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Suite 313 77 Dunning Avenue, Rosebery

02 9662 3500


CONTENTS

OVERVIEW PARTNERS

SELECTED PROJECTS . MULTI UNIT RESIDENTIAL . SINGLE RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE The information in this Professional Services Proposal is provided for the exclusive use of the recipient for the purpose of evaluating the suitability of services offered by MASQ architecture and may not be disclosed to third parties without the written permission of the authors. Drawings, documentation, photographs and other information included in this Professional Services Proposal are copyright and may not be reproduced or otherwise copied without the prior written permission of MASQ architecture.


OVERVIEW

MASQ architecture was established in 2002. We specialize in high end private residential and medium density housing with focus on producing houses of distinctive design quality. Our approach is for elegance and beauty coupled with functionality and usable spaces. There are 2 active partners, with the third involved in academia and is head of the Faculty of Architecture at the University of NSW. Collectively there is over 35 years of experience amongst the partners. All our staff are senior architects and have been with practice for many years. We offer a personalized client focused service where you deal directly with the Partners and who have full involvement at all stages of projects from design through to documentation and construction. This allows consistency of process and decision making.


PARTNERS

Ted Quinton B.Arch. (Hons), Registered Architect (REG NO 6880) Member RAIA

Alan SmuskowitzB.Arch, Registered SAIA

Ted Quinton obtained his architectural qualifications with Honours in 1997 from the University of NSW. He worked with one of Sydney’s leading domestic architects, prior to overseas work in the UK and Middle East

Alan Smuskowitz obtained his architectural qualifications in 1990 from the University of Witwatersrand, followed by a number of years working with one of South Africa’s highest profile architects, Jo Noero. Alan then ran his own practice for several years before immigrating to Australia in 2001.

Ted has broad experience as design and project architect across a range of built projects ranging in scale from domestic to large educational and commercial projects both in Australia and overseas. As Design Director, Ted is responsible for all the conceptual and design development of projects in the office and is closely involved during documentation and construction to ensure the continuation, resolution and fulfilment of the original design intent Ted also teaches 3rd year Design Studio at the University of NSW and undertaking several writings commissions for HOUSES magazine.

Architect

South

Africa

Alan brings his broad experience with medium to large scale residential and commercial projects to the practice. He has worked at a range of project scales of including undertaking significant commercial and residential projects in fast developing areas of Sydney such as Rhodes and Sydney Olympic Park. Alan also has particular skills in initiating and facilitating developments, from initial client contact and feasibility sketches through to the development approval process. In addition his role has a focus on Business Development and Customer Relationship Management. Alan is currently registering as a Sustainability Assessor which will further expand his range and skills.

Harry Margalit B.Arch. MA PhD Aff.RAIA

Harry Margalit obtained his architectural qualifications in 1983, followed by a number of years in architectural practice in Cape Town, Sydney and Brisbane. In 2000 he returned to academia, graduating with a Master of Arts (2001) and a PhD in Australian Modernist architectural history in 1997. Harry continued his involvement in architecture alongside an academic career. His tenured teaching posts include the University of Newcastle and the University of Sydney as Senior Lecturer in Design in the Faculty of Architecture. He is currently Associate Professor and Program Head at the University of New South Wales. He is the author of over 30 books, articles and conference papers on contemporary and Modernist architecture. Harry has also been involved in architectural practice for over 20 years and has acted as a design consultant to a number of leading Sydney firms and associated architectural competitions.


MULTI UNIT RESIDENTIAL.....///

one of our key areas of expertise lies in the design of multi-unit and mixed use residential buildings. These projects ranged in size from boutique apartments to large scale housing complexes. We bring to these projects a wide knowledge of various housing typologies and the skills to create quality and livable spaces in dense environments.


SELECTED PROJECTS

Residential Units. Campsie Mixed Use Residential. Rose Bay Residential Units. Rose Bay Mixed Use Residential. Top Ryde Mixed Use Residential. Northbourne Ave Canberra Residential Units. Istanbul Turkey Residential Units. Chatswood Residential Units. Maroubra


RESIDENTIAL UNITS. CAMPSIE

date

2011

site area

5170 m²

net area

10535 m²

cost

$10M

number of units

78

Situated on the old Sunbeam factory site in Campsie, the 78 units are 3 storey walk up type apartments. The challenge was to engage with the remainder of the site and residential complex, however being south facing posed a problem with gaining the statutory requirement of north sun. A plan type developed that allowed a predominance of through apartments, thereby maximising north exposure while allowing engagement with the internal street and activity of the remainder of the site. A simple palette of face brick, render and glass is used, the language distinctly modern, recalling the row housing so commonly found in Sydney. The emphasis on amenity and liveability was paramount as well as creating a street façade that is expressive in materiality.


MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL. ROSE BAY

date

2009

site area

613 m²

net area

1846 m²

cost

$3.5M

number of units

9

The project located significantly along New South Head Road forms a transition between the landscaped Royal Sydney Golf Course and the Rose Bay commercial centre. The building has been designed as a landmark gateway building into the commercial precinct and comprises ground floor retail with luxury residential accommodation above. Three levels of apartments are expressed with fully operable sun and privacy screens which creates a changing and active facade, responds and alters its appearance depending on the time of day or season. Despite the narrow site, articulated building elements of walls, balconies and overhangs express the multi functional character of the project Passive solar design principles have been employed to ensure all residential units enjoy a high degree of thermal comfort, and to minimise reliance on mechanical ventilation, heating and cooling. Sustainable design initiatives include solar hot water (gas boosted) for the apartments and alternative water supply for gardening and toilets.


RESIDENTIAL UNITS. ROSE BAY

date

2011

site area

536 m²

net area

603 m²

cost

$2.5M

number of units

6

The narrowness of the site presented a range of challenges to overcome as well as providing a key opportunity. With north orientated along the length of the site this allowed the internal organisation of the units to have a private and public layout along the east west axis. As such all living spaces where placed on the north side and all bedrooms with associated services on the south. This clear differentiation allowed for easy alignment of services, critical in apartment buildings. The building is comprised of 6 units with the top most level housing rooms in a loft style arrangement. Natural light and cross ventilation where prime objectives of the design to ensure maximum amenity. A palette of minimal materials has been employed; bagged brickwork, deep recesses, and lightweight balconies, all reflecting an art deco sensibility that picks up on the range of similar period apartments in the area.


RESIDENTIAL UNITS. MAROUBRA

The typical dilemma faced with sites that have beautiful views is how to achieve a relatively equal level of amenity for all apartments. The conventional unit plan type creates a hierarchy between front and back units with diminishing levels of amenity towards the rear. Our approach to this project was to utilise the commercial concept of a central core with radiating apartments types. In this way we were able to obtain views for each apartment, the wrap around plan allows an increase of amenity for all units regardless of location in the building. All living spaces as a result have access to the view and achieve a better level of cross ventilation. The plan form also allows for a mix of unit types from 1 to 3 bedrooms. A tight resulting footprint and repetitive construction system makes the building very cost effective

and

interchangeable

add

on

elements

screens creating visual interest in the facade.

such

as


MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL. TOP RYDE

date

2009

site area

9525 m²

net area

23000 m²

number of units

200

Located in the growing Gladeville to Top Ryde corridor, the brief was to redevelop an existing car showroom and sales yard with 100 residential units above. Currently awaiting State Government rezoning approval the masterplan set out to identify and determine a maximum envelope size that was acceptable to all stakeholders and whereby within it allowed a new way of prescribing objectives for large complex sites on major arterial roads. From the outset consideration has been given to the building form, amenity of residents within the complex and the neighborhood and the impacts such developments have on infrastructure and transport. Through ongoing collaborative engagement with the Local Authority we have been able to set the framework for the future design of this project, which is to commence in April 2011.


MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL NORTHBOURNE AVE CANBERRA date

2011

site area

42200 m²

net area

30000 m²

number of units

1062

The proposal sets out a masterplan that deals with the creation of intimate and usable spaces that respond to the seasonal changes of Canberra and provide a strong sense of community through careful design of public, semi public and private spaces. Central to the theme is the creation of an ‘active landscape’, a fluid space defined by building edges and imbued with the life of rees and plants. Canberra’s environment of hot summers and cold winters, suggests that any proposal put forward needs to strongly consider opportunities of creating habitable and pleasant external spaces that can be used all year round. Adequately dealing with such conditions necessitates a careful reading of site and context and the adoption of a person centred approach that at its core places the need of people above that of buildings. Such an approach then is predicated on the simplest of notions such as inclusivity and enjoyment and the continual question of what we may deem to be the “good life”.


RESIDENTIAL UNITS. ISTANBUL TURKEY

The dense and still bohemian suburb of Cihangir in central Istanbul is the location of some of the cities most elegant and beautiful art deco and modern apartments. A patchwork of eclectic styles, interwoven within the hilly and narrow streets, with glimpses of views to the Bosphorus all makes for a sometimes overwhelming and intoxicating sensation. In the design of the infill units, we have drawn on the unpredictable and the erratic of collective forms, the unself-conscious use of colour and applied materials. With expansive views of the Bosphorus and exposure to the prevailing winds and at times harsh sunlight, balconies have been recessed rather than protruded, providing protection and amenity. The faรงade is treated as a continuous folding and moving plane, abstracting the pastiche of coloured buildings in the area.

fixed

flexible

open


RESIDENTIAL UNITS. CHATSWOOD

located on the midst of Chatswood, this suburban narrow site is limited in area and street frontage, the site conditions called for a compact and effective footprint that maximise the internal floor area while providing a dynamic volumetry that contrasts with the typical precinct aesthetic. The resulting compact floor plate maximises the space efficiency and provides an equal level of amenity for all 6 apartments and the proposed building layout is characterised by the minimised circulation space Palate of face brick and render addresses the predominant precincts aesthetic and the staggered volumes enhance the dynamic nature of the plate


PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL.....///

we always aim to have our houses evoke a sense of ease, elegance and refinement by the creation of intimate, personal and discrete spaces.


SELECTED PROJECTS

House at Bellevue Hill House at Point Piper House at Bellevue Hill II House at Bellevue Hill III House at Bondi Beach House at Vaucluse House at Vaucluse II House at Dover Heights House at Dover Heights II House at Dover Heights III House at South Coogee House at Coogee House at Seaforth House at Seaforth II House at Balgowlah Heights House at Roseville House at North Coast House at Avalon Prime Minister’s house at Canberra


HOUSE AT BELLEVUE HILL

date

2004

council

Woollahra Council

site area

311,66 m²

net area

400.65 m²

cost

$1.8M

living spaces

2

bedrooms

6

bathrooms

4

car spaces

3

The design addresses the main constraints of the site - a steep fall towards the west and a broad view of the city skyline. An amphitheatre was carved into the yard of the house to grade the slope, as well as providing a casual entertaining area and a natural light well. The lower floor was consolidated into one long living space stretching from the intimate amphitheatre to the expansive views. A sequence was worked into the site and house to structure how one moves through, beginning at the entry gate and continuing through the house, along side the amphitheatre and terminating at the upper level pool, which also has a direct connection to the children living area. All around the house are external spaces for a variety of uses, from a laundry court and adjacent all weather ‘grotto’ to the large sheltered undercroft for contemplating the city view.


ground floor plan


HOUSE AT BELLEVUE HILL

first floor plan


HOUSE AT BELLEVUE HILL


HOUSE AT POINT PIPER

date

2005

council

Woollahra Council

site area

759.94 m²

net area

622.82 m²

cost

$3.2M

living spaces

3

bedrooms

5

bathrooms

7

car spaces

4

The design addresses the main constraints of the site - a steep fall towards the west and a broad view of the city skyline. An amphitheater was carved into the yard of the house to grade the slope, as well as providing a casual entertaining area and a natural light well. The lower floor was consolidated into one long living space stretching from the intimate amphitheater to the expansive views. A sequence was worked into the site and house to structure how one moves through, beginning at the entry gate and continuing through the house, along side the amphitheater and terminating at the upper level pool, which also has a direct connection to the childrens living area. All around the house are external spaces for a variety of uses, from a laundry court and adjacent all weather ‘grotto’ to the large sheltered undercroft for contemplating the city view.


ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT POINT PIPER


HOUSE AT BELLEVUE HILL II

date

2012

council

Woollahra Council

site area

713.77 m²

net area

343.76 m²

cost

$1.5M

living spaces

3

bedrooms

3

bathrooms

3

car spaces

2

Two key client requirements drove the design of the house; the desire to be as close to the rear garden as possible and the house needed to be affordable. The plan of the house was stepped down the site splitting the front and back portions. Program was allocated accordingly depending on function and separation requirements between parents and young adults; independence and privacy versus times of common family interaction. The stepped form is expressed by two gable roofs connected in between by a small flat section. Materials are restrained; a pseudo Scandinavian palette was adopted of light timbers, limestone and white walls, which was then interlaced with timber lining in some ceilings and throughout the eaves, reminiscent of the detailing and materials of many prewar local houses. This house continues our interest in creating elegant homes that fit a particular sensibility of the understated and the contextual, doing no more than it has to, yet is unmistakably architectural and modern.


ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT BELLEVUE HILL III

date

2011

council

Woollahra Council

site area

1081 m²

net area

587 m²

cost

$3M

living spaces

4

bedrooms

6

bathrooms

5

car spaces

2

With a large program and a limited site area, bound at the rear by a steep slope and at the front by predominant neighbouring building setbacks, a cranked plan type was used to compact the brief without sacrificing space and size. As a result the house remains intimate with spaces visually connected through courtyards that break the building form. The plan type also allows for solar access and natural ventilation deep into the house that otherwise would have been difficult with a more conventional plan. The house takes its cues from the surrounding built context and abstracts traditional pitched roof houses in the vicinity with an overlay of a Mediterranean textured aesthetic.


HOUSE AT BELLEVUE HILL III

basement plan

ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT BONDI BEACH

date

2010

council

Waverley Council

site area

420 m²

net area

350 m²

cost

$1.6M

living spaces

2

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

3

car spaces

2

Within the context of narrow fronted sites typical of the North Bondi Beach area the only visual impression that one has from the street is that of façade. It is the main visual element of the house since the rest is hidden from public view and as such provided us with a chance to investigate how one may engage with the street and passerby. The façade of the Bondi beach house is conceived as a series of layers pulled away and expressed formally through openings recesses, high level windows and screening, all intent on creating a sense of depth and expressiveness. In this we pay homage to a long time favourite; the Dr Curuchet house by Le Corbusier. In effect the front acts as a brise soleil for the eastern sun, modulating its effect on the interior. Programmatically a double height study is placed behind the façade forming part of the vertical circulation route between ground and first floor. The central staircase placed at the front of the house frees up valuable space deeper inside and creates a generous volume and a sense of luxury at the entry that is rare on small sites. The simple in line plan of the house is occasionally punctuated by side courts or cuts in the roof to enliven the side facades and bring light into the centre of the house. High level windows at the front continue the theme of lightness and allow the eye to extend along the floating roof line and beyond to sky


HOUSE AT BONDI BEACH

ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT BONDI BEACH


HOUSE AT BONDI BEACH


HOUSE AT VAUCLUSE

date

2008

council

Woollahra Council

site area

594.4 m²

net area

383 m²

cost

$2.5M

living spaces

5

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

5

car spaces

3

The main aspects driving the design of this house were views to the city and the clients desire to “not have a box”. These two clear statements resulted in a dynamic house form that responds to the site conditions, in particular the difficult western exposure to both the view and the afternoon sun. The scale of the house as presented to the street became key, and an approach of varying the forms and materials proved effective. The entry sequence and the experience of a winding, ascending movement within the house form a distinct experience. Thus the entry foyer sits at a lower level to the main living space, and so one experiences a gentle upward transition into the house that is revealing of the various geometries.


basement plan

ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT DOVER HEIGHTS

date

2011

council

Waverley Council

site area

634.26 m²

net area

507.87 m²

cost

$4.2M

living spaces

3

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

5

car spaces

2

Situated on the western escarpment of Dover Heights facing the city, this steeply sloping site created an opportunity for a multi-level house for a large family with varying needs. The front faces a busy road and as such the house is designed with almost no openings, providing a robust and somewhat monolithic appearance to the street. The house is organised as two distinct volumes with a circulation core in the middle. The main living areas and master bedroom are located at the rear facing the main view with other bedrooms in the volume closer to the front. The steeped form of the house was created to take advantage of sun and views from as many areas as possible and the introduction of a north and south courtyards intended to enhance solar access as much as possible into the main living spaces. The solidity of the external appearance, that responds to its context, is offset internally by the use of natural materials; warm timber veneers, stone flooring, high ceilings and an abundance of natural light.


basement plan

lower ground plan

ground floor plan

upper floor plan


HOUSE AT DOVER HEIGHTS II

date

2011

council

Waverley Council

site area

571.27 m²

net area

559.64 m²

cost

$1.8M

living spaces

4

bedrooms

5

bathrooms

6

car spaces

2


basement plan

ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT DOVER HEIGHTS II


HOUSE AT DOVER HEIGHTS III

date

2012

council

Waverley Council

site area

515.39 m²

net area

555.65 m²

cost

$1.8M

living spaces

4

bedrooms

5

bathrooms

5

car spaces

2


basement plan

ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT SOUTH COOGEE

date

2008

council

Randwick Council

site area

377.45 m²

net area

449.90 m²

cost

$1.6M

living spaces

2

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

4

car spaces

2

The form of the house is derived from the limitations of its context. Neighbour views of Wedding Cake Island and the southeast needed to be maintained. The walls angle and tilt in plan and elevation in order to allow this to occur. The house opens to the east and north which is its greatest aspect with the living room on the upper level to take advantage of the cooling breezes and views. The entry is slightly raised above the bedrooms and is intermediate to the living level. Views are slotted, contained or expanded depending on orientation and aspect. The house is solid and robust to resist the battering of the elements. It can be dark, light, cool, or warm, responding to season and needs, providing its inhabitants the greatest amenity from which to contemplate nature.


ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT SOUTH COOGEE


HOUSE AT SOUTH COOGEE


HOUSE AT SOUTH COOGEE


HOUSE AT SOUTH COOGEE


HOUSE AT COOGEE

date

2010

council

Randwick Council

site area

380 m²

net area

370 m²

cost

$1.6M

living spaces

4

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

4

car spaces

2


HOUSE AT COOGEE


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH

date

2008

council

Manly Council

site area

682.23 m²

net area

330.64 m²

cost

$1.8M

living spaces

2

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

3

car spaces

2

Located on a sloping site on the western escarpment of Seaforth the house is designed around a central courtyard, with bedrooms on the lower level and living spaces on the upper. A lap pool extends along the northern boundary enclosing the courtyard and creating an internal focus to the site. A large undercroft area extends the upper living spaces into the garden and with its deep shade acts as an ideal retreat in hot summer months.


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH

basement plan

ground floor plan

first floor plan


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH II

date

2005

council

Manly Council

site area

1134.13 m²

net area

538.20 m²

cost

$1.6M

living spaces

5

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

4

car spaces

2

This house, located in the improbable network of roads that terrace the eroded gullies of western Seaforth, is defined by two opposing conditions – view and sun. The site slopes sharply to the south, towards a valley and water view. The challenge was to take in the view, and open the living spaces to the south, while maintaining northern light and sun. The house steps down the site as a series of pavilions, split by a central court and connected by a stepping corridor. The upper pavilion contains bedrooms and study areas, while the lower comprises living and leisure spaces. Clerestory windows infuse the interior with both light and outlook. The house is designed around seasonal use. The sheltered central court provides refuge on windy days: high northern windows admit winter sun but are shaded in summer. The wide southern deck has a column-free roof, extending the living room and framing the view towards middle harbour. In summer the split plan allows generous cross breezes through the house, enhancing the sense of easy living that underpins both form and spaces.


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH II

lower level plan

ground floor plan


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH II


HOUSE AT SEAFORTH II


HOUSE AT BALGOWLAH

date

2005

council

Manly Council

site area

1967.71 m²

net area

1124.25 m²

cost

$4.5M

living spaces

4

bedrooms

7

bathrooms

7

car spaces

4

The brief for this house was unusual by domestic standards. The couple have a daughter who relies heavily on a motorised chair to move about, with the occasional use of prosthetic limbs. The family therefore needed clear and easy circulation through the house, with most of the living areas on a single plane, free of threshold level changes. The house also needed to cater for their daughter’s needs into adulthood, and consequently it can be easily divided into a number of suites to allow several adults to live discretely and semi-independently. The current requirements were more family centred. A central atrium allows easy communication and contact between members of the family. The couple live a very public life, and the house needed to accommodate various medical staff and as well as co-workers who are present more often than not. An upstairs suite for the parents allows some escape from this sometimes intense daily rhythm. The house is complemented by a pool and exercise area, as well as an entertaining court that adds sociability, and a large roof terrace. The bulk of the house projects to the south west, taking in water views to the main living areas. The family room opens to the court, pool and yard, aided by a structure-free corner that transforms it into a shaded undercroft when the glass walls are retracted. Numerous devices, from the level thresholds to the inset bath and lowered kitchen return bench, aid the family in incorporating their children into all aspects of domestic life.


HOUSE AT BALGOWLAH


basement plan

ground plan

first plan


HOUSE AT ROSEVILLE

date

2005

council

Ku-Ring-Gai Council

site area

780 m²

net area

280 m²

cost

$1.1M

living spaces

2

bedrooms

5

bathrooms

4

car spaces

2

The site has a small rise towards the back, and no prospect. The primary attribute is a North-East aspect to the long dimension. Other factors include a busy main road close by, which precluded a second storey due to noise. The house is effectively two linked pavilions - one for living and one harbouring bedrooms. The plan folds on itself, so that the living areas open to the sun and a narrow court formed by the glazed corridor to the bedrooms. All areas exhibit different degrees of enclosure, from the open living area to the private bedrooms, with their bay windows. The roof form shuts out noise and western sun, reinforcing the amenity of the house and its garden and courts.


HOUSE AT AVALON

date

2005

council

Manly Council

site area

1317.38 m²

net area

1374.38 m²

cost

$3M

living spaces

5

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

4

car spaces

2


HOUSE AT AVALON


street level plan

top level plan

middle level plan

courtyard level plan

bedroom level plan


HOUSE AT AVALON


HOUSE AT NORTH COAST

date

2011

site area

5000 m²

net area

400 m²

living spaces

2

bedrooms

4

bathrooms

5

car spaces

2

The house proposes a regional typology that responds to the climatic conditions of this latitude and is conceived of as a covered platform in the landscape. A large roof covers its equal space below with a central courtyard cut in the middle. The internal layout can be flexible and variably configured depending on use and occupation requirements. The internal court provides an enclosed protected space should the harshness of the elements begin to impinge, while the outer veranda can be used to extend and open the house into the landscape. The house can be built to a variety of specifications ranging from basic amenity in the form of a shed, through to a "luxury" retreat or home. Regardless the simplicity of the plan always results in the same evocative form reminiscent of the picturesque and that of the classic romantic Australian image of the rural house


PRIME MINISTER’S HOUSE AT CANBERRA

date

2013

site area

10000 m²

net area

2500 m²

living spaces

8

bedrooms

7

bathrooms

9

car spaces

6



MASQ architecture multi residential portfolio