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Thursday, January 27, 2011

University of Victoria’s Independent Newspaper

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Washrooms

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p. 3

Groups look for bottled water-free campus 3

Music: it makes your brain go ’round 13

Fee for new athletics facilities goes to referendum 16

UVic swim team prepares for championships 17


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Two SUB washrooms could go gender-neutral gender-neutral will more resemble single stall washrooms in the same kind of venue.” The Student Union Building (SUB) Paterson and UVSS Chairperson may soon see gender-inclusive James Coccola will be working in washrooms. consultation with TransAction, the At the Jan. 24 UVic Students’ Victoria advocacy group for trans* Society (UVSS) Board of Directors people, SUB management and UVic meeting, Director-at-Large Tara facilities management to explore Paterson moved to investigate the cost and logistics of converting a set the options available. Paterson and Coccola will present of main-floor SUB washrooms to be their findings to the board, with a gender-inclusive. goal deadline of the Feb. 7 meeting. The motion passed with unani“In this report, we’re going to be mous consent of the board. looking at the costs and what the “Gendered washrooms, as the potential layout of something like majority of them at UVic curthis would be, and generally if it’s rently are, can be very marginalfeasible, so we’ll have to look into izing for trans, gender-queer and things like building code. There gender-variant people,” explained may be some implications around Paterson. “The SUB only has one that,” said Coccola. “We’ll be congender-neutral washroom and it’s sulting with staff and other people also an accessible washroom and who use the Student Union Buildit’s in very close proximity to the ing just to kind of see how it will public washroom so many folks affect the operations of the Student have told me that it can be very Union Building.” uncomfortable for them.” Coccola doesn’t foresee there being Paterson says that these washmajor problems with the project. rooms also take resources away “The biggest one will probably from people who require accesbe around the building codes, but sible washrooms and are not trans that’s something we still or gender-queer or genderhave to look into to variant. see what that would The SUB currently has be,” he said. “I’m eight multi-use washWhat do you not sure what rooms on the main other issues may floor, and the investhink about gendercome up, but I’m tigation may also neutral washrooms? assuming that consider single-use Tweet us @TheMartthere won’t be washrooms. too many, hope“We haven’t disrelet fully.” garded the possibility Paterson’s moof looking at singletion also included a stall washrooms,” said clause to send a letter to the Paterson. “Many folks who I’ve university administration encouragtalked to said they prefer singleing them to look into implementing stall washrooms. However, it would more gender-neutral washrooms. be more cost-effective to convert “Currently, UVic only has 36 genout current multi-use washrooms to der-neutral washrooms on campus. be gender neutral.” Some buildings and some faciliPaterson said another factor is ties are better than others. What is that multi-use washrooms are less considered now currently a gendermarginalizing. neutral washroom is simply an “It makes a stronger political accessible washroom that has both statement and really gets people a sign that signifies for men and a thinking about the issue who may sign that signifies for women,” said not otherwise think about it.” Paterson. “Other schools that went Paterson doesn’t think cost will be forward with similar projects have a huge factor. gone with the guideline of no space “It’s going to be a matter of being more than 200 metres withgetting the estimates and seeing out a gender-neutral washroom the degree of construction that within that space.” will be required,” she explained. Gabrielle Sutherland, who is the “One option is to simply change UVic Pride representative on the signage, but in the name of safety, UVSS board, is strongly in favour of many multi-use washrooms that go > Kailey Willetts

Paterson’s motion. “This is an issue that I’ve been fighting for in one way or another in various places since 2001,” said Sutherland. “I personally fought very hard and for a very long time to use the women’s washroom, so I will probably continue to, but I think, from my experiences as someone who’s transitioned, going into a washroom of the gender that you identify as … to go into the washroom as a male to female transsexual, it’s a dangerous place.” Sutherland also strongly advocates for multi-use, instead of single-use, facilities. “That’s kind of like being pushed back into the closet again. People have said to me, ‘Well, we don’t really feel comfortable with you using this washroom, but we’ve got one over here for you.’ And I always got really, really upset, because it’s like, do I get my own lunch counter as well?” she said. “I think to effect societal change it has to be open. It can’t be hidden.” UVSS Director of Finance Kelsey Hannan expressed some concerns over the motion. “With any capital upgrade financial concerns always exist,” he said. “I think my questions and concerns at the meeting were basically in response to exactly where this is going and how they’re going to propose it, but I’m not going to say unilaterally that I’m against multiperson gender-neutral bathrooms. I just need to understand how it would be implemented.” Hannan said in future buildings, solely implementing single use washrooms would be ideal. However, since that may not be realistic in the SUB, he has concerns over multi-use washrooms. “There’s the issues obviously of safety and of comfort, of religious affiliations; we have students of a diverse makeup here. They may not feel comfortable. This isn’t about transgender people being in the washroom, but simply people of the other gender, so we have to try and find a solution where we can accommodate a diverse range of people and perspectives,” he said. “I think, overall, single-person washrooms facilitate that the best. The question is, when you have facilities that are multi-person washrooms, do you go the route of making them gender-neutral because it’s not nec-

Marc junker

Gender designations could be flushed out of some SUB washrooms.

essarily possible for us to just make single-person washrooms?” UVic Pride is in the planning stages of an awareness campaign to encourage the university to implement gender-neutral washrooms. “On a societal level, I think any sort of implementation that makes people feel unsafe in a public setting is something that needs to be repaired, something that needs to be adjusted, because I think going to the washroom is something you do every day and a lot of the time you do it in a public place,” said first-year student Lincoln Welsh, who is helping with the campaign. “If that’s something you have to go through every day and that makes you feel uncomfortable, then that should not be something you have

to put up with.” The campaign will also provide information about gender-neutral washrooms to try to address concerns people may have. “I feel very comfortable that the students at large at UVic are pretty open-minded, and I feel very hopeful and pretty optimistic that there’ll be a mostly positive response,” said Welsh. “At this point in the game, we’re not talking about complete takeover. There would still be gender-segregated washrooms that they can use. If you go into a gender-inclusive space it’s agreed that you’re taking it upon yourself to be comfortable with it, and it’s a safer space, so you’re going into it knowing that there’ll be people from other genders.”

The Martlet asks:

How do you feel about a bunny-free campus? STREETERS January 27, 2011

“Fuck the bunnies. Not literally though, I’m not pro-bestiality. They’re kind of wrecking up the joint.” Will Clarke Major: in flux

“Sad. It’s terrible. I mean we did have a pretty bad infestation at one point, but . . . . . . we’re known for the landscape, and the bunnies are part of the landscape.”

“I thought they were cute and “I love it. I hate those things.” everything...now it feels empty, Herman Dylan I guess. But then I get used to, Commerce, 3rd year you know, not having them around...so I’m not really sure.”

Monica Dunlop and Colleen Mcguire Social Science, 1st year, Social Work, 1st year

Inuk Yeo Psychology, 1st year

NEWS 3


Strategic plan looks for community input > Gemma Karstens-Smith UVic is looking towards the future and they want students and the community to help fill out the picture. The university is currently conducting consultations for their next strategic plan. When completed and approved by the University Senate and Board of Governors about a year from now, the plan will help guide policy and institutionalize ideas, empowering students, faculty and staff to put them into practice. “The important thing, from my perspective, in terms of developing a strategic plan, is assessing the changing external environment and then deciding how you go about responding to that in order to go about accomplishing the goals you’ve set for yourself,” said UVic President David Turpin. UVic’s last strategic plan, “A Vision for the Future: Building on Strength” was approved in January 2007 and looked at expanding the university. Turpin says some of the successful initiatives from that plan include growing UVic’s graduate education and research programs, committing to indigenous education and setting a goal to be a “university of choice” for students, faculty and staff across Canada and abroad. However, Turpin notes that growth may not necessarily be in the works for the coming strategic plan. “I think one of the questions we’re going to be out there seeking input

on is ‘are we at the right size?’” said Turpin. “What is the appropriate balance between undergraduate and graduate programming? Are there specific areas that we may want to grow?” Canada’s changing demographic will also affect the new plan, as Canada is currently seeing a decline in the traditional university-aged population. Turpin says UVic is going to have to focus on recruiting and supporting groups who are traditionally under-represented in post-secondary education. One thing Turpin would like to keep working on is the “quality of the broader learning environment outside of the classroom.” “I think we have a special obligation in that regard, with students coming not only from this region, but coming from further and further afield,” he said. “We’ve got a special obligation to support them in that environment.” As for other initiatives the new plan may focus on, the university is leaving that up to the broader community, particularly students. Consultations are scheduled with various groups between now and June. Turpin says community input is vital to the process. “Just about every initiative in the [last] strategic plan is something that came from the broader community,” he said. “For example, our focus on student financial assistance: we talked again and again

Gemma karstens-smith

UVic President David Turpin wants students to voice their opinions to shape the university’s future.

and we heard from students and we heard from faculty that this is an absolutely key initiative, so we set the goal of being in the top 20 per cent of Canadian universities in terms of our commitment to student financial assistance. We’ve worked very, very hard to achieve that goal.” One group that will have a consultation meeting is the UVic Students’ Society (UVSS). UVSS Chairperson James Coccola says the UVSS Board

of Directors is hoping to hold meetings with students to get input before they meet with the university. “I’d also offer, if anybody wants to write an email to myself, I can take that into consideration when talking to the university about the strategic plan,” said Coccola. Coccola and Turpin encourage anyone who’s interested in having their voice heard to visit web.uvic.ca/strategicreview/share_your_view.php

or attend a consultation meeting. A consultation schedule can be found at the same website. Turpin says the more voices involved in the process, the better the outcome will be. “It’s an exciting process,” he said. “An important process, that allows us to focus on who are we, where do we want to go, and how do we respond to this challenging and rapidly changing environment.”

board briefs

YPY, Access UVic to be debated at UVSS meeting > Gemma Karstens-Smith The UVic Students’ Society (UVSS) Board of Directors has requisitioned a meeting for Jan. 31 to discuss a pair of issues that are sure to be contentious. At their Jan. 24 meeting, the Board put two motions into “notice of motion,” meaning that they will be dealt with at the next meeting. “Notice of motion is to allow people to see that a motion is coming up. So they know in advance, so they have time to prepare for an actual motion,” said UVSS Chairperson James Coccola. Coccola notes that in some instances, policy requires the Board to give one week’s notice of motions. “This is a way for us to do that,” he said. “[We do it] so people have enough notice to deal with an issue

they might be interested in.” One motion pertains to an event pro-life club Youth Protecting Youth (YPY) held on campus on Oct. 26 called “Echoes of the Holocaust.” Several complaints were filed against the club regarding the event, prompting a Complaints Committee to be created. According to the proposed motion, the Committee deemed that the event’s name “allowed for people to be misled about the nature of the event” and such an act is in violation of the UVSS harassment policy. If the motion passes without amendment, YPY will be censured for violating the harassment policy. The motion also proposes that the UVSS “investigate a mediated solution with [YPY] to help prevent further issues,” that legal counsel be consulted to examine what changes

to policy could be made to “address concerns around the conduct of offcampus groups or speakers” and that the UVSS’ Political Action Committee hold a restorative justice event. YPY’s club status and funding have been hotly contested and denied several times in recent years, particularly after they brought Stephanie Gray, co-founder of the Canadian Centre for Bioethical Reform, to campus for a debate in Fall 2009. In May 2010, YPY filed a petition with the B.C. Supreme Court against the UVSS demanding that, among other things, the club’s status and funding be reinstated, including funds that were denied in past years. YPY and the UVSS settled out of court on July 13. The court petition is being held in abeyance, meaning YPY can resubmit the petition in the future.

The other proposed motion has to do with the status of Access UVic. On Aug. 23, the Board voted to “not currently” recognize Access UVic as the constituency group for students with disabilities at UVic, saying Access had been a “non-performer” in terms of a Memorandum of Agreement signed in 2007. The Memorandum of Agreement was signed “to acknowledge that the UVSS and Access UVic are separate, distinct and equal entities with the common goal of organizing and advocating for students and to pledge a spirit of collaboration and mutual support in pursuit of those goals.” The motion put forward on the Jan. 31 meeting says that, based on the findings of an auditor’s report, “the UVSS no longer has the confidence that student fees will be

properly accounted for by Access Association of Disabled Students.” If the motion passes without amendment, the UVSS will accept proposals (a constitution and bylaws that have been ratified at a general meeting) for a new constituency group to fill the role of the UVSS constituency group “Society for Students with a Disability.” The motion also says that the UVSS will provide resources for students with disabilities so they can create a new constituency organization. Another provision of the motion is that the Board will consider, on a case-by-case basis, covering liabilities directly related to the operation of Access UVic incurred by Access UVic’s board of directors before Jan. 24. The Jan. 31 meeting will be held at 6 p.m. in the Student Union Building’s Upper Lounge.

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UVSP, UVSS want to move towards bottled water ban > Nathan Lowther Should bottled water continue to be sold on campus? A petition being circulated by the University of Victoria Sustainability Project (UVSP) wants to pose this question to the student body in a non-binding referendum during the March UVic Students’ Society (UVSS) elections. “We’re asking a hypothetical question to gauge support before moving ahead [with the bottled water-free campus campaign],” said Edward Pullman of UVSP. “This is only the first step in a larger process.” If the petition is successful, students will vote on whether they support a gradual move towards sol kauffman eliminating bottled water from oncampus vending machines. If stuEdward Pullman from UVSP wants to reduce bottled water sales. dents vote in favour, it would give UVSP and the UVSS the mandate to They’ve already begun retrofitting options and make up lost revenue. begin moving towards that objecwater fountains in high-traffic areas “There’s other products, like pure tive. But it wouldn’t be as simple as to accommodate refillable containfruit juices, that I think you can just saying no more bottled water. ers. Director Neil Connelly sees this argue is more nutritious. It’s more “It is, I believe, the second-most as one step towards a more sustainexpensive and you get less volume, popular drink in the [Student able university. but we’ve seen growth in that marUnion Building (SUB)], and it is, “We are looking to advance ket within both the [SUB] and the as far as I know, the most popular sustainability across campus with drink on campus,” said UVSS Chair- university, so is there potential for inclusive discussions between all more growth?” person James Coccola. parties involved,” said Connelly, Pullman sees potential parallels This creates potential economic who supports the idea of reducing in locally sourced, healthy and issues if the student body votes in sales of bottled water on campus. ethically produced beverages and favour of a ban. But support for the campaign is not fair-trade coffee. Fifteen years ago, “From our beverage provider’s universal among university faculty when students voted that only perspective, the vendor’s perspecand staff. “It fits with our objectives fair-trade coffee would be available tive, what are we going to replace it of reducing waste and energy costs in the SUB, the fair-trade coffee with?” Pullman said. “It makes up and promoting the high quality market was quite small. such a substantial portion of sales of the [Capital Regional District] “We literally couldn’t find supply that in terms of our beverage conpublic water supply. But it’s comto meet the demand we had in the tracts that both the university and plicated because of the variety of building. Now fast-forward 10, 15 the SUB hold, there is an expectainterests at stake.” years later and now pretty much all tion there that that is lost revenue Even if a referendum is held coffee on campus is fair trade.” and there has to be some effort where students overwhelmingly Another option could be replacmade to supplant that revenue.” vote in favour of a gradual ban, it ing disposable plastic water bottles Both Pullman and Coccola agree wouldn’t guarantee bottled water in vending machines with reusthat addressing the issue of lost would disappear from campus. As able ones. This would help reduce revenue would be a major hurdle if Coccola points out, all parties have the burden on landfills by keeping the student body chooses to ditch to be on board. containers out of garbage bins. But the bottle. Coccola suggests the “It’s something that a lot of people providing reusable bottles would UVSS would have to look at what have talked about for a number of only be part of the solution. other campuses across the country years, but there’s a lot of challenges “The other thing we’re going to are doing in that regard. around it, and it has to have the have to do is upgrade the infraAnother issue is providing support of both the Student Society structure of the water fountains students with healthy vending and the university.” around campus so people can have options. If water is gone, it could The petition will be in circulation access to clean drinking water,” leave students nothing to purchase from Jan. 24 to Jan. 28. Look for said Coccola. except pop and high-sugar fruit it around campus, in the SUB, or This is something UVic’s concentrates. But, Pullman says, it’sMARTLET AD Jan 20 Office 2011 visit the UVSS Resource Centre to of Campus Planning and Sustainconceivable that there are alternasign up. ability is already working towards. tives that could provide healthy

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Talk questions civil rights of sidewalks > Kimberly Profili Sidewalks need to be redefined in terms of their capacity as public spaces, according to a recent City Talks lecture. Through a series of lectures sponsored by UVic’s Committee for Urban Studies, Victoria has been able to better understand and collaborate on urban themes and issues. In the Jan. 20 lecture, Simon Fraser University professor Nicholas Blomley talked about his recently published book, Rights of Passage: Sidewalks and the Regulation of Public Flow. The talk focused on the conflicts that can occur between pedestrianism — which Blomley explained is only concerned with maintaining and regulating sidewalk flow — and civic rights. “A good sidewalk for a civic humanist is one that produces politics and pleasure. The pedestrianist’s good sidewalk is one that facilitates those functional ends that do not in themselves require further justification,” he said. Blomley suggested that if you aren’t a part of the pedestrian flow, you are understood as an object. “Static elements, if they are allowed on the sidewalk at all, are to be positioned away from the flow of the pedestrian traffic,” he said. “Slow flow and blockage is the unending story at the centre of pe-

6 NEWS

destrianism, where flow of course is the primary goal.” Blomley argues that legislative bodies should consider sidewalks as spaces for political and civic engagement. This “civic humanist” view wants panhandlers and homeless people to be understood not as objects, but as pedestrians. “People are often assimilated or reduced to objects. Pedestrianism is elements of the sidewalk that are either engaged in circulation or engaged in forms of obstruction,” said Blomley, pointing out that these definitions used by pedestrianists oversimplify the dimensions of people, which is why social groups and activists already spotlight this kind of issue. For example, buskers require permits to stay on designated sidewalk areas. The question of whether permits are necessary or if loitering is an expression are highly contested ideas between the two schools of thoughts. “It’s interesting that sidewalks are publicly-owned spaces and yet are regulated by the municipal government,” said Blomley. What about protests and public enjoyment? According to Blomley, the pedestrianist’s goal is to separate private activities from public spaces because of circulation jams that may occur. “What is interesting for me is this is the only logic that seems to be at

kat eschner

SFU geographer Nicholas Blomley (right) talks with attendees following his City Talks lecture.

play here,” he said. Blomley suggested spaces for activities should be included in how sidewalks are produced, regulated and maintained. “Blomley suggests pedestrianism is more the dominant logic in

terms of how sidewalks are actually regulated. Whereas here, there’s a lot of rhetoric on civic humanist elements of sidewalks in the sense of gatherings and assembly. But in practice that’s not how sidewalks are regulated,” said Reuben Rose-

Redwood, an Urban Studies Committee member and UVic geography professor. Information for City Talk’s next lecture can be found on their website thecitytalks.ca. Admission is free.

January 27, 2011


Radical Tides

Ambush at Douglas Channel > MARK WORTHING

B.C. Liberal leadership candidate comes to UVic for a discussion with students > Quinn MacDonald The B.C. Liberal party will vote for its next leader and the province’s next premier on Feb. 26. Leadership candidate George Abbott was at UVic on Jan. 20, talking about his campaign. The upper lounge of the Student Union Building (SUB) was filled with students and community members, including Minister of the Environment Murray Coell, when Abbott spoke for an hour about the kind of consensusbuilding government he would create should he be elected premier. Afterward, attendees were invited to Felicita’s for appetizers where Abbott, a UVic graduate, introduced himself to every person who had come out and answered any remaining questions. Abbott joked around and created a casual atmosphere as he focused on the need to regain the trust that British Columbians have lost in their government in the last year and a half. He said that the B.C. Liberal party will need to reconnect with British Columbians if they are to have any chance at being elected in 2013. “I see people who believe that we have completely stopped engaging them in the preparation of public policy in B.C.,” Abbott said, noting that many people were “deeply disappointed and frustrated” with the implementation of the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) and the decisions leading up to it. The controversial HST is something Abbott supports. He said it is more effective than the provincial sales tax (PST) because it converts bottom line and capital expenses. He also suggests that, over time, it will result in greater economic growth than PST which he says tends to punish

FOR THE WEEK OF JANUARY 25, 2011

January 27, 2011

people for investing capital. Abbott feels that government and industry need to convince the broader population that the tax will benefit more than just the people in business suits. Kevin Falcon, who is also vying for the party’s leadership, favours lowering the tax rather than eliminating it, initially to 11 per cent and then to 10 per cent after a few years.

portunity for people who have been marginalized and disadvantaged in our province for a long time.” Abbott added that he believes it’s important to have a balance between development and environmental protection. During his visit to UVic, Abbott also echoed leadership candidate Moira Stilwell’s proposed decrease on student loan interest rates. He also said it is unfair to the students who are paying back loans whose interest rates have been devised to account for defaulted loans. Abbott also said that his is committed to raising B.C.’s minimum wage, which is the lowest in Canada. “There’s no question that the minimum wage will rise. If you are currently earning $8 you will see a raise in the months ahead,” he said. To be eligible to vote in the B.C. Liberal leadership race, you must be a member of the B.C. Liberal party by Feb. 4. You can sign up online at bcliberals.com.

I see people who believe that we have completely stopped engaging them in the preparation of public policy

CFUV TOP TEN

Recent threats of supertankers billowing out of Douglas Channel from the Port of Kitimat aren’t the first threats that have been uttered against the North Coast. In May 1977 British Petroleum (BP) came remarkably close to transporting Alaskan oil out of the Port of Valdez in super tankers to Kitimat. The oil would then be funneled to Albertan pipelines in the tar sands, eventually merging with southbound pipelines continuing to the southern United States. British Columbian environmentalist Rod Marining led an early Greenpeace campaign to manifest a marine blockade at the mouth of Douglas Channel in front of the Hartley Bay First Nations reservation with an alliance composed of members of the Fisherman’s Union, Native groups, the United Church, allied workers union and rural environmentalists. The Ambush at Douglas Channel, as it was called, littered the opening of the channel with 42 boats and vessels that were charged with blockading the M.V. Princess Patricia, a Canadian Pacific Cruise ship that was chartered by Kitimat Pipeline Company Ltd., composed of 15 oil companies. The Princess Patricia was touring the proposed oil tanker route carrying 250 mayors, councillors, aids, oil executives and media hosting the annual North Central Municipal Association of Mayors conference, with the oil companies footing the

bill. Oliver Clifton organized the Gitga’at band members in Hartley Bay, making a small cavalry out of trollers, seiners, herring skiffs, and locals boats. “You could see the big black puff of smoke from around the corner,” said Marining. “He was gunning it right for the blockade, at 15 knots.” Marining and Mel Gregory launched the zodiac and the blockade began. They were taunting the 6,000-ton Princess Patricia, cutting her off as she made a run to break through the blockade. They were touching the hull of the Princess Patricia as media and 100 onlookers peered over the edge of the boat. CBC flew over in a helicopter, filming the organized chaos from above. Marning and Gregory narrowly escaped death during this blockade. They both dove off their boat as the floor of the Zodiac folded under the pressure of the Princess Patricia. The strength from the reverse propellers sucked the boat down into its intake and out of sight. “I could feel myself getting sucked down in to the propeller’s current,” said Marining. Marining and Gregory, were fished out, exhausted and coughing up sea water, by a First Nations fishing boat, while the Princess Patricia keeled sideways rendering the blockade a success. With oil politics heating up in the region once again, it remains to be seen if the Ambush at Douglas Channel will be fossilized into history or become a blueprint for upcoming activists.

Abbott talks HST, student debt

–George Abbott Abbott said he considers this an option, but pointed out that it is an $800-million difference that B.C. would not have, a difference that could be spent on education or healthcare. He thinks that the economy is not strong enough at this time to sustain a one per cent lowering of the tax. Strengthening and growing the economy was a big talking point for Abbott, along with the positive effects that would come with it. Abbott said he would like to focus on natural resource development, noting that B.C. has a huge opportunity to make billions of dollars in the gas and oil industry, particularly in the North Eastern corner of the province, and that in a decade the province could be rivaling Alberta in revenue production. “When resource industries do well, the whole economy does well. But we do not want to see resource expansion just for that purpose alone,” said Abbott. “It’s important to have a strong economy, not because it generates profit, but because it generates op-

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The leadership race Other people in the race for the B.C. Liberal leadership include: Christy Clark – journalist, CBC radio host and former B.C. Liberal minister of Education Mike de Jong – former attorney general who has a penchant for listening to Gordon Lightfoot while doing paperwork Kevin Falcon – minister of Health who enjoys Mountain Biking and proper helmet use Ed Mayne – mayor of Parksville, owner of a Tim Hortons franchise, and grandfather Moira Stilwell – former minister of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development and longtime physician

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NEWS 7


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Editorial

How to build a better budget

Uvic’s secret weapon in the bunny Battle: a LEadership candidate

Fuck fighter jets. Fuck corporate tax cuts, too. Not that the government will actually listen to anything the majority of Canadians are saying (a poll commissioned by the Council of Canadians says 71 per cent of us would rather see Prime Minister Stephen Harper spend money on fighting climate change than building the military to fight wars). Harper and his cohorts are too busy prepping for an election and rolling out attack ads to actually consult Canadians on what should be in the next federal budget, due in March. After blowing our surplus on gimmicky GST reductions and costly summits, the next budget is supposed to be the one where the government stops doling out more than it takes in. Of course, like so many prime ministers before him, Harper’s secret to success so far has been buying our votes by keeping the spending spigots wide open. Luckily, Harper’s urge to start slashing programs for those who need it most is moderated by his fear that doing this will lose him his job. Harper’s answer: try to get out of presenting a necessarily stingy budget by having an election first. If the opposition parties don’t play along, we figure Harper might need a little help cobbling something together. Here are some of our suggestions: Don’t blow even bigger holes in the deficit by buying 65 stealth F-35 fighter jets for an outrageous $16 billion dollars. Apparently the old ones are no good anymore. NATO wants us to upgrade. Bollocks. Pour $16 billion into health care, research and development, education, infrastructure, aid for Afghanistan — nearly anything but fucking fighter jets. Neither are corporate tax cuts the magic solution to get businesses hiring again. Harper wants to give about $6 billion back to corporations by reducing their federal taxes to 15 per cent. The vast majority of working Canadians pay a higher rate. What gives? Canadian businesses are already competitive. The government should keep the money for more noble priorities, like rebuilding Haiti or something. And while you’re at it, keep businesses’ money out of politics so it’s a fair race for all. Eliminating the funding political parties get for each vote they earn, as Harper signaled he will, won’t save much money but will invite big business to step back in to fill the void. As if oil companies don’t dictate to government enough. Stop planning to build more prisons. It’s no secret that Harper would love nothing more than to lock up as many troubled people as he can — it makes him look tough to the rednecks who support him. Maybe we could spend the proposed $600 million on addictions treatment, homelessness and other measures to actually reduce the crime rate. Relieve student debt and lower tuition by restoring funding to postsecondary education. Yes, we’re playing to the crowd on this one, but honestly: how does the government expect young Canadians to ever own a home and save for retirement — let alone afford to take on the tax burden of the glut of retirees who are on their way — when the cost of educating ourselves forces us into debt servitude for years? How about a general commitment to spending public money on things that help us rather than hurt us? Fund athletic programs and local food initiatives — they help people live healthier lives out of the medical system — instead of wasting money on hyper-securitized international summits. Why not save some money by dropping the charges against the G20 protestors as well? They’re not the real criminals. Finally, invest in green jobs and technology like green’s never going out of style. If Canadians have to compete in a global job market, we should be blowing the bank on investments that will produce high-paying jobs in service to the planet. That’s how we’ll reverse our lamentable reputation when it comes to doing our part to arrest climate change. When it comes to budgeting, priorities should always be the guiding principal to plan by. If Harper tries to duck a critical budget by forcing an election or tries to stuff fighter jets, corporate tax cuts and superprisons down our throats, he will finally reveal his true priorities — and just how out of touch they really are.

Editorial topics are decided on by staff at our weekly editorial meeting at 2 p.m. every Friday in the Martlet office (SUB B011). Editorials are written by one or more staff members and are not necessarily the opinion of all staff members. 8 OPINIONS

glen Glen o’neill O’Neill

letters Smokers not all “bad-ass”

Do the UVSS-inspired twist

Re: “Studying, not smoking,” Jan. 13

Re: “UVSS hypocrites squelch free speech,” Jan. 20

I have been an on-and-off smoker since age 15. As you age, the smoking image becomes less alluring, but the gross smell, hacking cough and fading bank account start to kick in, and all you want to do is stop smoking! But you try eight times and still no luck. Your nicotine levels are down. You walk outside the library, but it’s Victoria, so rain soaks your face and cigarette. You stand under the overhang to light up, not realizing there are air vents above you. Then you walk over to the bucket saying “butt out here” and kindly put your butt in the appropriate place. If there were a sign outside the library saying “Please do not smoke here: vents above,” I would have found another place to smoke given that I’m not a rebellious teenager trying to fit in. Stereotyping all smokers as “badass” fosters unfair judgments. Most smokers do not want to offend, harm or purposefully blow smoke in someone’s face. We simply have a legal addiction to nicotine. It’s not easy to quit, so give us a break! We have enough to deal with without people glaring and judging us as if we “don’t give a shit.” I am a social work student, so I like to think I do give a shit. Brit Weis UVic student

Drat. I support banning Maclean’s, but not because of any particular thing printed in it. It should be banned because it went from being a decent publication (some years ago) to being a sensationalist, trashy, hollow tabloid. And it shouldn’t really be a “ban” so much as a slow turning of the back; Maclean’s is best simply ignored. But if the ban is on record as being motivated by a particular article, sorry: free speech applies and I can’t support it. Never thought I’d stand up for the current incarnation of Maclean’s. Thanks, UVic Students’ Society (UVSS), for twisting my priorities with your oddness. Felix Giannelia UVic student

to be done, and students are not adequately served. This proposed change would balance the hours executives work while serving the needs of students. If we implement a fifth executive, the days of executives having to prioritize between student groups and events will be gone. This proposed change will separate Clubs and Course Unions from Events and create much-needed focus in the way we serve our members. Whether you support this change or not, it is important to come to the Special General Meeting (SGM), because at the end of the day the UVSS is yours. Your voice is important to its role as a student organization.  I implore you to come have your voice heard at the SGM on Jan. 27 at 3 p.m. in Cinecenta. Jenn Bowie UVSS Director-at-Large

Bylaw 8: the Rise of the Fifth Executive The idea to reform the structure of our Board of Directors came to me over the summer when it became evident that change was necessary. Our current structure has been in place since the UVic Students’ Society (UVSS) was a smaller organization. As our membership has grown, so has the need for a greater number of executives on our board. The four executives work very hard, often more than 50 hours a week. But there is still so much work

Happy? Sad? Enraged? Tell us: letters@martlet.ca The Martlet has an open letters policy and will endeavour to print every letter received from the university community. Letters must be submitted by email, include your real name and affiliation to UVic, and have “Letter to the editor” in the subject line. Letters must be under 200 words and may be edited. January 27, 2011


Diamonds: a widow’s best friend

Volume 63, Issue 20

The Martlet Editor-in-Chief Gemma Karstens-Smith

> Nathan Lowther

Managing Editor Kristi Sipes Production Co-ordinator Marc Junker Advertising Director Bryce Finley Glen O’Neill

News Editor Kailey Willetts Opinions Editor Vanessa Annand Features Editor Jason Motz Culture Editor Brad Michelson Sports Editor Max Sussman Junior Designer Glen O’Neill Photo Editor Sol Kauffman Staff Photographer Megan Kamocki Staff Writers Nathan Lowther Mark Worthing Distribution Co-ordinator Jon-Paul Zacharias Distribution Michael Miller Mike Edel Ivan Marko Web Editor Adam Bard Copy Editor Jon-Paul Zacharias Staff Karolina Karas, Kate Shepherd, Cody Willett Contributors Joanna Bell, Graham Briggs, Miryam Burns, Brooke English, Marcel “Felix” Giannelina, Megan Jones, Taryn KarstensSmith, Tyler Laing, Quinn MacDonald, Ivan Marko, Kenza Moller, Pat Murry, Kieran Nelson, Anton North, Candace O’Neill, Danielle Pope, Kimberly Profili Cover Photo Gemma Karstens-Smith The Martlet Publishing Society is an incorporated B.C. society and a full member of Canadian University Press (CUP). We strive to act as an agent of constructive social change and we will not print racist, sexist, homophobic or otherwise oppressive copy. Martlet (SUB B 011) P.O. Box 3035 University of Victoria Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P3 martlet.ca Newsroom: Editor: Business: Advertising: Fax:

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January 27, 2011

Cancun: no can-do climate summit > Kieran Nelson I went to see the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Cancun (COP16) — or, more precisely, I went to be there when it all happened. From the streets of Mexico, a country gripped in a war with rebellious drug gangs running narcotics to the American market, COP16 looked different than from the distant television sets of North America. During the conference, I filmed protests of American hippies and Canadian students as they snaked through the streets and began crying for the downfall of capitalism in front of the Cancun Walmart. A massive tent city of peasants that had caravanned through Mexico occupied a corner of town. It was a circus of Che Guevara t-shirts and film documentaries for sale. Longhaired shirtless American outcasts milled about, enjoying the protest ambiance. Cancun was different from Copenhagen. It was understood well beforehand that there would be no agreement this time. Two years into the Great Recession, governments have muzzled their diplomats and implemented a new strategy: produce a declaration or statement of good intentions, and pretend that things are going alright. Still, in Cancun I was annoyed by the lack of practical examples offered from any party as to how to

fix the planet’s climate change problem. The delegates inside the Moon Palace were flogging market-type solutions: companies in Europe or California, for example, would buy up forested areas in Latin America to offset the carbon they burned. Offset markets, in theory, would create incentives to reduce oil consumption. But even if we could get every nation to sign a trading scheme (which we can’t), it would still be far too little, far too late. And in the streets of Cancun, Indigenous peasants marched and declared they did not want corporations to buy up the right for them to use their land. Protestors called for rights-based community solutions for climate change, no involvement of the International Monetary Fund or the World Bank in climate change solutions, and immediate moratorium on the exploration of oil and gas. But it’s a dangerous logic that says, “I am the only legitimate solution to climate change.” It’s dangerous when the right wing does it. It’s dangerous when the left wing does it. It is dangerous because it means that everyone wants to push their own petty political cause rather than come together and fix this crisis. It wasn’t only those with vested interests who perturbed me in Cancun; the media were troubling as well. Few international news websites even ran articles on COP16. The Mexican news showed

discussions involving discomfitted African delegates declaiming that not the same old money, but new money, must be given to the third world to fix climate change. On the final day, Evo Morales arrived to tour the conference and address the tent city circus. He called for a Bank of the South and a new doctrine of socialism. Oh, great. So the left, once again, is leaning on its opponent. At least it acknowledges it doesn’t really have a doctrine. COP16 was a joke, and there is no leadership or ingenuity for solving the problem on either side of the political spectrum. The media, as well as the world’s leaders, ignored COP 16 to avoid the embarrassing scenario of what happened in Denmark at COP15. And while our politicians are being co-opted by the Moon Palaces of the world, protests which are years in the making and cost thousands of dollars to assemble are rewarded with 10 measly seconds of protest footage displayed on the Mexican national news. When the talks wrapped up, the BBC quoted a World Wildlife Fund organizer who said of the Cancun statements, “There’s enough in it that we can work towards next year’s meeting in South Africa to get a legally binding agreement there.” This is how the world was left thinking of the Cancun conference: with optimism, with apathy, and with a lot of other concerns.

Who wants to be premier? > Cody Willett Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be premier for a day? I’m a geek for politics, so I have. You hear the radio announcer rattling on about some guy calling for this, denying that, praising so-andso. It sounds like a pretty dynamic gig. So dynamic, in fact, that you’re constantly jetting off here and there to represent your people and be the centre of attention. You’re a celebrity of sorts. So I don’t think it’s unfair to say we’re currently watching our own create-a-celebrity reality show and it’s called “Who Wants to Survive Dancing with Leadership Races for Victoria’s Shore?” I hear the ratings suck because the contestants are uninspiring, though. This will not do. The people demand to be entertained. So how should we be judging these contestants? They have to show us that they can throw wicked parties. It’s really that simple. I’ve been to a political party convention or two in my day, and it’s at the parties (euphemistically called “hospitality suites”) held each night that friends and deals are made, where status is earned and lost. For example, back

at the 2004 Liberal convention in Whistler, Christy Clark and Kevin Falcon were the hands down winners of the “I-can-get-you-drunkfor-free-at-my-hospitality-suite” game. Little wonder they both lead the field among the B.C. Liberal leadership candidates today. However, they obviously didn’t have what it takes to compete with the likes of Gordon Campbell in his prime. Campbell’s ability to throw parties is legendary. It’s probably the single most important factor in explaining why British Columbians kept him around for the last decade. Who else could get away with zooming off to Olympic ceremonies, elite Bilderberg meetings and industry fundraisers while on public time? The man knew how to schmooze. But now that Campbell’s tax cut binges and social program purges have put him into political rehab for good, it’s Clark’s and Falcon’s time to shine. Yet, like the rest of the Liberal and NDP field, they’re not really capturing anyone’s imagination. For some reason these wannabe celebrities are promising gimmicky things like Family Day and telephone town hall meetings. Who’s going to tune in and vote for that? People are just itching to text

their vote in for the first contender to promise to let the good times roll again. After all, we’re in rough shape. Call it the post-Olympic hangover or the post-recession hunger: we all just want to enjoy ourselves without regretting it so much the next day. We need a premier who gets this and is ready to lead by example. People need to get to the party safely: why not propose boatloads of funding for sustainable transit? People want to get drunk at the beach without dead creatures washing up on shore: why not commit to an oil tanker ban? People want to go out dancing without fear of being shot in a drive-by: why not free up the police and knee-cap gang profits by legalizing B.C. bud already? Seriously, this campaign platform writes itself. So why is this next-top-politician reality show failing to catch on with the public? It looks to me like the candidates are afraid of being anything like Campbell, thinking the public hated his wild ways and that’s why we voted him off with low popularity ratings. The thing is, we didn’t begrudge Campbell’s ability to pull off a hell of a party — we were just fed up with not getting invited.

When I die, I want to be made into a diamond. I think that would be pretty cool. It would be a real commemorative keepsake for my widow. Like Elvis plates, but not quite as useful. And it really does seem like the best choice for the planet. Getting pumped up with preservatives and buried in an oak and satin casket just means you’re going to take a really long time to rot. It seems pretty selfish to take up that much room for that much time when you’re already dead. Cremation seems a bit better. At least you’re not taking up as much space. But with all the chemicals and pharmaceuticals we ingest in our lifetimes, who knows what those ashes would be putting into local ecosystems. That’s probably why it’s illegal to dump the ashes of a loved one off the back of a B.C. Ferry. Sure, you could keep them in an urn. That would at least put the problem off for a while. But let’s be honest: your spouse’s ashes on the mantel is a bit tacky. A LifeGem, on the other hand, is different. It’s “a certified, highquality diamond created from a lock of hair or the cremated ashes of your loved one as a memorial to their unique life” (according to the LifeGem website). You’ll take as long to decompose (roughly) as the wannabe zombies buried in the cemetery, but you’ll only be causing clutter in someone’s jewellery box instead of wasting prime development land. Squeezing all your worldly remains into “carat sizes ranging from 0.25 ct to over 1.5 ct” keeps your angel dust from poisoning the planet. It’s really the perfect example of looking good while doing good. The big concern, you’d think, would be the end product looking cheap and fake. But nope, they are actually “molecularly identical to natural diamonds found at any high-end jeweller.” This means the LifeGem has the same attributes as any other diamond, including clarity, colour and hardness. The LifeGem does open up some ethical issues though. After all, the big selling feature to this process is how it reduces the waste we leave behind when we die. So when Mary gets Ted princess cut, what’s going to happen with the shards? Go into any hardware store, and they’ll have diamond-tipped saw blades and drill bits. Can Ted’s shards be used for that? If so, would it have to be clearly marked so consumers could make an informed choice? Maybe a sticker that says, “This blade may contain Ted”? Still, the LifeGem’s positives definitely outweigh the negatives. I know I’m reassured just thinking that if my widow needs to, she can pawn my remains to get a few bucks to keep the heat on. Yes, she could probably do the same with a marble grave marker, but this will be much easier for her to transport. Hopefully I’m getting a bit ahead of myself here. Hopefully there are still decades of good times ahead for me and my wife. Of course, it’s inevitable that we’ll have our rocky moments over a lifetime together, which is another reason LifeGems are so great: everyone knows nothing says “sorry” like a diamond.

OPINIONS 9


AN OPE DOO

Men’s Traum battles the st men can’t be

A

young man walks down the steps of a brown building. He looks at the sign pointing towards the door: Men’s Trauma Centre. The man has no cuts, scrapes or bruises. In fact, he’s clean cut and wearing a business suit. He makes eye contact with no one, but goes straight to the receptionist. “I’d like to talk to someone. Please,” he says, quietly. He is one of the nearly 1,000 men who have come through the doors of the Victoria Men’s Trauma Centre since it opened in 2003. But while the non-profit centre has served hundreds of men, as well as their friends and families over the past eight years, it still struggles to maintain funding — and it still battles to fight stigmas around male survivors.

Survival isn’t just for the fittest “One of the biggest misconceptions our society continues to believe is that men are not allowed to be victims,” says Alana Samson, executive director of the centre. “Men are seen as either providers or predators in our society, with very little wiggle room in-between . . . Many people think we’ve come to an enlightened age where these things don’t happen anymore, but we see it every day here at the centre.” The centre deals with varying types of trauma from physical and sexual violence to spousal abuse, emotional abuse, gay bashing, combat trauma and more. While it could be easy to assume the clientele are mostly young and impoverished, the centre’s users actually range in age from 16 to 81, and from nearly homeless to business executives and medical practitioners. Care is individualized, but often includes counselling and therapy, as well as assistance for people who are working with the justice system to report crimes, and programs to get people back on their feet. According to the 2000 National Violence Against Women Survey, 78 per cent of survivors of sexualized violence were women, and 22 per cent were men. In addition, most perpetrators were men: nearly 100 per cent of cases reported by women, and roughly 70 per cent of cases reported by men asserted male perpetrators. With figures like that, it’s easy to see how men can become “de-emphasized” in terms of survivor need — but, while those stats are 11 years old, Samson says the importance of the centre is even greater today. The trauma centre is non-profit, so it relies on donations, grants and fundraising efforts to provide service to the Victoria region. One of those fundraising efforts is taking place this month, when the centre hosts a raffle titled “The Elton John Night to Remember.” The raffle includes a chance to win tickets to the Feb. 15 concert, dinner for two at Cafe Brio, limousine service and Cadbury Roses chocolates. Tickets are $30 and are available for purchase from the centre until noon on Feb. 8. Funded or not, one of the most difficult elements the centre has to deal with is stigma — not just from the community, but also from the men themselves. “Many men are afraid to ask for help when they’ve been through a trauma because they fear that people will think they too will turn into offenders, but that’s just not true,” says Samson. Studies have shown that fewer than five per cent of people who have survived abuse ever go on to become perpetrators, says Samson. She says people confuse those statistics with the fact that 95 per cent of

10 FEATURE

offenders were also abused in their lives. Myths also cycle around the idea that, if a man was abused by another man, people will see him as gay, says Samson.

Not all men want sex Adam Awad, National Deputy Chairperson Elect for the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS), says one of the cornerstones for perspectives against male survivors goes back to the idea that men want sex all the time. “There is this unspoken perception of ‘what man wouldn’t want sex?’ And, if you don’t, there must be something wrong with you,” Awad says. “We know this isn’t true, yet we still have so far to go to break down these stigmas.” Awad, 24, who identifies as a queer man and is the former Queer Issues Co-ordinator for Canadian University Press (CUP), says when it comes to activism on battling stigmas, he’s no stranger. Awad used to volunteer for the Toronto People With AIDS foundation, and also runs anti-oppression workshops for various groups. While he has never experienced direct sexualized violence himself, Awad says he has many close friends who have confided their experiences to him. Some of the stigma-breakdown work must be done through better education, both in middle and high schools, and in post-secondary education facilities, he says. While the “No Means No” campaign has been met with success for females, creating male-oriented campaign slogans could be another option — something focusing on “Not All Men Want Sex All the Time With Anybody,” he jokes. Slogans aside, Awad sees many of the trauma statistics as a double-edged sword. “If you want to make the point that violence and assault in our society is unacceptable, then it helps to prove we need to break the cycle,” he says, adding that stats urge society and governmental programs to halt that five per cent of individuals who do go on to become perpetrators. “Yet, you also want to prove that not all survivors will perpetrate, which at once comforts but can also mute the first point, so it’s tricky.” While Awad believes there is an important place in society for men’s trauma specifically, he also poses the thought that gender could be removed from the equation entirely.

January 27, 2011


EN OR

ma Centre tigma that e victims

By Danielle Pope “It’s not just men, or women, or those who identify as either who experience trauma. People experience trauma, and any survivor should be given the resources they need,” he says.

Silence is not golden At the Victoria centre, only five of the 11 counselling staff are male. Samson says the centre has found many of the men (about 60 per cent) are more comfortable speaking to a female therapist. About 20 per cent prefer male, and 20 per cent don’t care. “The majority of men who are abused were abused by other males, so they don’t want to sit in a room with the same sex,” Samson says. “That said, about 75 per cent of our clientele were abused as children, often sexually. Of those, 30 per cent were abused by women — which is far more than we ever anticipated.” Part of the complication around talking about trauma, both Samson and Awad point out, comes from how we

January 27, 2011

define trauma. Since it looks different in every instance, there’s no blanket or list of check boxes to see if one experience “counts.” “So many people see a perpetrator as some malicious, calculating person who plans out a whole attack — and it can be — but the reality is that this is not always the case. It could also be someone who got really drunk and misinterpreted the signs, which paints a whole other picture,” says Awad. “There are so many complicating psychological factors. It never excuses an attack, but we have to be able to understand how these things happen before we can fix them, and sometimes even before we can convince a person that, yes, you were assaulted.” Yet, it’s our silence around abuse in general that causes the real problem, and part of that silence comes from “our perceptions of other peoples’ perceptions,” Awad explains. “Often, we censor ourselves to how we think other people will react. A lot of men have really good friendships and, chances are, if they broached topics of abuse with each other they would be met with support,” he says. “But we’ve built a culture where men are told not to confide in each other that way.”

Trauma can be invisible Recently, one of Awad’s middle-aged friends came out about experiencing a sexualized violence as a child. The man sent an email out to some of his closest friends, stating that he was tired of having the experience run his life, and it was time to “come clean” about it. While Awad admits he was shocked to learn about his friend, the man was met with support from all. “Here was a man, who we all knew as happy and bubbly, and it had taken his whole life to come to terms with what happened. It was a surprise, but life is a performance. We all do it, and some are better actors than others,” Awad says. “Clearly, he’d been experiencing this on the inside for a long time, but just because someone doesn’t look like they’ve gone through something traumatic doesn’t mean they haven’t. We can’t see people’s pasts.” Samson says the Men’s Trauma Centre sees people who have experienced one act of violence that haunts their whole life and sense of self, and others who experienced a lifetime of abuse but appear socially well adjusted. The tipping point usually comes, she says, when a person recognizes a connection between what’s going on in their current life and what went on in their past. “Trauma is something that occurs within an individual. Two people can have the same experience and come out with entirely different levels of coping,” says Samson. “It has to do with your psychological resilience, sense of control, your support network at the time and so much more . . . Our job here isn’t to judge or justify. It’s to listen to everyone’s story and offer the assistance and support we can.” To learn more about how you can help the Victoria Men’s Trauma Centre, or how the centre can help you, or to purchase raffle tickets, visit menstrauma.com.

FEATURE 11


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Look, Mom: music helps you study — sort of > Kenza Moller Music is everywhere. It not only beats in clubs, it energizes our gym sessions and sets a tune to our allnighters. Although older generations shake their heads in disapproval, biology is on our side: the brain is hard-wired to like music. In the past couple of decades, neuroscientists have started delving into the connection between music and grey matter, and as it turns out, music’s effect goes far beyond the ears. Eliciting the same effect as chocolate, sex and cocaine, emotional music leads to a release of dopamine in the reward centers of the brain. Studies done on patients with coronary heart disease found that when patients plugged in their iPods, their blood pressure, heart rate and level of anxiety decreased, making music instant stress relief. “We know that it’s not just a placebo,” said Dr. Frank Russo, Director of Psychological Science at Ryerson University, who specializes in music cognition. “We’ve done the control studies now, and music really is capable of regulating stress and calming you down quicker than a control condition.” However, the type of music one listens to affects the body’s ability to relax. An Italian study discovered blood pressure, heart rate and breath depth parallel sound levels in music, explaining why Jack Johnson calms you down and Rihanna fires you up. Russo says it’s also important to pick music you like. “It’s not like going to a doctor and saying, ‘I’m feeling stressed, write me a prescription for two shots of James Brown.’ In addition to

selecting music that’s calming, you want to select music that you like a lot for that extra pleasure boost to your mesolimbic reward system,” he explained. The link between music and emotions runs deep: studies of a woman with bilateral damage to both temporal lobes (known only as I.R. for privacy reasons) suggest emotional reaction to music is deeply ingrained in the brain. The woman’s intelligence, memory and language abilities were not affected after her injury, yet she lost her ability to identify any music or tell tunes apart. However, despite her incapability to recognize music, she continues to have emotional reactions to it — each suited to the song. The research suggests that, while ability to understand melody is damaged when the temporal lobes are injured, emotional reaction to music runs through different parts of the brain. It’s a handy tip to remember when anxiety hits, but the trick to getting music to work with — rather than against — you is timing. Playing music directly before an event where one needs to concentrate, such as cramming for an exam, apparently prepares the brain to pay attention. A research team at Stanford used functional magnetic resonance imaging to find that people’s brains wander while listening to music but that their attention is focused as soon as the music stops. However, while studying immediately after listening to music may improve concentration, background music can decrease the effectiveness of studying if heard simultaneously — regardless of the listener’s opinion of the music.

Megan Kamocki

Several studies in recent years have shown links between music and the human brain.

“The trick is to avoid distraction while reaping the benefits [of music]. Luckily, it’s possible to reap the benefits with fairly soft music, and soft music is not very distracting,” explained Dr. Bill Thompson, author of Music, Thought and Feeling: Understanding the Psychology of Music. “Positive ‘happy’ music can lift your spirits and enhance your ability at creative problem solving; energetic, upbeat music can energize you and enhance your ability at rapid decision making.” So if you can’t listen to your raucous music while trying to relax, and you can’t pump it during study time, when can you actually use music to your advantage? As it

turns out, if you sync your music with your gait while you exercise, you can increase your endurance by 15 per cent. Participants in a 20-year study by Brunel University also showed signs of increased positivity, even when nearing physical exhaustion. A person’s pace will reflect the beats per minute in a song. “Listening to music is thought to directly activate motor areas in the brain. Music seems to have ‘motionlike’ properties — the rhythmic nature of music stimulates our motor system, making it easier to synchronize to music,” explained Thompson. Music also helps you simply

endure exercise for more time. Known as a “dissociation effect,” (or in simple terms, distraction) music lowers perceived effort by 10 per cent, letting you go on a little longer. “Your brain is trying to keep up with the music’s tempo, which is in turn activating the motor cortex, which is in charge of executing movement, and the neurons are firing at a faster rate in this motor cortex,” said Russo. “It’s almost like you’re making it easier for your brain to be involved in exercise.” So as long as you’re selective with your music and timing, there’s no reason not to press replay.

Ra Ra Riot bring raucous ruckus to Sugar > Karolina Karas WHAT: Ra Ra Riot with Givers WHEN: Friday, Jan. 28 WHERE: Sugar Nightclub HOW MUCH: $17 at Ditch Records Somewhere on a highway stretch in between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, Calif., Milo Bonacci, guitarist for the band Ra Ra Riot, tried to answer what he finds most memorable about Victoria, B.C. The answer took a moment as Ra Ra Riot last played in Victoria almost two years ago and the band is still on tour in promotion of their August 2010 release, The Orchard. Still, his answer is not surprising. “The ferry ride to [Vancouver] Island was probably one of the band traveling highlights of all time,” he said. “It was really beautiful.” Bonacci and the rest of Ra Ra Riot will be back soon, however, playing Sugar Nightclub on Friday, Jan. 28, with opening act Givers. Ra Ra Riot formed in 2006 — “almost to the week, actually,” said Bonacci — after meeting at Syracuse University in New York, through university classes and mutual friends. But Bonacci says it wasn’t until the first practice that they all really got to know each other. The campus environment heavily

January 27, 2011

influenced the early days of Ra Ra Riot, where they started off playing at parties, friends’ houses, and around campus. “That’s what we geared writing music towards, that sort of atmosphere.” Bonacci said. “We were really just playing music for our friends, something to do on the weekends. It was sort of a hobby at the time. I think in a lot of ways that [campus] environment affected what we were playing or how we were playing music.” In their first years of being Ra Ra Riot, the band toured the United Kingdom on their own, before coming back to America to open for Editors and Tokyo Police Club. This led to their first headlining tour in 2007 — one year after forming the band. Tragedy struck in June 2007, however, when the original drummer, John Ryan Pike, passed away. Their debut album, The Rhumb Line, was released in 2008 and their latest album, The Orchard, this past August. But Bonacci doesn’t feel like the past five years happened quickly in any sense. “It’s been definitely a steady growth,” he said, “but I don’t think there ever was really a moment where we felt like we had taken off or things were happening too quickly. We’ve been working really

Provided by Ra Ra Riot

Ra Ra Riot is visiting Victoria to promote of their latest album, The Orchard.

hard since day one and I think the trajectory of the band parallels the amount of effort that we’ve been putting into it.” The band is currently on tour in promotion of The Orchard, an album Ra Ra Riot found inspiration for while living in a farmhouse for a month in upstate New York.

“It was away from the city, with very few distractions,” Bonacci says of the location. “We were really just focusing on getting back into writing music together. We spent all of our days doing that.” For the rest of 2011, Ra Ra Riot plans on continuing their tour, but Bonacci hopes to get in some time

to start writing songs together, whether individually or together as a band. “When we’re not touring, hopefully there’s a creative process going on,” he said over the laughter of a handful of people in the vehicle somewhere between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara.

CULTURE 13


Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party aim to intrigue > Megan Jones WHAT: Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party WHERE: Lucky Bar WHEN: Friday, Jan. 28 HOW MUCH: $15, available at Ditch Records, Lyle’s Place and ticketweb.ca It’s more than just a spell of dreary weather — this term is lacking pizzazz, the kind that sparked our days leading up to Christmas break. If you’re looking to put that spring back in your step, search no further than Lucky Bar on Jan. 28, where Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party (TLGLTP) will help you forget those looming midterms. Composed of six members (not including two additional honourary step-in members), the Vancouver-based group gives a stellar performance with their costumes, crowd surfing, eclectic indie-electro tunes and a whole lot of sweat. “As long as people are partying, sweating, and preferably making an ass of themselves on the dance floor, we’re happy,” said Mike Shindler, lead singer and guitarist of the group. TLGLTP is known for being intentionally ambiguous. Their website is composed of links to phony charity sites — including “Less Nickleback For Children” — which reveal information about the band beneath layers of satire. When asked which artists they hope to work with in the future, a “penguin, a harpsichord, and a bag of ice,” is decided as the perfect collaboration.

14 CULTURE

Provided by TGLTP

Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party are known to take the stage in full body suits that induce dance parties.

Even the band’s name is largely a mystery; apparently TLGLTP evolved during an “unrecorded amount of time in Berlin.” Thus the interview, which took place over the phone while the band waited in line at a venue in Vancouver, quickly becomes an

entertaining mix of car sirens, sarcastic anecdotes and amused sincerity. In essence, TLGLTP is the best kind of fun: a group of young men who aren’t afraid of mocking themselves, and just about everything else too. “We just want to vindicate our ex-

istence,” said Benny Schutze, drummer, of the band’s performance goals. “We’re very insecure people who want everyone to love us.” Shindler, Schutze, Sean Tyson and Dave Vertesi each attended UVic for their undergraduate degrees. They studied mostly

philosophy and anthropology, favouring teachers who dabbled in witchcraft. But when Shindler described the band’s favourite local spots, such as Steamers and Lucky Bar, a previously cheeky tone becomes much more sentimental. “We love the packed feeling at Lucky and prefer that to larger venues we’ve played,” said Schutze. The relatively new group has toured the West Coast extensively, opening for big names such as Natalie Portman’s Shaved Head and k-os. Since the release of their EP last March, TLGLTP has gained credibility with critics not only for their unique sound, but also for their performance-art-based DJ sets and eccentric stage costumes. Fans are also encouraged to wear costumes to shows, which makes for a colourful atmosphere. Fellow Canadian musician Knifey Spooney sums up the experience in a quote displayed on TLGLTP’s website, reading “Words cannot describe . . . they had costumes that tasted like candy, and music that turned my world into a video game. It was overwhelming. I lost all sense of direction.” Future plans for the group include releasing an album in the next few months and a possible trip to Berlin. And after that? “We’ve got Abbotsford in our sights, possibly Coquitlam, and we’ve always wanted to play Mission.” Before the band begins conquering the lower mainland, TLGLTP will play a show at the Lucky Bar on Friday, Jan. 28. Pull out your technicolour costumes and don’t miss it; it’s going to be a good one.

January 27, 2011


Laramie Project helps crowds remember, reflect > Brooke English WHAT: The Laramie Project WHEN: Now until Jan. 29 WHERE: Langham Court Theatre HOW MUCH: $18, $16 for students “I believe in the death penalty. I would like nothing better than to see you die, Mr. McKinney. However, this is the time to begin the healing process, to show mercy to someone who refused to show any mercy . . . Mr. McKinney, I give you life in the memory of someone who no longer lives.” — Denis Shepard In October 1998, Denis Shepard’s son Matthew was murdered by Aaron McKinney in a homophobic attack. Today, Matthew Shepard’s memory lives on not only through his family, but also through The Laramie Project, a play about the reaction to his murder. A cunning combination of journalism and theatrical presentation, The Laramie Project is based on hundreds of real interviews conducted with the real residents of Laramie, Wyoming after the brutal murder. The play — written by Moisés Kaufman and other members of the Tectonic Theatre Project — also takes material from the journals theatre company members kept during the time of interviewing, as well as published news reports. Now Victoria is getting a chance to see The Laramie Project. The scene is set in Langham Court Theatre, a building that has hosted theatre productions since 1938. While it’s a long, complex production running about two-

and-a-half hours and boasting over 30 actors, it’s certainly worth the effort. “This show is more than just one story, and it’s not about hate . . . it’s about humanity,” said Alexis Kuss of the production team. With one too many subplots going on within the rich character development, Laramie is both physically and emotionally exhausting. It’s a challenge not everyone is up for apparently, as the snoring audience member to my left proved singlehandedly. Regardless, Laramie is one roller-coaster of a show that can get audience members to completely re-evaluate their way of thinking, and subsequent use of discriminatory slurs and behaviours. The production starts off with typical, everyday conversations in the Midwest, with the playwright and his posse interviewing residents, but slowly the intensity builds. Many subplots of the various residents involved ensue, each unique and some more well-acted than others. The female police officer who finds and treats a bloodied and barely breathing Matthew discovers she had open cuts on her hands and worries about contracting AIDs. A male actor, attending the same university as Matthew, plays a gay character in a production and has his own realization about how he treats gay people. 
 Laramie is fascinating in the fact that it never once attempts to depict Matthew, or the horrifying event that unfolded on the night of his murder, but instead focuses on the event’s monstrous effects. The most telling sign of hatred,

Provided by Laramie Project

The Laramie Project is a play about the hate crime that took the life of Matthew Shephard in 1998.

powerfully depicted in the play, are the religious groups openly protesting at Matthew’s funeral, holding signs saying “God Hates Fags.”
 But by far the most powerful

scene in Laramie comes when Dennis Shepard is faced with a choice Matthew Shepard never had: life or death for his son’s murderer. The Laramie Project is an emotional journey, one which some

might find difficult to come to terms with due to it’s complexities and themes. But in the end, it shows how Matthew Shepard’s story continues to touch, inspire and change people today.

Local pub celebrates quarter-century of service > Tyler Laing Maude Hunter’s Pub, affably known as Maude’s to most, turns 25 next month, celebrating a birthday that’s older than many UVic students. But since its inaugural year in 1986, it’s these students who have helped Maude’s reach its quartercentennial. “We’ve got to thank them as much as we’ve got to thank anybody else,” said Norm Wilson, Maude’s general manager, “because they’re the rea-

son this whole business has been as successful as it has.” In return for their patronage, Wilson says it’s important that students get what they come for. “We like to pride ourselves on big portions at fair prices. We want to appeal to the students so they know they can come here and get a good meal.” Another reason for its success has been the pub’s stability. Maude’s has offered the same type of consistent, traditional pub-style

food for years. “You know what you get when you come to Maude’s, whether you were here in 1995 or 2011,” said Wilson. Recently, a change did occur, however: chef Jeff Keenliside rejoined the staff in October. Keenliside had been a sous chef at Maude’s during the late ’80s, but then moved on. He helped Cafe Brio win Restaurant of the Year in 2001 and 2002, and won Chef of the Year in ’05 with the Marina Restaurant. “For us it’s a huge acquisition,” said Wilson. “He’s a little bit out of our league.” Wilson says that the addition couldn’t have come at a better time. “With the new drinking laws

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we’ve had to adapt our food a little bit more to appeal people to come in . . . so having a guy like that helps make sure our food quality and our dishes are something that people are going to want and desire.” Beverage selection has also kept customers happy over the years. When Maude’s first opened, it only had four beer taps. Now it has 20. “We try to keep them as local as possible to support those local breweries,” said Wilson, “because we’ve got some fantastic ones on the Island.” Yet liquor was initially a point of contention. Long before there was ever a pub along the Shelbourne corridor, Maude Hunter, the warmhearted woman for whom the current establishment was named, ran a tea house in the area. It was known as much for its social atmosphere as anything else. But because Hunter had been a prohibitionist, some thought it was dishonourable to name a liquor establishment after her. However, the pub was pushed as a gathering place along Shelbourne, just like Hunter’s tea house, and this quieted the critics. Maude’s was one of the first neighbourhood pubs in Victoria. “It played a big part in actually expanding out of the downtown core,” said Wilson. “People didn’t have to travel downtown, which was huge.” Since then neighbourhood pubs have gone up all over Greater Victoria. And while variety is good for customers, it creates competition within the market. As general manager, Wilson has spent the last few years increasing Maude’s’ entertainment value.

“You can go anywhere and have a beer but if you can come here and have fun at it, then we’ve done our job.” Along with the ever-popular wing night on Wednesdays, Maude’s now has music bingo on Mondays and is currently hosting rock, paper, scissor contests on Thursdays — an event sponsored by Molson Canadian. Prizes include a beer fridge and Vancouver Canuck tickets. Canucks games offer another enjoyable night at the pub. Several high definition televisions allow customers to see the game from all angles. Wilson is trying to brand the establishment as a “Canuck house.” “I think the programming of what we try and push as far as promotions is the biggest thing to keep us relevant and keep us exciting — keeping us fun,” he said. Come Feb. 5 — Maude’s 25th anniversary — the pub will be brimming with fun. “We are going to do an ’80s theme,” said Wilson. “We’re going to go back to 1986 when it first opened.” Popular food from the time — zucchini sticks, mozza sticks, nachos and burgers — will have 1986 prices for the day, as will a handful of beers. There will be ’80s music and movies on during the day with music bingo in the evening. Prizes will be awarded to customers with the best ’80s costumes. It’s a way for Maude’s to thanks its customers — including UVic students — for 25 years of service. “We are proud to be able to support UVic students and hopefully they consider us to be their off-campus pub,” said Wilson. “That they enjoy coming here is the biggest thing.”

CULTURE 15


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Being first is everything. There is no second place. Second place is losing. Be first. Write for Martlet Sports.

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sports@martlet.ca

Students asked to partially fund new facilities > Kailey Willetts This election period, students will be asked if they want to pay an additional $55 in athletics fees in order to support the building of a new athletics facility. A student-run petition has garnered support to pose the question to students via referendum during the UVic Students’ Society (UVSS) elections in March. “The government is no longer funding athletics buildings so we’re hoping for student support and we’re trying to put the new fee in, and going through the UVSS to do that,” said petition organizer and Vikes women’s rugby captain Jesse Olynyk. The university ran a non-binding ballot on the fee increase in October 2009 which demonstrated 53 per cent student support for the fee, out of the 20 per cent of students who participated. Now Olynyk is hoping students will confirm this support through the UVSS referendum, which would be binding. She, with a small, tight-knit team of petitioners, has collected 2,151 signatures, more than the requisite 10 per cent of the student population needed to call a referendum. “There seemed to be a lot of support, but we talked to just over 2,000 undergrads; there’s a lot more undergrads out there. Hopefully the support that we saw is universal,” she said. “I just think students should take a look at it and realize

that it’s a wellness thing and it will add to our campus.” Plans have continued for the facility since the consultative ballot. “We’re at a point now where we’re very close to having the detailed design of the facility completed. That work’s been continuing, as has legwork around the fundraising component of the facility,” said Clint Hamilton, director of Athletics and Recreation. Of the $59 million project, students would contribute close to $21 million, with the university matching that contribution. The rest would be raised through external fundraising initiatives. “When you look at other projects that have been built both in the United States and in Canada, you’ll see that in some cases the full burden of projects like this fall to the students to step up and absorb the full cost,” said Hamilton. “In this case we’ve got a pretty good equation.” The new facility would be built where the old army hut buildings were located, behind the McKinnon building. “It’s going to encompass new weight rooms, new gyms for rec and intramurals; it’s also going to have a new spectator gym, a rock wall which has been a really big draw for a lot of people,” said Olynyk. “Second phase, they’re looking at having a 50-metre pool and a hot tub; there’s going to be parking opposite the new building. It’s also going to house CanAssist as well as some of-

fices and classroom space.” The new facility will also include athletics and recreation offices, a large field house and squash courts. “All of the things that were incorporated in the design that we were telling students about with the consultation process,” explained Hamilton. One perk for students is that the new facility would be located right on campus. “I mean [Ian Stewart] is not far but yet it is because there’s no fast way to get there, and then you feel lazy for taking the bus,” said Olynyk. “On campus is definitely a benefit.” Elements of McKinnon gym would stay in use, including the pool, dance studio and gyms. “The rest of McKinnon becomes renovated and repurposed to meet the school of exercise physical health education priorities,” said Hamilton. The majority of the facilities at Ian Stewart will be decommissioned, because they will be core components of the new facility. If the referendum passes, construction on the new facility could move ahead very quickly. “My hope as a director would be that, pending a successful student referendum, we would go to the construction phase very quickly,” said Hamilton. “My hope would be [construction would take]18–24 months afterwards after they start to completion . . . I know we could use it yesterday.” UVSS Chairperson James Coccola

Megan Kamocki

New athletics facilities would repurpose much of the current Ian Stewart complex.

says that, while athletics fee referendums haven’t been held through the UVSS in the past 20 years, it was a practice in the ’80s. “It’s happening [now] because the university and some students want to build a building but there’s no funds to pay for it,” he explained. “My ideal would be for the province to step up and pay for this, but as far as I know the province is not going to be giving out money to anyone anytime soon.” Coccola said whether or not students fund this new building is now up for them to decide.

“Really the question comes down to, if students want this, this would be a way for them to do this,” he said. “If students don’t think it’s appropriate for funding to go this way, they can make it known.” Olynyk hopes referendum results represent as many students as possible. The last UVSS election and referendums saw approximately 20 per cent voter turnout. “I just encourage everyone to come out and vote so we can get a really good representation of what students think and not what just 15 or 20 per cent think,” she said.

Four Vikes selected for Team Canada sevens > Kate Shepherd and Max Sussman Four current members of the Vikes rugby squad will compete for Canada in this year’s rugby Sevens World Series, on a roster that features the talents of eight players picked from B.C. teams. Vikes fly-half Nathan Hirayama, wing Sean Duke, wing/ fullback Keaton Styles and flanker Adam Kleeberger will all suit up for the Canadian Sevens squad that will travel to Wellington, New Zealand and Las Vegas to participate in events on Feb. 4 and 12. The announcement of the team followed a three-day selection camp at Shawnigan Lake School and included no new recruits, as Team Canada Head Coach Geraint John looks to develop a group of players already familiar with one another from previous international play. One name notably missing from the roster, however, is UVic scrum half, and last year’s Canada Sevens captain, Phil Mack. Voted the 2010 Canadian Sevens Player of the Year, Mack will be unable to compete with the team in Wellington and Las Vegas due to injury. This will be Styles’s second year competing on the world series circuit, while Kleeberger, Duke and Hirayama have been involved with the team for several years. For Hirayama, Duke and Styles, the selection comes off a successful 2010 season with the Vikes, which saw their team top the B.C. Premiere Rugby Union last spring. The Vikes beat Meraloma in May to take home the Rounsefell Cup for

16 SPORTS

Sol Kauffman

Nathan Hirayama, far right, is one of four Vikes playing for Canada in the Sevens World Series in February.

the third time in the club’s history. In the championship game, second year Hirayama scored 26 points to lead the team to a 31-27 win at Wallace Field. Kleeberger spent the 2010 season with a club in Auckland, New Zealand. With the Sevens World Series coming up, Vikes Head Coach Doug Tate has been forced to prepare for a major lineup shakeup. “I saw a lot of players today and I

know we’re going to have to move some guys around next week because we’ve got some guys going to Wellington,” Tate said after his team played in the first leg of the fabled Wightman Boot Competition in front of a big crowd at Wallace Field on Jan. 22. “We’re not going to be able to play that wide open; there’s going to be some guys missing.” Hirayama scored six points on three converts in the Boot game,

while Kleeberger, Willem du Plessis and Ben Thompson all recorded tries. The Vikes built an early 29-5 lead in the game, but what Tate called “unforced errors” allowed the Thunderbirds to control much of the second half and close the gap. In the end, the Vikes were able to hold on for a 41-20 win. The upcoming Sevens tournaments will test the Vikes players’ skills in a considerably different

format. With only seven players active on the field, Sevens tournaments allow for a faster-paced and higher-scoring game than the traditional 15-player format. The games still utilize the space of a full-sized rugby pitch, but with a shorter playing time (games consist of seven minute halves, as opposed to traditional 40 minute halves), the increased amount of space makes for an open style of play in which individual skills are highlighted. The Sevens World Series, started in 1999, consists of eight international tournaments held in seven different countries, as teams earn points dependent upon their final ranking in individual tournaments. There are 24 teams that compete in the World Series, including the reigning champions, Samoa, and New Zealand, who have won 8 of the 11 series held so far. In the history of the event, Canada ranks 12th in terms of overall points. The addition of rugby sevens to the Summer Olympic Games, starting in 2016, has increased interest in the format. Sevens has also been included in the Commonwealth Games since 1998, with New Zealand coming away with titles at every subsequent Games. However, with the sevens game enjoying increased popularity and exposure through the World Series, Rugby World Cup Sevens, and soon the Summer Olympics, other countries, particularly those less competitive in the traditional 15-player format, are aiming to pose a challenge to New Zealand’s dominance. Canada may just be one of those teams.

January 27, 2011


CANADA

WEST SCORE BOARD

Men’s Basketball Standings School W-L Pct. Streak UBC x 16-2 .889 W12 .889 W14 TWU x 16-2 Sask. 13-3 .813 W10 Alberta 12-6 .667 W3 Regina 10-6 .625 W2 .611 W4 Victoria 11-7 Man. 7-9 .438 L6 6-10 .375 L1 UFV Calgary 5-11 .313 L5 Leth. 5-13 .278 L2 .250 L6 Brandon 4-12 TRU 3-15 .167 L2 .125 L4 Winn. 2-14 Women’s Basketball Standings School W-L Pct. Streak Sask. 14-2 .875 W12 .813 L1 Regina 13-3 Winn. 13-3 .813 W1 Alberta 14-4 .778 W1 13-5 .722 W10 UBC Victoria 13-5 .722 W2 8-8 .500 L1 UFV TRU 7-11 .389 L8 Calgary 6-10 .375 W2 4-12 .250 L1 Man. Leth. 4-14 .222 L2 1-17 .056 L16 TWU Brandon 0-16 .000 L16 SCORING 1. Daniel Ferguson-AB 2. Jacob Doerksen-TWU 3. Rejean Chabot-SASK 4. Jamelle Barrett-SASK 5. Paul Gareau-REG 6. Josh Whyte-UBC 7. Tyler Fidler-CGY 8. Randy Davis-LETH 9. Joel Friesen-UFV 10. Jordan Baker-AB

Avg/G 23.5 22.9 22.9 22.6 19.3 18.0 17.1 17.1 16.8 16.7

ASSISTS 1. Jamelle Barrett-SASK 2. Josh Ogden-MAN 3. Alex Murphy-UBC 4. Tristan Smith-TWU 5. Zeon Gray-UFV SR

Avg/G 6.5 5.4 5.1 4.8 4.7

REBOUNDING 1. Greg Stewart-TRU 2. Tyler Fidler-CGY 3. Michael Lieffers-SASK 4. Jordan Baker-AB 5. Tyrell Mara-TWU Derek Waldner-LETH 7. Nolan Brudehl-SASK 8. Kamar Burke-UBC 9. Jacob Doerksen-TWU 10. Richard Reimer-MAN

Avg/G 12.2 10.6 9.8 9.4 8.4 8.4 8.3 7.9 7.8 7.3

SCORING 1. Kim Tulloch-SASK 2. Joanna Zalesiak-REG 3. Caitlin Gooch-WPG 4. Ashley Hill-CGY 5. Jill Humbert-SASK 6. Marisa Haylett-AB 7. Becky Heninger-LETH 8. Nicole Clarke-AB 9. Debbie Yeboah-UVIC 10. Katie Miyazaki-SASK

Avg/G 16.5 16.4 15.2 14.9 14.5 14.5 14.0 13.8 13.6 12.9

REBOUNDING Avg/G 1. Stephanie Kleysen-WPG 10.6 2. Anne Mercer-REG 9.6 3. Sarah Wierks-UFV 8.4 4. Diane Schuetze-TRU 7.7 5. Lindsay Ledingham-REG 7.0 6. Katie Miyazaki-SASK 6.8 7. Joanna Zalesiak-REG 6.7 8. Zara Huntley-UBC 6.4 Sarah Semeniuk-UVIC 6.4 Corina Reimer-TWU 6.4 ASSISTS 1. Jill Humbert-SASK 2. Joanna Zalesiak-REG 3. Devan Lisson-UBC 4. Katie Miyazaki-SASK 5. Lia St Pierre-UBC

January 27, 2011

Avg/G 4.7 4.2 4.2 4.1 3.3

Vikes ready for championship challenges > Nathan Lowther The Vikes swim team may be heading to Vancouver for the Canada West (CanWest) Championships from Jan. 28 to 30, but their focus is in Calgary. That’s because Calgary will be hosting the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) Championships Feb. 24–28, the only meet that matters. “We go to six meets in the university swim season, and they’re all for qualification of the CIS, or just to get ready and get in shape for the CIS championships at the end of the year,” said assistant coach Ryan Clouston. This is Clouston’s first year as assistant coach after a successful five-year Vikes career. “The CanWests are similar, we have a couple people still trying to make the qualification time [but] most of the team has made their qualification time and just using it as a stepping stone to get ready for the CIS Championships,” he said. Swimmers qualify for the championship meet by beating a time set at the beginning of the season. So, where in other sports the goal of each meet would be winning your event, or your team earning the most points, in swimming it’s all about beating that necessary time. “It’s very individual in how you qualify and it doesn’t really matter what placement you get at any other meet,” said Clouston. There are 32 different races at a meet, with men and women competing in 16 separate categories. Each swimmer swims once and each meet is geared toward first qualifying for the CIS, then prepping for it. “CanWest is a training event for most of the team. I’m hoping that we get another few people onto the team so we can do an even better showing at the CIS,” Clouston said. “From our other guys, I’m hoping that we have some good swims despite being a little tired from hard training.” Hard training indeed. For the

Provided

Ryan Cochrane leads a group of new UVic recruits who make up the strongest team the Vikes have had in years.

slower members of the team, the goal is seven or eight two-hour training sessions in the pool per week. And for those trying to make national teams, 10 or 11 visits to the pool every week. Then, once they’ve got the chlorine out of their eyes, it’s into the gym for strength training. Clouston is optimistic about the team’s chances this year. That optimism is boosted further by a bumper crop of recruits, including an Olympic medallist. “We’ve got Ryan Cochrane swimming for the first time for the team at the CIS championships. Cochrane was an Olympic [bronze] medallist in Beijing, so he’s a good recruit.” Cochrane was the only Canadian swimmer to find the podium in Beijing, and followed that up with two golds and a silver at the Pan Pacific Games in August. Cochrane has the big resumé, but he’s only one member on a strong men’s side. Nick Sinclair is a

standout swimmer in the backstroke, said Clouston. Another Pan Pacific medallist also joins the team in bronze-winner Richard Weinburger. “He’s had a couple really good swims, and he’s a rookie so he should be good,” said Clouston. While Clouston doesn’t expect the women’s side to be quite as strong as the men’s, there have been some standouts. “On the women’s side we have Ella Dalling who’s doing really well. And we have Siobhon Newell and then we have another couple of good recruits,” he said, adding that Cochrane, Weinburger and a couple of top women will miss the CanWest championships because they are out of the country taking

part in world trial events. When they all fly back to reunite with their Vikes teammates in time for Calgary, Clouston sees a team overflowing with talent. “We have a stronger team than I’ve seen since I’ve been here, so it should be a good CIS championships for us. We should be very strong and should be able to surprise a few people,” said Clouston. The swim team’s head coach is Peter Vizsolyi, who has been with the team for 28 years. Their best season was in 2000 when the men placed third and the women second at the CIS championships. The past five years have seen an average placing of ninth for the men and seventh for the women.

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business.humber.ca SPORTS 17


• • • AT T E N T I O N • • • Satellite / Cable viewers WATCH . . .

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Shepherd’s Chapel

• • •

Galaxy 6 Channel 16 (on 24 hrs./day) KVOS TV 5 a.m. - 6 a.m. Also on small dish networks www.shepherdschapel.com CLASSIFIEDS

Armed against cervical cancer.

FREE EYEBROW THREADING with Brazilian waxing, $37. Fernwood Holistic Health Care Centre. Only by appointment. (250) 507-7174. OLD WINERY SELF STORAGE Clean, secure, indoor lockers. Open 7 days per wk. (250) 727-2311. 3952 Quadra St. Behind the Keg. Discounts available! CALLING ALL SKINNYDIPPERS and wannabees too. A local nudist club is holding monthly nude swims at a city recreation centre pool. If you are interested in attending, please feel free to contact arbutusparkswim@yahoo. ca or phone (250) 472-1805 for more information. ROOF & GUTTER INSPECTION & REPAIRS, de-mossing. BBB member, (250) 380-5685.

EVENTS UVic Pride Special General Meeting — Feb. 3, 5 p.m. Members of UVic Pride or those who are interested in getting involved are welcome to attend. To hold elections and ratify changes to our constitution. Feb. 3, 2011 5 p.m. in the Michelle Pujol Room

Support the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation — Feb. 13, 8:30 p.m. Support the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation by attending a screening of the film 65_REDROSES about artist Eva Markvoort. Sunday February 13 8:30 pm at Club 9ONE9. Tickets available at Ditch Records for $15

Cervical cancer is not hereditary, and does not discriminate. In fact, up to 4 out of 5 women will be infected with the virus that causes cervical cancer at least once in their lifetime.* But you can help protect yourself with Cervarix . Cervarix is a vaccine specifically designed to help prevent the virus types that cause most cases of cervical cancer – HPV 16 & 18. Talk to your doctor about Cervarix™ today, and help stop cervical cancer before it starts. TM

TM

LSAT MCAT GMAT GRE Preparation Seminars

Cervarix™ helps protect females aged 10-25 years against cervical cancer and abnormal and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV 16 and 18. It does not treat these conditions and does not protect against all HPV types. Duration of protection has not been established. 100% protection cannot be guaranteed and continued routine screening is necessary. Side effects and allergic reaction may occur. Ask your doctor if Cervarix™ is right for you.

• Complete 30-Hour Seminars • Convenient Weekend Schedule • Proven Test-Taking Strategies • Experienced Course Instructors • Comprehensive Study Materials

* sexually-active females

• Simulated Practice Exams

www.cervarix.ca

• Limited Class Size • Free Repeat Policy • Personal Tutoring Available • Thousands of Satisfied Students

OXFORD SEMINARS

Cervarix™ is used under license by GlaxoSmithKline Inc. ©2010 GlaxoSmithKline Inc. All rights reserved.

31303-01-Eng-Consumer Ad.indd 1

604-683-3430 1-800-269-6719 www.oxfordseminars.ca 10/6/10 3:51 PM


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Pretentious wordsearch I T J R B X P F Q X O K M A U W H T T F O I S O N E E C O U M X O E O X X F

S H X I F R E T D R U G C L V P O L A P I J X P T C U B S M V Q N M E O X V

S U B E H G B K D V X F F S L F H K Z T L P A W I F W R R V U S I U C V K H

J H I Z E G G D T P I X Q E O I W X C V E H S I B G C U T O V Z N F B G K U

E K Q L X L L G T O U H S B M T S O P H V A X C H R F F T J W P T F D U M F

K E F E E T C Y R R Q X M I B F W A O F E R V U F B M X D P V S F L H X D G

W A N N X D B H F T U S K X Q E R J E M R G O G T L H P R Q P Q T I Q O D V

Y M I N D M I N Y U Z Y L H X X K T F M S U O W A L K U V A X Y O A G Y R B

S A I K K U S F N S I T I V I T C N U J N O C Y B U P E Z C M G J T J G A P

E J K R M K O I T M Z E M C N X A S B R W M F C I N Y K P E S B W O D U L I

G P D S O C X U H N S N U V F A U N Y S Q G X D Y P Y F W X A Y R J I Y K R

V X O V B T J L P M D U A S Z L V B A S U Y U F K Y D V G M M N P Y R O Q X

Orchideous – conjures a bunch of flowers Morsmorde – conjures Dark Mark Mobilicorpus – moves unconscious bodies Fidelius – hides a secret within someone Ferula – creates bandages Densaugeo – enlarges teeth Avifors – turns small objects into birds

Q L S N I N A O U O K V Y T P G V I W M X O F G S L Z C W A O P H P T J V K

U V V F L V H N W Z Z C R P J C L B F P U S E A H T C O K U R H C A C C C A

C U U T I Z E O E K U H I P J L H M R O X M H D I E V V P I S P H C O O A M

X G F T C M Z J C W K Y S Z K J I D D S R O R I I B X W B G M E V T L Z V X

S X K R O L H G C J A W Z D X M A W C I X S U T J H M F H A O K A U L W A S

SEEING STARS

(magic spell edition) D Q H H R Q S G N J Z U Q H N P J E Z I P B I C N S C K A A R M W V O P R W

G Y G B P Z Z R N Y Y O X H C H W H O Z P D X B T Z F R T O D K N T P O X X

U O W O U D O F D G S A V Q I G D W N L W R W Y Q V A K O Y E C V K O B X T

P Q G B S Z O R L L P I E G G T D Y P K G M U I Y J H A R R T G K O R T D Z

C X P J Q A J V V E O J N P H O S U A Q M B T S H K O P V Q F C U R T E O W

R E L J M L Y R H V D L V R U F F O S I C K P S C R Y X A I R H P A U G X R

O B L P F T C E X F B C Q J X D L U K M K R O Z I M N Z S O D W B S S J H H

T C U P E N O C F V F A X B T F W Y E L G J H D L B A W L F Z P Y N H N O B

Q W U Z J E U G W M M P A C J D H F O K A J W P G N R V G J K X Q S C Y E H

Q P Z G Y L Q C Q U W D Y J D H U Z Y P S Q K K Q U Q A I U H T O P V Z I D

B T T N A N W H V D O I E Q H L N J I R M S P W Y Y I Y H Z P M D J I W K X

B X W Q Y D V D T K Z C X Q K L C W M Y E L X B N J D Z Y Y L N U M P Q X Q

R W O F E R U L A Y B X R R C K O Q O U U C S J N F X E D D E H P K S A V H

Conjunctivitis – damages opponent’s eyesight Colloportus – locks a door Homenum Revelio – reveals humans near the caster Muffliato – keeps your conversation from being eavesdroppable Portus – turns an object into a Portkey

ORCHIDEOUS MORSMORDE MOBILICORPUS Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18): The air is clear FIDELIUS of any past grievances and you’ve been given FERULA a fresh start this week. Take advantage of your DENSAUGEO clean slate to rekindle those relationships that AVIFORS CONJUNCTIVITIS may have been damaged during turbulent COLLOPORTUS times. HOMENUM REVELIO Pisces (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20): You are pretty MUFFLIATO amazing, Pisces; no one can deny that. But PORTUS it isn’t necessary to wear yourself out to get everything done. If you are feeling stressed out or overwhelmed this week, then ask for help. Even superheroes have sidekicks.

BY CANDACE O’NEILL

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 22): Feeling tense? It’s time to let loose and have some fun this week, Leo! Get together a group of family and friends for a night of takeout and board games. You’ll thank yourself later — and they’ll be thanking you as well. Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22): Try not to take yourself — or anything for that matter — too seriously this week. It would be best to just sit back and roll with the punches, otherwise, you will be in tears by the week’s end.

Aries (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19): All work and no play can make Aries a dull Ram. You’ve been busier the past few weeks than you ever thought you could be, but don’t give up! You should be able to see the light at the end of the tunnel before the weekend arrives.

Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22): You may be a little absent-minded this week, Libra, and it could not come at a worse time! You’d do best to write down your dates, meetings and deadlines as forgetting something important this week will land you in a heap of trouble.

Taurus (Apr. 20 - May 20): If you’re feeling like you’ve bitten off more than you can chew, rest assured that you are the only one who thinks so. Everyone else has confidence in you and your abilities, so you should too! Lose the insecurity this week, as it will only inhibit your greatness.

Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21): Keep your eyes open for potential new allies that might surface out of the woodwork this week. They will be incredibly helpful in the weeks to come, so be sure to exchange emails and phone numbers.

Gemini (May 21 - June 20): It’s all about team work this week, Gemini. Whether at the office, school or home, you’re going to have to step up to the plate and offer a helping hand. It may mean a little extra work for you now, but it could mean less work in the weeks to come.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21): This week will bring along with it many trials and tribulations. The best thing that you can do — and it may be the only thing you can do this week — is to try to remain your positive self. Negativity will only make things worse.

Cancer (June 21 - July 22): Once you’ve set your mind on something, you tend to be stubborn and unstoppable. That’s not always a bad thing! Use your amazing sense of dedication this week to finish that project or get ahead on other things. You’ll be glad you did.

Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19): Procrastination will be your biggest foe this week. Avoid the temptation to let those responsibilities of yours slip by the wayside. Getting started is always the hardest part, but once you do, you’ll fly through that to-do list problem-free!

We've got workshops

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25/01/11 7:24 PM

Here are some of our upcoming workshops.Head down to SUB B011 and check us out!

Friday, Jan. 28, 3 p.m.:

Making the news With News Editor Kailey Willetts

Friday, Feb. 4, 3 p.m.:

In-depth reporting With Features Editor Jason Motz

Friday, Feb. 11, 3 p.m.:

Getting started with video

With Video Consultant Maeva Gaulthier

January 27, 2011

DIVERSIONS 19


•Splendid! We have been without an interpreter since our master got angry with our last protocol droid and forced him to draw comics for the Martlet. comics@martlet.ca

20 COMICS

January 27, 2011

JANUARY 27  

Issue 20, Volume 63

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