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• Marysville Getchell

CAMPUSES:

• Marysville Pilchuck • Marysville Tulalip


Engage. Inspire. Prepare.

Office of the Superintendent Becky J. Berg, Ed.D.

Dear Families, High school is both a challenging and exciting time. Students change so much from the time they enter as wide-eyed ninth graders, to when they graduate as eighteen year olds full of promise. This can also be a difficult time for parents. Knowing how much to lead and guide, and how much to empower our children is truly an art that I am not sure any of us perfect as much as we would like to! Planning is a key aspect of this stage of your child’s education. Our goal is that by the time they graduate from our district, they have many options open to them – instead of some options out of reach. That means that whatever their post-high school plan is, whether it be a four-year college, the military, community college or some kind of apprenticeship, that they have taken the appropriate coursework in high school to pursue their own personal path. High School Choice: The first aspect of this planning is helping your child choose a high school that is a ‘best fit’ for their interests. The Marysville School District currently offers seven high school choices designed around student interests and Snohomish County career trends. This model is currently under review, to study if we are achieving the student learning outcomes that we would like – for the hefty investment of taxpayer dollars. If the model is changed during your child’s time in high school, careful planning will occur in order to ensure a smooth transition and minimal impact on your son or daughter. If you have questions or concerns about this process, please call our Learning and Teaching offices at 360-965-0000. Course Selection: The next important aspect of this planning is to ensure that your child has a full schedule of courses that are a good fit for them, and that lead to on-time graduation. Please make sure that your child is taking the courses needed to qualify for education after high school. We know that in this current economy, those with just a high school degree and no after high school education or training will be fighting to find a family wage job. Instead, we want our students to thrive and to have choices. Therefore, please: • Review your child’s high school course selection plan, (blank plans available at every high school office or call 360-965-0000). • Learn about what your high school offers to help prepare students for college and/or career. • Learn about financial aid options for families for college. • Sign up for College Bound! If your child qualifies for free or reduced lunch, and graduates from high school with a 2.0 grade point average, they will qualify for help with their in-state tuition. This program has literally changed lives. If you qualify, please sign up at http://www.wsac.wa.gov/PreparingForCollege/CollegeBound. • Encourage your child to become involved as a volunteer. Colleges these days look for much more than a ‘book smart’ person. They need to be ‘people smart’ too. In closing, please be forgiving of yourself as a parent. These are exciting times. These may also be tumultuous times. As parents we do the best job we know how to do. None of us get it perfectly, but that is part of the journey. All of the best to each of you! Becky Berg Superintendent

“Making the decision to have a child - it is momentous. It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.” ― Elizabeth Stone


High School Selection Guide Table of Contents Marysville Getchell Campus 8301 84th ST NE Marysville, Washington 98270 Academy of Construction and Engineering High School

(ACE)

Page 13

Bio Med Academy High School

(BIO)

Page 14

International School of Communications High School

(ISC)

Page 15

School for the Entrepreneur High School

(SFE)

Page16

(MPHS)

Page 17

Arts and Technology High School

(A&T)

Page 18

Tulalip Heritage High School

(THS)

Page 19

(MMVHS)

Page 20

Marysville Pilchuck Campus 5611 108th ST NE Marysville, Washington 98270 Marysville Pilchuck High School Marysville Tulalip Campus 7204 27th Ave NE Marysville, Washington 98271

Alternative Learning Experience Program Marysville Mountain View High School Course Descriptions

Career and Technical Education Course Descriptions District Program Options Offered to all Students Sno-Isle Technical Skill Center Special Education English Language Learners Marysville School District High School Athletics

(Course Descriptions)

Page 21-33

(CTE)

Page 34-44

(Sno-Isle)

Page 45-48

(Special Education)

Page 49

(ELL)

Page 50

(Athletics)

Page 51


24-Credit Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements:

How Do the 24-Credit Graduation Requirements Add Up?

3

4

24

4 English 3 Math 3 Science 3 Social studies 1 Career and Technical

4 Elective Credits

17 Core Credits + 3 Personalized Pathway Requirements

17

24 Credit* Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements for the Class of 2021

Education

2 Health and Fitness

2 Arts 2 World

Language

1 Arts 1 PPR 2 PPR

PPR = Personalized Pathway Requirements: Three locally determined courses that lead to a specific post-high school career outcome chosen by the student, based on the student’s interest and High school and Beyond Plan.

*For individual students, 2 credits may be waived: A district must adopt a written policy to waive up to 2 credits of the 24, based on the student’s ‘unusual circumstances.’

Washington State Board of Education 600 Washington Street SE PO Box 47206 Olympia, Washington 98504


24-Credit Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements:

How Are Math Requirements Changing?

3

3

For the Class of 2013 to the Class of 2020:

For the Class of 2021 and Beyond:

3 Credits

3 Credits

of High School Math x Algebra I/Integrated Math 1 x Geometry/Integrated Math 2 x Algebra II/Integrated Math 3

or x A third credit of high school math in place of Algebra II/Integrated Math 3 o Approved in a meeting with the student, the parent or guardian, and a school representative.

Washington State Board of Education 600 Washington Street SE PO Box 47206 Olympia, Washington 98504

of High School Math x Algebra I/Integrated Math 1 x Geometry/Integrated Math 2

and x A third credit of high school math based on the student’s High School and Beyond Plan o Approved by the student and the parent or guardian, or school counselor or school principal.


24-Credit Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements:

How Are Science Requirements Changing?

2

1

For the Class of 2021 and Beyond:

Until the Class of 2020:

2 Credits of Science

including 1 lab

3

1 Credit of

Lab Science

The third credit of science based is the student’s High School and Beyond Plan, and approved by the student and the parent or guardian, or a school counselor or principal.

3 Credits of Science

including 2 labs

What is a Lab? “Laboratory experiences provide opportunities for students to interact directly with the material world (or with data drawn from the material world), using the tools, data collection techniques, models and theories of science.” The National Research Council. (2006) America’s Lab Report: Investigations in High School Science. This definition allows flexibility in offering lab science classes—not all laboratory sciences need to be taught in a specialized laboratory facility.

Washington State Board of Education 600 Washington Street SE PO Box 47206 Olympia, Washington 98504


24-Credit Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements:

How Much Student Choice?

4 4 Elective

3

7

Credits that must be based on a student’s High School and Beyond Plan

7 Flexible

Credits

Credits

3 Personalized Pathway Districts may have local

Requirement Credits

requirements.

Courses that lead to a specific post-high school career and educational outcome chosen by the student. Also, the content of the 3 rd credit of math and the 3rd credit of science are student choice, with the agreement of a parent, guardian, counselor or principal.

For students to explore and to pursue a pathway that leads to a post-high school career or educational outcome of their choice.

Career and Technical Education courses determined to be equivalent to core requirements and competency-based credits provide additional flexibility for students.

Washington State Board of Education 600 Washington Street SE PO Box 47206 Olympia, Washington 98504


24-Credit Career- and College-Ready Graduation Requirements:

What are Personalized Pathway Requirements (PPR)? High School and Beyond Plan

Personalized Pathway

Personalized Pathway Requirements

High School and Beyond Plan (HSBP) Plan for attaining post-secondary career and education goals, created in collaboration between the student, parent/guardian, and high school staff.

Personalized Pathway Locally determined high school course work necessary to prepare for the particular career and education goal chosen by the student.

Personalized Pathway Requirements (PPR) The three credits that a student must specify in their HSBP that meet both graduation requirements and helps to prepare for the particular career and education goal chosen by the student

Washington State Board of Education 600 Washington Street SE PO Box 47206 Olympia, Washington 98504


Marysville School District Graduation Requirements

PPR = Personalized Pathway Requirements: Three locally determined courses that lead to a specific post-high school career outcome chosen by the student, based on the student’s interest and High school and Beyond Plan.


Class of 2021 and beyond requirements - 24 Credits English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Schedules- Based on a 6 period Day

Marysville-Getchell Campus General Education 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Math

Math

Math

CTE

Science

Science

Science

Elective

World Language

World Language

Elective (W.L.)

Elective

PE / Health

Social Studies

Social Studies

Social Studies

Fine Arts (CTE)

PE

Fine Arts

Elective

Marysville-Pilchuck Campus General Education 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Math

Math

Math

Elective

PE / Social Studies

Health / Social Studies

Social Studies

Social Studies

Science

Science

Science

Elective

World Language

World Language

PE/CTE

Elective

Fine Arts / CTE

PE/Fine Arts

Fine Arts

Elective

Marysville-Tulalip Campus General Education 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Math

Math

Math

CTE

Science

Science

Science

PE

World Language

World Language

Fine Arts

Fine Arts

PE / Health

Social Studies

Social Studies

Social Studies

AVID

AVID

AVID

Elective


Marysville Pilchuck & Getchell Campuses MUSIC (Band / Choir) 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Music (Fine Arts)

Music (Fine Arts)

Music (Elective)

Music (Elective)

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Math

Math

Math

CTE

Science

Science

Science

Elective

World Language

World Language

PE

Elective

PE / Health

Social Studies

Social Studies

Social Studies

AVID 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Math

Math

Math

CTE

Science

Science

Science

PE

World Language

World Language

Fine Arts

Fine Arts

PE / Health

Social Studies

Social Studies

Social Studies

AVID (Elective)

AVID (Elective)

AVID (Elective)

AVID (Elective)

ADVANCED / ACCELERATED 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Honors English 9

Honors English 10

AP Composition

AP Literature

Math (Geometry)

Math (Algebra 2)

Math (Pre-Calculus)

Math (AP Calculus)

Science (Biology)

Science (Chemistry)

Science (AP)

Elective (Science)

World Language

World Language

Elective (WL)

Elective (WL)

PE / Health

AP World History

AP US History

AP Comp Politics

Fine Arts / CTE

PE/ Fine Arts

Fine Arts

PE / CTE


NJROTC 9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Math

Math

Math

Elective

Science

Science

Science

Fine Arts

World Language

World Language

Fine Arts

PE

PE / World Geography (MP) PE / Health (MG)

World History / Health (MP) World History / World Geography (MG)

US History

Civics/CWP

NJROTC (CTE)

NJROTC (Elective)

NJROTC (Elective)

NJROTC (Elective)


HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT REQUIREMENTS (AS OF JUNE 2015 AND AS DEFINED BY THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION) FOR THE GRADUATING CLASSES OF 2021 AND BEYOND

English

4.0

9th Grade English 10th Grade English 11th Grade English 12th Grade English

Physical Education Health

0.5

Science

3.0

Social Studies

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

1.5

Includes two lab sciences. Students must demonstrate proficiency in Biology through the End of Course (EOC) exam third credit based on student interest and approved by parent/guardian.

Math

3.0

Algebra I 1.0 Geometry 1.0 Algebra II (or third credit alternative) 1.0 Students must earn three credits in math. The third credit option is chosen by student and approved by parent/guardian.

World History World Geography U.S. History Civics Contemporary World Problems

3.0*

0.5 0.5 1.0 0.5 0.5

*Washington State History is required for graduation. This state requirement is fulfilled in Grade 8. Social Studies Transfer students may need to complete this requirement prior to graduation. See your counselor.

World Language

2.0

Arts

2.0

Two consecutive years in the same language.

Music, Art or Drama 1.0 credit may be a Personalized Pathway Requirement, which are related courses leading to specific career or educational paths chosen by the student based on interest or focus. See your counselor.

Career and Technical Education

1.0

Other Courses

4.0

Choose from Business Education, Technology Education, Health Occupations, etc. Check with your counselor about possible 2 for 1 credit for CTE courses.

24

REQUIRED HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS


Planner FOR GRADUATING CLASSES OF 2021 AND BEYOND THIS IS A SAMPLE OF THE MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENT COURSES THAT SHOULD BE TAKEN.

Freshman Year of High School First Semester 1. 9th Grade English 2. Math 3. Science 4. Fine Arts 5. Physical Education 6. World Language

Sophomore Year of High School First Semester 1. 10th Grade English 2. Social Studies 3. Math 4. Science 5. World Language 6. Physical Education

Junior Year of High School First Semester 1. English 2. Social Studies 3. Math 4. Science 5. Fine Arts 6. Elective (World Language)

Second Semester 1. 9th Grade English 2. Math 3. Science 4. Fine Arts 5. Health 6. World Language

Second Semester 1. 10th Grade English 2. Social Studies 3. Math 4. Science 5. World Language 6. Physical Education

Second Semester 1. English 2. Social Studies 3. Math 4. Science 5. Fine Arts 6. Elective (World Language)

Senior Year of High School First Semester

Second Semester

1. English

1. English

2. Social Studies

2. Social Studies

3. Career and Technical Education

3. Career and Technical Education

4. Elective

4. Elective

5. Elective

5. Elective

6. Elective

6. Elective

(Recommended for both semesters of Senior year: Additional Math, Science, World Language)


AVID

AVID is intended to benefit students that have the desire to attend college but may need

additional academic support to maximize their potential. As students progress in AVID, their selfimages improve, and they become academically successful leaders and role models for our school and community. AVID puts your student on the college track! • • • •

Learn organizational strategies and study skills Develop critical thinking and inquiry skills Receive academic help from peers and college tutors Participate in enrichment and motivational activities that support community.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) (9,10) Course Description: The AVID course is an elective class for students to prepare them to become college-bound. The AVID curriculum focuses on writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading through the AVID High School curriculum in both teacher and tutor-led activities. While concurrently enrolled in a college-prep course of study, students learn strategies to enhance success. Note-taking, outlining, writing, speaking, reading, test-taking strategies and selfawareness are stressed. In addition, the course includes college motivational activities and intensive preparation for ACT, SAT I and SAT II. AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) (11,12) Course Description: The AVID Elective class for the junior and senior years prepares students for entrance into four-year colleges by emphasizing analytical writing, preparation for college entrance and placement exams, college study skills, oral language development, note taking, research, and completing applications for college programs. Students are expected to participate in, and eventually act as moderators for Socratic Seminars. In addition, students are required to make oral presentations to the class on topics related to career searches, contemporary issues, and social concerns, all the while focusing on a culminating senior paper, portfolio, and/or project.


ACADEMY OF CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements

24 Credits

English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond 9th Grade English 9 Math Science World Language PE/Health Fine Arts (CTE)

Marysville-Getchell Campus General Education 10th Grade 11th Grade English 10 English 11 Math Math Science Science World Language Elective (World Language) Social Studies Social Studies PE Fine Arts

12th Grade English 12 CTE Elective Elective Social Studies Elective

If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Getchell Campus Engineering Construction Game Design

Human Body Systems Principles of Biomedical Science Video Production (TV3)

Latin Integrated Communications Business Marketing

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.

Student Store


BIO MED ACADEMY

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements

24 Credits

English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond 9th Grade English 9 Math Science World Language PE/Health Fine Arts (CTE)

Marysville-Getchell Campus General Education 10th Grade 11th Grade English 10 English 11 Math Math Science Science World Language Elective (World Language) Social Studies Social Studies PE Fine Arts

12th Grade English 12 CTE Elective Elective Social Studies Elective

If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Getchell Campus Engineering Construction Game Design

Human Body Systems Principles of Biomedical Science Video Production (TV3)

Latin Integrated Communications Business Marketing

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.

Student Store


INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements

24 Credits

English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond th

9 Grade English 9 Math Science World Language PE/Health Fine Arts (CTE)

Marysville-Getchell Campus General Education 10th Grade 11th Grade English 10 English 11 Math Math Science Science World Language Elective (World Language) Social Studies Social Studies PE Fine Arts

12th Grade English 12 CTE Elective Elective Social Studies Elective

If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Getchell Campus Engineering Construction Game Design

Human Body Systems Principles of Biomedical Science Video Production (TV3)

Latin Integrated Communications Business Marketing

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.

Student Store


SCHOOL FOR THE ENTREPRENUER

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements

24 Credits

English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond th

9 Grade English 9 Math Science World Language PE/Health Fine Arts (CTE)

Marysville-Getchell Campus General Education 10th Grade 11th Grade English 10 English 11 Math Math Science Science World Language Elective (World Language) Social Studies Social Studies PE Fine Arts

12th Grade English 12 CTE Elective Elective Social Studies Elective

If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Getchell Campus Engineering Construction Game Design

Human Body Systems Principles of Biomedical Science Video Production (TV3)

Latin Integrated Communications Business Marketing

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.

Student Store


MARYSVILLE PILCHUCK

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

4

3

2

3

3

2

24 Credits

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

1

4

2

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

9th Grade English 9 Math PE/Social Studies Science World Language Fine Arts/CTE

10th Grade English 10 Math Health/Social Studies Science World Language PE/Fine Arts

11th Grade English 11 Math Social Studies Science PE/CTE Fine Arts

12th Grade English 12 Elective Social Studies Science Elective Elective

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Pilchuck Campus Japanese French AP Spanish

Forensic Science Guitar Child Development

Anatomy & Physiology Poetry/Song Writing Write about Film

Marketing Student Store World Literature

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.


ARTS & TECHNOLOGY

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements

24 Credits

English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond 9th Grade English 9 Math Science World Language PE/Health AVID

Marysville-Tulalip Campus General Education 10th Grade 11th Grade English 10 English 11 Math Math Science Science World Language Fine Arts Social Studies Social Studies AVID AVID

12th Grade English 12 CTE PE Fine Arts Social Studies Elective

If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Tulalip Campus Manufacturing Computer Repair Lab Lushootseed

Native Art & Design Elementary Tutoring Elementary Tutoring

Tribal Law Digital Photography

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.


TULALIP HERITAGE

Class of 2021 and beyond requirements

24 Credits

English

Math

World Lang

Science

Social Studies

Arts

Health/ Fitness

CTE

Electives

4

3

2

3

3

2

2

1

4

Sample Four Year Plan for Class of 2021 and Beyond 9th Grade English 9 Math Science World Language PE/Health AVID

Marysville-Tulalip Campus General Education 10th Grade 11th Grade English 10 English 11 Math Math Science Science World Language Fine Arts Social Studies Social Studies AVID AVID

12th Grade English 12 CTE PE Fine Arts Social Studies Elective

If you are a student taking Band, AVID, JROTC or have a special pathway, consult with you designated counselor.

Unique Elective Offerings @Marysville Tulalip Campus Manufacturing Computer Repair Lab Lushootseed

Native Art & Design Elementary Tutoring Elementary Tutoring

Tribal Law Digital Photography

Engage. Inspire. Prepare.


MARYSVILLE MOUNTAIN VIEW

Marysville Mountain View High School is an Alternative Learning Experience Program (ALE) is available to motivated, self-directed students in grades 9-12. Students participate in an ALE model that provides for onsite, remote and work-based learning opportunities that lead to a high school diploma from the Marysville School District. This ALE program provides the opportunity for students to earn credits through shorter, more rigorous academic terms and requires that students be self-motivated and able to work independently within and outside of school. Students are required to participate in 25 hours of weekly learning activities both in and out of school and have direct communication with their instructors on a weekly basis. Student progress is evaluated monthly per WAC 392-121-107. To be in compliance with School Board Policy 2255, students must demonstrate they have the academic skills to function effectively in an independent setting. Prior credits earned, assessment scores, and recommendations from counselor/administrator serve as evidence. MMVHS is not recommended for incoming freshmen. Students who are interested in attending MMVHS must complete the following: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

Attend an orientation with a parent/guardian. Complete an application packet that includes a student essay, parent input response, and letter of recommendation from a principal or counselor. Meet the credit requirements for admission. Attend and complete all intake assignments. Continue to attend your current school until a transfer is approved.

Criteria requirements for MMVHS (ALE) Alternative Learning Experience: Credits required upon entry: Semester 1 9th 0 credits 10th 0-6 credits 11th 6-12 credits 12th at least 12 credits 5th year Srs. 15+ credits

Semester 2 9th 0-3 credits 10th 3-9 credits 11th 9-15 credits 12th at least 15 credits 5th year Srs.-by consultation only


General Education Choral

Concert Ensemble

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit This course is open to all students, from experienced musicians to first-time singers, who want to perform choral music of all kinds in a big group environment. Music will cover a wide range of choral styles, eras and languages. This group has two required performances a semester, and the opportunity to travel to events around the region and country. Focus is on developing and improving vocal technique and reading music.

Chamber Ensemble

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: Audition required. Vocal Ensemble courses are intended to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts in small ensemble or madrigal groups. Course goals may include the development of solo singing ability and may emphasize one or several ensemble literature styles.

Treble Ensemble

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: Audition required. Treble Choir is an advanced choir for women. Students will be admitted as space allows according to audition. Music will be selected from college-level literature, with an emphasis on independent parts. This group will have multiple required performances throughout the year both locally and around our region.

Instrumental

Concert Band

Grades 9-10 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: Musical instrument exp. Courses in Concert Band are designed to promote students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover a variety of band literature styles, primarily for concert performances.

Guitar I/II

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 Fine Arts/Elective credit Fee: $10.00 Guitar courses introduce students to the fundamentals of music and guitar-playing

techniques, such as strumming and chords. These courses may also include more advanced guitar-playing techniques.

Jazz Ensemble I/II

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: Audition or instructor permission Instrumental Ensemble courses are intended to develop students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, percussion, and/or string instruments in small ensemble groups. Instrumental Ensemble courses cover one or more instrumental ensemble or band literature styles.

Percussion Ensemble

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Fee: $85.00 This course is exclusively percussion instruments: snare, bass, timpani, mallets, auxiliary percussion, quad tons, and other similar instruments. Topics covered will include exploration of all facets of percussion. Students will perform at school concerts and be give the opportunity to perform with Concert Band, Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble.

Symphonic Band

Grades 9-11 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: 9th grade by audition only, 10th & 11th audition or instructor permission Fee: $85.00 This course builds skills in sight reading, individual and ensemble performances, scales performance and conducting. Students perform in concerts and festivals.

Wind Ensemble

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: 9th & 10th by audition only, 11th & 12th Audition, instructor permission This course builds skills in sight reading, individual and ensemble performances, scales performance and conducting. Students perform in concerts and festivals and school events.

THEATRICAL ARTS

Drama I

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 Fine Arts/Elective credit Exploration in Drama courses are designed to enhance students’ understanding of life through the study and performance of dramatic works. They emphasize developing students’ ability to express themselves and


establish personal criteria for the critical evaluation of drama activities.

transformation under heat, and the various methods used to create and finish objects.

Drama II/III/IV

Ceramics II & III

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: Teacher Permission Required Drama courses promote students’ experience and skill development in one or more aspects of theatrical production, but they concentrate on acting and performance skills. Focus on improving technique, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical techniques and traditions, and increasing their chances of participating in public productions.

Visual

Advanced Placement Studio Art Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit Fee: $15.00 AP Art courses provide the opportunity for students to critically examine architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within their historical and cultural contexts. In covering the art of several centuries (not necessarily in chronological order), students learn to identify different styles, techniques, and influences and to formulate and articulate their reactions to various kinds of artwork.

Art I-II / Studio Art I-IV

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 Fine Arts/Elective credit Fee: $15.00 These comprehensive courses provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore an art form and to create individual works of art. These courses may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world. Initial courses cover the language, materials, and processes of a particular art form and the design elements and principles supporting a work of art. As students advance and become more adept, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic styles. These courses may also include the study of major artists, art movements, and styles.

Ceramics I

Grades 10-12 1 sem 0.5 Fine Arts/Elective credit Fee: $10.00 Ceramics/Pottery courses focus on creating three-dimensional works out of clay and ceramic material. Particular attention is paid to the characteristics of the raw materials, their

Grades 10-12 1 sem 0.5 Fine Arts/Elective credit Prerequisite: Ceramics I/II Teacher permission required. Fee: $10.00

Digital Photography

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Arts/Elective credit College in the High School Maybe Available Prerequisite: ART I or instructor’s permission Photography courses expose students to the materials, processes, and artistic techniques of taking artistic photographs. Students learn about the operation of a camera, composition, lighting techniques, depth of field, filters, camera angles, and film development. The course may cover black-and-white photography, color photography, or both. As students advance, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic style. These courses may also cover major photographers, art movements, and styles.

Health & Fitness

Aerobics

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Fitness/Conditioning Activities courses emphasize conditioning activities that help develop muscular strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness.

Aquatics

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Aquatic/Water Sports courses help students develop skills useful or necessary in an aquatic environment. They may focus on swimming and competitive strokes, such as freestyle, breaststroke, butterfly, and so on or may involve team-oriented water sports, such as water polo and relay swimming. These courses may also include (or concentrate exclusively on) diving and/or lifesaving skills.

Athletic Development

Grades 10-12 1 sem 0.5 credit This course is offered only during Zero Hour and is designed for students who want sport specific strength and conditioning principles/activities. The Olympic lifts will be


emphasized as well as core training specifically for speed and power development.

other components such as anatomy and conditioning.

Fit for Life

Tournament Sports

Grade 9 1 sem 0.5 credit These courses emphasize acquiring knowledge and skills regarding lifetime physical fitness; content may include related topics such as nutrition, stress management, and consumer issues. Students may develop and implement a personal fitness plan.

Flex and Fitness

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit This course is energetic and active yet suited to all levels of personal fitness. The main thrust of each class is to bring about a transformation of the physical body, relieve stress, sculpt muscles, develop flexible bodies, and gain a greater calmness.

Health

Grades 10 1 sem 0.5 credit Similar to Family Living courses, but more focused on the individual, Personal Development courses emphasize strengthening self-esteem, recognizing and resisting negative peer pressure, and developing coping skills for dealing with changes within one’s self and within others. These courses may also have a substance-abuse prevention component.

Net Sports I/II

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Individual/Dual Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one individual or dual sport (such as tennis, golf, badminton, jogging/running, racquetball, and so on).

Sports Conditioning

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Fitness/Conditioning Activities courses emphasize conditioning activities that help develop muscular strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness.

Strength & Conditioning I/II

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Weight Training courses help students develop knowledge and skills with free weights and universal stations while emphasizing safety and proper body positioning; they may include

Grades 10-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Team Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one team sport (such as volleyball, basketball, soccer, and so on).

Walk Fit

Grades 9-12 1 sem 0.5 credit Class uses walking to improve fitness! Supplementary activities may include: water walking, swimming, stretching, and fundamental strength exercises. This courses is designed to accommodate students with temporary or permanent injuries and limitations that inhibit full participation in other physical education classes. All conditions or injuries in which medical advice/attention has been sought require a description from the student’s doctor (to include a description/duration of limitations).

Language Arts

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition

Grade 11-12 1 year 1.0 Language Arts credit Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Language and Composition courses expose students to prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. These courses emphasize the interaction of authorial purpose, intended audience, and the subject at hand, and through them, students learn to develop stylistic flexibility as they write compositions covering a variety of subjects that are intended for various purposes.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Language Arts credit Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Literature and Composition courses enable students to develop critical standards for evaluating literature. Students study the language, character, action, and theme in works of recognized literary merit; enrich their understanding of connotation, metaphor, irony,


syntax, and tone; and write compositions of their own (including literary analysis, exposition, argument, narrative, and creative writing).

themselves in front of groups. The Debate course specifically addresses the following Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Writing, Speaking and Listening, Grades 11-12.

College Writing

Journalistic Writing

Grade 12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Lang. Arts III This course develops writing skills for students pursuing post-secondary education. It teaches students to organize, create, and effectively present essays, reports, proposals, both as individuals and groups.

Contemporary Literature

Grade 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Literature courses offer the opportunity for students to study and reflect upon the themes presented in the body of literature being presented. Students improve their criticalthinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the reading selection and as they understand how the work reflects society’s problems and culture. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions are often required. Literature courses may survey representative works, reflect a particular genre or a specific theme, or survey works of a particular time or people.

Creative Writing

Grade 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Creative Writing courses offer students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis of the courses is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Although most creative writing classes cover several expressive forms, others concentrate exclusively on one particular form (such as poetry or playwriting).

Debate I/II

Grade 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Debate is a one-semester elective course designed to provide experience in preparing, analyzing, and participating in debates. Students will engage in team policy and Lincoln-Douglas debates and other speaking experiences, with the goals of improving their self-confidence and ability to present

Grades 10-12 1 year 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Prerequisite: Instructor permission required Journalism courses emphasize writing style and technique as well as production values and organization. Journalism courses introduce students to the concepts of newsworthiness and press responsibility; develop students’ skills in writing and editing stories, headlines, and captions; and teach students the principles of production design, layout, and printing. Photography and photojournalism skills may be included.

Language Arts I/ Language Arts I Honors

Grade 9 1 year 1.0 Language Arts credit English/Language Arts I courses build upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing and usually include the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Typically, these courses introduce and define various genres of literature, with writing exercises often linked to reading selections.

Language Arts II/ Language Arts II Honors

Grade 10 1 year 1.0 Language Arts credit English/Language Arts II courses usually offer a balanced focus on composition and literature. Typically, students learn about the alternate aims and audiences of written compositions by writing persuasive, critical, and creative multiparagraph essays and compositions. Through the study of various genres of literature, students can improve their reading rate and comprehension and develop the skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message.

Language Arts III / American Literature

Grade 11 1 year 1.0 Language Arts credit English/Language Arts III courses continue to develop students’ writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage, as students write essays and begin to


learn the techniques of writing research papers. Students continue to read works of literature, which often form the backbone of the writing assignments. Literary conventions and stylistic devices may receive greater emphasis than in previous courses.

Language Arts IV: Integrated Communications

Grade 12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit English/Language Arts IV courses blend composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Typically, students primarily write multiparagraph essays, but they may also write one or more major research papers.

Language Arts IV: Senior Review

Grade 12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit English/Language Arts IV courses blend composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Typically, students primarily write multiparagraph essays, but they may also write one or more major research papers.

Poetry and Song Writing

Grades 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit This course will provide students an opportunity to gather, analyze, synthesize, and gather information from a variety of poetry and musical sources. Students will be able to articulate qualities that make writing of poetry and song writing synonymous. As well as, write poetry and music from a variety of publishing options incorporating essays and research. Students will receive support for their culminating exhibition portfolio.

Senior Literature: College Prep

Grade 12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit English/Literature (juniors and seniors) courses are designed for juniors and/or seniors and emphasize comprehension, discernment, and critical-thinking skills in the reading of texts and literature. These courses introduce and explore more advanced literary techniques (irony, satire, humor, connotation, tone, rhythm, symbolism, and so on) through two or more literary genres, with the aim of creating sophisticated readers. Writing assignments are

required as an additional method to develop and improve critical-thinking and analytic skills.

Speech I/II

Grade 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Public Speaking courses enable students, through practice, to develop communication skills that can be used in a variety of speaking situations (such as small and large group discussions, delivery of lectures or speeches in front of audiences, and so on). Course topics may include (but are not limited to) research and organization, writing for verbal delivery, stylistic choices, visual and presentation skills, analysis and critique, and development of selfconfidence.

World Literature

Grade 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Lang. Arts II World Literature courses use representative literature selections from ancient and/or modern times from countries around the world. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they comprehend the diversity of literary traditions and the influences of those traditions. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions are often required.

Writing about Film

Grades 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Language Arts credit This course will focus on English based topics as art of fiction, film genre, plot analysis, and film history. Discussions, clip analysis, and analysis by essay writing will be stressed. Writing will include reviews and research papers. A film list from different times and genres will be submitted for approval before viewing.

Writing for Publication

Grades: 9-12 1 sem or full year 0.5 – 1.0 Language Arts credit This course develops writers by combining elements from journalistic and creative fiction writing courses. Students will study the craft of writing for an audience, developing style and voice, refining ideas and content, editing to a high degree of clarity and accuracy, and formatting final draft(s) for publication. Aspiring photographers and artists will provide original graphics to complement text as class member’s work together to produce school and


community publications such as magazines, literary collections, newsletters, TV3 screenplays, and web pages. Students will produce a professional portfolio to showcase college-ready skills. (Publication of all pieces is not required.)

Bridge to College ELA

Grade12 1 year 1.0 credit The Bridge to College ELA course addresses key learning standards from Washington State’s new K-12 learning standards (CCSS) as well as essential college-and-career readiness standards agreed upon by both higher education faculty and k-12 educators. The course will also develop students’ essential habits of mind necessary to be successful in college. Students who complete this course will be equipped to engage in college-level work in English.

Math

Algebra I

Grades 9, 10, 11 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Algebra I courses include the study of properties and operations of the real number system; evaluating rational algebraic expressions; solving and graphing first degree equations and inequalities; translating word problems into equations; operations with and factoring of polynomials; and solving simple quadratic equations.

Algebra II

Grades 9-11 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Prerequisite: Passing grade in Algebra I &Geometry Algebra II course topics typically include field properties and theorems; set theory; operations with rational and irrational expressions; factoring of rational expressions; in-depth study of linear equations and inequalities; quadratic equations; solving systems of linear and quadratic equations; graphing of constant, linear, and quadratic equations; properties of higher degree equations; and operations with rational and irrational exponents.

Advanced Placement Calculus

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses, AP Calculus AB provides students with an intuitive understanding of the

concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications. These courses introduce calculus and include the following topics: elementary functions; properties of functions and their graphs; limits and continuity; differential calculus (including definition of the derivative, derivative formulas, theorems about derivatives, geometric applications, optimization problems, and rate-of-change problems); and integral calculus (including antiderivatives and the definite integral).

Advanced Placement Statistics

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level statistics courses, AP Statistics courses introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

Calculus

Grades 10-11 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Calculus courses include the study of derivatives, differentiation, integration, the definite and indefinite integral, and applications of calculus. Typically, students have previously attained knowledge of pre-calculus topics (some combination of trigonometry, elementary functions, analytic geometry, and math analysis).

College Algebra

Grade: 11-12 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Prerequisite: Completion of Integrated 3 or Teacher permission This course will prepare students for college level mathematics, college placement tests, entrance exams, and the SAT. Students will experience what a freshman level college algebra student will see. There is an increased emphasis on textbook readings. The topics covered in this course will be: algebraic expressions, equations and Inequalities, relations and functions graphing relations and functions, general graphing techniques, polynomial and rational functions, graphs of polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions.

Geometry

Grades 9-10 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit


Prerequisite: passing grade in Algebra Geometry courses, emphasizing an abstract, formal approach to the study of geometry, typically include topics such as properties of plane and solid figures; deductive methods of reasoning and use of logic; geometry as an axiomatic system including the study of postulates, theorems, and formal proofs; concepts of congruence, similarity, parallelism, perpendicularity, and proportion; and rules of angle measurement in triangles.

Pre-Calculus

Grades 10-11 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit College in the High School Credit Available Prerequisite: College Algebra Pre-Calculus courses combine the study of Trigonometry, Elementary Functions, Analytic Geometry, and Math Analysis topics as preparation for calculus. Topics typically include the study of complex numbers; polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, rational, right trigonometric, and circular functions, and their relations, inverses and graphs; trigonometric identities and equations; solutions of right and oblique triangles; vectors; the polar coordinate system; conic sections; Boolean algebra and symbolic logic; mathematical induction; matrix algebra; sequences and series; and limits and continuity.

Bridges to College Mathematics

Grades 12 1 year 1.0 Mathematics credit Prerequisite: Passing grade in Algebra I & Geometry, attempt Algebra II. Bridge to College Mathematics is a year-long course focusing on the key mathematics readiness standards from Washington State’s K-12 Learning Standards for Mathematics (the Common Core State Standards, CCSS-M) as well as the eight Standards for Mathematical Practices. The course is designed to prepare students for entrance in to non-calculus pathway introductory college math courses. The course addresses key learning standards for high school including Algebra I, Statistics, Geometry, and Algebra II standards essential for college-and career-readiness. The course curriculum emphasizes modeling with mathematics. Topics include building and interpreting functions (linear, quadratic & exponential), writing, solving and reasoning with equations and inequalities, and summarizing, representing, and interpreting data. The course is designed to focus on building conceptual understanding, reasoning and mathematical skills and provides students engaging mathematics that builds flexible

thinking and a growth mindset. Seniors who score in Level 2 on the Smarter Balanced 11thgrade assessment and are successful in this course (B or better), the Bridge to college Mathematics course offers an opportunity to place in to a college-level course when entering college directly after high school.

Science

Astronomy

Grades 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Science credit Fee: $20.00 Prerequisite: Successful completion of one semester physical science/Physics Astronomy courses offer students the opportunity to study the solar system, stars, galaxies, and interstellar bodies. These courses usually introduce and use astronomic instruments and typically explore theories regarding the origin and evolution of the universe, space, and time.

Advanced Placement Biology

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Topics will include 1) molecules (biochemistry) and cells, 2) genetics and evolution and 3) organisms and populations. Students focus on detail and it is intended for the collegeoriented student. Lab work is an integral part of this course and will require creativity and problem solving skills in order to complete.

Advanced Placement Chemistry Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of chemistry, Advanced Placement Chemistry courses cover chemical properties and interactions in more detail. Advanced chemistry topics include organic chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, macromolecules, kinetic theory, and nuclear chemistry. Students focus on detail and it is intended for the college-oriented student. Lab work is an integral part of this course and will require creativity and problem solving skills in order to complete.

Biology

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Biology courses are designed to provide information regarding the fundamental concepts of life and life processes. These courses include (but are not restricted to) such topics as cell structure and function, general


plant and animal physiology, genetics, and taxonomy.

Chemistry

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Prerequisite: Currently enrolled in Algebra II or higher Chemistry courses involve studying the composition, properties, and reactions of substances. These courses typically explore such concepts as the behaviors of solids, liquids, and gases; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; and atomic structure. Chemical formulas and equations and nuclear reactions are also studied.

Environmental Science

Grades 10-12 1 sem 0.5 Science credit Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology Environmental Science courses examine the mutual relationships between organisms and their environment. In studying the interrelationships among plants, animals, and humans, these courses usually cover the following subjects: photosynthesis, recycling and regeneration, ecosystems, population and growth studies, pollution, and conservation of natural resources.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Fee: $20.00 Prerequisite: Successful completion of 1 year of Biology Anatomy courses present an in-depth study of the human body and biological system. Students study such topics as anatomical terminology, cells, and tissues and typically explore functional systems such as skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, and nervous systems.

Marine Biology

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Marine biology allows students to investigate the physical and biotic environment of the marine world. They study the relationship between plants and animals in the Earth’s oceans with emphasis on the Puget Sound area. Taxonomy, physiology, and anatomy of major marine groups are studied.

Physical Science

Grade 9 1 year 1.0 Science credit

Physical Science courses involve study of the structures and states of matter. Typically (but not always) offered as introductory survey courses, they may include such topics as forms of energy, wave phenomenon, electromagnetism, and physical and chemical interactions.

Physics

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Science credit Fee: $20.00 Physics courses involve the study of the forces and laws of nature affecting matter, such as equilibrium, motion, momentum, and the relationships between matter and energy. The study of physics includes examination of sound, light, and magnetic and electric phenomena.

Social Studies

Advanced Placement Comparative Politics

Grade 12 1 year 1.0 Social Studies credit Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level Comparative Government and Politics courses, these courses offer students an understanding of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The courses encompass the study of both specific countries and general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all national policies. Course content generally includes sources of public authority and political power, the relationship between states and society, the relationships between the political and institutional frameworks of citizens and states, political change, and comparative methods.

Advanced Placement Government

Grade 12 1 year 1.0 Social Studies credit Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level Comparative Government and Politics courses, these courses offer students an understanding of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The courses encompass the study of both specific countries and general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all national policies. Course content generally includes sources of public authority and political power, the relationship between states and society, the relationships between the political and institutional


frameworks of citizens and states, political change, and comparative methods.

Advanced Placement U.S. History

Grade 11 1 year 1.0 Social Studies credit Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S. History courses provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and materials in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.

Contemporary World Problems

Grade 12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit Contemporary World Issues courses enable students to study political, economic, and social issues facing the world. These courses may focus on current issues, examine selected issues throughout the 20th century, and look at historical causes or possible solutions.

Economics

Grades 11- 12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit Economics courses provide students with an overview of economics with primary emphasis on the principles of microeconomics and the U.S. economic system. These courses may also cover topics such as principles of macroeconomics, international economics, and comparative economics. Economic principles may be presented in formal theoretical contexts, applied contexts, or both.

and the relationship of the individual to the law and legal system. These courses do not typically delve into the same degree of detail on constitutional principles or the role of political parties and interest groups as do comprehensive courses in U.S. Government.

Sociology

Grades 10- 12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit These courses examine a particular topic in sociology, such as culture and society or the individual in society, rather than provide an overview of the field of sociology.

Tribal Law

Grades 11-12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit Law Studies courses examine the history and philosophy of law as part of U.S. society and include the study of the major substantive areas of both criminal and civil law, such as constitutional rights, torts, contracts, property, criminal law, family law, and equity. Although these courses emphasize the study of law, they may also cover the workings of the legal system.

U.S. History

Grades 11- 12 1 year 1.0 Social Studies credit U.S. History courses provide students with an overview of the history of the United States, examining time periods from discovery or colonialism through World War II or after. These courses typically include a historical overview of political, military, scientific, and social developments. Course content may include a history of the North American peoples before European settlement.

World Geography

Grades 11- 12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit Psychology courses introduce students to the study of individual human behavior. Course content typically includes (but is not limited to) an overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, personality and behavior, and abnormal psychology.

Grade 10-12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit World Geography courses provide students with an overview of world geography, but may vary widely in the topics they cover. Topics typically include the physical environment; the political landscape; the relationship between people and the land; economic production and development; and the movement of people, goods, and ideas.

Senior Civics

World History

Psychology

Grade 12 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit Civics courses examine the general structure and functions of American systems of government, the roles and responsibilities of citizens to participate in the political process,

Grade 10 1 sem 0.5 Social Studies credit World History courses provide students with an overview of the history of human society from early civilization to the contemporary period,


examining political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments.

introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of the Japanese-speaking people.

World Languages

Japanese II

French I

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Designed to introduce students to French language and culture, French I emphasizes basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. French culture is introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of the French-speaking people.

French II

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit French II courses build upon skills developed in French I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in French and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of French-speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

French III/IV

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit French III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

Japanese I

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Designed to introduce students to Japanese language and culture, Japanese I courses emphasize basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. Japanese culture is

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Japanese II courses build upon skills developed in Japanese I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in Japanese and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of Japanese-speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

Japanese III/IV

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Japanese III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

Latin I/Latin I Honors

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Elective credit Fee: $20 It is strongly recommended that a student has achieved a C or better in English/Language Arts in order to enroll in this course. Latin I courses expose students to the Latin language and culture, emphasizing basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the influence of Latin on current English words. Students will be able to read and write in Latin on a basic level.

Latin II/Latin II Honors

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Elective credit Fee: $20 Latin II courses enable students to expand upon what they have learned in Latin I, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge through the practice of structures, forms, and vocabulary. Reading materials reflect Roman life and culture.

Latin III/Latin III Honors Grades 11-12


1 year 1.0 Elective credit Fee: $20 Latin III courses build students’ knowledge of the Latin language and culture, typically focusing on having students express increasingly complex concepts in writing and comprehend and react to original Latin texts.

Latin IV/Latin IV Honors

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Elective credit Fee: $20 Latin IV courses build students’ knowledge of the Latin language and culture, typically focusing on having students express increasingly complex concepts in writing and comprehend and react to original Latin texts.

Lushootseed I

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit

Lushootseed I prepares students to read traditional stories in the original language and familiarize them with the general structure of the language. Conversational skills will also be practiced. The teaching materials contain a wealth of information about the traditional culture.

Spanish I

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Fee: There may be a fee of $13 for a consumable student workbook. Designed to introduce students to Spanish language and culture, Spanish I courses emphasize basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. Spanish culture is introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of Spanish-speaking people.

Spanish II

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Fee: There may be a fee of $13 for a consumable student workbook. Spanish II courses build upon skills developed in Spanish I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in Spanish and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students

usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of Spanish-speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

Spanish III

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Spanish III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

Spanish IV

Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 World Language Credit Spanish IV courses focus on advancing students’ skills and abilities to read, write, speak, and understand the Spanish language so that they can maintain simple conversations with sufficient vocabulary and an acceptable accent, have sufficient comprehension to understand speech spoken at a normal pace, read uncomplicated but authentic prose, and write narratives that indicate a good understanding of grammar and a strong vocabulary.

AP Spanish

Admitted by Test 1 year 1.0 Elective Credit This course provides students with opportunities to develop language proficiency across the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. Students learn about culture through the use of authentic materials that are representative of the Spanishspeaking world.

Proficiency-Based World Language Credits  N o v ic e Mid - 1 credit  N o v ic e H ig h - 2 credits  I n t e r m e d ia t e Lo w - 3 credits  I n t e r m e d ia t e Mid - 4 credits

 C r e d it w ill a p p e a r o n t h e t r a n s c r ip t w it h a “P” for pass as the grade mark. Novice Mid Summary:


Student has completed a nationally recognized (or OSPI/MSD approved?) language proficiencyassessment and demonstrated at least Novice Mid (NM) proficiency across skill levels. Full Description: Students with language proficiency at the Novice Mid level generally demonstrate these language skills: In Listening, student can understand some everyday words, phrases and questions about self, personal experiences and surroundings, when people speak slowly and clearly. In Reading, student can understand familiar words and short, simple phrases or sentences. In Interpersonal Communication, student can interact with help using memorized words and phrases. Student can answer simple questions on very familiar topics. In Speaking, student can use simple phrases and sentences to provide information about self, and immediate surroundings. In Writing, student can provide some basic information on familiar topics in lists and simple forms. Course Objectives: Students demonstrate language proficiency in alignment with the Washington State K-12 Learning Standards for World Languages in the area of Communication (Interpretive Mode, Interpersonal Mode, and Presentational Mode) and demonstrating proficiency according to LinguaFolio™ descriptors at the Novice Mid level. Novice High Summary: Student has completed a nationally recognized language proficiency assessment and demonstrated at least Novice High (NH) proficiency across skill levels. Full Description:

Students with language proficiency at the Novice High level generally demonstrate these language skills: In Listening, student can understand ideas on familiar topics expressed through phrases, short sentences, and frequently used expressions. Student can understand the main point in messages and announcements. In Reading, student can understand the main idea and some details in simple texts that contain familiar vocabulary. In Interpersonal Communication, student can exchange info about familiar tasks, topics and activities. Student can handle short social interactions using phrases and sentences, but student may need help to keep the conversation going. In Speaking, student can

use a series of phrases and sentences to provide basic information about familiar topics. In Writing, student can write simple descriptions and short messages and request or provide information on familiar topics. Course Objectives: Students demonstrate language proficiency in alignment with the Washington State K-12 Learning Standards for World Languages in the area of Communication (Interpretive Mode, Interpersonal Mode, and Presentational Mode) and demonstrating proficiency according to LinguaFolio™ descriptors at the Novice High level. Intermediate Low Summary: Student has completed a nationally recognized language proficiency assessment and demonstrated at least Intermediate Low (IL) proficiency across skill levels. Full Description: Students with language proficiency at the Intermediate Low level generally demonstrate these language skills: In Listening, student can understand main ideas and a few details in sentences, short conversations and some forms of media. In Reading, student can understand the main idea and many details in some texts that contain familiar vocabulary. In Interpersonal Communication, student can begin and carry on an unrehearsed conversation on a limited number of familiar topics. Student can ask and answer simple questions and exchange information in highly familiar situations. In Speaking, student can connect basic sentences to provide information on familiar topics. Student can relate with some details, information about what is read, heard and seen. In Writing, student can write about familiar topics and experiences in series of sentences. Course Objectives: Students demonstrate language proficiency in alignment with the Washington State K-12 Learning Standards for World Languages in the area of Communication (Interpretive Mode, Interpersonal Mode, and Presentational Mode)

and demonstrating proficiency according to LinguaFolio™ descriptors at the Intermediate Low level. Intermediate Mid Summary: Student has completed a nationally recognized language proficiency assessment and demonstrated at least Intermediate Mid (IM) proficiency across skill levels. Full Description: Students with language proficiency at the Intermediate Mid level generally demonstrate these language skills: In Listening, student can understand ideas on familiar topics expressed through a series of sentences. Student can understand details expressed in conversations and through some forms of media. In Reading, student can understand most details in texts


that contain familiar vocabulary and the main idea and many details in texts that contain unfamiliar vocabulary. In Interpersonal Communication, student can state my views and begin and carry on conversations on a variety of familiar topics and in uncomplicated situations. In Speaking, student can connect sentences in order to describe experiences, events, and opinions. Student can narrate a story and make a simple factual presentation. In Writing, student can summarize, describe or explain familiar topics and support my views with some details. Course Objectives: Students demonstrate language proficiency in alignment with the Washington State K12 Learning Standards for World Languages in the area of Communication (Interpretive Mode, Interpersonal Mode, and

Presentational Mode) and demonstrating proficiency according to LinguaFolio™ descriptors at the Intermediate Mid level.


CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

CONNECTING LEARNING TO EARNING Ever want to learn more about a career in aerospace, sports medicine, computer science, engineering, or automotive technology? Is learning about culinary arts or project management more up your alley? How about sustainable design in areas like solar power, or wind energy? As a high school student, you are entering an exciting time filled with numerous opportunities that allow you to take charge of your education and focus on specific class choices that prepare you to be ready to enter a highly competitive workforce based on global knowledge and information. To be Career & College Ready, you need to be able to integrate and apply 21st Century Employability Skills, technical knowledge, and core academic strengths. With an emphasis on real-world, real-life skills, the Marysville School District’s CTE programs offer outstanding hands-on, relevant instruction and training leading to industry specific pathways that will help you become successful in the future. Our goal is that every Marysville student graduates with the skills necessary to be globally competitive, and prepared to enter the workforce or continue on with their post-secondary education.

C

credit options:

CTE courses = Value Added Education Meeting graduation requirement options through Credit Equivalencies, the “2 for 1 Rule”, and college

T E

CTE courses offering Credit Equivalencies help students successfully meet graduation requirements more efficiently. The 2 for 1 Rule applies only to CTE courses offering Credit Equivalencies offering additional benefits for students. CTE courses offering college credit afford students a jump start on their post-secondary goals.  Contact your school counselor for additional information on all of the above options

No matter what your career goals are, you can achieve them through CTE Each year CTE students graduate from high school with identified career goals, job and leadership skills, and professional certifications. In addition, these students know exactly where they will go next to further their academic and post-secondary education and training. NOTE: Availability of CTE courses is subject to change. For a complete list of current courses available at your school, please contact your building counseling office.

ICON KEY:

Career & Technical Education CTE 21st Century Employability Skills

Credit Equivalent Course More than one graduation requirement/credit option met

CONNECTING LEARNING TO EARNING

STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Courses focused on high demand career fields

FREE – Earn college credit in high school

College in the high school Credits available for purchase at various community colleges Program of Study Consecutive courses with career path focus


Accounting I Grades 9-12 Grade 11-12 at School for the Entrepreneur 1 year 1.0 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Accounting prepares students to practice the profession of accounting and to perform related business functions. Includes instruction in: basic accounting principles and theory, financial accounting, budget control, ledgers, tax accounting, general journals, legal aspects of accounting, auditing, reporting procedures, statement creation and analysis, professional standards and ethics, and applications to specific for profit, public, payroll, tax records, automated accounting systems, and nonprofit organization. Students will participate in a leadership activity as part of the course.

Accounting II Grades 9-12 Grade 11-12 at School for the Entrepreneur 1 year 1.0 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is a continuation of Accounting I. Students will learn about accounting for sales and cash receipts, purchases and cash payments, special journals such as: sales and cash receipts and purchases and cash payments, adjustments, financial statements for a corporation and merchandising corporation accounting as well as publicly held corporations. This course is a great continuation for students who are interested in pursuing a career in Accounting or Owning their own business. Prerequisite: Complete Accounting 1 with a C or better

Animation Grades 10-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Students will develop their computer skills to create imaginative designs, graphic layouts and animations using Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, Flash and/or Blender 3D. They will complete tutorials and use those skills to create various projects including logos, cartoons and collages. All work will be collected and presented in portfolio form. Prerequisites: Computer Applications

Automotive Technology - Intro Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is a MUST for every student that is currently driving or plans on driving a car or light truck. This course is geared to increase the level of awareness of light vehicle maintenance and repair. Subjects include tools & equipment, safety, mechanical and electrical systems, lubrication and cooling systems, steering and suspension systems, brakes, heating and air conditioning systems, body maintenance and car buying tips. Students will gain valuable skills and knowledge that will give them confidence to perform light

vehicle maintenance that will save them money on expensive vehicle maintenance and repairs. The knowledge gained will also benefit student’s in future mechanical-related fields, including automotive technician, maintenance technician, auto body, and sales and marketing of automotive related products.

Automotive Technology I-IV Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is perfect for the student that has an automotive, diesel, mechanical or electrical related career interest. Curriculum emphasis is placed on diagnosis and repair of cars and light truck vehicles. Students will use a self-paced computer based curriculum that includes subjects in tools, safety, brakes, steering & suspension, wheel alignment, automatic and manual drive-trains, engine repair, engine performance, electrical and electrical systems, heating and air conditioning, and emission systems. This course emphasizes and promotes strong employability skills that will help lead to future successful employment. This self-paced ASE certified course is competency based and offers students ASE examination and industry certification opportunities. Prerequisite: Intro to Automotive Technology or Instructor Permission Lab Fee: $20.00

Business I Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This course surveys an array of topics and concepts related to the field of business. It introduces concepts such as banking and finance, the role of government in business, consumerism credit, investment, and management. Students will also be exposed to the varied opportunities in secretarial, accounting, management and related fields.

Business Law Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Social Studies OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course focuses on low and new issues from the perspective of the social sciences and humanities. Includes instruction in the theory and practice of the legal systems, including the statutory, administrative, and judicial components of civil and criminal law.

Business Management Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This introductory course places an emphasis on the management of a business and entrepreneurship, providing exposure to common techniques and problems of management. Students will begin the


process of developing a comprehensive business plan for a business of their choice.

Business Math/Financial Algebra

Dual College Credit Program for qualifying students Required: School district volunteer application with approved clearance including: confidentiality agreement, disclosure statement, and Washington State Patrol background check must be completed.

Grades 10-12 at all other campuses Grades 11-12 at Marysville Pilchuck 1 year 1.0 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Computer Applications

This course has been aligned to the state Algebra 1 standards, and is appropriate for students who are enrolled in schools with a business and marketing focus. It applies business-related concepts to problems-solving mathematical situations, including the use of quadratic equations. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to utilize advanced algebraic concepts when solving problems involving real-world applications in the area of finance. Problem-solving skills and strategies are applied to topics such as banking, simple and compound interest, credit and debt management, mortgages, and taxes.

Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Business Operations Procedures

This is an exploratory course giving students the opportunity to create their own learning path for: web design, photo manipulation, office productivity, A+ networking, video game production, video editing and/or programming languages. Students have the freedom to learn technology that is relevant to their interests, but must be responsible for their individual tutorials and study groups. An element to the course is career exploration in the field of information technology, and students will be expected to research possible careers. Course may be repeated with prior approval of the instructor.

Computer Repair Lab Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is a continuation of learning the basic management skills of operating a business, with an emphasis on the financial aspects. Students will complete the development of a business plan and will refine leadership and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: Completion of Introduction to Business and Business Management

In this course, students learn hardware and software via hands-on work. Students are members of the Marysville Computer Repair Lab offering repairs to community members and refurbishing donated computers for use by Non Profit groups. This course is repeatable.

Career Choices

Computer Science Principles

Grades 10-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

Career Exploration courses help students identify and evaluate personal goals, priorities, aptitudes, and interests with the goal of helping them make informed decisions about their careers. These courses expose students to various sources of information on career and training options and may also assist them in developing job search and employability skills.

Child Development Grades 11-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

Students operate and teach in the on-site Preschool Lab while studying children through age eight. Topic areas include: physical, emotional, social, moral, and intellectual development of children; child development theories and theorists; roles and responsibilities of parenthood; multicultural and global experiences of families throughout the world; health and safety for children and families; early childhood education curriculum and methods of instruction; professional practices and standards when working with children; and career exploration of careers with children.

Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Math OR Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is an exploratory introduction to Computer Science. It is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. Note: Students can choose to take the CSP AP test from this class, but it is suggested that they take both Computer Science Principles and CS50-AP first. Prerequisite: Algebra I suggested

Computer Science AP Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Science OR Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

AP Computer Science A is a lab based course. Concepts are taught through ongoing hands-on labs and group collaborations. Students will study the concepts behind Java, in preparation for the AP CS A test. By the end of this course, students will develop


knowledge of programming methodology, procedural abstraction, structuring of algorithms, and the use of data. Students will leave class prepared to apply a problem solving process to future learning and will be prepared to take on future programming languages. Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry suggested

Computer Science-50 AP Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Science OR Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This is Harvard University’s initial Computer Science course that provides an exploratory introduction to Computer Science. It is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of and experimentation. Note: Students can choose to take the CSP AP test from this class, but it is suggested that they take both Computer Science Principles and CS50-AP first.

Computer Graphics Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

Students will develop their computer skills to create imaginative designs, graphic layouts, and animations using Illustrator, Flash, and Photoshop programs. They will complete tutorials and then use the acquired skills to create various projects. All work will be collected and presented in portfolio form.

Construction - Intro Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This semester-long course introduces students to the opportunities available in construction-related trades, such as carpentry, masonry, air conditioning/refrigeration, and plumbing. Students learn about the processes involved in construction projects and may engage in a variety of small projects. The following topics are covered: Basic Safety, Introduction to Construction Math, Introduction to Hand Tools and Power Tools, Introduction to Blueprints and Basic Rigging.

Construction I Grades 10-12 1 Year 1.0 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course continues with fundamentals of the construction industry. Students learn proper use of power tools and site safety practices. Topics include: Electrical/Carpentry Safety; Introduction to Electrical Circuits; Introduction to the National Electrical Code; Hand bending; Basic Electrical Construction Drawings; Residential Electrical Services; Floor Systems; Wall and Ceiling Framing; Roof Framing and Forms, and Basic Stair Layout. Prerequisite: Introduction to Building

Construction II-IV Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

These are advanced level courses that that provide students with the knowledge and skills required for construction of commercial, residential, and institutional structures. Included are the following topics: Orientation to the Trade; Building Materials, Fasteners and Adhesives; Hand and Power Tools, Reading Plans and Elevations; Advanced Floor Systems, Wall, Ceiling and Roof Framing; Introduction to Concrete; Reinforcing Materials and Forms; Windows and Exterior Doors and Stairs. During the second semester, students will move outside to apply their knowledge and skills by building sheds, pergolas and other projects.

Culinary Arts Food Preparation Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit (2 hour block class)

This course introduces the challenging, exciting, and highly-in-demand world of professional cooking, under the tutelage of a classically trained chef. The nationally recognized curriculum integrates classical and modern culinary techniques with strong kitchen management skills. Students learn, through handson instruction the theory, methods, and techniques of food preparation such as knife skills, sanitation and safety, baking and pastry, stocks, soups and sauces, meat, poultry and seafood cookery, grilling roasting, braising, etc. Classes require an ability to work under pressure and exceptional teamwork skills while providing excellent customer service in the School House Café, a student-run restaurant. Students gain valuable employability training beginning with the ServSafe® program curriculum for food protection; which is the first step toward a valuable HACCP certification learning how various foods should be produced, handled, and served. REQUIRED: Food Handlers Permit. Instructor will provide details on this process. LAB FEE: $20.00 and a Chef Uniform/kit available for purchase. Industry exam and uniform fees may apply and are the responsibility of the student.

Culinary Arts Restaurant Operations Grades 9-12(block class)

This program is unique in that the program serves students in grades 9-12 and offers restaurant and hospitality exposure in a “real life” situation. The Restaurant Operations course provides students with knowledge and skills related to commercial and institutional food service establishments, with an emphasis on Management. Course topics therefore include guest service, and relationships, planning, resource management, professionalism, food presentation, labor planning and scheduling, dining room service and beverage service. The food production lab will define basic fundamentals and the requisite ingredients needed to accomplish food preparation. Sanitation and safety practices will be


employed and reinforced as well as other topics related to operating a restaurant. REQUIRED: Food Handlers Permit. Instructor will provide details on this process. LAB FEE: $20.00 and a Chef Uniform/kit available for purchase. Industry exam and uniform fees may apply and are the responsibility of the student.

Digital Photography/Photoshop I & II

disciplinary course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

Exploring Computer Science Grades 10-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

In this course, students will learn to set up camera for the best image quality, take better photos, learn the basics of layout and photo composition, how to manipulate photos as well as Adobe Photoshop basics. Projects will include a digital scrapbook, a PowerPoint photo gallery, a PhotoStory and others. This class requires a photo shoot each weekend as well as an in-class shoot weekly. Dual College Credit: Program for qualifying students.

This course of study is designed to allow students to explore a variety of computer science topics, such as Web design, human computer interactions, programming, and problem solving. Optional topics include mobile applications, robotics, and digital animation. Students will develop critical thinking, logic, and problem solving skills relevant to today’s technology.

Engines Technology

Family Health

Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This exciting introduction into the world of engines will launch students into a self-paced small engines project. Students will utilize service information to locate critical engine specifications, perform proper tool identification, shop safety practices, precision measurements, fuel, and ignition system adjustments. Students will completely disassemble and rebuild their own engine with the goal of making it run properly by the end of the semester. This course will prepare students to progress into the Advanced Automotive Technology course as well as additional educational and career opportunities.

Environmental Science Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Science/Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Environmental Science is truly an interdisciplinary science: encompassing biology, botany, chemistry, geology, climatology, geography and civics to understand the systems of and human impacts to the Earth’s environment. This course is comparable to a semester long college course in rigor but is completed over the full year. Prerequisites: Passed Algebra 1 with a C or better and Biology.

Environmental Science AP Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Science/Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

The AP Environmental Science course is a yearlong class designed to be the equivalent of a onesemester, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of this inter

Grade 10 1 semester

0.5 Health OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Acquiring knowledge and decision-making skills to maintain personal and family wellness throughout the life cycle through the study of: health and fitness planning; mental health and wellness; communication and non-communicable diseases; consumer health protection and safety; substance abuse; nutrition and dietary guidelines; human sexuality; social health and communication and; career development workplace health and wellness. Leadership and employability skills are an integral part of this class emphasizing 21st Century Skills to prepare students for personal enrichment and the world of work.

Graphic Design Foundations Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Graphic Design courses emphasize design elements and principles in the purposeful arrangement of images and text to communicate a message. They focus on creating art products such as advertisements, product designs, and identity symbols. Graphic Design courses may investigate the computer’s influence on and role in creating contemporary designs and provide a cultural and historical study of master design works of different periods and styles. Prerequisite: Art I or teacher permission Lab Fee: $15.00 per student

Independent Living Grades 10-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This course allows students to focus on preparing for living on their own. Students will engage in projects


and activities focused on: your role as a consumer; finding and keeping a job; shopping and money management; food purchasing and preparation; financial management and banking and understanding credit, insurance, and federal income tax.

Intro to Engineering Design (IED) I/II PLTW

school on non-school days depending on what each project demands. Prerequisite: Teacher Permission required AND all students must be an active ASB member in good standing.

Leadership - Project Management II Associated Student Body ASB Grade 9-12 1 year 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit

Grades 9-10 1 semester 0.5 Math OR Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

IED is a course appropriate for students interested in design and engineering. IED focuses on exposing students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards, and technical documentation. IED gives students the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of course concepts through problem-based learning. The course assumes no previous knowledge, but students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. In addition, students use the most current issued 3D solid modeling design software package to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems. Students will develop problemsolving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges that increase in difficulty throughout the course. Students will also learn how to document their work, and communicate their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community.

Principles of Engineering Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Students will be fully immersed in problems that will engage and challenge, exploration of a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation all focused around a hands-on, project based learning model.

Leadership – Project Management I Associated Student Body ASB Grade 9-12 1-2 semester(s) 0.5 or 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit (1.0 Technical Writing – Arts & Technology ONLY)

All ASB elected officers are required to take this course. Students establish goals and objectives to accomplish and develop a plan to fit the needs of the individual’s ASB position. Students focus on: teamwork, management, planning, communication, organization, and evaluation skills. Students will be learning and carrying out school assemblies, and events for small and large groups on a regular basis. Students may need to work during lunches, stay after school, or come to

This course will provide students with the knowledge, skills and experience needed to further the development of their leadership strengths. Course expectations include applying leadership lessons to different situations, using our classroom, school, and community as a laboratory. Students will participate in a school or community service project, work effectively in a group, and develop recognition activities which may include some after school, evening, and weekend activities essential in completing projects. Cheer, class and club officers are encouraged to take this class. Prerequisite: Teacher Permission required AND all students must be an active ASB member in good standing.

Manufacturing & Engineering Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Math OR Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course will emphasize safety training, and then culminate with construction of a design made in the CAD class. Students will explore several career options leading to careers or to advanced training at a community/technical college. Topics in this course include classic woodworking, computer aided wood routing (CNC programmed machine tools), composites, welding and precision machining. Students will develop a project of their choosing within one or more of the options of woods, composites or metal or a combination of both.

Manufacturing Technology II Grades 10-12 1-2 semester(s) 0.5 or 1.0 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education/Elective Credit - Algebra II Credit Available

Students will continue sharpening their skills in the use of composites, MIG, TIG, Arc and Gas Welding, Automated CNC programming and CNC machine operation, classic woodworking or precision machining. These skills are targeted to careers in aerospace, apprenticeship programs or further education in manufacturing technology. Prerequisite: 9th grade students may enroll with prior approval of the instructor.

Marketing I Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit


In this course students will be introduced to the basics of marketing, selling, and entrepreneurship concepts. Topics covered include: marketing functions, interpersonal skills, sales, and advertising and promotion. The course emphasizes communication and collaboration, creativity and innovation, initiative and self-direction, leadership and responsibility, and productivity and accountability.

Sales & Marketing I Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit

This project-based full year course introduces students to economics, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Topics covered include Advertising, Promotion, Selling, Professional Development, and Career Research and the course emphasizes leadership, communication, social awareness and critical thinking. Students in the Marketing program operate the DECA Student Store and other school businesses and have the opportunity to participate in local, state, and national DECA activities.

Sales & Marketing II Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This project-based full year course builds on students’ prior knowledge of sales and marketing and focuses on the development of real business and marketing plans. Topics covered include Advertising, Human Relations, Strategic Planning, Marketing Research, and Promotion, as well as an emphasis on leadership, communication, social awareness and critical thinking. Students Assist with running the DECA Student Store and other school businesses and have the opportunity to participate in local, state, and national DECA activities. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sales & Marketing or Instructor Permission

Marketing – LAB II Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit Location: School for the Entrepreneur

Students in this course will focus on fashion marketing, advertising/promotion, or travel and tourism marketing. This project-based course independent based course builds on student’s prior knowledge of sales and marketing and focuses on the development of promotional plans, campaigns, and other projects. Topics covered include: advertising, business law, economics, social intelligence, specific industry basics; and marketing research and promotional planning and development. Prerequisite: Intro to Marketing I or prior approval from the instructor.

Marketing Operations Grades 10-12 1 year 0.5 or 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit

This year long course provides marketing students with a hands-on learning experience in the area of retail marketing & management through the DECA student store The Oasis. Students in this class are responsible for the complete operation of the student store including: merchandise buying and pricing, inventory management, cash handling, accounting, scheduling, and promotions. Students practice advanced business, management, marketing, and entrepreneurship fundamentals. Prerequisite: Sales & Marketing I, or prior approval from the instructor.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

This project-based course introduces students to marketing concepts and strategies while focusing on the sports and entertainment industries. Topics covered include facility design, merchandising, advertising, public relations/publicity, event marketing, sponsoring, ticket distribution, and career opportunities as they relate to the sports and entertainment industry. In addition, this course emphasizes leadership, communication, social awareness and critical thinking. Students assist with operation of the DECA Student Store and promotional events at various sporting events throughout the school year.

Social Media Marketing Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

Discover the evolution and purpose of Social Media and why it is a disruptive wave of innovation. Learn about how it affects your personal and professional life. Understand the importance of personal branding and how these principles can be applied in the professional world. Understand the history, purpose, anatomy, best practices, current trends, and pros & cons of the top 8 Social Platforms: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, Google+ and Blogs.

Microsoft Office Specialist I Grades 9-12 1-2 semester(s)

0.5 or 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is designed to teach basic computer skills in the Microsoft Office Suite. Topics include Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access, and will prepare students for Microsoft Core Exams. In addition, students will also develop graphics skills and use various forms of presentation software. Students continuing on to develop more advanced skills will learn to collaborate with workgroups, use macros, and use multiple workbooks and mail merge.


Microsoft Office Specialist II Grades 9-12 1-2 semester(s)

0.5 or 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit

This is a hands-on course aimed at those who have basic computer skills. Students who complete this class will be able to use the computer as a tool to enhance their education. Productivity software is introduced using the Microsoft Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 2013. Internet activities are integrated into the coursework. Students will be participating in a leadership activity as part of this curriculum.

Native Art Design & Production Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Arts OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Historical and contemporary aspects of Northwest Coast design including social, spiritual, and functional aspects are explored. Students will cover theory and practice in drawing, designing, and painting in this genre. Lab Fee: $15.00

NJROTC: Naval Science I Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit OR 0.5 CWP Contemporary World Problems Credit for two years of program study

NJROTC Naval Science I emphasizes citizenship and leadership development, as well as maritime heritage, sea power, and Naval operations and customs. This course includes, but is not limited to, an introduction to the Naval Junior ROTC program, US Navy mission and organization, maritime geography, Naval history, basic seamanship, oceanography, and health education.

This course broadens understanding of operative principles of military leadership, the concept and significance of teamwork, and discipline in the accomplishment of an objective. Each lesson is taught with a focus on being employable. Timeliness, respect, and commitment are specific characteristics practiced by wearing the uniform once a week, ongoing instruction in leadership, naval orientation, navigation, composition of the Navy, military and international law, SEA power, Global Awareness: Cultural Studies and nation security. Laboratory sessions in drill, commands and ceremonies are also provided. Classroom training is supplemented with field trips and orientation visits to various military facilities and museums.

NJROTC: Naval Science IV Grades 11-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR Physical Education OR Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit OR 0.5 CWP Contemporary World Problems Credit for two years of program study

This course builds on employability skills and provides leadership opportunities by closely examining the roles of leaders and followers as well as identifying characteristics and best practices of each. Provides opportunity to exercise leadership in group dynamics using the uniform to demonstrate capabilities and leadership skills. Continually conduct exercises in career planning and education with experience in producing effective oral and written communications. Will prepare the student to readily accept the responsibility and importance of citizenship as related to the democratic principles upon which our country is founded. Laboratory sessions in drill, commands and ceremonies and classroom training will continue to be supplemented with field trips and orientation visits to various military facilities.

NJROTC: Naval Science V

NJROTC: Naval Science II Grades 10-12 1 year 0.5 Fine Art OR 1.0 Career & Technical Education/Elective Credit OR 0.5 CWP Contemporary World Problems Credit for two years of program study

NJROTC Naval Science II, builds upon the contect of Naval Science I. These courses include, but are not limited to leadership principles and discipline, citizenship, naval opportunities and career planning, naval ships and weaponry, seamanship, meteorology and weather, and survival training. Students continue to learn teamwork, naval history, and military principles.

NJROTC: Naval Science III Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR Physical Education OR Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit OR 0.5 CWP Contemporary World Problems Credit for two years of program study

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR Physical Education OR Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit OR 0.5 CWP Contemporary World Problems Credit for two years of program study Transportation: Course is conducted outside of normal school hours, transportation is not provided.

This course broadens understanding of operative principles of military leadership, the concept and significance of teamwork, and discipline in the accomplishment of an objective. Each lesson is taught with a focus on being employable. Timeliness, respect, and commitment are specific characteristics practiced and taught to others using the uniform and rank structure from the military model. Additionally: it is an alternative period, after/before school, for cadets who desire to participate in NJROTC but cannot fit it into periods 1-6, it is program time for Cadet Staff to accomplish jobs and run the unit, Student will complete the curriculum for Naval Science I, II, III, or IV, and Classroom training is supplemented with field trips and orientation visits to various military facilities.


Publications Grades 9-12 1 semester 1.0 Fine Arts OR English OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Publications is a journalism focused course which emphasizes writing style with technique as well as production values, marketing, and organization. This course introduces students to the concepts of newsworthiness and press responsibilities; develop students’ skills in writing and editing stories, headlines, and captions; and teaches students the principles of production design, layout, and printing. Photography and photojournalism skills may be included. Students will produce a series of publications to demonstrate their knowledge of concepts learned. Prerequisite: Technical Communication/Yearbook OR instructor approval

Sports Medicine I/II Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Health OR Career & Technical Education Credit

In this course students will learn about the care of athletes through the application of therapeutic tasks that are designated by an athletic or fitness trainer. Topics covered may include tapping, bandaging, proper use of protective padding, treatment modalities, anatomy and physiology, and medical terminology. Students may learn to measure cardio respiratory endurance, flexibility, body composition, and blood pressure. More advanced topics may include: injury assessment, the phases of healing, and the use of exercise and equipment to help in the reconditioning of injured athletes.

Sports Medicine Clinical I/II LAB Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Career & Technical Education Credit

This hands-on lab focused class is designed to allow sports medicine students to apply skills and knowledge learned to real clinical cases involving real athletes. Each student will have a performance skills competency check list system for all skills introduced. Students will have the opportunity to work directly with athletes and provide immediate care and first aid to injuries. Sports medicine students may work with one team or they may rotate through different teams and gather a variety of experiences. Students participating in a sport will be assigned to that team. Hands-on skills include: CPR, first aid training, blood borne pathogens training, athletic taping and wrapping, care and prevention of athletic injuries, rehabilitation of injuries, fitness programs, human anatomy, injury recognition an evaluation. Prerequisite: Enrolled in Sports Med I or II

STEM Bio-Medical Science Intro PLTW Grade 9-12

1 year 1.0 Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course will allow you to explore numerous careers in the cutting edge field of biotechnology and medicine. You will learn current health, societal, risk management and safety issues; and legal considerations. You will also gain information in areas of: how various careers in this field interact; understanding the importance of interaction with various diverse groups; ethical and legal concepts, and consider a self-assessment of goals, interests, and abilities. You will also investigate future education and employment options and in various areas within this growing global career field.

Human Body Systems PLTW Grade 10-12 1 year 1.0 Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This yearlong course is designed to provide an introduction to the systems of the human body through hands-on projects and problems. Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; dissect representative organ system specimens, use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases.

STEM Foods I Grades 9–12 1 semester 0.5 Health OR Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This class introduces students to the Science of Food including: Basic Food Chemistry, Organic Chemistry of macronutrients, Chemistry of micronutrients and how to conduct experiments while cooking. Basic math and science skills will be taught, along with the use of technology to plan and prepare food and learn about the nutrition and science of food. Leadership and Employability Skills will be incorporated through FCCLA (Family, Career, and Community Leadership Association) projects. Prerequisite: Successfully pass Algebra I

STEM Foods II Grades 10–12 1 semester 0.5 Health OR Lab Science OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Advanced STEM Foods builds upon the basics learned in the Introduction to STEM Foods course. Topics in this class include: Food Microbiology & Food Safety, Food Preservation, Nutritional Guidelines, Digestion & Metabolism, Research & Development of Food Products, and Careers in Food Science. Students will plan and prepare food using math, science and technology. Leadership and Employability Skills will be incorporated through FCCLA projects. Prerequisite: Successfully pass Algebra I


Studio Art I & II

employment documents. Students will also learn to write different styles of reports and proposals.

Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Technical Mathematics

This is an entry and intermediate level course in developing the creative process, fundamental skills, craftsmanship and artistic foundations. Emphasis on developing a greater depth of understanding of Art Elements and Principles of Design and their application in other content areas will be explored using a variety of media. Relevance in art history, art movements and artists will be surveyed. Studio experiences include drawing, painting, illustration, sculpture, printmaking, multi-media and digital imagery. Each student will demonstrate knowledge and skills through reflection and the development of a body of work through student portfolio representation. Lab Fee: $20.00

2D Studio Art AP Grades 9-12 1 year 1.0 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

AP 2D Studio Art students are expected to become independent thinkers, self-starters and apply knowledge of the Elements and Principles within their body of work. Acceptance is based on portfolio submission and/or intermediate level art course completion. Artistic development and concentration is individualized through mentorship and peer critiques. AP students must submit portfolios (25 or more art pieces) to the AP College Board for evaluation in May. Lab Fee: $20.00

Studio Art I & II Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This comprehensive course proves students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore various art techniques in drawing, perspective, shading, color theory, and painting. Students will learn how to critique and judge art and understand the concepts of how Fine Art is different from crafts. A chance to focus on learning about a particular artist will be done through writing an Art Report and Art Essay. This course will also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the field of art. Lab Fee: $20.00

Technical Communications Grade 9-12 1 semester 0.5 English OR Career & Technical Education Credit (Yearlong course for 1.0 credit available at Arts & Technology High School)

This course meets the Senior Writing requirement or qualifies as an English Elective. Technical Writing combines writing skills, computer applications, and communication strategies to assist students in producing business documents and reports. Writing projects include memos, professional letters, and

Grades 10-12 1 year 1.0 Math OR Career & Technical Education Credit

This course is intended for students from various disciplines and lays the groundwork for applying mathematical concepts and problem solving in the technical fields. Moreover, this course is designed for career-technical students. The topics focus on critical thinking, problem solving and mathematical communication using applications in applied arithmetic, measurement, geometry, and statistics and probability.

Video Documentary Grades 10-12 1-2 semester(s) 0.5-1.0 English OR Fine Art OR Social Studies OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Documentary for Social Change allows students to choose a topic that they'd like to make a difference in, and produce a short film to assist in that change. Students will write, shoot, and edit a 30-45 minute film over the course of a semester. This is an upper level video course, where students should enter with a foundation in video filming and editing.

Video Production I: Intro to Video Production Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Audio/Visual Production courses provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for television, video, film, and/or radio production. Writing scripts, camera operation, use of graphics and other visuals, lighting, audio techniques, editing, production principles, and career opportunities are typical topics covered within production courses.

Video Production II: Intermediate Video Production Grades 11-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit Location: International School of Communications

A continuation course offering, students in Intermediate Video are usually required to produce their own program or segment. Additional topics such as broadcast industry regulations, radio/TV operation, and power of the medium, photography, and transmission technology may be included. Prerequisite: Video Production

Video Production III: Advanced Digital Film Making Grades 11-12 1 semester 0.5 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit


Student will focus on script writing and the production of large student projects. They will form film companies and propose projects for instructor approval. Much of the work is shot after school and on weekends. Students will need to be selfmotivated, responsible, and able to complete complex tasks within a given time frame. Topics covered include: advanced script writing; advanced filmmaking; final cut express editing; and, large scale projects. Prerequisite: Video Production II

Video Production IV: Broadcast Video Morning Announcements Grades 9-12 1-2 semester(s) Credit

0.5-1.0 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education

Broadcasting Technology courses provide students with the knowledge and skills to produce television broadcast programs. Typically, students prepare and produce short programs, learning the technical aspects of the operation and how to evaluate programming and assess audience reaction and impact. Prerequisite: Prior approval of the instructor

Video Production V: Broadcast Video Charger Chat Grades 10-12 1-2 semester(s) Credit

0.5-1.0 Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education

The Charger Chat course provides students with the knowledge and skills to produce a broadcast television talk show. Students prepare and produce a 30 minute talk show, learning the technical aspects of the operation. In addition, students will learn oncamera presentation and interview skills. Prerequisite: Video I & Video II

Web Design I Grades 9-12 1 semester 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit

In this course, students will have the opportunity to explore the field of web page development, design and administration using Adobe Dreamweaver, Fireworks and Flash. Additional topics include HTML, planning web pages, and layout and design techniques.

Worksite Learning Grades 11-12 0.5 Career & Technical Education Credit Must complete 180 hours of verified paid work experience which meets all requirements described below.

Worksite learning courses provide students with work experience in a field related to their interests. Goals are typically set cooperatively by the student, teacher, and workplace supervisor. Students may be placed in paid or unpaid work experience.

Students must be at least 16 years of age and have completed or be concurrently enrolled in the qualifying Career & Technical Education course.

Yearbook Grade 11-12 1 year 1.0 English OR Fine Art OR Career & Technical Education Credit

Publication Production courses provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to produce the school newspaper, yearbook, literary magazine, or other printed publication. Students may gain experience in several components such as: copy writing, editing, layout and design, photography skill building, computer program knowledge, creative problem solving, teamwork and collaboration, creative thinking skills, being self-motivated, organized, and meeting deadlines under pressure; building proficiency in interviewing people and becoming responsible through development of leadership skills. Prerequisite: Yearbook application and prior approval of the instructor. Pre-approval: 10th graders may be allowed to participate at certain school locations with prior approval of instructor. END CTE SECTION

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Sno-Isle Skills Center

9001 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204 Phone 425.348.2220 Fax 425.356.2201 http://snoisle.mukilteo.wednet.edu

Application to Sno-Isle is made in the spring of each year for entrance into fall classes. Students apply for admission and then interview with the instructor at Sno-Isle. Application forms can be obtained from your school’s counselor. All programs except for Cosmetology are free; some classes require a materials fee. Students can earn 1.5 credits each semester, and some of the credits have cross-credit equivalencies. There are 2 sessions at Sno-Isle, one morning session, and one afternoon session. Transportation to Sno-Isle is provided by the sending school district. Students MUST use the bus transportation provided. For safety and liability concerns, private driving is not permitted.

Sno-Isle Skills Center Aircraft Assembly & Service Tech Grades 11-12 1 year The program provides basic training in aircraft assembly and reconditioning using a combination of textbook assignments, lectures, lab demonstrations, and one-onone assistance, with the goal of assisting students in qualifying for entry level aircraft mechanic training programs offered by local aircraft manufacturing industries and community/technical colleges. This program focuses on safety, tool identification and proper use, and other technical skills such as drilling, deburring, riveting and fastener installation on aluminum and titanium. Students will practice their skills on projects provided by local aircraft manufacturing and refurbishing industries. Auto Body/Collision Repair Grades 11-12 1 year This program provides training in auto bodywork using a combination of textbook assignments, lectures, lab demonstrations, and one-on-one assistance. Auto Body/Collision Repair focuses on safety, tool identification and proper use, vehicle construction, minor body repair, sanding, painting components and techniques, estimating damaged vehicles, welding and other technical skills. The program includes use of I-CAR professional training materials to meet National Automotive Technical Education Foundation (NATEF) requirements.

Automotive Technology Grades 11-12 1 year With the advanced technology of today’s automobiles, skilled certified technicians are in high demand. The Auto Technician Training Program provides students with training in these certified areas: Engine Repair, Suspension and Steering, Electrical and Electronics, and Engine Performance. One of a technician’s most valuable skills is the ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis. This requires good reasoning ability and a thorough knowledge of today’s automobiles. College credits may also be earned through Lake Washington Technical College and Skagit Valley College. Program is also articulated with Universal Technical Institute. Computers, Servers and Networking Grades 11 - 12 1 year IT is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. For a challenging, changing, dynamic career, apply for Computers, Servers, and Networking. Earn college credits while learning in a hand on environment with a dynamic, industry certified instructor passionate about technology. A variety of industry-standard equipment helps students learn how to troubleshoot, repair, build, and rebuild computers. Students progress to building and controlling networks, and are prepared for industry standard certifications from Comptia, Microsoft, and Cisco.


College credits may also be earned through Everett Community College and Edmonds Community College. Construction Trades Grades 11 – 12 1 year This course is operated to simulate the workplace in a construction company. Students will be introduced to construction industry jobs, they will help plan, estimate, order materials and build projects. The projects include, but are not limited to framing, roofing, siding, stairs, and rafters, hanging windows and doors and some finish work. The program is coordinated and sponsored in partnership with N.C.C.E.R. (National Center for Construction Education and Research) and C.I.T.C (Construction Industry Training Council). With the successful completion of the program, the students will receive an Industry-recognized Certificate of Training. The students must maintain a C or better nd

grade in the class. To become a 2 year student, you must complete the core curriculum and Carpentry One to industry standards. Cosmetology 11th Grade only Sno-Isle Tech Campus 1 year This is an introductory course offered on th

the Sno-Isle Tech campus for 11 graders only. This lecture/lab class is closely supervised in the introduction and practice of shampooing/draping, hair analysis/treatment, haircutting, natural nail care, basic skin care, temporary hair removal, wet styling, thermal styling, permanent waving, chemical relaxing, hair coloring/lightening, safety measures and decontamination control. Emphasis is placed on quality of work and knowledge of procedures, safety and decontamination th

control. 11 grade students completing the Sno-Isle Tech campus course would have the opportunity to continue their training at Everett Community College campus as 12 th

th

graders*.

(*As 12 graders, EvCC tuition is required which is partially subsided by Sno-Isle Tech.) th

Cosmetology – 12 Grade only (Everett Community College Campus) 1 year

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For the 2012-2013 school year, 12 grade students will enroll directly into Everett Community College’s cosmetology program. Sno-Isle Tech will subsidize a portion of their college tuition. Students are required to purchase their own beauty kit and textbook. (see cost list for details) Prior to their 12th grade year, students are

required to start their training Summer Quarter 2010 and continue training during their 12 grade year. Additional Everett Community College training after high school graduation will be required to complete the total number of training hours required for a Washington State cosmetology license. Curriculum provided by EvCC cosmetology program.

Criminal Justice Grades 11 – 12 1 year Students will be exposed to all aspects of the criminal justice system including the evolution of law enforcement: past, present and future. Student will develop leadership qualities and learn command presence, and will deal with issues such as: ethics, morals, principles and legality. The class will include several on-site visits to correctional facilities, police departments, and courtroom trials. Students will receive professional training in weaponless defense, handcuffing techniques, water rescue, CPR, and first aid. College credits can be earned through the College in the High School Program at Everett Community College. Culinary Arts Grades 11 – 12 1 year Students receive training as line cooks, prep cooks, pantry workers, baking & pastry positions, sanitation, and wait staff. Fine food preparation, using classical techniques, as well as baking, management and hospitably industry skills are learned through practical experience as students prepare meals and operate Le Bistro Restaurant four days a week. Morning session students prepare most of the food, and the afternoon students finish preparation and operate the dining room. College credits may also be earned through Lake Washington Technical College. Dental Assisting Grades 11 - 12 1 year Students will learn oral anatomy,


sterilization and disinfection, oral pathology, preventive dentistry, radiography (x-ray), and chair-side procedures. Students must be understanding and communicate well with others, as well as able to work independently in a diverse environment as a team member. Successful completion of this course could qualify the student to apply for employment in dental assisting, sterilization, dental lab technician or a front office position. Many dental hygiene courses give preference to students with dental experience. Diesel Power Technology Grades 11-12 1 year This course is designed to prepare students for entry- level mechanic’s apprentice and helper/specialist positions with experience in diesel driven or hydraulic operated equipment repair and maintenance. Students gain knowledge and skills needed to rebuild, repair, and maintain the main components of diesel equipment. Supportive high school courses include any shop classes using hand and power tools. DigiPen Video Game Design Grades 11-12 1 year Students learn to design and create video games using trigonometry and higher math, computer programming in C++, as well as 2D computer animation. With guidance from the program partner, DigiPen Institute of Technology, the course prepares students for skills necessary for video game industry’s biggest needs: qualified video game designers, programmers and artists. Strong drawing skills are not needed. Such skills will be developed and refined as you progress throughout the program. This is a math intensive program. Curriculum provided by DigiPen Institute. Fashion and Merchandising Grades 11-12 1 year This program surveys the fashion industry with emphasis in retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and design. Students will obtain practical knowledge creating displays, designing a line of clothing, producing a fashion show, and studying the history of fashion in the textile industry. College credits may also be earned

through Edmonds Community College and Shoreline Community College. Fire Service Technology Grades 11-12 1 year This course is open to students interested in a career in the Fire Service. Instructional areas include fire-fighting suppression training, fire prevention, inspection and investigation, life skills, self-confidence, leadership and teamwork, basic First Aid/CPR and safety awareness. Students will work in classroom setting as well as outside in inclement weather. Teamwork, leadership and individual responsibility will be developed. College credits may also be earned through Everett Community College and Olympic College. Medical Assisting Grades 11-12 1 year This course is a starting point to jumpstart a career in the medical field. Students will learn the language of doctors, nurses, and health care professionals. They will also develop skills to take blood pressure, temperature, pulse, respiration, height, weight; perform vision screening, surgical scrub, CPR, First-Aid, medical instruments and office th

management. 4 quarter internships are possible within a health care setting. Nursing Assistant Grades 11-12 1year Students spend time in the classroom and the hospital lab at the Skills Center learning many procedures for patient care. These procedures include learning to measure blood pressure, temperature, pulse and respirations, as well as learning how to bathe, groom, feed, lift, exercise, and position patients. During this time, students will become familiar with anatomy, physiology, signs and symptoms of illness and prevention of disease. Students become comfortable with the process of growth and development, aging and death. A portion of the year is spent in a supervised clinical experience working with patients in nursing homes and other extended-care facilities. Students successfully completing this course and passing a State exam qualify for a State Nursing Assistant Certified certificate (NAC). They are then ready for immediate employment.


College credits may also be earned through Everett Community College. Precision Machining Grades 11 - 12 1 year This course is an introduction to the Engineering and Manufacturing Industry. Because of an ongoing need manufactured goods, this industry will never become obsolete. In this course, students will learn how to plan and make precision finished parts from raw metal. Students will use precision measuring tools, lathes, milling machines, computer CAD/CAM, and CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machines. This course prepares students for employment in the field of engineering and manufacturing and can qualify them for advanced placement at Lake Washington Technical College, Everett Community College, Shoreline Community College, Green River Community College, or Renton Technical College. College credits may also be earned through Everett Community College and Lake Washington Technical College. Robotics & Electronics Technology Grades 11-12 1 year Students will be introduced to electrical circuits – both analog and digital electronics, and microcontrollers. They will construct circuits using schematic and assembly drawings, test and troubleshoot the circuits using electronic test equipment such as digital multimeters, function generators, and oscilloscopes. Prepare for your career today by earning up to an entire year of college credit in this exciting technical program. College credits are earned from both Edmonds Community College and North Seattle Community College.

Veterinary Assisting Grades 11-12 1 year This provides entry-level skills needed to become veterinary assistants and grooming assistants. In addition, a thorough investigation of other careers available in the field will be done. Students learn breed identification, Anatomy and Physiology, detection of illness, sanitation, and major illnesses. Surgical assisting and grooming skills are learned in a realistic setting on campus that models job site environments found in industry. Students will also obtain experience through practical handling of dogs, cats, and horses at the school and on internships in local businesses during spring quarter. Welding/Metal Fabrication Grades 11-12 1 year This program trains students in blueprint reading, shop math, layout and fit-up, and fabrication of a wide variety of projects. Students are introduced to basic entry-level skills of oxy-acetylene welding and cutting (hand and machine), shielded metal arc welding, gas metal and flux cored arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and many other areas. Advanced students will also be able to work on a CNC Plasma cutting table, cutting out such items as art forms, signage and parts. Fabrication is the process of making things out of metal according to blueprints, drawings and sketches. Work experience credit and Washington State Welder Certification testing are available to graduating seniors in their final semester. College credits may also be earned through Everett Community College and Lake Washington Technical College


MPHS Life Skills Program The MPHS Life Skills Program provides educational services to students with moderate to severe developmental disabilities. Our mission is to partner with parents and local resources to help students with disabilities become capable, connected, and contributing members of their community. We do this by offering instruction in functional academics, independent living, vocational education, community-based learning, citizenship, and self-advocacy. Life Skills students are an integral part of the larger MPHS learning community and have regular opportunities to participate in a variety of courses and/or activities with nondisabled peers. Our program philosophy is based on the goal of continuous growth in the following areas: 1. Competence – the skills needed to maximize independence, quality of life, and community participation. 2. Character – personal traits such as honesty, courage, kindness, and integrity. 3. Communication – the ability to understand and be understood by others. 4. Critical thinking – the ability to ask questions, make decisions, and solve problems. 5. Collaboration – the ability to work well with others towards a common goal. 6. Creativity – the ability to think for oneself and generate new ideas, actions, and products. 7. Curiosity – the desire to explore, discover, and understand. 8. Connection – meaningful relationships with other people and organizations. 9. Caring – thoughtful respect for the well-being of others and the world around us. 10. Citizenship – effective participation and contribution to the larger community.


English Language Learners (ELL)-Sheltered Instruction This program is designed for English Language Learners. Sheltered instruction is an approach for teaching grade-level content to English learners in strategic ways that make the subject matter concepts comprehensible while promoting the students’ English Language development. In the sheltered English classroom, teachers use physical activities, visual aids, and the environment to teach important new words for concept development in mathematics, science, history, economics, and other subjects. Push in model: in this model the ELL staff member comes into the mainstream classroom and works with the content area teacher to provide extra language support to ELLs. Students work on content and language objectives within the same lesson. It also encompasses strategic introduction of content vocabulary, explicit literacy instruction, and the use of hands-on manipulative. English Language Learners remain in the mainstream classroom and receive ELL support services by our ELL staff members for 15 to 30 minutes per session. Students may work in small groups with the ELL staff member who functions as a resource instructor in the classroom or the ELL staff member may co-teach a lesson using instructional techniques to support English language learners. In small group activities, ELL students may engage in some of the same kinds of language study found in a pull-out class; however, the ELL staff member works in collaboration with the classroom teacher to tailor lessons to content study. Students who have gained a level of proficiency in English will still be challenged during content study for perhaps as long as 5-7 years. The ELL staff member may serve as a resource to help support students’ development of content vocabulary and concepts.

RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES IN DIFFERENT LANGUAGES: www.msd25.org/Page/402 LINEA DE INFORMACION DE ESCUELAS EN ESPAÑOL 360.965.0254 (Spanish School Info line) ИНФОРМАЦИОННАЯ ЛИНИЯ НА РУССКОМ ЯЗЫКЕ 360.965.0253 (Russian School Info Line) DO YOU NEED AN INTERPRETER AT YOUR SCHOOL? ●

For immediate assistance: Ask your school to use Language Line (7 minutes over the phone interpreting services with 150 languages available) ● For longer meetings/conferences: Request an interpreter in advance Multicultural Parents Volunteers www.msd25.org/Page/403 Parent Community Liaisons www.msd25.org/Page/399 MSD_Ell_Department

ELL_MSDWendyMV


Marysville School District High School Athletics Marysville Getchell, Marysville Pilchuck and Tulalip Heritage High Schools are Washington Interscholastic Athletic Association (WIAA) member schools and are subject to WIAA guidelines. We look forward to offering athletic opportunities for all of our high school students that choose to participate. Students that attend the following schools are listed under the campus where they will maintain their athletic eligibility: Marysville Getchell Chargers:  Academy of Construction and Engineering (ACE)  Bio-Med Academy (BIO MED)  International School of Communication (ISC)  School for the Entrepreneur (SFE) Marysville Pilchuck Tomahawks:  MPHS (MP)  Arts and Technology (A & T) Tulalip Heritage Hawks  Heritage  Tulalip SHoPP Program Marysville Getchell and Marysville Pilchuck are in the WESCO Athletic Conference and are in the WIAA 3A classification. Tulalip Heritage is in the Northwest 1B Athletic Conference and in the 1B classification.

Sports offered at each school: MG and MP Boys: Cross Country, Football, Tennis, Basketball, Swim and Dive, Wrestling, Baseball, Golf, Soccer, and Track and Field. MG and MP Girls: Cross Country, Soccer, Swim and Dive, Volleyball, Basketball, Wrestling, Golf, Fast pitch, Tennis and Track and Field. TH Boys: Football and Basketball TH Girls: Volleyball and Basketball Things you need to know:   

Once eligibility is established at a school, all transfers are subject to the WIAA transfer rules. Alternative Learning Experience (ALE Programs) students compete for their original MSD school of attendance. Tulalip Heritage students can compete in individual sports that are not offered in their school, by the district applying for a co-op status with MP or MG. The district will determine which school will co-op w/Heritage.



2017-18 High School Selection Guide