’s brief and Parkstone’s efforts in this area are helped by the activities of the group of companies. Its Aggregates division, for example, supplies new and recycled aggregates for other parts of the business as well as third party companies while its Environmental division

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Parkstone Group :feature 2 19/09/2013 09:05 Page 105


Parkstone Group :feature 2 23/09/2013 15:22 Page 106


Parkstone Group :feature 2 21/09/2013 13:14 Page 107

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE ITS AIMS OF MINIMISING ITS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT, PARKSTONE SPENDS CONSIDERABLE TIME AT THE START OF PROJECTS TALKING WITH CLIENTS TO ENSURE ANY LANDFILL DISPOSAL IS MINIMISED

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

provides recycling facilities. “It’s very beneficial to the rest of the group because, from a landfill point of view, it’s expensive,” states Colin. “We use a lot of concrete and excess concrete can be crushed and used again. Recycling the materials we use is a big part of what we do and it’s environmentally friendly because we’re re-using constantly.” WASTE PROCESSING In effect, it’s a constant processing of waste to create aggregate that goes out for construction use. It’s cost effective and a definite positive for the group, with the waste recycling facilities also offered to other companies. Parkstone is, of course, governed to some degree by the wishes of main contractors and the circumstances of particular sites where it works. That determines what’s

removed and what’s left, with buildings often needing to be demolished and each particular site assessed individually for sustainability, legal considerations and economic responsibilities to the rest of the group. In order to achieve its aims of minimising its environmental impact, Parkstone spends considerable time at the start of projects talking with clients to ensure any landfill disposal is minimised. That’s often achieved by a remodelling of the site to create a balanced cut and fill, remodelling of existing material with the addition of lime or cement to produce a more stable founding material or by crushing and screening of existing hard materials so they can incorporated into the works. Any material that is unusable is recycled into materials that can be sold back to the construction Industry.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

107


Parkstone Group :feature 2 21/09/2013 13:15 Page 108

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

“SOMETIMES WE USE A COMBINATION OF IDEAS FROM SEVERAL CLIENTS AND OURSELVES IN ONE PARTICULAR AREA. IF SOMEBODY HAS A GOOD IDEA AND IT WORKS, WE ALL SHARE IT AND WE ALL BENEFIT.”

This process avoids the need to dispose of over two thirds of the material previously destined for landfill. With the economy apparently on the mend and construction activity picking up, Parkstone is wary of the financial implications of trying to move too quickly. Colin says: “We want a nice steady growth because we’ve had competitors in the past try to expand too fast and they don’t exist any more. We’re in the process of extending our fleet of tipper wagons as we currently use both our own and subcontract to remove waste and deliver gravel and stone. We’re expanding but making sure it’s sustainable and we’re not getting ahead of ourselves.”

108

ACHIEVING BEST PRACTICE Any expansion will be accompanied by necessary changes to health and safety as well as environmental activities to ensure Parkstone maintains legal compliance and achieves best practice. “Individual clients bring new initiatives and, wherever possible, we’ll adapt what they have and adopt it as our standard,” says Colin. “Sometimes we use a combination of ideas from several clients and ourselves in one particular area. If somebody has a good idea and it works, we all share it and we all benefit.” www.parkstonegroup.com Tel: 0845 4810700

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Parkstone Group :feature 2 23/09/2013 15:35 Page 109

HEALTH & SAFETY: PARKSTONE GROUP

[

]

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS

BUILD YOUR CLIENT LIST

ADVERTISE IN BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

CALL 01484 411400

For more information or a free quote call Kate or Steve:

01484 411 400 www.designcpl.co.uk

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

[CPLDESIGN] PRINT AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

109


BFP:feature 2 21/09/2013 14:27 Page 110

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY: THE BRITISH PROPERTY FEDERATION

BPF WELCOMES FLOOD SOLUTION T he British Property Federation (BPF) has welcomed confirmation that flood insurance will continue to be available to households and businesses beyond July following an announcement this morning by Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander. The ‘Flood Re’ proposal, to be consulted on, will limit the amount hundreds of thousands of people in at risk areas will pay for insurance, rather than reverting to the open market and seeing swathes of property across the country rendered worthless. The BPF had warned throughout the process that a solution between insurers and the Government must be found as property without insurance is essentially worthless. Key elements of the proposal include:

110

Flood Re will be run and financed by insurers as a not –for- profit fund which will cover the cost of flood claims from high risk homes. Insurers will pass the flood risk element from those households deemed at high risk of flooding to the fund. Premiums for the flood risk will be calculated based on council tax banding up to a maximum limit depending on the Band. Flood Re would charge member firms an annual charge of £180million.This equates to a levy of £10.50 on annual household premiums and represents the estimated level of cross-subsidy that already exists between lower and higher flood risk premiums. Flood Re will be designed to fully deal with at least 99.5% of years. Even in the worst half a per cent of years, Flood Re will cover losses up to those expected in a 1 in 200 year – a year

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

six times worse than 2007 – with Government taking primary responsibility – working with the industry and Flood Re – for distributing any available resources to Flood Re policyholders should claims exceed that level. Ian Fletcher, director of policy at the British Property Federation, said: “This is welcome news and will come as a huge relief to property owners across the country that have been living with uncertainty about flood insurance for too long. “It’s clear that without an agreement with Government the insurance market would not be able to offer protection in high risk areas, and with recent flood incident still fresh in the memory this would have been an unpalatable outcome. “Universal flood cover was always a prize worth persuing, as is ensuring it remains affordable to everyone.”

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


BFP:feature 2 21/09/2013 14:27 Page 111

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY: THE BRITISH PROPERTY FEDERATION

RESULTS OF SECOND ANNUAL PLANNING SURVEY

I

ndependent property consultant GL Hearn, in partnership with the British Property Federation (BPF), today held a seminar to announce the results of its Annual Planning Survey (APS). The survey, which is in its second year, analyses the efficiency of all 33 London Borough in processing major* planning applications in terms of process times and approval rates, as well as determining the number of major applications submitted per borough. Conducted over the summer of 2013, the survey canvassed the views of those involved in both sides of the development management process to understand the collective sentiment within the industry of recent and proposed changes to the planning system. The survey was conducted in two parts, with the first asking the views of Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) and the second carried out amongst those involved on the Applicants’ side. GL Hearn received 50 responses from LPAs and 144 from Applicants and/or their advisors. The surveys found that during the 2012-13 period there were 22% fewer major applications determined (775 applications in 2012-13 against 1075 in 2011-12). Of the 775 applications determined, there was a significant reduction in decision time compared to last year, with the average time from validation to determination falling to 24 weeks in 2012-13 (down from 34 weeks in 2011-12). The average approval rate was only very slightly down this year, from 85% in 2011-12 to 82% in 2012-13. UNCHANGED Overall the likelihood of securing planning permission for a ‘major development’ remains unchanged in comparison to last year’s survey. Major planning applications are being determined faster than this time last year, although, the large majority of applicants remain unsatisfied with the length of time it takes for applications to be determined (70% in 2012-13 down slightly from 75% in 2012) with 63% still concerned with the cost of applications. Shaun Andrews, Head of Investor and Developer Planning at GL Hearn said there are a number of possible reasons behind the speeding up of the determination process: “It may be that there are fewer applications in the system, therefore LPAs are able to allocate resources more efficiently. Or it could be due to greater emphasis being placed upon the pre-application period, so although applications are being processed more quickly, overall the length of time for the application

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

process remains the same. Alternatively, it could be that the Government’s reforms are having a positive effect and as such LPAs are making considerable efforts to determine applications more quickly.” Shaun continues: “Last year’s survey provided some compelling evidence that there is an appetite for further reform to the planning system, particularly that which will reduce planning delays, the costs associated with ‘planning gain’ and that which will deliver greater certainty for investors. This year’s survey demonstrates that this appetite for improvement remains with an overall dissatisfaction with the current speed of determination and cost of applications.” “Whilst there have been a number of Government reforms since 2010, the main initiatives are remain the Localisim Act and NPPF - when asked what impact these reforms have had on development activity, the prevailing view remains that there has been only been a limited effect, if any at all.” ‘SPECIAL MEASURES’ Since the last survey two significant measures have either been introduced (special measures) or reinvigorated (Planning Performance Agreements). When asked what impact ‘special measures’ will have on the planning system there was a split response: 47% of Applicants believe they will improve LPA performance, whilst 58% of LPAs do not think they will improve performance. Of those that have entered in to a Planning Performance Agreement, the same division was found: only 25% of Applicants view the experience as positive (same as in 2012) in comparison to 62% of LPAs. Liz Peace, chief executive of the British Property Federation, said: “We’re pleased to see a reduction in the time taken by local authorities to determine a planning application. “Time will tell as the economic conditions improve, and more major proposals come to the table, whether this is a sustained improvement or as a result of the fall in applications from the previous year. It should also be noted that there’s supposed to be a 13 week deadline for major planning applications, so while this is a move in the right direction, there’s still a long way to go. “One area where there appears to be agreement is ensuring local authorities have the resources and staff to ensure planning applications are dealt with in a timely manner. In the face of central government spending cuts there are fears planning departments are smaller and less well equipped.”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

111


Land Securities :feature 2 20/09/2013 12:20 Page 112

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY: LAND SECURITIES

WORKING TO A CLEAR PLAN

LAND SECURITIES DEVELOP AND MANAGE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY THROUGHOUT THE UK MEETING THE NEEDS OF BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITIES

112

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Land Securities :feature 2 20/09/2013 12:20 Page 113

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY: LAND SECURITIES

A

s a FTSE 100 company, and the largest Real Estate Investment Trust in the UK, Land Securities is a business based on market-leading strategy and values. The company’s story begins in 1944 when founder Harold Samuel purchased Land Securities Investment Trust Ltd, which at the time, owned three houses in Kensington. After refocusing on commercial property, the company blossomed – quickly becoming the UK’s leading property business. This desire to strive for the very best is no more evident than in Land Securities award-winning health and safety culture, and the pioneering approach the company takes towards its workers wellbeing. Clive Johnson is the Group Head of Health and Safety at Land Securities, having joined the business in 2011, with the objective to raise the health and safety Profile across the group’s significant portfolio. “After 18 months with Land Securities, I’ve now got a team of people equipped with the skills and requirements needed for looking after a complex portfolio including shopping centres, retail parks and construction developments up to £900 million,” Clive said. “We’ve changed things around a little bit with the team here - sending people on courses, and up-skilling them to have all the necessary health and safety competencies for the different parts of the business. We’ve got a rounded team now with the necessary skills to manage it all.” For Land Securities – a company with such a diverse array of property interests, achieving a sense of consistency is difficult with regards to a successful health and safety culture. This, according to Clive, has been a priority in his time at the company. “We’ve put a series of documents together called our “One Best Way”, in which we work with our whole supply chain. The aim is to try to achieve above compliance level, and demonstrate best practice across the board. I think a hands-on approach is the only way you can get our colleagues and supply chain to buy into health and safety.” This aim has also led to a recent innovation in Land Securities’ approach to health and safety

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

through the introduction of “Continuous Improvement Groups”, in which the company gather together related service providers, contractors and consultants to share and promote best practice. Land Securities set up these groups for six disciplines, which sought to bring the various health and safety representatives from each specialist group together to discuss best practice. However, more importantly, it presented a real opportunity for Land Securities to set the tone. “The level of safety we set will be the level of safety we get,” said Clive. “Ultimately, what we’re getting now is a consistent approach to health and safety across our entire portfolio. We set these groups up with our whole supply chain, security, cleaning, mechanical, electrical and maintenance, CDMC’s, designers and principal contractors. The programme is into its second year, and the results have been unbelievable.” In addition to this, Land Securities has just recently implemented “right card right job” through the principal contractor group, which targets a change of culture on construction sites, says Clive. “What I’ve noticed over the years is inconsistency with the way that CSCS cards are often being used. On many building sites, operatives use CSCS cards, just to gain access to site. The CSCS Card should

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

113


Land Securities :feature 2 23/09/2013 15:51 Page 114

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY: LAND SECURITIES

[

]

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS

For more information or a free quote call Kate or Steve:

01484 411 400 www.designcpl.co.uk

114

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

[CPLDESIGN] PRINT AND DESIGN SOLUTIONS

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Land Securities :feature 2 23/09/2013 15:51 Page 115

RETAIL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY: LAND SECURITIES identify the operative and his trade skill, which will then qualify them to undertake certain tasks. Often though, the trade listed on the card doesn’t match up to the actual job undertaken on-site, which can lead to, or be a contributing factor in, an increase in site accidents/incidents. “In order to combat this, we’ve installed a programme where people working on our site must have the right card for the right job. By doing this, we’re ensuring competence, and making sure each person has the right skills for the job. We recognise that we’ve got to raise the bar in the sector we work in.” RESULTS The results of this initiative have yet to be measured, with Land Securities recording an extremely low accident/incident rate in 2012. “We did just short of four million man hours last year, and we had nine reportable accidents right across the business,” said Clive. “We’re way below the industry average for accidents, and we’re very proud of that.” One of the reasons for this record is simply by encouraging an open dialogue amongst the company’s construction workers. “We’ve got an open and honest policy with all our contractors, and our people are very open about recording things. We don’t try to hide accidents, it’s quite the opposite we want to know what’s going on, so we can stop it from happening in the future!” Land Securities’ progressive and honest approach to health and safety management earned the company an international award from the British

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Safety Council last year. The award was for the company’s Gunwharf Quays shopping centre in Portsmouth, a ground-breaking £200 million redevelopment of the harbour. “We’ve instigated a complete culture at Gunwharf Quays to make sure it’s a safe place for people to come and shop – it’s all about being proactive, managing safety with huge crowds, and creating a safe shopping experience.” HEALTH AND SAFETY AIMS Recently, the company revealed its health and safety aims for 2013, with Clive outlining four key objectives for the year ahead. “Our first objective is to provide a vision for behavioural change for both our employees and supply chain through One Best Way, and our health and safety pledge. “Secondly, we aim to encourage visible leadership in health and safety, and thirdly, we intend to work towards ‘Destination Zero’, in our journey to achieve an injury-free environment.” While these three objectives will undoubtedly raise the bar for Land Securities’ already extremely successful health and safety record, it is the fourth aim that perhaps resonates the most. “Our final objective is to bring the ‘health’ back into health and safety,” said Clive. “We’re introducing occupational medical surveillance on all our development projects, which is something the British Safety Council, H.S.E and BOHS are extremely pleased with. It is a great example of the client setting the tone.” There were unfortunately 50 fatal accidents in construction last year, but over 8,000 deaths

through construction-related occupational diseases. The effects of being exposed to damaging substances and fumes such as silica dust and diesel fumes, are not felt for years, which is possibly why the issue has slipped under the radar. Clive elaborates, “Silica is a good example of this issue, you often see workers cutting slabs with dust going everywhere - silicon fibres can be as carcinogenic as asbestos! What Land Securities want to do as a business is to not only make our construction sites safer, but healthier too. We want to give people a long and happy retirement, thanks to a healthy working environment.” This particular policy is extremely forward thinking, with Clive not anticipating quantifiable results in the short term. “Our health policy is new for this year, and it’s not going to be a quick fix. We’ll have to work hard, and I don’t think you’ll see any results in the first year - it’s about getting the ball rolling. “You can introduce policies to reduce injuries and see results pretty quickly. We’re not going to see results for several years – except for people living longer!” Clive is confident that putting the “health” back into health and safety is a long-overdue advancement in effective policy. “This is something that the industry is looking for clients to drive, as it’s overlooked – and it shouldn’t be. We as a business can do something about it, and that’s what we’re trying to do.” www.landsecurities.com Tel: 020 7413 9000

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

115


civils:feature 2 18/09/2013 11:45 Page 116

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS

CELEBRATING

EXTRAORDINARY

ENGINEERS

INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS WALES CYMRU HAS COMMEMORATED THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE EXTRAORDINARY ENGINEERING TEAM BEHIND THE PONTCYSYLLTE AQUEDUCT AND LLANGOLLEN CANAL

A

new commemorative panel was presented by the Institution to the Canal & River Trust to celebrate the contributions of the famous civil engineer and his colleagues to the iconic structure, which has been recognised by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Professor Barry Clarke, Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) President, said: “It is a great personal pleasure for me during my visit to North Wales as 148th president of the Institution of Civil Engineers to come to this iconic structure which stands as a monument to our first president, Thomas Telford along with his associates William Hazledine and William Jessop. He continued: “The plaque presented today celebrates the contribution of all three of these great pioneers, and their associates, to the planning, design and construction of this magnificent structure. It is a testament to their imagination, expertise and quality of execution that the canal and its aqueducts still form a key element of our infrastructure today. It thus provides an excellent example of the sustainable construction which the Institution has highlighted in recent years and current members aim to achieve in all areas of construction.” Telford was responsible for the innovative construction of Pontcysyllte Aqueducts where a continuous cast iron trough was fabricated on top of stone pillars to carry the canal and towpath 126 feet (38.2m) above the River Dee. Telford was also responsible for hundreds of other works throughout Great Britain and was invited to become the First President of the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1820 an honour he held until his death.

116

William Jessop was apprenticed to John Smeaton, “the Father of Civil Engineering” and became an experienced and respected engineer in the field of canals, rivers, drainage and similar works. Jessop’s role at Pontcysyllte was to consider, correct and approve Telford’s plans and recommendations. Telford called Hazledine “The Arch-conjurer himself, Merlin Hazledine”! Hazledine was responsible for making all the iron for Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, transporting it to site and building the 1007 ft (305m) long trough to carry the canal over the Dee Valley. Hazledine was also responsible for supplying the ironwork for a number of Telford’s bridges throughout the country. Geoff Ogden, Chairman of ICE Wales Cymru, said:“The plaque is part of a programme to celebrate civil engineering in Wales. In the past eight years the Institution of Civil Engineers Wales Cymru has placed 29 plaques and information panels throughout Wales marking important historical engineering sites and commemorating famous engineers such as Trevithick, Brunel and Telford. Keith Jones, Director of ICE Wales Cymru, said: “We are pleased to take this opportunity to recognise another early civil engineer whose work can still be seen and admired for its engineering and to recognise his contribution to the history of civil engineering and the development of engineering skills.” Wendy Capelle, Waterway Manager at the Canal & River Trust added: “We are pleased to be able to work with ICE to help recognise the extraordinary engineering achievement of Hazeldine, Jessop and Telford in the creation of the magnificent Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, the centrepiece of the World Heritage Site.”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


civils:feature 2 18/09/2013 11:47 Page 117

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

117


Transport for London:feature 2 19/09/2013 14:24 Page 118

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

KEEPING LONDON MOVING THESE ARE EXCITING YET CHALLENGING TIMES FOR TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

118

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Transport for London:feature 2 19/09/2013 14:24 Page 119

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

I

t is an exciting yet challenging time for Transport for London (TfL). The local government body responsible for the majority of the city’s transport system has already commenced large-scale investment to improve the network but is committed to significant efficiency savings between now and 2022. Despite seeing its funding from government cut by 8.5 per cent following a comprehensive spending review this year, TfL has identified a number of areas where it can reduce costs, including its recently successful Innovative Contractor Engagement process, while delivering strategic investment to improve the entire transport network. Sarah Atkins, commercial director for Rail and Underground, says the investment is important because of the role TfL will play in London’s postOlympics development in the next five years and beyond. “One thing that was accepted by politicians and business during the spending review was the fact that the upgrades we are delivering are critical to London’s future,” she remarks. “As well as the completion of the subsurface upgrades we have plans to deliver new upgrades, for example on the Piccadilly line, that will improve the

capacity of the network to cater for London’s increasing numbers of travellers. Where we have already completed upgrades – for example, on Victoria and Jubilee lines – we are looking at ways we can enhance the service to get more out of the network.” Certainly, the economic climate has played a role in both TfL’s ability to invest and the need to reduce costs but this hasn’t prevented it from developing a very ambitious programme of upgrades and enhancements. “We are committed to a six-year programme that will include, for example, large station upgrades at Tottenham Court Road, Bond Street and Victoria as well as significant subsurface improvements. But we still must find additional savings and efficiencies to the £9.8bn we have already secured to 2017/18. We are making tough decisions to make sure we are delivering the best possible value for money for fare and tax payers by bearing down on costs whether that is in maintenance and operating budgets or in the way that we deliver our capital projects. “Importantly we must marry efficiencies with effectiveness so we are also looking to our supply chain to help us achieve our objectives. This has led to innovation in the way we procure the services of our suppliers.” Through this process, Dragados SA was recently appointed the contract for the Bank station capacity upgrade. The Bank and Monument Tube station is the fourth busiest interchange station on the Underground network carrying 96,000 customers during the morning rush hours. Located in the heart of the city’s financial district, customer numbers are expected to rise and the interchange must be in a position to cater for them. Served by six lines as well as the Docklands Light Railway (DLR), the upgrade project will deliver increased capacity at Bank station and a step free route between the Northern line platforms, DLR and street levels. This is the first time TfL has made use of its Innovative Contractor Engagement (ICE) process which was principally designed to get the benefits of early contractor involvement while developing major design and build contracts. Each bidder is encouraged to bring their expertise and knowledge to drive innovation that will reduce cost and risk to the project. For Bank, TfL produced a RIBA-D base design but gave bidders the flexibility to submit their own

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

119


Transport for London:feature 2 19/09/2013 14:25 Page 120

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT FOR LONDON designs. Through the ICE process, bidders were encouraged to take the design and find ways to reduce the cost of delivering the project while maintaining or enhancing its effectiveness. A robust process applied to this new procurement model means TfL is able to meet the mayoral and governmental imperative to deliver better value for money and its objectives to deliver an improved service to its customers. At Bank, the target was an increase in value of 15 per cent, made up of reduction in the estimated final cost, improvements in the benefits, reduction in disadvantages and an improved schedule. The process proved to be a success with three out of four of the bidding consortia exceeding this target. Assessed against the previously developed RIBA-D base design, the lead bid score provided overall improvement of 49.8 per cent, including 19 per cent improvement on customer journey time and 23 per cent cost reduction. Collaboration has also proven a decisive model in producing significant cost benefits. Andrew Quincey, director of commercial, whose responsibilities include procurement of services for TfL’s surface transport network, highlights the benefits of the recent London Highways Alliance Contract (LoHAC). Developed as a joint venture between TfL and London’s boroughs, LoHAC aims to deliver a reliable, reputable and cost-effective highways service across the city. “One of the biggest pressures in recent years is collaboration when buying similar things so through

120

our alliance with London’s borough’s we expect to save up to £450m on highway services over the next eight years. Previously, the work was carried out by a vast range of different contractors. Now, for the first time, these contracts cover all of London’s major roads,” explains Andrew. LoHAC will deliver around 25 per cent savings on a spend of £1.2bn over the life of the contract. This will be achieved through a number of benefits such as

work provider with increased economies of scale. For example, a recent escalators contract with Otis will deliver savings worth £65m over TfL’s previous policy of procuring individual escalator services. Through standardising the specification, TfL won’t be installing different makes and models of escalator around the network. Otis now has a long-term contract to deliver both maintenance and installation of new escalators. A similar contract, worth

“EFFICIENCY IS KEY, BUT IT IS ALSO ABOUT MAKING SURE WE DON’T LOSE SIGHT OF THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE TO CUSTOMERS.” ANDREW QUINCEY DIRECTOR OF COMMERCIAL consistency in the quality of works and materials used and co-ordination and planning of works to reduce congestion and disruption to customers. There will also be a reduction in contract tender costs while plant and labour costs are optimised. Elsewhere, TfL has reduced the amount of contracts it puts in place thus cutting down on the amount of suppliers it uses. For example, for the materials it purchases London Underground reduced its suppliers from 1200 to 45. This has brought with it cost savings in addition to better control. Crossrail, which will fall under the management of TfL in 2018, is also providing the transport net-

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

about £30m in savings, has been agreed with KONE for the network’s lifts. TfL has ambitious plans for the future and it has placed trust in its supply chain to help it deliver those objectives. “Efficiency is key,” says Andrew, “but it is also about making sure we don’t lose sight of the service we provide to customers. We rely on our supply chain to not only deliver efficiency continuously, but also to help us deliver effectiveness, reliability of service and performance.” www.tfl.gov.uk Tel: 0343 222 1234

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Transport for London:feature 2 19/09/2013 14:25 Page 121

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

BE BETTER INFORMED For Just £59 you can have BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE delivered to your doorstep EACH MONTH

SUBSCRIBE TODAY CALL 01484 411400 www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

121


transport scotland:feature 2 18/09/2013 12:37 Page 122

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT SCOTLAND

KEEPING

SCOTLAND TRANSPORT SCOTLAND IS THE NATIONAL TRANSPORT AGENCY FOR SCOTLAND

MOVING T

he general perception is that all big projects come in behind schedule and over budget. That’s something David Middleton, Chief Executive of Transport Scotland would argue against because he believes his organisation tends to manage things much better. “We have a sizeable track record of serious projects that have been on time and on budget so we think we have some expertise in that,” he insists. “It’s not always the case that big projects go over budget; in fact it’s been pretty infrequently the case here.” GOVERNMENT RESPONSIBILITIES Transport Scotland is the government agency in Scotland that fulfils Scottish ministers’ transport responsibilities including those for the motorway and trunk road network, overseeing the rail fran-

122

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


transport scotland:feature 2 18/09/2013 12:37 Page 123

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT SCOTLAND

chise, ferries, and Highlands and Islands airports. It also covers policy responsibility, whether for sustainable transport initiatives, aviation matters except where reserved to the UK government, cycling, walking, canals and all other transport responsibilities for the government in Scotland. David says: “It’s about links across Scotland, making sure we’re well connected, both to benefit the economy, improve journey times and making them more reliable and to make a contribution to reducing emissions.” To achieve that, it works within a budget allocated by ministers and with priorities set, although the agency has input to the process. Certain elements have to be included, such as the maintenance of the trunk road and motorway network, and additional projects then include road and rail developments. Once funds are allocated, certain of the larger projects will be subject to specific legislation although many will go through a conventional process of publishing road orders, holding a public enquiry and then, if the go-ahead is given on the original or an amended basis, running the capital procurement and awarding the contracts. While there are some framework agreements for consultancy and smaller areas of work, any sizeable projects are always tendered for in a conventional EUcompliant way. REGIONAL TRANSPORT PARTNERSHIPS The progress of all projects is monitored and there’s also regular liaison with Regional Transport Partnerships although, as David points out, each one varies: “Strathclyde Partnership for Transport has quite a big service delivery because it oversees

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

bus services in the city of Glasgow and beyond, and it runs the Glasgow underground. Some of the others are more about their regional interests, making representations and pursuing advocacy, and we liaise with a lot of them on many projects. We work quite closely with Nestrans in the Northeast as we’re looking at taking forward the Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route project.” Transport Scotland also has relationships with other organisations that include the public transport operators. Since the buses are deregulated, the relationship is largely around running the national concessionary travel scheme at agreed remuneration levels and paying the bus service operating grant, a subsidy to the industry.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

123


transport scotland:feature 2 18/09/2013 12:38 Page 124

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT SCOTLAND The organisation’s responsibility to reduce emissions is through the transport element of the government’s emissions targets. Although it’s accepted Transport Scotland can’t directly influence vehicle emissions and people’s driving habits, David stresses it has significant influence in other ways: “We try to be sustainable when we carry out road improvements in terms of the use of materials. On the M74, we reused material from other parts of Glasgow where some demolitions were going on while on the Forth Replacement Crossing, everything is re-used in a sustainable way. I know some people won’t see a motorway extension as being something that leads automatically to lower emissions but, if we relieve congestion, we hope we can help to reduce emissions. “The railways are a success story in Scotland in the last few years and we hope that, by encouraging people to use them where possible, we can reduce the number of car journeys. At the same time, we recognise that the overwhelming proportion of the nation’s freight still goes by road and therefore we need quick, reliable, predictable connections by road so the economy can function and traffic is not sitting in queues for great lengths of time.” There are walking and cycling initiatives in cities to try and encourage less car use, with a target of 10% of journeys being by cycle by 2020. Added to that are schemes to promote electric vehicles and capital support to public transport operators for more hybrid buses. Much of the organisation’s attention currently is focused on five major schemes that are expect-

“THE RAILWAYS ARE A SUCCESS STORY IN SCOTLAND IN THE LAST FEW YEARS AND WE HOPE THAT, BY ENCOURAGING PEOPLE TO USE THEM WHERE POSSIBLE, WE CAN REDUCE THE NUMBER OF CAR JOURNEYS.” DAVID MIDDLETON CHIEF EXECUTIVE ed to cost £3.8 billion to build. The Queensferry Crossing, previously known as the Forth Replacement Crossing, is in construction, as is the Borders Railway that will provide a new line from Edinburgh to the central Borders. A preferred bidder for enhancements to the M8 is due to be announced shortly while the Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route is at an earlier stage. The Edinburgh to Glasgow improvement project is a rolling programme of contracts and improvements to the Edinburgh to Glasgow railway connections that’s proceeding at the moment, with contracts such as the Cumbernauld line electrification already happening. All were the subject of a recent report by audit body Audit Scotland, which concluded there were no worries about the progress of any of the projects and no suggestion of cost overruns. That follows the success of previous recent projects, the M74 and M80 motorway extensions that opened

in 2011, which both came in on time and within budget. Whilst Transport Scotland has plenty to contend with currently, due to the five major projects it’s working on, it’s already looking ahead to future programmes. “The government’s committed to upgrading to dual carriageway the A9 between Perth and Inverness by 2025 and the A96 between Inverness and Aberdeen by 2030,” recounts David. “We’re also discussing with the Department for Transport in the south about the Secretary of State for Transport’s aspirations to see High Speed Rail in due course leading to a three hour journey between the central belt of Scotland and London. Separate to that, there’s work going on up here to look at the business case for beginning High Speed Rail in Scotland, perhaps between Glasgow and Edinburgh.” www.transportscotland.gov.uk Tele: 0141 2727100

ADD ANOTHER DIMENSION TO YOUR

BUSINESS ADVERTISE IN BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

CALL 01484 411400 124

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


transport scotland:feature 2 01/10/2013 09:30 Page 125

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: TRANSPORT SCOTLAND

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

125


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:09 Page 126

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION

THE FORESTRY COMMISSION IS THE GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE PROTECTION AND EXPANSION OF BRITAIN’S FORESTS AND WOODLANDS

MANAGING OUR

WOODLANDS 126

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:09 Page 127

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION

S

et up in 1919 in response to the depletion of Britain’s woods and forests during the First World War, the Forestry Commission is a nonministerial government department responsible for the protection of woodland in England and Scotland. When the commission was first established it began to buy large amounts of former agricultural land which eventually made it the largest land owner in Britain. Over the years the goals of the Commission have broadened into such areas as research and recreation. In addition, protecting and improving biodiversity across Britain’s forests are also key concerns of the organisation. The primary role of the Forestry Commission is the protection and management of England and Scotland’s woodland. As well as this, the Commission is responsible for conservation, support, and restoration. It also provides leisure and recreation that supports its key aims through interaction with the public. As the all-seeing-eye, the Forestry Commission plants many millions of trees every year, to create new woodland and to replace the trees harvested. Some of these trees will help to regenerate blighted industrial landscapes such as former coalfield communities and to bring new woodlands closer to urban areas. Crucially, the Commission sustainably harvests almost four million tonnes of wood every year from England and Scotland's public forests. That’s more than a third of total domestic production. This reduces dependency on imported wood and provides low-carbon materials for the domestic wood-using industries, and for fuel and energy. The income from timber helps to offset the costs of managing the forests in its care. As Britain’s largest land manager the Commission is custodian of 900,000 hectares of land including some of the best loved and most spectacular landscapes. Two-thirds of the estate lies within National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty or Sites of Special Scientific Interest. The organisation also provides grants, licences and advice to private woodland owners to encourage new tree planting and to help keep private forests and

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

woodland under active and sustainable management. It also works in partnership with a wide range of public bodies, NGOs, small businesses and communities to respond to national, regional and local needs. Where land is not wanted, The Forestry Commission will turn it into green space for the benefit of all. Through pioneering research and on-theground experience, the Commission has proved it can successfully, and economically, transform brownfield sites such as old collieries and factories into usable greenspace. This improves the environment, people’s health and the local economy by restoring places that people want to work, rest and play in. Indeed, more people visit a forest than they do the seaside. The Commission offers visitors many thousands of waymarked walks and trails, cycle routes and bridle paths, open every day and free of charge. In many places, the Forestry Commission provides the only local opportunity for quiet and accessible recreation. The millions of visitors contribute almost £2 billion annually to the economy, mostly into rural areas. Its network of visitor centres provides a unique opportunity to engage with the public. They are an ideal platform to talk to people about climate change, helping them to understand the issues, see

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

127


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:10 Page 128

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION

directly how climate change is affecting our trees and woods today, what we need to do to help them adapt, and what actions individuals and families can take to make a difference. GREEN BUILDINGS The green agenda and operating in a sustainable manner is at the heart of everything the Forestry Commission does. This is exampled in the leisure and recreation arm of the organisation where it continues to develop its relationship with the public. A key part of this is the green technology utilised at its current and newly constructed visitor centres. For example, in 2007, a project to develop Dalby Forest near Pickering as a regional centre of excellence for sustainable activities saw the site undergoing redevelopment. This provided a new cycle centre and an area for business use. The new visitor centre with community facilities, restaurant, and retail and exhibition areas opened in April of that year. It also features an interactive learning centre for renewable technologies. The centre has been designed to nestle into the natural landscape, and it was constructed using the latest sustainable building methods.

128

Dalby Forest is the largest forest in Yorkshire and a key attraction in the North York Moors National Park with 400,000 visitors per year. The forest was used primarily as a timber resource until 1960, when the opening up of a through-route brought more visitors to the area. Today, the forest plays a major role in the local tourism sector and offers a range of outdoor leisure activities including mountain biking, seasonal concerts and the high-rope course ‘Go-Ape’. The site of the new visitor centre was excavated using a ‘cut and fill technique’, minimising environmental impact and the amount of soil that had to be moved. The building is set on steel screw pile foundations and is fixed to the ground with 39 screws, making it easy to remove and be recycled should the building no longer be required in the future. The main structure has been constructed using premade glue-laminated frame made from certified Scandinavian hardwood. The floor, roof and walls are formed from insulated panels, creating a ‘super insulated’ external envelope. Oak was used for the internal floors, and Douglas fir for the window frames and doors. The building is clad in untreated

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Forestry Commission :feature 2 23/09/2013 11:50 Page 129

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

129


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:15 Page 130

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION

130

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:16 Page 131

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION

larch harvested from the surrounding forests and locally milled. The naturally-weathered timbers provide a distinctive finish. The whole structure has a negligible environmental footprint and can be completely dismantled and recycled at the end of its life. Sustainable technology within the building includes the use of wood fuel. A 50 kilowatt wood fuel boiler provides heating and hot water. The boiler is fuelled using wood pellets, made from compacted sawdust, which burn very effectively. The fuel hopper holds 5 tonnes of pellets (sourced from the UK) which provides heating for 8–10 weeks. It uses a reservoir of heated water to buffer variations in demand, with auto-ignition and the ability to slumber when required, suited to the building use and insulation performance. The building has also been designed to maximise natural light and ventilation. The central atrium provides an impressive foyer and meeting place which is naturally ventilated by single-glazed windows that automatically open and close. A‘stack

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

effect’ (hot air rising) pulls cool air in through the lower windows during hot sunny days. An integrated building management system controls the natural ventilation systems, monitors electricity from the solar panels, wind turbine and wood fuel boiler, and manages the temperature in various parts of the centre to ensure maximum thermal efficiency. Elsewhere, you’ll find a collection of solar panels. A photovoltaic system on the atrium roof consists of 10 solar modules that contribute to the energy load. On a bright day the array can produce 1.5 kilowatts of electricity per day. A solar thermal installation provides supplementary water heating. The centre also uses wind power. A small wind turbine was installed as part of an educational display that demonstrates how renewable energy technologies work. In addition, a variety of recycled materials have been used for the internal fixtures and fittings. The toilet doors are made from recycled plastic bottles,

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

131


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:16 Page 132

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: FORESTRY COMMISSION toothbrushes, electrical cable casing, coffee cups and yoghurt pots, and the reception desk from mobile phones and wellies. The roofing membrane is made of recycled bicycle tyres. And, rainwater is used for flushing the toilets which reduces reliance on the village water supply. Foul waste is treated on-site with a bio-filtration system so that the clean water can be safely released into the local river. The Forestry Commission has continued to utilise green technologies in the building of its visitor centres and other construction work. Last year, Hicks Lodge Visitor Centre, near Ashby de la Zouch – built by the Forestry Commission and the National Forest Company – was opened and is now celebrating its excellent rating by BREEAM. The eco-building built on an eyesore open cast mine in The National Forest in Leicestershire has been given a top seal of approval for its green credentials - and set a benchmark for others to follow. The facility, which cost over £550,000, is the gateway to the new National Forest Cycling Centre, which offers family and multi-user trails. Forester Alan Dowell said: “This is the first Forestry Commission building to achieve this world class standard and all the partners involved in making the project happen are incredibly proud. Since we opened the public response to the visitor centre and the trails network has been beyond our wildest dreams.” Built from timber, the building has a café, bike hire, repair shop, cycle wash, toilets, shower and changing facilities. Featuring solar panels, wood fuel heating – with timber supplied from local woods – rainwater harvesting and movement sensitive lighting, it was designed to showcase green technologies. Just a few years ago it was all very different. Open cast mining was carried out on the site between 1980 and 2005, but since then it has been transformed from an eyesore into a vibrant beauty spot at a total cost of £1.5m. Forest chiefs also say visitor figures are set to beat original estimates, with over 6,000 people using the Hicks Lodge cycle trails in February alone. www.forestry.gov.uk Tel: 0117 906 6000

132

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Forestry Commission :feature 2 18/09/2013 12:16 Page 133


McPhillips:feature 2 23/09/2013 12:59 Page 134

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: MCPHILLIPS (WELLINGTON) LIMITED

M

INNOVATIVE

SOLUTIONS

cPhillips (Wellington) Limited is a building, civil engineering and groundworks contractor. It has operated throughout the midlands, Wales and North West England since 1963. The company is able to provide a fully integrated building and civil engineering capability delivered by a directly employed workforce. Services include: new build and refurbishment, earthworks, drainage, groundworks, highways including S278 works, access roads and car parks, surfacing and paving, and specialist structures. The company had every reason to celebrate in 2013 after receiving RoSPA’s highest accolade – the Order of Distinction. McPhillips’ commitment to achieving the highest standards of health and safety was recognised by the award following sixteen consecutive Gold awards. The prize was presented to Safety, Training and Quality Manager Stuart Bishop during the RoSPA Occupational Health and Safety Awards 2013 ceremony at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole Hotel, at the National Exhibition Centre, in May. It wasn’t the only award McPhillips won in the last twelve months. The Dogs Trust Shrewsbury won the National Constructing Excellence Project of the Year in December 2012, while the Dogs Trust Loughborough was presented with two awards - Project of the Year and Design & Innovation by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) East Midlands Region in April 2013. In addition, McPhillips’ delivery of £3.3m of new Section 278 highways infrastructure at Stourport

MCPHILLIPS IS AN AWARD WINNING CIVIL ENGINEERING AND BUILDING CONTRACTOR THAT HAS BUILT A STRONG REPUTATION FOR PROVIDING OUTSTANDING SOLUTIONS FOR OVER 45 YEARS 134

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


McPhillips:feature 2 23/09/2013 12:59 Page 135

CIVILS, TRANSPORT AND UTILITIES: MCPHILLIPS (WELLINGTON) LIMITED received the Best Small Highway and Transportation Project at the West Midlands Branch of the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation Annual Dinner in March 2013. Gorge Connect Park and Ride was presented with Best Small Project at the inaugural Institute of Highways Engineers Mercia Branch Awards in April 2013, and Considerate Constructors gave McPhillips a Performance Beyond Compliance rating under its corporate membership of the Scheme. RECENT PROJECTS Recent projects include the current work McPhillips is carrying out for a new residential development in Merseyside. This Taylor Wimpey North West project was a brownfield site formerly known as St Aelreds College and the plans are for 84 residential dwellings. McPhillips is undertaking £2m worth of infrastructure work. Its activities include remodelling of the ground levels, existing watercourse diversions and associated headwall structures, removal/grouting of existing redundant sewer, installation of all new foul and surface water drainage, construction of a new 500m spine road, all access drives to surface course and all groundworks to the plots up to the damp proof course. Elsewhere, McPhillips is currently on-site at Adams Grammar in Newport, Shropshire converting an old gymnasium and theatre into a state-of-the-art two storey 640m2 Sixth Form Centre and a former Coach House into a new Performing Arts Centre. These are both due for completion this month.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

The new Sixth Form building involves a back to structure refurbishment which, when completed, will provide flexible lecture and study areas, teaching rooms and offices. The Performing Arts Centre will provide acoustically modelled music teaching space and recording studio. In addition, McPhillips is continuing to deliver infrastructure for Phase 3 and PIW7 on the new Lawley Village residential development in Telford. Phase 3 infrastructure includes the estate roads and sewers for the next large phase of residential development, whilst PIW7 is for Section 278 works on the existing Dawley Road adjacent to Phase 6. PIW7 works have been phased to reduce disruption to existing traffic and encompassed the removal of a large traffic island, road widening, improved highway drainage, resurfacing, installation of traffic calming brick paved raised tables, pedestrian refuge islands, a zebra crossing, construction of new 3m wide cycleway and footway, street lighting, signage and tree planting. “EXCELLENT THROUGHOUT” Guy Scott, Lawley Village Developer Group Director, commented: “McPhillips have managed this tricky Section 278 scheme faultlessly. The works have been delivered on time despite including some additional works with high standards of traffic management, workmanship, health & safety and welfare. The contractor’s relations with the project stakeholders has been excellent throughout.”

The company’s annual turnover is in the region of £30 million and typical individual project values range between £20,000 to £10 million with ninety per cent of its projects undertaken as principal contractor. The company has remained family owned and managed since its inception and currently has Peter and Nicholas McPhillips as joint Managing Directors. DIRECT EMPLOYMENT McPhillips is based in Telford and employs 240 people from the surrounding community with ninety-two percent of employees living within twenty miles of its Telford offices. The company operates in this manner so that it is able to invest training in its workforce and retain their experience. This strategy of direct employment enables it to remove risk from projects through an ability to guarantee quality and resources which provides greater control over cost, programme, workmanship and health and safety. Significantly, McPhillips is an approved contractor for a range of local authorities including Telford and Wrekin Council, Shropshire Council, Worcestershire County Council and both East and West Cheshire Councils amongst others. It is also framework partners with Birmingham City Council and Denbighshire County Council. Elsewhere, regular private sector clients include Taylor Wimpey, Persimmon Homes, Dogs Trust and the Shropshire Star. www.mcphillips.co.uk Tel: 01952 670440

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

135


Royal Parks:feature 2 19/09/2013 15:54 Page 136

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS

A HAVEN IN THE HEART OF THE CITY

THE 5,000 ACRES OF THE LONDON ROYAL PARKLAND PROVIDE UNPARALLELED OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENJOYMENT, EXPLORATION AND HEALTHY LIVING IN THE HEART OF THE CAPITAL.

136

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Royal Parks:feature 2 19/09/2013 15:54 Page 137

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS

T

he Royal Parks are inviting landscape maintenance contractors to apply to their formal procurement process to supply landscape maintenance services for the eight London Royal Parks on contracts worth around £7m a year. This is an exciting opportunity to work in eight of London’s busiest and most prestigious parks – all are registered as Grade I Listed on the English Heritage Register of Parks and Gardens (except The Green Park and Primrose Hill which are Grade II Listed). The parks make a significant contribution to the well-being of large numbers of people. All parks have Green Flag Award status indicating a high standard of general and environmental management. Kensington Gardens, St James’s Park and Greenwich Park have obtained Green Heritage awards acknowledging the contribution that these parks play in conserving and promoting the heritage of these sites. Richmond Park is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), a National Nature Reserve (NNR) and a European Special Area of Conservation (SAC). The current landscape maintenance services contract comes to an end in March 2014, creating a unique and exciting opportunity for landscape

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

maintenance service providers to deliver these challenging yet prestigious contracts. Landscape maintenance services will include the full range of amenity horticulture operations across all parks (excluding tree works) but also include supporting events, litter picking, refuse collection, road/path sweeping, cleansing, gritting, playground inspection and funeral preparation at Brompton Cemetery. The Royal Parks have placed an OJEU notice and will go to formal tender in August 2013 appointing new contractors in December 2013 to commence when the current contracts end the following March. Currently there are four contractors operating across the eight parks, however there will be no limitations on contractors bidding for all of the work. One of The Royal Parks exciting upcoming projects will be conducted at Brompton Cemetery. The cemetery is a significant member of one of London’s most remarkable of Victorian legacies, a ring of private cemeteries created around central London known as The Magnificent Seven, developed in response to cope with the cholera epidemic of the 1830s and 1840s and dire burial practices in overcrowded churchyards and chapel vaults.

THE CURRENT LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES CONTRACT COMES TO AN END IN MARCH 2014, CREATING A UNIQUE AND EXCITING OPPORTUNITY FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICE PROVIDERS TO DELIVER THESE CHALLENGING YET PRESTIGIOUS CONTRACTS.

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

137


Royal Parks:feature 2 19/09/2013 15:54 Page 138


Royal Parks:feature 2 19/09/2013 15:54 Page 139

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS

In 1837 by Act of Parliament, The West London and Westminster Cemetery Company was authorised to develop a site to the west of London. They appointed architect Benjamin Baud who brilliantly handled the flat, unassuming 16 hectares site to create one of the finest cemetery designs of the early Victorian period. Today the cemetery is owned by the Government and is managed by The Royal Parks, and forms a much used green oasis in a densely populated area of inner London characterised by a notable absence of public open space. Brompton Cemetery’s historical significance is recognised by being Grade I listed on the English

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Heritage Parks and Gardens of Special Interest in England. The historic monuments and sculptures range from Grade I to II, with several listed tombs. The site is also of importance for its ecological interest and is listed as a Site of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCI) of Borough Importance (Grade I). The Royal Parks is submitting an application for funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and the Big Lottery Fund (BIG) for the Brompton Cemetery Conservation Project. This funding will enable The Royal Parks to develop the project with local people and, if successful, go on to implement improvement plans for Brompton Cemetery to

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

139


Royal Parks:feature 2 19/09/2013 15:54 Page 140

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS ensure the heritage and wildlife are conserved for future generations. Round one of the HLF application proposes heritage, access and environmental/ecological improvements, enhancing visitor facilities and providing community and funerary activities. Heritage improvements will include assessing the existing heritage assets, considering their significance and identifying assets at risk to devise a plan for conserving them. Access improvements will involved ensuring that the cemetery and facilities are accessible by all and that the heritage and wildlife features can be enjoyed by everyone. This will run alongside new visitor enhancements to improve facilities, to add facilities where necessary and to introduce the opportunity for further engagement with the local community. Proposals aim to convert the North Lodge into a visitor centre, shop and cafe, whilst also provid-

140

ing a base for The Friends of Brompton Cemetery and volunteer and maintenance facilities. The entrance will be remodelled, with entrance gates and railings restored, and paths and planting upgraded. Landscape enhancement proposals call for restoring The Chapel with a re-design to accommodate office and flexible community facilities, including new ramped access, and enhanced landscape setting. In addition, proposals aim to refurbish the South Lodge as residential accommodation for the Cemetery Manager and provide an enhanced landscape setting including entrance railings and gates, paths and planting. Elsewhere, The Royal Parks has received a grant of nearly ÂŁ1.5 million from the HLF and the Big Lottery Fund for the Isabella Plantation Access Project. This grant will enable The Royal Parks to implement improvement plans for the Isabella Plantation that were developed from previous HLF

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Royal Parks:feature 2 23/09/2013 15:48 Page 141

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS

and Big Lottery Fund grants and after a year of public consultation. The Royal Parks recently celebrated the 60th anniversary of the Isabella Plantation with an array of free events for the public. These included guided walks, a showcase of art for young people and a Teddy Bears picnic for young children and families. The events showcased a number of recent improvements to Isabella Plantation which include enhancements to ponds and streams, upgrades to the existing path network, resurfacing and redesign of the Plantation’s disabled car park as well as the addition of a new fully accessible toilet block. Jo Scrivener, Assistant Park Manager said, "We want to give as many people as possible the opportunity to come and visit the Isabella Plantation and see the improvements made to date. “We were very fortunate to be able to secure £1.5 million from Heritage Lottery Fund and the Big Lottery Fund and a further £120,000 from Sita Trust to deliver a range of improvements to the Plantation projects. “The Isabella Plantation is one of the most visited attractions in Richmond Park and it is hoped these improvements will encourage education and

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

141


Royal Parks:feature 2 01/10/2013 09:35 Page 142

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS

142

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Royal Parks:feature 2 19/09/2013 15:59 Page 143

CULTURE & HERITAGE: ROYAL PARKS

community activities and be enjoyed by park users for years to come.� The Plantation can be dated back as far as 1771, when it is shown on maps as Isabella Slade. It was planted for timber in 1831. From 1953 the present garden of clearings, ponds and streams was established, and the old name Isabella was adopted for the fenced garden. Millions of Londoners and tourists visit the eight Royal Parks for free each year. The 5,000 acres of historic parkland provide unparalleled opportunities for enjoyment, exploration and healthy living in the heart of the capital. A simple walk or a picnic in the park, sport, top quality entertainment, community and education projects are all waiting for visitors.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Keeping 5,000 acres of urban parkland stocked with trees and other plants is no small task. Therefore, The Royal Parks has its own nursery to meet the demand and a dedicated team of plantsmen and parks staff to keep the parks looking great all year round. Of course, part of its remit is to conserve the parks for future generations so it has a Green Housekeeping Committee, which looks at how it can reduce the impact it has on the local and wider environment. It also has an Ecology Officer, who advises on habitat management, sustainability, and biodiversity. www.royalparks.org.uk Tel: 0300 061 2000

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

143


CRC Evans:feature 2 24/09/2013 10:13 Page 144

OFFSHORE CONSTRUCTION: CRC EVANS OFFSHORE

PIONEERING EXCELLENCE CRC-EVANS OFFSHORE HAS SERVED THE OFFSHORE PIPELINE INDUSTRY FOR DECADES

C

onstruction is widely acknowledged to be a hazardous business. But when you’re operating offshore and in demanding conditions worldwide, the challenges are multiplied, making CRC-Evans’ safety record even more commendable. CRC-Evans is the largest manufacturer of specialised pipeline construction and automatic welding equipment. Its Offshore division undertakes pipeline construction, including specialist welding, achieved using fifty full-time staff and a pool of 200300 specialised technicians. Brian Tanner’s main responsibility as HSEQ Manager is to keep them all safe, a task made more difficult by working in places such as Malaysia, Brazil, the Gulf of Mexico, and Norway. However, as he recounts, communications are easier since email

144

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

came on the scene: “We communicate regularly, including a monthly worldwide newsletter. We give feedback on the previous month’s safety performance and feature news. “We have a Focus on Safety document where we feature incidents and their causes, lessons learned and resulting changes. It also has a topical theme and this month we’re highlighting the 25th anniversary of the Piper Alpha disaster. The newsletter has feedback on anything from observation cards the employees fill in with suggestions or when they’ve seen things that aren’t right.” All observation cards are reviewed by a health and safety committee, with a monthly award for the best one. A further incentive is a donation to a selected charity when KPIs are achieved each month, with the company’s contribution often matched by contractors and customers.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


CRC Evans:feature 2 24/09/2013 10:13 Page 145

OFFSHORE CONSTRUCTION: CRC EVANS OFFSHORE Efforts on health and safety are helped by training that includes health and safety induction for everyone plus location-specific and project inductions as well as other training matched to employees’ needs. The outcome is a British Safety Council International Safety Award for the last three years plus a Certificate of Business Environment, Health and Safety Excellence and a Business Integration award for 2012, both from Stanley Black & Decker, which acquired CRC-Evans in 2010. COMMITMENT AND LEADERSHIP The awards have resulted from a continuous environmental drive to develop systems producing less noise and fumes, using fewer resources and being safer to use as well as reductions in usage and waste. On the safety aspect, Brian believes the reasons are many. “We have commitment from senior management right down to the shop floor,” he says. “Much of our success is down to our supervisors in the field who manage people daily because we not only choose people to supervise who are good at their jobs, but also those who display leadership qualities. It pays dividends because they aren’t just supervising, they’re constantly coaching and mentoring our people.” There’s an attempt to involve everyone in safety, including consulting people during the development of processes. Added to that is acting on feedback received, having a two-way dialogue at toolbox talks and giving employees the right to stop jobs if unhappy with any safety aspect. It is, as Brian confirms, an ongoing process: “We never stand still and always look to make improvements. We always try to build feedback into systems so employees know we’re listening and, if we don’t use a suggestion, we tell them why. If we ignore them, they’ll stop talking to us and that’s the last thing we want.” www.crc-evans.com Tel: 01224 766660

REACH THE PEOPLE

WHO MATTER A DV E R T I S E I N

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION CALL 01484 411400

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

145


Goodman:feature 2 20/09/2013 15:19 Page 146

LOGISTICS & WAREHOUSE DEVELOPMENT: GOODMAN UK LOGISTICS

I

n a global business, it’s important to stay in regular contact with colleagues, even if they’re in different time zones. That’s the case for Charles Crossland, who heads up Goodman UK’s Logistics operation. He says: “It’s a close company and every week we have group calls where country heads update each other. It means I have a call at 6.30 am each Monday; other than the time, it’s a good thing. It’s important to know what colleagues are doing and can only benefit the business.” Goodman is a global provider of high quality logistics developments and is currently the largest industrial developer in Australia and Germany, one of the largest in China and the UK, and a significant operator throughout Asia, Europe, North America and more recently in Brazil. It has a market capitalisation of around $8 billion and the global spread, in Charles’ opinion, gives overall benefits in

THINKING BEYOND THE OBVIOUS GOODMAN IS AN INTEGRATED PROPERTY GROUP THAT OWNS, DEVELOPS AND MANAGES INDUSTRIAL AND BUSINESS SPACE GLOBALLY

146

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


Goodman:feature 2 20/09/2013 15:19 Page 147

LOGISTICS & WAREHOUSE DEVELOPMENT: GOODMAN UK LOGISTICS the current economic situation. “It’s been difficult in the UK recently but things have been very good in China and Japan,” he says. “There are issues in parts of Europe although Germany has been very strong for the last few years. A feature of being a global business is there will be ebbs and flows at any given stage and we’re now seeing a slight increase in demand in the UK.” The UK operation has a business parks division in addition to the logistics division that currently has fourteen sites, mainly across the Midlands and Southeast plus some in the Northwest. Its focus is on building logistics warehouses, mainly for retailers and third party logistics providers, and the preference is to develop properties to meet specific customer needs with the customer taking a full repairing and insuring lease on completion. That’s not set in stone, however, because Goodman will sell plots for customers to develop and does consider freehold turnkey options. Goodman doesn’t build speculatively but, as Charles confirms, acquires and prepares land before customers are identified: “We’ll buy sites speculatively and get the planning, put the infrastructure, services and roads in. We get sites ready to develop so we can take a customer there, point to their site and develop the building from there. It can take a few years to get planning and 12-18 months to put the infrastructure into these big sites so we do that up front and we’re ready to react quickly to occupier requirements. We spent over £105 million in the last three or four years preparing sites ready for development and we can now offer 14 million square feet of accommodation around the UK.” KEY LOCATIONS Land is generally sourced in key locations, which typically for logistics providers are well located areas for the markets they serve. They need good communications, close to motorway networks and sometimes with rail links so occupiers have the option to move goods by rail. Many big sites are around the Midlands where businesses have national distribution centres and there are smaller regional centres closer to the main cities.

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk

Sourcing of land is handled by an in-house team, with a construction and development team overseeing the planning process, design, procurement of contractors and project management of the build. The extent of Goodman’s responsibility is generally to deliver the shell building, often with basic services installed, and for the client to handle the final fit-out to their specification. CLIENTS’ NEEDS BEING MET That approach, as Charles emphasises, results in clients’ needs being met exactly: “For all new buildings, we aim to achieve a BREEAM rating of excellent where possible with a very good rating an absolute minimum. We implement the requirements of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive and assess the energy performance of these buildings, aiming to achieve an APC rating of A with an absolute minimum of B. That’s an important element for us and we work with the occupier to provide them with a building they require, using the team here within Goodman to really understand what they want and how to provide that. Where we can advise, clearly we will, but we want to deliver the building they want not the building we want.”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

147


Goodman:feature 2 20/09/2013 15:19 Page 148

LOGISTICS & WAREHOUSE DEVELOPMENT: GOODMAN UK LOGISTICS

“OUR FOCUS IN THE UK IS ON OUR LAND BANK, WORKING THROUGH THAT AND DOING DEALS WITH OCCUPIERS. OF THE 800 ACRES OF LAND WE OWN, ABOUT 500 ACRES IS SERVICED AND IS READY TO GO” CHARLES CROSSLAND

148

The commitment to sustainable construction extends to membership of the UK Green Building Council and Planet Positive. Recent projects include a 500,000 square foot building for Co-operative Food Supply Chain Logistics in Andover, a print works for the Daily Mail at Thurrock and being development partner to the Greater London Authority at its London Sustainable Industries Park, a forty-acre scheme in Dagenham. Like most aspects of the construction industry, logistics development is altering. “The internet is a big driver and has led to a change in some requirements,” explains Charles. “When supermarkets started servicing internet requirements, they did it out of their stores. Now they’re looking for specific fulfilment centres and that’s led to requirements for units of 100-150,000 square feet. Rather than just having regional distribution centres in locations around the UK, they’re adding smaller buildings to service customers with vans operating from these fulfilment centres to residential addresses for internet orders.”

BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE

CONTINUOUS CYCLE The business is a continuous cycle of acquiring and preparing land, developing to meet customer needs, then moving on to the next site. And although uptake has been slow over the last few years, that’s now starting to improve with a number of deals coming through. Charles says: “Our focus in the UK is on our land bank, working through that and doing deals with occupiers. Of the 800 acres of land we own, about 500 acres is serviced and is ready to go. So there’s a real push to move that land forward, to deliver to occupiers and to start looking at the land coming through in three to five years’ time so we have a pipeline for the medium term. But the focus remains very much on trying to move that land and deals with occupiers and, as the economy starts improving, there’ll be more activity on that front.” uklogistics.goodman.com Tel: 0121 5068100

www.bdcmagazine.co.uk


CPL Ad:Layout 1 07/09/2013 11:41 Page 1

[

]

AFFORDABLE DESIGN, PRINT AND WEB SOLUTIONS

[CPL DESIGN] is a multidisciplinary design consultancy offering a complete range of cost effective design and print solutions to a range of clients. We specialise in branding, design for print, promotional materials as well as on-line and digital work translating your ideas into innovative visual communications with real impact.

BRANDING From updating logos to designing them from scratch, we can create a professional style for your company.

PRINT Impress potential clients with a professionally designed company portfolio: brochures; catalogues; menus: magazines.

DIGITAL Step up your online presence. We can design and develop a website specifically tailored to your needs.

PROMOTIONAL

For more information or a free quote call: Kate or Steve on 01484 411 400 or visit www.designcpl.co.uk

Whether you need a simple flyer or you are preparing for a show stopping event, we can supply the material to entice your customers: flyers, leaflets & postcards; posters; exhibition graphics.


coverA3 191:Layout 1 23/09/2013 12:44 Page 1

BUILDING DESIGN &

CONSTRUCTION OPTIMUM GROUP SERVICES

NOVEMBER 2013

OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

BUILDING DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

NOVEMBER 2013 ISSUE 191

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

TRANSPORT FOR LONDON

KEEPING LONDON MOVING

SCOTLAND EXCEL THE CENTRE OF PROCUREMENT EXPERTISE

WORKING TO A CLEAR PLAN

LAND SECURITIES

Bdc 191  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you