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MORE OF the best from in and around the Vale

No. 245

AUGUST 2019

© Paul Lashmar Photograph by Robin Mills


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COVER STORY Robin Mills met Paul Lashmar in Dorchester ‘I was born in Rainham, Essex, in a rented 2-up 2-down full of radical ideas, such as making art and design more cottage with the spider infested toilet out the back and accessible to people from working class backgrounds, and a tin bath in front of the fire on a Friday evening. My I’m still in touch with two of them. I had three years of mother was second generation Irish whose family came extraordinary education there. One of my tutors became to Dagenham because that was where the work was. My a mentor for me, a role which helped me no end having mother and father met while they were both in the RAF lost my father, because it meant someone older than me just after the war; he came from Bournemouth, and the took me seriously, which more than anything gave me name Lashmar is English despite how it sounds. My first confidence. Mentoring is something I’ve tried to do all my memory is that of seeing a red sky from my cot, because working life. As a side-line to the course I helped one of from where we lived near the Ford factory you could see the tutors as a researcher in his work as an investigative the glow of the pig iron being tipped at night from the journalist, putting together a story about the Cold War foundry. My father was a “tongsman”, an incredibly hot which was published in the Observer. Jack Crossley, the and dangerous job, but he earned good money. news editor there, a tough old Fleet Street hand, was imMine wasn’t a great childhood. My mother had miscarpressed with our work, and thanks to a recommendation riages and mental health problems and was often away for from my course tutor, offered me a job as a researcher. weeks. This led to a split with my father, and sadly he comWorking for him meant I needed to learn how to write, mitted suicide when I was 8. I often lived with my grandpar- © Paul Lashmar Photograph by Robin Mills and Jack seemed to like what I did, often asking me to ents in Dagenham, who like the rest of my family, worked rewrite the copy that other Oxbridge educated reporters at Fords. My mother remarried but I didn’t really get on wrote. When Jack left, the next news editor was Robin with my stepfather until decades later. My ‘Nan’ worked in the canteen and was Lustig, who hired an investigative reporter from the Guardian called David a shop steward, but she was a wily person and suggested that I could sign up Leigh, an extraordinary character, and suggested I work with him. David and with a false name, lie about my age and get casual work. So aged 13 (and again I just clicked and thirty seven years later we still do. Leigh and Lashmar we a year later) I became a kitchen porter during the summer holidays, earning £25 were the investigative team at the Observer, up against the other Sunday papers a week which was good money in 1968. The high point of that job was being such as the Sunday Times who had much larger resources. We considered our commended by the directors of Fords for the quality of my crinkle cut chips. task was to beat them every week, getting the stories they didn’t. We did Mark My mother sent me to a Catholic school in Chingford called St Egberts, Thatcher in Oman, MI5 vetting at the BBC, several investigations into police which exposed me to people who didn’t come from Dagenham, for example corruption, Stalker, Spycatcher, Clive Ponting, the Belgrano, and many, many refugee classmates who’d come out of Czechoslovakia in ’56. We were a more. I learnt that as a journalist if you take on the government you don’t peculiar class because we didn’t play football, we would stand round and do so lightly, but in those days we were a gung-ho, fearless lot. Many of the argue about things, which with hindsight was formative, and this was also the people we went after were very rich, very powerful and had the best lawyers, period when the “hippieness” starts to creep in. So I shifted from being quite and we had to out think them. After I and many others left the Observer due conservative to enjoying counterculture zeitgeist, reading Oz magazine and to owner Tiny Rowlands’ interference, I went to work at World in Action on discovering a love for music, which is something which has lasted all my life. TV. There were some very exciting times, some too exciting, following stories I got in terrible trouble for hitch-hiking down to the Bath Festival at Shepton on police collusion with organised criminals, being rammed by their cars, Mallet in 1970 to see Led Zeppelin et al. I’d asked my mother to write school and travelling to Brazil to cover how street children were being murdered like a note to cover for me, which she did, but not grasping the point, told them I vermin, following the death wagon to get footage as they went round in the was at a pop festival. But Led Zeppelin’s 3 hour set was worth the bother. mornings collecting bodies. That was a pretty hairy time, but perhaps my best When St Egberts closed down I went to technical college in Redbridge story was investigating the Royal Family’s ability to negotiate how little tax they for three years, where I was social secretary. It was quite hippy, we had sit-ins, paid, a privilege which changed after we wrote about it. and I hung out a lot with bands, and despite having a fairly amazing social life Anna and I got together, in late ’93, married in ’94, our son Ben arrived in managed to get an Ordinary National Diploma in the Sciences. Coming from ’95, then Arthur in ’97. I wanted to make sure I was going to be a good father the kind of background I did, I knew I had to get out of Dagenham, but for them. The world of journalism was full of tough individuals and you had to how? I’ve always understood how hard it is for people from an economically be tough too, there was no paternity leave, the birth of one’s children was seen deprived background to make a success of their lives, compared to those who as somewhat incidental. I didn’t want to belong to that club. From 1998-2001 I have cultural or economic capital. Today when I teach, I go to even greater was at the Independent and we lived in Crouch End. Having sworn that we were lengths for students without those advantages, to try and give them confidence Londoners, Anna and I changed our minds and explored the idea of living in which is all-important. I think it was an easier time for us back then, because Dorset. What clinched it for Bridport was hearing the live music coming out of we all had low expectations which were easily met, but now everyone has high the Hope and Anchor as we crossed the car park. We subsequently went there expectations which are constantly being deflated, not least because of Brexit. on a regular basis, and through extraordinary landlady Val Crabb got to know In ’72 I then fell into a job at a record company, working out how many many Bridport characters. Anna returned to teaching and I was offered a job vinyl ‘45’ records to press each day, like Rod Stewart, Slade and the Stylistics. on the MA Broadcast Journalism course at Falmouth. Then 9-11 happened, Later I moved over to being a warehouse supervisor, still only aged 19. By and the Independent on Sunday asked me to cover it as I was the only journalist that time I’d been to the Bath Festival, the Isle of Wight Festival, Hyde Park they could use who knew about terrorism, spies, etc. So I was able to do that, to see the Rolling Stones and Blind Faith, was around people with whom largely still able to remain in Bridport, and teach at Falmouth. I could talk about the music of John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and Pharoah In 2011 as three of the family were commuting daily to Thomas Hardye Sanders, and was listening to rock, blues and jazz, funk, everything that came School in Dorchester we moved there. I also needed better access to Lonmy way, because we had no barriers. It was a fantastic period for music. In don as I’d been taken on at Brunel University as a research academic and May 1975 I went on a trip with a flamenco playing mate to Spain, and meetstill teaching. I soon realised that to progress I would need a PhD, which ing some other people crossed to Morocco in a classic hippy road trip in a took 3 years of hard slog because I got no time off to fit in the study, but rough old Transit with no windscreen, over the Atlas Mountains to Fez and I achieved it in 2015. In 2017, through the grapevine I heard there was Marrakesh. I was meeting people who’d had the benefit of university educaa job going at City University, which was considered the top journalism tion, who knew about philosophies like existentialism, and looking back I course. I got the job. If Dorset is my spiritual home, City feels like I got realise I’ve always been interested in the power of ideas that can change the lucky at work. There are 500 students, 27 staff and 60+ visiting lecturers. world. I decided it was time to get myself better educated if I could. Two months ago I was made Reader. And now from being Deputy Head Reading Time Out, I saw an advert for a course called Diploma in CommuI’ve been asked to be Head of Department, starting in August. For a boy nication and Design at North East London Polytechnic. The tutors there were from Dagenham, it’s been a long but never dull journey.’ Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 3


MV UP FRONT As the clock ticked ever closer to midday on Tuesday, July 23rd—one of the hottest days of the year so far—it was hard to concentrate on a daily routine due to the imminent election of the next Prime Minister. Amongst those who felt that bending or avoiding the truth isn’t a talent to smirk about, there was an unease that was gradually escalating to a feeling of impending doom. Whilst amongst those who believed bluff, bluster and big promises was a recipe for political stability within their own party, there was a sense of excitement. So with a small desk fan pushing warm air around the room, I decided to take an early lunch and watch the parade of commentators and pundits trying to muster some enthusiasm for the moment ahead. The clock ticked some more, and I promptly fell asleep. When my snoring eventually woke me, Boris Johnson had been voted in as head of the Conservative Party and therefore the next Prime Minister. So along with the other more than 99% who didn’t vote, I went back at work. Coincidentally one of the first things I read was a recently published report called Understanding our Political Nature: How to put knowledge and reason at the heart of political decision-making. It was produced for the Joint Research Centre in Brussels by sixty experts from across the globe who worked in the fields of behavioural and social sciences as well as the humanities. The opening sentence suggested that humans do not always think rationally and that it is problematic to base politics on the assumption that they do. The report went on to highlight things that many people have been concerned about for some time, such as the view that facts don’t tend to change people’s minds because they don’t want to hear things that challenge their beliefs, especially from an opposing political platform. Or that we are increasingly exposed to misinformation and that constant lying doesn’t mean that we always eventually believe the lies; it means we stop believing in anything. The consequence is that we find it difficult to make decisions. After months on the roller-coaster of British politics, I imagine I’m not the only one who fell asleep at the decisive moment this week. Many people are simply beaten into submission and want it all to be over. Whilst some hope Boris can pull a rabbit out of a hat, many others feel like rabbits in the headlight of an out of control bicycle, driven by what one wag described as ‘a mayonnaise covered potato dipped into a bucket of straw.’ We stand in the middle of the road, fingers crossed; eyes tightly shut, hoping that what we can’t see can’t hurt us.

Published Monthly and distributed by Marshwood Vale Ltd Lower Atrim, Bridport Dorset DT6 5PX The Marshwood Vale Magazine is printed using wood from sustainable forestry

This Month Historic impressions

Images of everyday life

Sherborne House

Compiled by Ron Frampton

Ken Wheadon, photograph by Peter Livingstone

FOR this issue of Images of everyday life, Peter Livingstone met Ken Wheadon at his workshop in Combe St. Nicholas. “I was born in 1925 at Corfe, a village near Taunton. My father was one of seven children and my mother one of thirteen. Dad was a gardener for a local doctor. I went to Corfe school and didn’t leave the village until I was seven. When I was eight, I would snare rabbits and take them to the blacksmith to be collected by a Taunton man. My friends and me would put West of England hessian sacks over our heads for protection and crawl under the brambles at the local golf club, Pickeridge. We gathered up golf balls and would sell them back to the golfers. When I was eleven, I helped with the harvest after school, until it was dark. The highlight of my young life was to take the big Shire horses back to the stable. I’d then go back to the farmhouse for cheese and cider. In 1937, my father got a job as a maintenance engineer at Brecknell and Willis, a Chard engineering factory, and we moved to the nearby village of Combe St. Nicholas. I attended the village school from the ages of twelve to fourteen. Brecknell and Willis set up an iron foundry at Combe St. Nicholas and I began working there when I was fourteen as an apprentice pattern-maker. I made pretend wooden rifles for the Local Defence Volunteers (LDV was thought also to stand for Look, Duck and Vanish). Then I made racksaw benches which were used to cut up trees for the Devon War Agricultural

Executive, and cartwheels for Bunkhams of Highbridge, which were put on water carts towed behind steam rollers. Later, I would make exact wooden patterns for metal casts. For example, of large cogwheels, which were pressed firmly into sandboxes to form the moulds. The wooden templates would then be taken out and hot metal would be poured into the moulds to make the cast iron cogs used in huge machines. At seventeen, I was a sergeant in the Air Training Corps. I was confident that my skills and experience would be put to good use in the Royal Air Force, but things turned out differently. After sending troops to the front, the government had found that it did not have enough men left to work the coalmines. Ernest Bevin came up with a plan to redress that - the names of forty thousand boys and young men were chosen by lot, as their time came to be enlisted, to be miners. My name came out of the hat, and I was instructed to report to Chesterfield in Derbyshire to become one of ‘Bevin’s Boys’. I worked in the East Midlands coalmines for nearly four years. For a boy who had grown up with the sun on his face playing and working in Somerset fields, the conditions were dreadful. For eight hours a day, I’d work on my hands and knees in almost darkness, cutting out coal in a seam tunnel no more than two feet high. To get to the seam you’d be taken down in a lift and then walk perhaps two miles underground. I was finally released in 1947.

Life though has its compensations. While working in the Midlands, I met a girl called Doris, working in a grocer’s shop. She was sixteen and we have now been married for 56 years. We have three children, nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Our daughter, granddaughter, and two great-granddaughters have all attended the same village school as me, in Combe St. Nicholas. When I returned to Somerset in the late 1940s, I went back to work at Brecknell and Willis. Then three years later, I began odd jobbing on my own account. In the 1950s and 1960s, I worked building houses out of Devon Lady Cedarwood - a three bedroom house might sell for £3,500. Then again, I went back to odd jobbing, repairing farm equipment, making coffins, and so on. For the past twenty years, I’ve worked as a carpenter on the Colin Mear Engineering site at Combe St. Nicholas. I fashion wooden boxes to hold the finished engineering parts. I’m now 78 and will consider retiring when I’m 80. I’ve always kept myself busy. I was in the St. John Ambulance brigade for 50 years, and I’m a member of the Royal Life-saving Society. Though I still live only a few miles from my birthplace, my life’s journey has been a long, full and rewarding one.”

Cover Story By Robin Mills The day the earth moved By Philip Strange Coast & Countryside Events The Folly Mill Lane Firebrand By Cecil Amor Courses and Workshops News & Views Laterally Speaking By Humphrey Walwyn A Look Back By Fergus Byrne

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House & Garden Vegetables in August with Ashley Wheeler August in the Garden By Russell Jordan Property Round Up By Helen Fisher

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Food & Dining Pain BagneBy Lesley Waters Pea Salad By Mark Hix Poached Chicken Salad By Peter Gordon People in Food By Catherine Taylor Fishing in the computer age By Nick Fisher

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Health & Beauty Services & Classified People at Work By Catherine Taylor

Next month Ron will be meeting someone in South Somerset.

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Contributors

Deputy Editor Victoria Byrne

Design

Fergus Byrne Sue Norris sue@marshwoodvale.com

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Next month we will be looking at another interesting building. Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 51

“Doing nothing gets pretty tiresome because you can’t stop and rest.”

Editorial Director Fergus Byrne

girls Grammer School following the 1944 Education Act, until it closed in 1992. The Sherborne House Trust was set up in 1995 in order to preserve and restore the building to its former glory and to be a regional centre for the visual arts. The plans for Sherborne House are extensive and will eventually offer inside and outside exhibiting space, workshop spaces, a restaurant and a shop. Most significantly, this prestigous house is set to become the permanant home for the collection of work by Dame Elizabeth Frink. Frink, the internationally renowned sculptor and accomplished print maker died in 1993 having moved to her beloved Dorset 16 years earlier. She held her first major exhibition at the Beaux Arts Gallery when just 22 years old and went on to have an illustrious career and was hailed as one of the great female sculptors of the 20th century. There is no doubt that Sherborne House is a valuable asset to the South West. Its recent appearance on the BBC’s Restoration programme has helped to highlight the need for serious effort to restore its splendour.

Arts & Entertainment From Pharsius to Damien Hirst, Arts Awards have made an impact By Mamie Colfox Natural Response By Fergus Byrne Museums and Galleries, Performance, Preview and Film

Fergus Byrne

For all Enquiries Tel: 01308 423031 info@marshwoodvale.com

The preservation of the original fittings, panelling and plasterwork is remarkable especially given the history of the house after the death of Portman in 1728. It was leased out for nearly a century and then owned briefly by an affluent local farmer, James Toogood. In 1816 it ws sold to Edward, 2nd Earl of Digby for £2000 but again was not lived in by the owners, but by a succession of tennants including a silk manufacturer, a Major and a banker. A full inventory of the house, dated 1726, was recently unearthed in the Public Record Office at Kew. The Palladian house became home to a rather more famous character during the mid 19th century when William Charles Macready resided there. He was the leading actor manager of his day and at the pinnacle of his career decided to retire and move to Dorset. At Sherborne House he was visited by many noteable characters including his close friend Sir Charles Dickens. It was here that Dickens gave public readings including ‘A Christmas Carol’. In the 1930s the house was first leased and then sold to Dorset County Council where it then housed Lord Digby’s School. It remained a school, though changing to a

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Sherborne House, Dorset, photograph by Richard Sercombe

IF THE shimmering figures of Charles Dickens, Sir James Thornhill and William Charles Macready were to stand on the steps of Sherborne House today, the £3M needed to restore this magnificent building could be raised with little effort. These three - the literary genius Dickens, Britains first knighted artist Thornhill and the famous Victorian actor Macready have all travelled the stairs of Sherborne House and with their historic connection paved the way for what is today a thriving arts and cultural centre for Dorset. Although originally a Tudor building, built sometime after 1570, the house as it stands today was created by the Blandford Forum architect Benjamin Bastard in 1720 for Henry Seymour Portman. It was Portman who commissioned Sir James Thornhill, doyen of the English decorative history painters, to decorate the house. All the walls and ceiling were decorated by the artist and centred on the story of Ovid’s Metamorphosis of the Calydonian Hunt. His most famous murals are in the Painted Hall at Greenwich and in the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral and his murals at Sherborne House are some of the very few to be found outside London.

Cecil Amor Mamie Colfox Helen Fisher Nick Fisher Richard Gahagan Peter Gordon Margery Hookings Mark Hix

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Russell Jordan Robin Mills Gay Pirrie-Weir Catherine Taylor Philip Strange Humphrey Walwyn Lesley Waters Ashley Wheeler

The views expressed in The Marshwood Vale Magazine and People Magazines are not necessarily those of the editorial team. Unless otherwise stated, Copyright of the entire magazine contents is strictly reserved on behalf of the Marshwood Vale Magazine and the authors. Disclaimer: Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of dates, event information and advertisements, events may be cancelled or event dates may be subject to alteration. Neither Marshwood Vale Ltd nor People Magazines Ltd can accept any responsibility for the accuracy of any information or claims made by advertisers included within this publication. NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS Trades descriptions act 1968. It is a criminal offence for anyone in the course of a trade or business to falsely describe goods they are offering. The Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982. The legislation requires that items offered for sale by private vendors must be ‘as described’. Failure to observe this requirement may allow the purchaser to sue for damages. Road Traffic Act. It is a criminal offence for anyone to sell a motor vehicle for use on the highway which is unroadworthy.


The Day the Earth Moved by Philip Strange

Nearly 180 years ago, about three miles west of Lyme Regis, a huge chunk of the East Devon coast split off to form a plateau separated from the mainland by a deep, dry ravine. This was the largest movement of land ever experienced in this part of the country; it remodelled the coast and created a unique new environment. The plateau, now called Goat Island, and the ravine are still unique and when I walked there in late June, pink and purple orchids flowered across the grassy surface of the plateau whereas the ravine was populated by a tangled jungle of trees and other vegetation.

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n the early 19th century, the land behind the cliffs in this part of East Devon was dominated by farming. Between the cliffs and the sea there was an area of land, the undercliff, formed by subsidence that supported fertile market gardens and orchards with some pasture for animals. Cottages had also been built here for farm labourers who walked up and down the steep cliff path to the farmhouse a short distance inland. The latter part of 1839 had seen unprecedented rain and as Christmas approached, there had been ominous signs of instability in the cliffs with deep fissures opening on the cliff tops and settlement cracks appearing in cottages built on the undercliff. One of the farm labourers who lived in the cottages with his family was William Critchard. At about 1am on Christmas Day 1839, Critchard and his wife returned to their cottage having been generously entertained along with other labourers’ families by their master at his farmhouse. Their Christmas Eve gathering had included the West Country custom of burning the ashen faggot (a large ash log) accompanied by the drinking of copious amounts of cider. On their way back to the cottage, the couple noticed that part of the cliff path had dropped about a foot since the morning and new cracks had appeared in the cottage walls. Still merry after their evening’s entertainment they retired to bed unconcerned. At 4 am, however, they were awoken by a “wonderful crack” and by 5am they rose to find deep fissures appearing in the garden. They realised that something major was happening and set off up the cliff path, now almost impassable owing to subsidence, to spread the alarm. Movement in the cliffs continued over the next 24 hours and as the day dawned on December 26th it revealed a landscape changed almost beyond recognition. Contemporary drawings show that a massive section of cliffs, about three quarters of a mile long and estimated as 8 million tons of rock, had moved seawards by several hundred feet creating a dry ravine, the Great Chasm, in its wake. The plateau of land that had moved was bounded by cliffs 150 feet high and came to be called Goat Island. The ravine held a gothic landscape of lumps and bumps, peaks and troughs, vividly expressing the power of the convulsion that had occurred. The cliffs in this part of Dorset and Devon are notoriously mobile, but the events of Christmas 1839 represented the greatest ever movement of land in the area. At the time there was much speculation as to the cause of the landslip: might it have been the result of an earthquake or a volcano, was it the work of rabbits, or could it have been a punishment from God? By chance, two of the most eminent geologists of the time, William Buckland and William Conybeare, were staying nearby and could interpret the events; Buckland’s wife Mary made invaluable drawings of the changed landscape. Buckland and Conybeare concluded that the excessive rain had saturated the permeable layers of chalk and greensand that constituted the upper part of the cliffs. Beneath these layers was an impermeable layer of clay and the chalk/greensand, saturated and very heavy, moved forward on the impermeable clay leading to the landslip. The new landscape became a tourist attraction. Queen Victoria arrived on the Royal Yacht to view the scene and others took to

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paddle steamers to gaze in wonder while specially composed music, the Landslip Quadrille, was played. Bizarrely, fields of corn and turnips growing on cliff top land had moved intact with Goat Island and were ceremonially harvested the following August by local village maidens dressed as attendants of Ceres, the Roman Goddess of the Harvest. But what of Goat Island nowadays? It’s only accessible on foot but the walk along the coast path is worth the effort. I set off from Axmouth on a misty but mild morning in late June to make the steep climb across the golf course and on to the cliff top. I followed narrow lanes with high banks and skirted cornfield edges to reach the coast path. Cliff edge scrub obscured the sea most of the time but occasional breaks revealed Beer Head lurking mysteriously in the mist. About two miles into the walk, with my attention captured by the many flowers lining the path, I was jolted from my reverie as the path twisted and dropped down steeply into dense vegetation. It continued to descend with the occasional squirm to the right or left before bottoming out. About me now was a disorienting, tangled jungle of trees, shrubs and ferns with brambles and creepers dangling downwards to catch the unwary. Dampness hung in the air and only brief vestiges of light filtered through the canopy. This is the undercliff near the edge of the Great Chasm, no longer an open ravine but taken over by nature in the intervening 180 years. Quite soon the track reared upwards again climbing steeply towards the light past a cushiony chalk hillside with a scattering of wild flowers. In time, the path levelled out to a long, lush grassy meadow sloping gently towards sheer cliffs above the undercliff and the sea; this is Goat Island. Woven within the grass were the frilly flowers of eyebright, many yellow dandelion-like flowers of catsear, patches of yellow rattle and wild thyme and two blue spikes of viper’s bugloss. It was, however, the orchids that surprised me with their number and variety: pyramidal orchids with their intensely pink, three-lobed petals overlapping like ornate roof tiles and common spotted orchids with their cylinders of lilac pink flowers carrying magenta hieroglyphics. I searched for bee orchids and found only two spikes, each bearing several flowers. With their mauve propeller-like sepals and their large central petal complete with furry edges and yellow horseshoe patterns on a maroon background, these flowers are one of nature’s marvellous mimics said to resemble bumblebees. Butterflies, especially marbled whites completed the scene. Goat Island nowadays is a beautiful, unusual place, an oasis of calm where noise means bird song. It is also a managed landscape, a cooperation between nature and humans, as every year the grass is mown to encourage flowers and to prevent scrub taking back the land. Goat Island is also a place of history and I stood there for some time, trying to imagine the scene 180 years ago when the land beneath my feet moved and the lives of the people living there were changed forever. Philip Strange is Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Reading. He writes about science and about nature with a particular focus on how science fits in to society. His work may be read at http://philipstrange.wordpress.com/


Main picture: Bee orchid and pyramidal orchid on Goat Island. Opposite page: Down into the undercliff. Below from left: Marbled white butterfly. Wild marjoram along the coast path and the common spotted orchids on Goat Island

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DWT helping to lead the way with new scheme to monitor water quality in Dorset rivers

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olunteers have been donning their waders, wellies and wildlife identification skills to help monitor the health of rivers in Dorset this summer as part of the new Extended Riverfly Scheme. The standard nationwide Riverfly survey is designed to detect a serious pollution event, by sampling, identifying, and counting 8 invertebrate groups, the aquatic stages of mayflies, caddisflies, stoneflies as well freshwater shrimps. However, some rivers support a different range of invertebrates, and are more complex. With funding from the Vitacress Conservation Trust, the Freshwater Biological Association, DWT and the Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project are working together to develop a scheme of 33 invertebrates to help provide a more comprehensive analysis of our rivers and streams—also known as the Extended Riverfly Scheme. The basis of the survey is ‘kick sampling’ which involves gently kicking the bottom of the river, then waiting with a net for three minutes to catch and identify the species which are released. They are then quickly and safely returned to the river. DWT Rivers Manager, Amanda Broom said, “The Extended Riverfly Scheme is a great example of citizen science in action—the people who take part love to see what’s living in their rivers and often don’t have a conservation background but are learning detailed identification processes. There’s a huge value in what they’re doing and they’re really helping with conservation work in Dorset.” Training for new Riverfly monitors involved has taken place this May and June at Dorset Wildlife Trust’ Headquarters in Dorchester. Two freshwater invertebrate specialists, John David-Bowker of the Freshwater Biological Association and Mitch Perkins formerly of the Environment Agency, guided the seventeen volunteer surveyors through the process of invertebrate identification. The Riverfly Monitoring scheme has currently 40 monitors covering over 50 sites across Dorset. DWT is looking for more volunteers to help ensure that the brooks, streams and rivers all over the county can be monitored. If you are interested in taking part in the riverfly monitoring scheme, full training will be provided. Please contact Angus Menzies on riverfly@dorsetwildlifetrust.org.uk.

Riverfly monitoring training event at DWT HQ in June © Angus Menzies 8 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

Riverfly volunteers in river © Angus Menzies

Looking at samples © Therese Bartley


World Helicopter Open Day at Chard Equestrian T

he home of Historic Helicopters in Chard is holding an open event on 18th August for World Helicopter Day, the second year it’s marked the occasion, using the large open fields and arenas at Chard Equestrian for a variety of events and displays. For helicopter enthusiasts it’s a chance to see the Whirlwind HAR Mark 10 and the Navy Wessex HU Mark 5 in action - the only ones of their type flying in the world! But there is lots more going on. The Army Display Team will have a climbing wall, virtual reality games and a living history display with military re-enactors. There will be a drone racing qualifier for the national championships, which will involve battling it out on an assault course using VR technology. Another exciting feature will be the “horseless horse trials” where a team of three, one in a wheelchair, will attempt a timed obstacle course and other equestrian challenges - all done by humans! It’s in aid of Regain, which supports those who have become tetraplegic as a result of a sports accident. Highlights include: a Police dog display team; “horseless” horse trials; historic helicopters in flight and military vehicles. There will also be drone racing; army display teams; a climbing wall and living history display with military re-enactors. A cafe and licensed bar will be available and there will be visiting helicopters from The Helicopter Club of Great Britain.

Based in Chard, Historic Helicopters raises money to help keep vintage military aircraft in the air. It preserves, maintains and operates a select fleet of unique aircraft. A small and dedicated team of aircraft engineers is employed to preserve and maintain the Historic Helicopters fleet. Most of them are former members of the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force and have a wealth of knowledge and experience. Several have even previously flown or maintained the very aircraft they are now preserving! Project Leader Andrew Whitehouse said: “A day like this is a great opportunity to share what we do and to spread the enthusiasm for these incredible aircraft. It’ll be a brilliant day out for all the family - we literally have something to keep everyone happy! “We also want everyone to have a chance to learn more about the historically significant helicopters which were built locally at Westland Helicopters in Yeovil, to increase everyone’s understanding and appreciation of the global impact made by this world leading Somerset company.” Profits from the open day will go towards the RAF Benevolent Fund and Navy Wings charity. It will run from 10am to 5pm. The cost will be £10 per person or £25 per car. For more information visit www.historichelicopters.com ot telephone Mark on 07903 411692.

RAF’s Westland Whirlwind and crew Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 9


Coast &Countryside Events MONDAY 29 JULY National Trust South Dorset Association 7.30 pm “A History of Indian Gardens - a Two-way Trade” a talk by Christine Stones. Brownsword Hall, Pummery Square, Poundbury, DT1 3GW. Presented by the National Trust South Dorset Association. Members £3 Non-members £4 inc. tea/biscuits No need to book. Please note this is an evening talk. Contact: Geoffrey and Elizabeth Wrench 01300 321601. Axminster Carnival Bingo Eyes down 8pm Axminster Guildhall. MON 29 JULY – FRIDAY 2 AUGUST Actiontrack Show Build Week A fiveday summer school for young people between the ages of 8 and 18. The David Hall, South Petherton, TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall.org.uk 01460 240 340. Monday 10am - Friday 4pm. TUESDAY 30 JULY Diesel Day Yeovil Railway Centre, Yeovil Junction 01935 410420 www. yeovilrailway.freeservers.com. Merriott Gardening Club A presentation by Paul Cumberton on ‘Alluring Alpines’. This should be very

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interesting as Paul has been clambering over the hills and mountains of Austria to add to his knowledge of these small but lovely plants. Please meet at the Tithe Barn, Church Street at 7.30pm refreshments and raffle and don’t forget to bring a flower for the Flower of the Month competition. Non-members £2 at the door - all very welcome. WEDNESDAY 31 JULY Coffee Morning 10am – 12noon Free Entry. The David Hall, South Petherton, TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall.org.uk 01460 240 340. Wyld Morris are dancing at Lyme Regis Lifeboat week 7.30pm between the Harbour Inn and the Royal Standard pub on Marine parade, Lyme Regis. Talk & Display of Birds of Prey 7.30pm Uplyme Village Hall by Xtreme Falconry. Uplyme & Lyme Regis Horticultural Society. Real live owls, falcons, hawks and a magnificent eagle. All tickets £3 from Uplyme Post Office and RNLI Gift shop or ring Brian Cursley 07831 533580. Profits to Lifeboat Week. WED 31 JULY – SAT 3 AUGUST The Sound of Music 7pm and Sat

2pm Adult £12, Child £8. Honiton Community Theatre Company return to The Beehive with one of the best known musicals of all time. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. THURSDAY 1 AUGUST Axminster Country Market Thursdays 8.30am-12, Masonic Hall, South Street, Axminster. Come and meet the producers! Cakes, savouries, crafts, cut flowers, plants, free-range eggs, fruit & veg - all seasonal, produced in or near Axminster. Reduce your carbon footprint, with food you can trust. Tea & coffee available too, come and say hello. West Dorset Ramblers 9.5 miles/15.3 km. Deepest Dorset & Jubilee Trail, Pound Cottage - Kingcombe Centre, Toller Pecorum, Winfield Eagle and West Compton. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01300 320346. Wellbeing Walk at Radipole Lakes (Stepping into Nature) 11am – 12noon. This is a relaxed, sociable and gentle monthly walk which is open to all , a health walk for healthy body and mind. We generally walk about a mile


Coast &Countryside in distance taking 40 minutes to 1 hour, usually around our Radipole reserve in the heart of Weymouth. You may see fabulous wildlife on the walk, but the focus is simply a stroll and chat. This walk is dementia friendly, and particularly suitable for anyone wishing to lose weight, recovering from illness or wanting to improve their mental health and wellbeing. Contact RSPB Radipole Lakes on 01305 778313. This event is free as it’s part of Stepping into Nature. Visit www.stepin2nature.org for more info. Try your hand at boat building at West Bay Discovery Centre. Gail McGarva, a traditional wooden boat builder based in Lyme Regis will be joining us with her boat Freda. Come along and rivet a miniature boat plank and learn more about traditional boat building.(Part of Turner events in Bridport.) 11am – 3.30pm. Free donations welcome. Further details www. westbaydiscoverycentre.org.uk. Lyme History Walks 11am from the Marine Theatre, this and every Wed, Thurs and Sat in August. Discover the unique and colourful history of Lyme Regis. Hear stories of amazing people

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including Mary Anning, and adventures on land and sea. Experienced Tour Guide: Chris Lovejoy. Lasts 1+1/2 hours. Cost: £8, Children half www. lymehistorywalks.com Call 01297 443140 mob 07518 777 258 for further information. Booking not required. Historical Walking Tours of Colyton Every Thursday until 29 September at 2pm. Meet at the Dolphin Street Car park. Booking not necessary. £3 for adults, under 16s Free. To arrange a walk for a larger group please phone 01297 552514. AV&DCS Family Explorer Afternoon 2pm – 4pm Borrow Pit, Seaton Marshes LNR, with Penny Evans. £5 per family. Book with EDDC at wildeastdevon.co.uk or 01395 517557. Talk ‘All boats have a story to tell’ 4.30pm at West Bay Discovery Centre Renowned local traditional boat builder Gail McGarva will be entertaining us with the stories that lie behind the boats. This engaging event, not to be missed, is a fitting way to celebrate West Bay Discovery Centre’s 1st birthday. Limited numbers so book early tickets £3 from West Bay Discovery Centre or from Bridport TIC 01308 424901 Further

details www.westbaydiscoverycentre.org. uk. Beaminster Short Mat Bowls meeting in the Public Hall at 7pm every Thursday in August 8, 15, 22 and 29. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. FRIDAY 2 AUGUST Seaton Lions Club Book Stall 9.30am – 1.30pm The Square , Seaton. East Devon Ramblers leisurely 5 mile circular walk from Uplyme. 10am start. Dogs on short leads.01392 873881. Swanage Gardening 10am-3pm (Stepping into Nature) Every Friday. Based at an old nursery, Greengage, offers a large greenhouse, planting beds and even a toilet block! Join in with various activities such as planting fruit and vegetables, cleaning vegetation and general maintenance. The Greengage nursery is still in it’s infancy so there is something for all abilities. Refreshments and tools will be provided. This activity is free and delivered by Dorset Wildlife Trust as part of Stepping into Nature.


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LOOKING TO INCLUDE AN EVENT? Charity and fund-raising entries in Coast & Countryside Events are free of charge. Please check times with organisers or venues. Email: info@marshwoodvale.com before the 10th of the month.

Contact Katie on 01202 692 033 or kwilkinson@dorsetwildlifetrust.org.uk to book. Visit www.stepin2nature.org for more info. The Living Tree cancer self-help group. 12.45pm Mindfulness and Compassion with Sue Howse. 2pm Tripudio. 2.15pm speaker to be confirmed. 3.15pm - 4.15pm Therapy session – Worry Busting with Louise Wender. Drop in any time between 2pm and 4.30pm at the Friends’ Meeting House, 95 South Street, Bridport DT6 3NZ. Tel 07341 916 976. www.thelivingtree.org.uk. Summer Concerts at St Paul’s On Friday lunchtimes you can come and enjoy a tasty lunch, and follow it up with a short concert, featuring the renowned organ in the church, as well as other instruments. Lunches from 12noon for £4.50, concert tickets (bought on the day) are £5. Concerts begin at 1pm. Kevin Lane(organ) “Classic Favourites” www.honitoncofe.org/. Actiontrack Show Build Performance 4pm At the end of a five-day summer school for children and students between the ages of 8 and 18, their parents, families and friends – plus

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Patrons of The David Hall - will have the opportunity to see what youngsters of South Somerset have created from scratch. Mike Penn, Chair of Petherton Arts Trust, explains: “The Actiontrack Show Build helps our young folk to develop their communication skills, boosts confidence and promotes teamwork in a way that will stay with them for life. Come along and see just how well young people can create, communicate and perform in ways that will delight you.” Free Entry. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall. org.uk 01460 240 340. Unique Boutique Event community evening street food markets back to East Devon for summer 2019. Friday evenings in the summer have become a way to get together over food and connect with your community. You’ll find a great location with views out across the Jurassic coast, the reasonably priced pop up bar and cool music to accompany your culinary journey around the world. Jubilee Gardens, Seaton, EX12 2QU First Friday of the month – 5pm – 9pm. Contact: Eleanor Carr chat@ UniqueBoutiqueEvents.co.uk www.

UniqueBoutiqueEvents.co.uk 07970 857696. A Song for Summer in St Martin’s Church, N. Perrott at 7pm – Roma Loukes and Miriam Ryen (sopranos) will sing Opera, Operetta & Musical Theatre with piano solos by Jonathan Delbridge. Tickets to include refreshments and a glass of wine. £10 adults, 12 to 18 yrs £5, under 12’s free. Proceeds to the church. Pete Allen Jazz Band Trad jazz with one of the UK’s top performers on clarinet. Hugely popular with our audience, Pete’s last concert at IAC sold out - advance booking recommended! 8pm. Tickets £20 (£35 with pre-show supper at 7pm – must be pre-booked). Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www.themeetinghouse.org. uk. DJ Food – Kraftwerk: Klassics, Kovers & Kurios The Ninja Tune and Solid Steel legend presents a show that takes Kraftwerk’s various eras, looks, and line ups and combines them into a 90 minute collage of electro and techno—a visual history of the groundbreaking electronic group. With support from DJ James


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Coast &Countryside Baker. £12 early bird / £15 advance / £17 on the door Bar opens and starts at 8pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. FRIDAY 2 - FRIDAY 9 AUGUST Folk Week Food and Craft Fair at Kennaway House. Local food, drinks and crafts on the lawn in the heart of Sidmouth. Kennaway House 01395 515551. SATURDAY 3 AUGUST The Great Bridport Bake-Off 1940s style Bridport Town Hall, 10am – 2pm free event, organised by the Bridport Heritage Forum. 40s Food. 40s Cooking, Tasting, Dig for Victory and ‘pop up’ British Restaurant. For more details contact Sheila Meaney on 01308 424169 or email: sheilannmeaney@btinterent.com. Bridport & West Dorset Rambling Club 7.5 mile walk from Chideock Hardown Hill, West Hay Farm, Coast Path 10.30am start. Bring picnic. No dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 898002. Lyme History Walks 11am from the Marine Theatre, this and every Wed, Thurs and Sat in August. Discover the unique and colourful history of Lyme

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Regis. Hear stories of amazing people including Mary Anning, and adventures on land and sea. Experienced Tour Guide: Chris Lovejoy. Lasts 1+1/2 hours. Cost: £8, Children half www.lymehistorywalks.com Call 01297 443140 mob 07518 777 258 for further information. Booking not required. Free live music by Shiraz 11am – 1pm Female duo playing contemporary folk and popular covers accompanied by guitar and violin from 11, with interval music by Fragments: self-penned folk and popular tunes. This event forms part of the Music in the Garden season organised and sponsored each year by Axminster Arts. It will take place in the Courtyard Garden at the Arts Café Bar, The Old Courthouse, Church Street, Axminster EX13 5AQ. 01297 631455. Dinosaur Footprints Walks to Keates Quarry 12noon - 2pm. Join Jurassic Coast Trust Ambassadors for leisurely, family-friendly Dinosaur Footprints Walks to Keates Quarry in Purbeck. Adults £6, children go free! Visit jurassicoast.org/shop to book or call 01308 807000. Also on 7, 10, 17, 21 and 24 August. South Somerset Monochrome Group 10am – 12.30pm at The Monks Yard at

Horton Manor, Horton Cross, Ilminster, TA19 9PY. “Exmouth Docks: The demise of a working port” - An illustrated talk by Alan Humphries. All levels of experience welcome. £5 including refreshments. For more information please email southsomersetmonogroup@ gmail.com. Crewkerne Gardening Club Annual Show in the Henhayes Centre from 10.30am - 2pm. A feast for the senses with plants, produce, homecrafts and handicrafts in competition. If you would like to take part, bring entries on Friday 2nd between 6pm - 8pm. Childrens entries are free. Refreshments and raffle on the day. Details from Rosemary Prince- 01460 74290. Harcombe House Open Garden With spectacular views across Charmouth & Lyme Bay, this ¾ acre beautiful formal garden and ½ acre wild garden in Morcombelake (DT6 6EB) have been restored in a natural, relaxed style. Many unusual, visually-stunning shrubs & perennials on the steeply-sloped site. Open for the National Garden Scheme 3, 4 & 6 Aug, 11am - 5pm. Adm £5 chd free www.ngs.org.uk. Loders Fete 2pm - 5pm in the grounds


of Loders Court DT6 3RZ (next to Loders Church). This year this traditional family fete will include a display from Xtreme Falconry, music from St Swithun’s Brass Band, Loders Pop-Up Bar and a host of stalls including new to you, bric-a-brac, books, cakes, local produce, etc, games and activities, raffle with cash prizes. Parking free. Dogs welcome. Entrance : £2 Children Under 12 free. Landscape Detectives, Colyton 2pm – 4pm. Travel back into the mists of time on a gate leaning amble to see clues in this marvellous landscape that reveals the intriguing history of the Shute estate in Colyton Parish with local historian Colin Pady. From Iron Age hillforts, ancient salt routes, to medieval fayres and ox roasts, Colin has extensively researched this fascinating corner of the historic Shute Estate owned by the Pole Family for over three centuries. No booking necessary. Free Legacy to Landscape Community Heritage Project event. Fairly level terrain, using public footpaths, and country lanes. Meet Colyton Picnic Site, Hillhead, Colyton, SY 244 934. Chardstock Annual Show 2.30pm Flowers, garden and home produce, arts and crafts. Chardstock Community Hall, Westcombes, EX13 7BJ. Admission: Adults 50p, children free. Everyone welcome. Refreshments. Whitford & District Produce Association Annual Summer Show & Dog Show 2pm - 5.30pm Whitford Sports Field, Whitford. Display of a large selection of vegetables, flowers, cookery & handicrafts, plus side shows & stalls, Brass Band & Jurrasix singers entertainment, Bouncy Castle, Tractors old & new, Classic cars, food & refreshments. Adults £2, children free. Parking available in the field. More info Hon. Secretary Christine 07872621094. Yarcombe Terrier Racing event when more than 60 terriers will compete in eight races in what has become a very popular gathering of owners and their dogs from as far away as 100 miles from this East

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LOOKING TO INCLUDE AN EVENT? Charity and fund-raising entries in Coast & Countryside Events are free of charge. Please check times with organisers or venues. Email: info@marshwoodvale.com before the 10th of the month.

Devon community. Some people have entered their terriers while they have enjoyed a weeks holiday nearby, such is the attraction of the event. From an idea by locals John Salter and Frank Bond which saw the first races held in 1975, the event has been held every year since then and now includes a variety of stalls, tote, plus hot and cold food and a well stocked bar, bouncy castle, assault course and other facilities. The gates open at 4.30pm with the first race at 5.30pm and children are welcome to join in the fun. Entry is £5 with children under 16 free. If anyone wishes to enter their terrier for the races it is not too late to contact Chris on yarcombe.racing@ gmail.com. HiDDeN Popular local band will be performing in The Shelters, Lyme Regis for Carnival Week from 8.30pm -10pm to warm up the fireworks. Scottish Dancing Party in Chardstock. Evening of Scottish Dancing at Chardstock Village Hall, tea or coffee included. 7.30pm – 10 pm. No partner required. Contact David on 01460 65981; Ann on 01308 422927; or Andrew on 01297 33461, or just come along, Summer Party, please bring a plate of food to share. www.chardscottishdancing. org. SATURDAY 3 - FRIDAY 9 AUGUST Artist Artisan An exhibition of Fine Art, Sculpture and Contemporary Craft. Free Entry. Kennaway House 01395 515551. SUNDAY 4 AUGUST Cattistock Countryside Show 9am – 5pmThe show is a really great value day out at £10 for a full car or £5 for a single person in the car. There is also main ring events a Horse Show, a flower show, a 36 class dog show, a Perry’s corner and other have a go activities and of course trade stands and more. See www.cattistockshow.co.uk/ for more details. Dorchester Summer Vegan Market Free Entry from 10am - 3pm over two floors of the Corn Exchange, High East Street, Dorchester, Dorset DT1 1HF. Both floors are fully accessible. A large dining area and 40+ stalls offering delicious hot and cold food, tea, coffee and yummy cakes, health and beauty care, ethical clothing & perfume, information, advice and so much more. For further information e-mail wdveganevents@ gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/ events/446511529453668. Steam Train Day and Tractor Show Yeovil Railway Centre Yeovil Junction, Stoford BA22 9UU. Still open for more tractors - call John on 01297 32935 - oth-

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erwise visit www.yeovilrailway.freeservers. com. East Devon Ramblers leisurely 9 mile circular walk from Wimbleball Lake. 10am start and bring picnic. Dogs on short leads. 07472 485499. Open garden at The Old Rectory (Pulham DT2 7EA): 4 acres of formal & informal garden, 10 acres of woodland walks and splendid views. Yew pyramids, circular borders, exuberantly-planted terrace, box parterres, pond, fernery, ha-ha, pleached hornbeam circle, flourishing bog garden. Open 4 & 8 August 2pm - 5pm in aid of the National Garden Scheme charities. Adm £6 chd free www. ngs.org.uk. Entertainer Darron Garnett performing on the bandstand in Greenhill Gardens, The Espanande, Weymouth. Free Entrance 2pm – 4pm. A Friends of Greenhill Gardens Event 01305 775829 janechandler123@hotmail.com www. greenhill-gardens.co.uk. Afternoon Teas at Clapton & Wayford Village Hall 2pm – 5pm– sandwiches, cakes, scones with jam & cream, tea/coffee (£5), in a friendly atmosphere with a lovely view. Disabled facilities, ample parking; all welcome. Further information/booking from Julia (01460 72769). MONDAY 5 AUGUST Severalls Jubilee Bowls Club Coaching for All ages 10am – 12noon at War Memorial Grounds, Severalls Park Avenue, Crewkerne, TA18 8HQ (entrance off Lang Road). Fancy trying outdoor bowls? Come and have an enjoyable morning at a very friendly club with bowls provided and refreshments halfway through and please wear flat soled footwear. For more information please phone Geoff Kerr on 01308 867221. Chard History Group assembled at Ford Abbey at 10am. John Allen, the veteran Talks Speaker to Chard History Group is to show the group around The Old Cisterian Abbey built almost 900 years ago and today the wonderful English Gothic setting was created by the Prideaux family. After the tour, “The Gardens for all Seasons” surrounded the Abbey and medieval vaulted Undercroft Tearoom is near by. Inspired by Archives 10.30am -12noon (Stepping into Nature). Enjoy the countryside? Love history? Enjoy both with pictures, maps or recordings at the Dorset History Centre (Dorchester) and learn something new about the natural world and local artists. The group is open to everyone including carers, those with dementia or with mobility, sensory or learning difficulties or those who would

just enjoy the company and stimulation. It’s all about relaxing, meeting new people and having fun. Contact Maria on 01305 228947 or m.gayton@dorsetcc.gov. uk to book. Visit www.stepin2nature.org for more info. Axminster Carnival Bingo Eyes down 8pm Axminster Guildhall. TUESDAY 6 AUGUST West Dorset Ramblers 8.0 miles/12.9 km. Hidden Valleys of Poorton. Powerstock, South Poorton, West Milton. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 898484. Diesel Day 11am – 3pm Yeovil Railway Centre, Yeovil Junction 01935 410420 www.yeovilrailway.freeservers.com. Sing and stroll in Bridport (Stepping into Nature) Every Tuesday. If you would like to gently improve your fitness, sing along, meet others, exercise your memory or just meet up and have fun, this is for you. Join on a guided walk to natural spaces in and around Bridport. On the way we will stop and sing. Led by experienced singing leader Tina Bridgman. Each walk is designed to avoid stiles and difficult terrain, and will have the option of a short, medium or longer walk to suit your fitness and time. Basic refreshments will be provided. All These walks are Free and are dementia friendly. Starting at 1.30pm at Buckydoo Square in Bridport. To book your place email timeandscale@gmail.com or call Peter on 07817 397331. Visit www.stepin2nature. org for more info. Elmer the Elephant Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 2pm £16 01308424204 www.bridport-arts.com. This show features a menagerie of 21 lovable puppets, tells the tale of an elephant that stands out but ultimately realizes that his friends have always valued his unique characteristics. Suitable for age 1+ but all are welcome. The Mothership Programme Sharon Bennett 5pm - 6pm Artist talk. Sharon Bennett is a socially engaged artist and collaborator. Working with communities, artists or family and friends. Her work blurs the boundaries between traditional positions of artist, artwork and audience. The Mothership Summer Programme. held at Copse Barn, Dorset DT6 3TQ. me@annabest.info, mothershipresidencies.tumblr.com. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book.


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Looking Ahead Fr1 30 Aug - Sun 1 Sept

Lyme Regis Folk Festival See www. lymefolk.com for details. Including Popular local band HiDDeN will be appearing at Lyme Regis Folk Festival on Sunday 1st September.

TUE 6 AUGUST – SAT 31 AUGUST Flower arranging through the decades to celebrate the anniversary of the National Flower arranging Society. Burton Bradstock Community Library Monday Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 3pm - 5pm, Tuesday & Saturday 10am – 12noon. For further information on all events please email: info@burtonbradstocklibrary.org.uk or go to www.burtonbradstocklibrary.org.uk. WEDNESDAY 7 AUGUST Benefits Advice Session at Age UK Shop, Bridport… an initiative by Dorset Welfare Benefits Partnership. Age UK Dorchester and Dorset County Council’s Welfare Benefits Team are working together to help older Bridport residents to maximise their benefits entitlements. Advice sessions will be held on the first Wednesday in each month, between 9.30am - 12noon at Age UK Shop, Bridport, and will be strictly by appointment. To make an appointment, please contact our Bridport Shop on 01308 424859 or at 16 West Street, Bridport DT6 3QP. AV&DCS Insect Walk 10.30am – 1pm, Trinity Hill with Martin Drake. Meet at Trinity Hill LNR car park SY307959. East Devon Ramblers moderate 10 mile circular walk from Tarr Steps. 10.30am start and bring picnic. Dogs on short leads. 01297 23424. Lyme History Walks 11am from the Marine Theatre, this and every Wed, Thurs and Sat in August. Discover the unique and colourful history of Lyme Regis. Hear stories of amazing people including Mary Anning, and adventures on land and sea. Experienced Tour Guide: Chris Lovejoy. Lasts 1+1/2 hours. Cost: £8, Children half www.lymehistorywalks.com Call 01297 443140 mob 07518 777 258 for further information. Booking not required. Chard History Group James and Darren Windsor are walking around Horton Fields at 6pm demonstrated “Metal Detectives” do. They will be coming to the next meeting in September with their latest ‘Finds’. Seatown RNLI BBQ outside the Anchor Inn. Starts 4pm. Lyme Regis lifeboat display (weather & operations permitting) from 7pm. Stalls, BBQ & music. Fun for all the family. Popular local band HiDDeN will be performing

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Sat 7 & Sun 8 September

Sitting Spiritually Open Garden, 10am - 5pm. Hand-Crafted Swing Seats, Pergolas, Swinging Day Beds, Benches & Rope Swings. Bramble Hayes, Yawl Hill Lane, Lyme Regis DT7 3RP.

from 5pm. Wyld Morris 7.30pm are dancing at The 5 Bells, Whitchurch Canonicorum. THURSDAY 8 AUGUST West Dorset Ramblers 10.5 miles/16.9 km. Purbeck Highways & Byeways. Steeple Hill, Grange Hill, East Creech, Corfe, Smedmore and Kimmeridge . Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 422514. 75 Years on … Remembering the Normandy Landings and local connections A guided walk led by local historian and author Elizabeth Gale. Meet outside West Bay Discovery Centre 10.15am for 10.30 start. The walk will take approximately one hour level walking, not suitable for dogs or children. Cost £3 Adults. Further details http:// www.westbaydiscoverycentre.org.uk/. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. Chard Royal Naval Association The association will be holding their annual skittles evening at the Bell and Crown pub Chard. Meeting at 7.30pm for 8pm start. Further details about the association can be obtained from the branch secretary Mr Gary Pennells on 01460 77978. Pub Quiz The Bell, Winsham. Every Thursday. Starts at 8.30pm. Teams of 4 entry 50p per person. Free round of drinks for the winning team. The evening ends with a roll over cash prize quiz. For details contact 01460 30677. Pirates of Penzance (Opera Anywhere) 7pm (refreshments from 6pm) £16 / £14 / £45 family ticket (max. 2 adults) Nothe Fort, Barrack Rd, Weymouth DT4 8UF 01305 266926 www.dorchesterarts. org.uk. Bring a chair or blanket! Join everyone at seaside for the jolliest maritime musical comedy of all time in the wonderful setting of Weymouth’s Nothe Fort. A fantastic family friendly mix of comic characters, witty dialogue, and great tunes. Perfect entertainment for a summer’s evening. FRIDAY 9 AUGUST East Devon Ramblers leisurely 5 mile circular walk from Beer Cliff Top. 10am start. Dogs on short leads. 01297 23045.

Sat 7 & Sun 8 September

Food Rocks Lyme Regis Mark Hix MBE is back with Food Rocks for its seventh year, bringing together top chefs and friends Mitch Tonks, Angela Hartnett and Richard Bertinet.

Summer Concerts at St Paul’s On Friday lunchtimes you can come and enjoy a tasty lunch, and follow it up with a short concert, featuring the renowned organ in the church, as well as other instruments. Lunches from 12noon for £4.50, concert tickets (bought on the day) are £5. Concerts begin at 1pm. www. honitoncofe.org/. Stephen Bell (organ) and Stuart Paul (trumpet) “Mainly English”. Food on Friday 12noon at Clapton & Wayford Village Hall - two course lunch, roll & butter + unlimited tea/coffee, £4.50. Special diets can usually be catered for if requested in advance. Disabled facilities, ample parking, lovely view. Open to all ages; very friendly atmosphere, newcomers really welcomed, but please book places in advance by phoning June 01460 77057 or Jackie 01460 72324, who will also provide more information if required. Fish & Chip Friday Battered Cod with chips, mushy peas & tartar sauce followed by a fruity dessert - only £8.75 (Members £6.50). Vegetarian alternative available. Booking essential. Henhayes Centre South Street Car Park, Crewkerne, TA18 8DA, 01460 74340. The Living Tree cancer self-help group. 2pm Tripudio. 2.15pm Ricky Romain plays sitar and talks about the healing quality of Indian Classical Music. 2.30pm – 4pm – Therapy session to be confirmed. Drop in any time between 2pm and 4.30pm at the Friends’ Meeting House, 95 South Street, Bridport DT6 3NZ. Tel 07341 916 976. www.thelivingtree.org.uk. The Darkside of Pink Floyd 7.30pm £17 in advance, £19 on the door (seated). More than just an ordinary Pink Floyd tribute band, The Darkside of Pink Floyd entertain audiences with a fantastic light show and passionate performances. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton. co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Matt Carter Septet Mainstream modern jazz with plenty of groove, and a touch of funk and gospel thrown in for good measure from a supremely talented young band. 8pm. Tickets £16 (£31 with pre-show supper at 7pm – must be pre-booked). Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www.themeetinghouse.org.uk. Trextasy This band is the only offi-


cial live tribute band dedicated to T.Rex, endorsed and approved by Marc Bolan’s family, estate, and original members of the band. Expect all the hits—Jeepster, I Love to Boogie, and 20th Century Boy in a fun night out. £23.50 advance / £27 on the door Starts at 8pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. SATURDAY 10 AUGUST Coffee, cakes, scones and savouries in Long Bredy’s unique village hall. DT2 9HP 10.30am - 12noon. Everyone is most welcome. Visit us and enjoy the beautiful Bride Valley. Bridport & West Dorset Rambling Club 8 mile walk from Powerstock, South Poorton, West Milton 10.30am start. Bring picnic. No dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 898002. Flower Festival in St Mary’s Church South Perrott 11am - 5pm with a stall and teas from 2pm. Contact 01935 891291. Free live music by The Silver Lining Band 11pm – 1pm Four-piece group playing 50s & 60s pop and rock ‘n’ roll. This event forms part of the Music in the Garden season organised and sponsored each year by Axminster Arts. It will take place in the Courtyard Garden at the Arts Café Bar, The Old Courthouse, Church Street, Axminster EX13 5AQ. 01297 631455. Axmouth Church Summer Fayre Axmouth Village Church Gates open at 11am – 4pm on the church green. Entry 50p children under 16yrs Free Morning Coffee – Light Lunches – Afternoon Tea Various Stalls including ; Raffle, Cakes, Bric-a-brac, good quality clothing. If you would like a stall to sell your own items they are £6, please contact Rose on 01297 20898.

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Impossible Bottles A Practical Demonstration by Alan Rogers- Keyhole Surgeon of the Craft World 1pm (doors 12.30pm) Free/Donation LSi Bridport, 51 East Street, Bridport DT6 3JX lsibridport.co.uk. Misterton Annual Show 1.30pm 3.30pm always popular with74 classes and 16 categories ranging from home bake, floral arrangements, art, handicrafts, photography and much more. Photography Topics are Gardens, Wild Life, Misterton, Round Things, You don’t see that every day! Urban Decay. entry is £1 (children are free). Light refreshments available. There is always an auction of goods at the end of the day so it’s also an opportunity to purchase some home bake, flowers or produce. Enq. Carol Walker 01460 74808. Beaminster Horticultural Society Summer Show at Beaminster Public Hall 2pm where there is an array of classes not only for those of you with green fingers, but also cookery, handicrafts, flower arranging, photography and some interesting classes for children to enter. Schedules are now available from various businesses in the town or e-mail bemhortsoc@gmail.com. Beer Wurlitzer Theatre Organ Show with Kevin Morgan at the Congregational Church, Fore Street, Beer, 2pm - 4.30pm, £7 at the door, children free, visit beerwurlitzer.org.ik or phone 01297 24892. Charmouth Gardeners Annual Village Show 2.30pm in the ‘Community Hall’, Lower Sea Lane and the ‘Village Hall’, Wesley Close. Exhibits include flowers, fruit and vegetables, home produce, photography, children’s sections and Handicrafts (needlework, woodwork, knitting and painting). Entrants for all classes although (* fruit and vegetable produce must be grown within a ten mile radius of Charmouth*) are most welcome. Free show schedules detailing all classes (free to enter) and an Entry form are available from Fortnam Smith & Banwell Estate Agents, Charmouth (detailing where to return by 7th August). Entry is £1 for adults (to cover both halls) children free entry. Lovely home cooked refreshments available. Please do join in, it’s a fun community day. Seavington Gardening Club Annual Flower Show at 2.30pm. This is an excellent open show with flower , vegetable, fruit, cookery, arts , crafts , photography plus an interesting children’s section. Everyone is welcome. The show will be held in Seavington Millennium Hall. Enquiries to Karen Day 01460249728 . Coneygar Lodge Care Home Charity Garden Party 3pm – 4.30pm Come and enjoy the festivities. Raising money for Alzheimer’s Society. Live music from Sarah Hannam, Birds of Prey display,

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raffle, tombola, cream teas, cake stall and more! Join the team in lovely gardens. Coneygar Lodge, Coneygar Park, Bridport DT6 3BA 01308 427365 www. coneygarlodge.co.uk. Clapton Wayford, Drimpton & District Horticultural Society Annual Summer Show 2.15pm Drimpton Village Hall DT8 3RF Schedules available from Brian Hesketh email heskiebb@gmail.com or Tel 01308 868843. This is a traditional Village Show. Opportunities for all to enter and participate with classes for all ages encompassing activities from art and crafts to cooking and Gardening. Meet friends and family, enjoy excellent local cooked food or just admire the many and varied entries and enjoy the atmosphere. A fun afternoon for all the family. The Story of the Beach Boys If you like the Beach Boys songs, you will love this band—the leading UK’s leading celebration of the sixties superstars. £18 advance / £20 on the door. Starts at 8pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. ABBA FOREVER Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 7.30pm £24.50 01308424204 www.bridport-arts.com. The unique look & sound are beautifully recreated in perfect harmony by all six live performers in this amazing tribute show. SAT 10 – SUNDAY 11 AUGUST A weekend celebration of Lucien Pissarro’s stay in Fishpond 10am - 5 pm, at St John the Baptist church Fishpond DT6 6NN. Discover the views he painted in Fishpond and look at copies of his work etc. See also local artists work. SAT 10 – THURSDAY 15 AUGUST Seaton and District Art Society Annual Art Exhibition 10am - 5pm at The Gateway (The Old Townhall) Seaton. Free admission and everyone welcome. For more information: Seatonartsociety. co.uk. SAT 10 – SUNDAY 18 AUGUST Burton Bradstock Art Exhibition 2019 (Burton Bradstock Festival of Music and Art) Village Hall, Church Street, Burton Bradstock DT6 4QS Monday – Friday 10am – 9pm, Weekends 10am – 7pm, Early closing on the last Sunday August 10am – 12.30pm artinfo@burtonbradstockfestival.com Facebook /burtonbradstockfestival. SUNDAY 11 AUGUST East Devon Ramblers moderate 10.5 mile circular walk from Beaminster. 10.30am start and bring picnic Dogs on short leads. 01395 579607.

South Perrott Village Fayre 11am 4pm. An enjoyable day out with something for all the family in this pretty Dorset village. Free entry and free car parking 01935 891291, 891891 or southperrott@yahoo.co.uk Sherborne Steam & Waterwheel Centre - Open Day 11.30am - 3.30pm. See the wheel and steam engines running. Audio-visual displays. Many items of local and historic interest. Tea Room. Picnic Area. Toilet. Oborne Road DT9 3RX. Free parking on road. Entry by donation. SSWC.co.uk. Symondsbury Flower, Produce & Novelty Dog Show The Tithe Barn, Symondsbury, DT6 6HG at 2pm. Novelty Dog Show entries £1 on the day. Produce, Flowers & Handicrafts Schedules available from The Ilchester Arms or Symondsbury Store. Barbecue, Cream Teas, Bar, Tombola, Auction Fun for all the family. The Sunday Sessions This regular free entry event is the Marine’s dedicated time to promote quality live music. Enjoy local drinks and the best musicians in our lovely bar overlooking the Cobb. If you’d like to play please email declan@howlrecords. com. Bar opens and starts at 3pm Free entry, no tickets The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. Sidholme Music Room Elysian Fields, Sidmouth. EX10 8UJ 3.30pm - 4.30pm Cimbalova Muzica Vedrovci, Family Dulcimer Band from South Moravia Traditional and Classical Favourites. MONDAY 12 AUGUST Yeovil Probus Club 1.30pm Choices and Benefits of a Healthy Lifestyle. The Yeovil Court Hotel, New Members always most welcome, please contact the Hon. Secretary on 01935 414765 for further details. TUESDAY 13 AUGUST Uplyme & Lyme Regis Horticultural Society Outing departing from Uplyme Village Hall. Depart by coach UVH 9.30am Keyneston Mill, Blandford. “From seed to bottle” The creative and experimental home of Parterre fragrances, Keyneston Mill is the largest private botanic gardens in the country dedicated solely to aromatic and scented plants, with over 1,000 varieties in a 50-acre estate. Here the key ingredients of Parterre luxury perfumes are grown, harvested and distilled. Bistro Style Cafe. Cost £18 total includes guided tour. Please ring Rose Mock 01297 34733 to book. West Dorset Ramblers 7.5 miles/12.1 km. Toller Wander. West Compton, Toller, Wynford Eagle. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 424714. Benefit Advice Session Portland


- Easton (an initiative with Island Community Action). Sessions will operate on the second Tuesday in each month, between 10am - 12.15pm at Island Community Action, and will be by appointment only. To make an appointment, please contact Island Community Action on 01305 823789 or at The Easton Centre, Portland DT5 1EB. office@islandcommunityaction.org.uk. Diesel Day 11am – 3pm Yeovil Railway Centre, Yeovil Junction 01935 410420 www.yeovilrailway.freeservers.com. Time for Tea and a Talk What you never knew about Axminster. John Jeffrey tells us some interesting and little known stories of Axminster £3 Tea & cake served. Call 01404 831207 to book. 2pm at Axminster Heritage, The Bradshaw Meeting Room, Thomas Whitty House, Silver Street, Axminster, Devon, EX13 5AH.  Axe Vale Stamp Club Bradshaw Rooms, Silver Street, Axminster EX13 5AH, 7.30pm for 8pm. Members’ Display Competition and Treasure Hunt. 01297 552482. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. WEDNESDAY 14 AUGUST East Devon Ramblers moderate 6.5 mile circular walk from Kilmington. 10am start. Dogs on short leads. 01297 552860. AV&DCS Botanical stroll 10am – 12.30pm Aylesbeare Common with Mike Lock. Meet Joney’s Cross car park SY057897. Cudworth Summer Market and Coffee Morning 10.30am – 1pm. Cakes, savoury bakes, produce, preserves, bric-a-brac and much more plus a marvellous raf-

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fle. Entrance £1 which includes coffee/ tea. St Michael’s Church, Cudworth, Nr Ilminster TA19 0PR. Lyme Regis U3A talk. John Dover will give a talk on Sir George Somers.Sir George Somers was born in Lyme Regis in 1554.He was an Elizabethan privateer, merchant trader, MP, military leader and founder of Bermuda (The Somers Isles), England’s first Crown Colony; John Dover will be speaking about his life. Coffee served from 10am - 10.40am, followed by the talk at 11am - 12noon. Woodmead Halls, Hill Road, Lyme Regis DT7 3PG. Free to members, £2 donation suggested for non-members.To join U3A see website www.lymeregisu3a.org or telephone 01297 444566. Southleigh Village Fayre 2pm - 5pm This year in the show ring there is a fantastic display of Falconry. Don’t miss the sheep racing, try your luck and place a bet on the woolly runners. Dogs! bring your handlers and enter the family dog show, just for fun. The fayre will be kept in order by Graham Barton from TV’s ‘Homes under the hammer’. Loads of attractions to keep the kids happy: games, Punch & Judy, welly wanging, ice cream, face painting, bouncy castle, farm animals and a parade of vintage tractors. And for the adults we have live music, local beer & cider, tea and cake tent, BBQ and plenty of market stalls to pick up excellent local crafts, plants and goodies. Tons of fun.... only £4 adults, accompanied children and parking free. Albion Stone Mine - Guided Walk 4.30pm - 6pm. Join mine manager Mark Godden for a rare opportunity to visit a working mine and find out more about Portland Stone. Priority booking for Jurassic Coast Trust Members. Visit jurassicoast.org/shop to book or call 01308 807000. Wyld Morris 7.30pm are dancing at the Bottle Inn, Marshwood. The Beehive Acoustic Café 8pm Free entry. A supportive open mic session in the Beehive bar with host and guitarist Terry Stacey. Come along to listen or to play. The Beehive, Honiton. www. beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. WED 14 – WED 21 AUGUST Abstracts, Ceramics, Watercolours An exhibition and sale of work by a local abstract painter and ceramicist Mike Fletcher. Kennaway House 01395 515551. THURSDAY 15 AUGUST West Dorset Ramblers 7.5 miles/12.1 km. Drimpton Circular. Drimpton, Burstock, Seaborough and Clapton. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 897702. Lyme History Walks 11am from the

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Marine Theatre, this and every Wed, Thurs and Sat in August. Discover the unique and colourful history of Lyme Regis. Hear stories of amazing people including Mary Anning, and adventures on land and sea. Experienced Tour Guide: Chris Lovejoy. Lasts 1+1/2 hours. Cost: £8, Children half www.lymehistorywalks.com Call 01297 443140 mob 07518 777 258 for further information. Booking not required. Wellbeing Walk at Radipole Lakes (Stepping into Nature) 11am – 12noon. This is a relaxed, sociable and gentle monthly walk which is open to all , a health walk for healthy body and mind. We generally walk about a mile in distance taking 40 minutes to 1 hour, usually around our Radipole reserve in the heart of Weymouth. You may see fabulous wildlife on the walk, but the focus is simply a stroll and chat. This walk is dementia friendly, and particularly suitable for anyone wishing to lose weight, recovering from illness or wanting to improve their mental health and wellbeing. Contact RSPB Radipole Lakes on 01305 778313. This event is free as it’s part of Stepping into Nature. Visit www.stepin2nature.org for more info. Broomhill garden open for National Garden Scheme charities (Rampisham DT2 0PU). Once a farmyard now a delightful, tranquil garden of 1½ acres. Island beds, borders filled with shrubs, roses, unusual perennials and choice annuals. Lawns to less formal areas with large wildlife pond, meadow, shaded areas, bog garden, late summer border. Open 2pm - 5pm in aid of the National Garden Scheme charities. Adm £5 chd free www.ngs.org.uk. Tatworth WI The S.S. Great Britain is the subject of the talk to be given by Ian Caskie in Tatworth Memorial Hall at 7.30pm. This is an open meeting and all are welcome. Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf (U) 7.30pm Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80 Family of four £22 Journey through all four seasons in stunning gardens and locations around the world. This fascinating documentary immerses viewers in the work of designer and plantsman Piet Oudolf who challenges conventional notions of nature, public space and beauty. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton. co.uk Box office 01404 384050. The Tuckers Jazz Club 8pm The Matt Carter Septet. The Tuckers Arms, Dalwood, Near Axminster, EX13 7EG (just north of the A35 between Axminster & Honiton). Tickets £10 Info. At www.dalwoodvillage.co.uk 01404 831 280. A seven-piece group of young players, from the Royal Academy of Music & Guildhall School of Music,

demonstrating a truly astounding level of competence considering none of them are over the age of 25. Art and Activism In conversation with: artist Bob and Roberta Smith, human rights lawyer Clive Stafford-Smith, UWE senior lecturer in History Dr Rose Wallis and activist Baroness Jones of Moulescoomb at 7pm. This talk will feature acclaimed artist Bob and Roberta Smith, human rights lawyer Clive Stafford Smith, senior History lecturer Dr Rose Wallis and will be chaired by Baroness Jones of Moulescoomb. The discussion will explore themes raised by a new collaborative piece of art, created by Clive Stafford Smith and Bob and Roberta Smith, which asks the questions, ‘Who are our contemporary Tolpuddle Martyrs?’ and ‘How can art be used as activism?’ For more information visit shirehalldorset.org or call 01305 261849. £10 per head. For more information visit shirehalldorset.org or call 01305 261849. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. Pub Quiz The Bell, Winsham. Every Thursday. Starts at 8.30pm. Teams of 4 entry 50p per person. Free round of drinks for the winning team. The evening ends with a roll over cash prize quiz. For details contact 01460 30677. FRIDAY 16 AUGUST Seaton Lions Club Book Stall 9.30am – 1.30pm The Square , Seaton. East Devon Ramblers moderate 5.5 mile circular walk from Wambrook. 10am start. Dogs on short leads. 01460 220636. Summer Concerts at St Paul’s On Friday lunchtimes you can come and enjoy a tasty lunch, and follow it up with a short concert, featuring the renowned organ in the church, as well as other instruments. Lunches from 12noon for £4.50, concert tickets (bought on the day) are £5. Concerts begin at 1pm. www. honitoncofe.org/. Ian Heavisides (organ) “1685 and all that” and much more. Chef ’s Special Lunch 12noon for 12.30pm. Only £9.50 (Members £8). Fruit juice on arrival, roast pork followed by Eton mess with coffee/ tea and a chocolate to finish. Vegetarian alternative available. Booking essential. Henhayes Centre - South Street Car Park, Crewkerne, TA18 8DA, Tel No: 01460 74340. The Living Tree cancer self-help group. 2pm Tripudio. 2.15pm Social afternoon. 2.30pm - 4pm Therapy session - Peter Cove offering Swedish Massage for hands & feet (please check beforehand if you have Lymphoedema or lymph nodes removed). Drop in any time


between 2pm and 4.30pm at the Friends’ Meeting House, 95 South Street, Bridport DT6 3NZ. Tel 07341 916 976. www. thelivingtree.org.uk. Wildlife Garden Open Day & Cream Tea Meet our experts in our own wildlife friendly garden. Get some top tips to help you support our ‘Get Dorset Buzzing Campaign’ when creating your own garden. Followed by cream tea in the tearoom. Call the centre to pre book your tickets – 01300 320684. £10 pp including cream tea. The Kingcombe Centre, Lower Kingcombe, DT20EQ www.kingcombe.org. Unique Boutique Event community evening street food markets back to East Devon for summer 2019. Friday evenings in the summer have become a way to get together over food and connect with your community. You’ll find a great location with views out across the Jurassic coast, the reasonably priced pop up bar and cool music to accompany your culinary journey around the world. The Ham, Sidmouth EX10 8BU Third Friday of the month – 5pm – 9pm. Contact: Eleanor Carr chat@UniqueBoutiqueEvents.co.uk www.UniqueBoutiqueEvents.co.uk 07970 857696. SATURDAY 17 AUGUST Sidmouth Food Festival Returning for its 4th year, this fantastic foodie festival will showcase fresh food and delicious drinks from local producers with international inspiration. A great family day out, with the beach only 2 minutes away. Kennaway House 01395 515551. 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing and celebrate the date in history that marked man’s first steps on the moon. 10am – 4pm Bob Mizon will be visiting Kingcombe with his Travelling

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Planetarium. More than 3,000 stars, the planets, the Sun, the Moon, the Milky Way and other dazzling features of the heavens appear inside the dome, along with fascinating presentations, to amaze and enthral the audience. £5 pp includes cold drink and moon themed snack. To book call the centre on 01300 320684. The Kingcombe Centre, Lower Kingcombe, DT20EQ. www.kingcombe. org. 40s Fun Bridport Town Hall, 10am – 2pm free event, organised by the Bridport Heritage Forum.40s Fun, 40s Music, Dancing, Films, Toys. For more details contact Sheila Meaney on 01308 424169 or email: sheilannmeaney@btinternet.com. Identify that Find! Beaminster Museum – Free drop-in morning 10.30am - 1pm for you to bring things you have found that may be historical, in your garden, on a walk, metal detecting, whatever. Ciorstaidh Hayward Trevarthen, Dorset’s specialist Finds Liaison Officer, will explain what they are and record where it was found. No charge, you keep the item, but this is your chance to record your find for posterity. If you’re bringing a lot of things please contact Museum to book on info.beaminstermuseum@gmail.com or 01308 863623. Bridport & West Dorset Rambling

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Club 6 mile walk from Frampton Frampton Park, Church Bottom, Compton Bottom 10.30am start. Bring picnic. No dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 898002. Lyme History Walks 11am from the Marine Theatre, this and every Wed, Thurs and Sat in August. Discover the unique and colourful history of Lyme Regis. Hear stories of amazing people including Mary Anning, and adventures on land and sea. Experienced Tour Guide: Chris Lovejoy. Lasts 1+1/2 hours. Cost: £8, Children half www. lymehistorywalks.com Call 01297 443140 mob 07518 777 258 for further information. Booking not required. Free live music by Jurassic Blue 11am – 1pmTimeless Tunes and songs from the 60s & 70s, with interval music by Dan Lewis-Leaver: self-penned songs. This event forms part of the Music in the Garden season organised and sponsored each year by Axminster Arts. It will take place in the Courtyard Garden at the Arts Café Bar, The Old Courthouse, Church Street, Axminster EX13 5AQ. 01297 631455. Dalwood Village Fair 12noon - 5pm at Carters Cross, Dalwood, EX13 7ED. Entry – adults £2.50, under 16s free. Fancy dress theme – Flowers, Fruit & Veg, judging at 12.30pm. Traditional Country Fair with Games, Side Shows,

Tombola, Craft Stalls, Dog Show, Craft and Produce Tent, Grand Draw, Juggler, Samba Band, Majorettes, Bouncy Castle, Miniature Train, Bar, BBQ, Teas and so much more. Drimpton Village Fayre 1pm - 4pm at Drimpton Village Hall and Playing Field. A variety of stall, massage, beer tent, tea and cake,Arts and crafts,model railway, vintage cars, bouncy castle, children’s activities, races and tug of war, Qi gong demonstration. Something for all the family. (sorry but no dogs allowed). Sid Valley Horticultural Society Annual Gardening & Craft Show 2pm – 5pm Sidford Sports Field, Byes Lane, Sidford, EX10 9QX Entry £2.50 Children under 16 Free Details on 01395 515736. Broadwey, Upwey and District Horticultural Society’s Summer Show at Upwey and Broadwey Memorial Hall, Victoria Avenue, Upwey, Weymouth DT3 5NG. There are classes in horticulture, handicrafts, cookery, floral art, photography and children’s classes. Open to the public at 2pm with teas available. Further details www.budhs.org. uk or contact the show secretary, 01305 813942, e-mail shows@budhs.org.uk for a schedule. Always happy to welcome new exhibitors. Jumble Sale 2pm – 3pm at Mistetton WI Hall, Middle Street. Lots of bargains and a Good As New section. Light refreshments available. Entry 20p. Enq 01460 74808. Radipole & Southill Horticultural Society Annual Show at the Southill Community Centre doors opening at 2.15pm. Presentation of the prizes will commence at 4pm. All are welcome to come along a see the exhibits in the various horticultural, handicraft and cookery sections and enjoy tea, coffee and cakes. Further information can be obtained on 01305 788939. Annual Teddy Bears’ Tea Party St. John The Evangelist Church Tatworth 3pm - 5pm free but there will be a raffle and tombola which are to be paid for. Tea of sandwiches, cakes and drinks. Lots of games and craft activities for the children and the young at heart; come along with your family. Bring your favourite teddy and win a prize. Prizes for the most inventive hat with a Teddy Bear Theme for adults and children. Teddy Bear Colouring Picture, Bring your picture to the tea party. Copies available at the back of Church which is open from 10am - 4pm. More prizes to be won. André Rieu: Shall We Dance? (12A) 7pm £10.30. Join André Rieu, his Johann Strauss Orchestra, world class sopranos, The Platin Tenors and special guests for a magical cinema experience. The Beehive, Honiton. www.


beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Quiz Night at 7.30pm. arranged by Refugee Support Group (South Somerset). A summer quiz for teams of four, raising money for charities supporting refugees in a variety of countries. Tickets: £6. No concessions. Light buffet included in ticket price. Bar open. Advance booking only by Wednesday 14 August. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall. org.uk 01460 240 340. Corduroy Amidst the self-conscious ‘Brit-Pop’ excesses of the nineties, the NME Reader’s ‘Best Live Act’ awards placed this jaunty Acid Jazz combo in its top five. The ‘Fabric Four’ returned to the iconic Acid Jazz label last year and are all set for another adventure in upbeat funk and jazz. With support. £16.50 early bird, £18.50 advance, £22 on the door Starts at 8.30pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www. marinetheatre.com. SUNDAY 18 AUGUST Steam Train Day Yeovil Railway Centre, Yeovil Junction www.yeovilrailway.freeservers.com 01935 410420. East Devon Ramblers leisurely 8.2

circular walk from Musbury. 10am start and bring picnic. Dogs on short leads. 01395 577891. Worbarrow Bay and Tyneham Guided Walk 10.30am - 2pm Join Jurassic Coast Trust Ambassador John Scott for a geology walk to one of the Jurassic Coast’s most beautiful locations. Tickets £5, JCT Members £2.50.Visit jurassicoast.org/shop to book or call 01308 807000. Fogg Summer Fayre 11am – 4pm with The Silhouettes, Sophie Green & Franz Atkinson and pupils from Twirl Academy performing on the bandstand in Greenhill Gardens, The Espanande, Weymouth. Free Entrance. A Friends of Greenhill Gardens Event 01305 775829 janechandler123@hotmail.com www. greenhill-gardens.co.uk. Divine Union Soundbath 2pm - 4pm Stour Row Village Hall, Stour Row, nr. Shaftesbury, Dorset SP7 0QG. Crystal and Tibetan Singing Bowl Soundbath Experience a magical performance of therapeutic Pure Sound by musician Dean Carter using singing bowls plus sacred vocal overtoning which promotes a deeply relaxing and healing state to rebalance and re-energise your body, mind and spirit. Your ‘participation’ involves simply lying down and enjoy-

ing/absorbing the sounds. (You may sit if preferred.) £12, Booking in advance and further details www.centreforpuresound.org ahiahel@live.com 01935 389655. Bring something comfortable to lie on and wrap around you. The Legend of King Arthur Boxtree Productions 5pm (refreshments from 4pm). £11 / £9 / £36 family ticket (max. 2 adults) Maumbury Rings, 17 Maumbury Rd, Dorchester DT1 1QN 01305 266926 www.dorchesterarts.org.uk Bring a chair and picnic. Pack up a picnic and join us in the open air to enjoy this classic tale of Arthur, a sword and the Knights of the Round Table. With inventive staging, original songs and magical storytelling, you and your family will be talking about this experience for years to come. MONDAY 19 AUGUST West Dorset Ramblers 9 miles/14.5 km. Northern Circuit of Pilsdon Pen, Burstock, Drimpton. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 459282. Severalls Jubilee Bowls Club Coaching for All ages 10am – 12noon at War Memorial Grounds, Severalls Park Avenue, Crewkerne, TA18 8HQ (entrance off Lang Road). Fancy trying

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The Folly Mill Lane Firebrand By Cecil Amor

T

his is a story of 1833 Bridport. Arson had taken place but the punishment meted out to the perpetrator was much more extreme than would be considered now. It is a true story of earlier life with disastrous consequences and is not for the faint hearted. In 1832 Bridport had suffered a number of fires, thought to be arson. Then in early 1833 there was another which destroyed eight properties in Irish Lane (now King Street) adjacent to Folly Mill Lane. Some were thatched houses and about thirty people had to vacate their beds and homes. There had been an attempt to set fire there only two or three weeks earlier. The properties would have been adjacent to the present East Street car park near Folly Mill Lane. The late Basil Short gave a lecture in the Unitarian Chapel in 1993 and much of this detail is drawn from his notes held in the Bridport Museum Local History Centre. Basil Short was formerly the Unitarian Minister in Bridport and an extra-mural local history lecturer of Bristol University. The main victim was John Follett, a flax comber, with his combing shop in Irish Lane close to his house. His garden adjoined that of the Wilkins family with their house forty yards towards Folly Mill. Thomas Wilkins was a carpenter with a sideline of twine spinning, with rates of 19s 6d in 1826, the same as Dr Giles Roberts, so not desperately poor. His eldest son, Sylvester Symes Wilkins aged 15 years was a shoemaker and had been a choir boy in St Mary’s Church and attended Sunday School there. In December 1832 he received a prize for good reading and conduct. So why did Sylvester, a “good boy” reasonably educated, from a comfortable home, become involved in arson. The fire commenced just after 10pm on Monday 25th February 1833 and shortly after the fire bell rang and there were cries of “fire”. It was a dark, wet night and the boys had run away. John Follett said he had previously found his flax on fire and he had seen three boys, whom he identified, in his garden several times. On his oath and others, three boys were committed to prison by a warrant dated 5th March 1833, by Joseph Gundry, esq., Justice of the Borough of Bridport. The Prison Book records that 15 year-old Sylvester Wilkins (Prison no. 325) was 5ft 5ins. tall, David Fudge Curme, a 17 year-old printer (no. 326) was 5ft 2 ins., both admitted on 5th March 1833. John Middleton (no. 334) a 17 year-old shoemaker, also 5ft 2 ins., was brought to prison on 9th March. Wilkins was described as having brown hair, grey eyes, 28 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

of sallow complexion with dimpled chin and pock-marked face and with a scar on his left hand, near his thumb. But he must have been thin and underweight, as will appear later. There were two judges at the trial, the Hon Sir James Allan and Hon Sir Joseph Littledale of the Westminster Courts. David Curme admitted his guilt, but offered King’s Evidence against Wilkins saying “Last Michaelmas Fair Wilkins said it would make a good fire and asked for help....but they would not....weeks later in the “Antelope” he asked again. We bought 1/2d of tobacco and Middleton lit a pipe”. However Middleton denied responsibility on the occasion of the fire. Curme also said “Sylvester pulled off some thatch and put some oiled paper in the hole....he called me and took a match from his pocket and lighted it at the pipe which I had in my hand. He then set light to the oiled paper. We then came away....then heard the fire bell ringing and he could not help laughing”. Sylvester Wilkins admitted firing Mr Follett’s house, but did not know why. On the subject of numerous earlier fires in the town, he knew of them, but was not responsible for them. At the Lent Assizes on 9th March 1833 the Jury found Wilkins guilty of arson, but recommended mercy. However the Judge ignored this plea, being keen to set an example by capital punishment. Following the trial Sylvester wrote several letters from prison, we are told “in a good hand”, wishing his parents well, with prayers and so on. He asked for Andrew Symes Partridge, David Hodder, George Clapp, William Hallett, David Lang and James Foss

Woodward to be his bearers. One assumes these were young men of about his age, perhaps fellow choirboys. He also asked for his co-defendants to attend his funeral. Wilkins was executed at noon on Saturday 30th March 1833 at Dorchester Gaol. The executioner attached lead “mercy weights” to his legs to hasten his end as otherwise his lightness might have prolonged his hold on life. This was common with underweight victims. Some time ago Bridport Museum had a representation of Wilkins on display but this has now been placed in the store. A contemporary local diarist, Maria Carter, of West Street, Bridport wrote on Sunday 31st March “Rev Broadley 15th chap. of Corinthians 33rd verse. A very good sermon respecting the boy that was hung yesterday”. Surprisingly she does not mention the fires or the subsequent funeral. Basil Short recorded that the funeral was on Good Friday at St Mary’s Church, Bridport, a grand affair with the streets lined with townspeople. 2,000 people filed past the body as it returned to Bridport. The Burials Register for St Mary’s, record no 668 show Sylvester Wilkins, buried on 5th April, aged 15 years, service conducted by Rev Robert Broadley. Neither of Sylvester’s friends, David Curme or John Middleton appear in the 1841 or 1851 Census Record Indexes, so they had probably left the area. The Wilkins family continued to live in Bridport, Thomas Wilkins was still a carpenter, aged 65 in 1851. His wife Ann was a dressmaker, aged 63 and Augustus a tailor of 27. Hezekiah was living in Bradpole aged 24. John Follett was living in Bothenhampton in 1851, still a comber. Basil Short suggested that Silvestor Wilkins may have “got into bad company”, perhaps easily led and obviously fascinated by fire. It is surprising that such a quiet boy, given a prize for good conduct only a year before should end in this way. It was also suggested that no one expected such a youngster to hang. So far we have not mentioned the “Bridport Dagger” but surely the hempen noose, made in Bridport, must have been used by the hangman. Nowadays we might expect processions, protests outside the then gaol and marches in opposition to the extreme sentence. We live in a peaceful area and trust that the horrific acts we see on TV cease and do not reach here. Bridport History Society does not meet in August. We look forward to seeing you in September. Cecil Amor, Hon President, Bridport History Society.


outdoor bowls? Come and have an enjoyable morning at a very friendly club with bowls provided and refreshments halfway through and please wear flat soled footwear. For more information please phone Geoff Kerr on 01308 867221. Inspired by Archives 10.30am -12noon (Stepping into Nature). Enjoy the countryside? Love history? Enjoy both with pictures, maps or recordings at the Dorset History Centre (Dorchester) and learn something new about the natural world and local artists. The group is open to everyone including carers, those with dementia or with mobility, sensory or learning difficulties or those who would just enjoy the company and stimulation. It’s all about relaxing, meeting new people and having fun. Contact Maria on 01305 228947 or m.gayton@dorsetcc.gov.uk to book. Visit www.stepin2nature.org for more info. U3A Coffee Morning at Ilminster A warm welcome awaits you at Chard Ilminster & District Ilminster with free coffee and biscuits on offer, your chance to find out what the U3A is all about, so call in at the Parish Hall Ilminster enjoy a free coffee and biscuits whilst you meet existing members and group leaders. With over 60 interest and activity groups for you to choose from… everything from Art to Zoology and you can have fun trying your skills at badminton, short tennis, table tennis and indoor cricket. The U3A is a wonderful way to learn, laugh, live and enjoy! Parish Hall North Street Ilminster. 10.30am - 12noon. More information call 01460 68629 Email: lewbat@uwclub.net. https://u3asites.org. uk/chardilminster/home. Axminster Carnival Bingo Eyes down 8pm Axminster Guildhall. MONDAY 19 – FRIDAY 23 AUGUST SummerMT@DYT 9.30am – 5pm Performance Friday 23 August, 7.30pm. Sunninghill Community HallTo book: phone 01305 266926 or email: finance@ dorchesterarts.org.uk £125 for the week (some assisted places available, contact Dorchester Arts for more details.) Ages 10-18 A production in a week culminating in a performance where up to 30 young people take part in drama, song and dance. TUESDAY 20 AUGUST AV&DCS Birdwatch Lambert’s Castle 10am – 12noon with Rob Johnson. Meet at car park SY366988. Diesel Day 11am – 3pm Yeovil Railway Centre, Yeovil Junction 01935 410420 www.yeovilrailway.freeservers.com. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 but no need to book. Apothecary Presents...New Ways of Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 29


Seeing Visualisation and the Spoken Word 7.30pm (doors 7pm) LSi Bridport, 51 East Street, Bridport DT6 3JX lsibridport.co.uk. WEDNESDAY 21 AUGUST East Devon Ramblers moderate 8 mile circular walk from Otterton Green. 10.30am start land bring picnic. Dogs on short leads. 01884 32039. HiDDeN Popular local band will be entertaining market day shoppers in Bucky Doo Square, Bridport from 10.30am. Lyme History Walks 11am from the Marine Theatre, this and every Wed, Thurs and Sat in August. Discover the unique and colourful history of Lyme Regis. Hear stories of amazing people including Mary Anning, and adventures on land and sea. Experienced Tour Guide: Chris Lovejoy. Lasts 1+1/2 hours. Cost: £8, Children half www. lymehistorywalks.com Call 01297 443140 mob 07518 777 258 for further information. Booking not required. Bridport Probus Club Memoirs of a Cold War – Peter Wallis. Meet at the Eype’s Mouth Hotel at 12noon on the third Wednesday of each month for lunch, followed by a talk. For more information contact Graham Pitts on 01297 561569. Causley & Coldfield 2pm - 4pm £5 (includes tea and cake if booked in advance). Join acclaimed singer songwriter Jim Causley and actor Charlie Coldfield for a gentle trip down memory lane. Featuring songs you will know and love interspersed with short readings and poems. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Colyton & District Garden Society Talk ‘Why did it die?’ by Neil Lovesey of Picket Lane Nursery. Colyford Memorial Hall at 7.30pm. Members free, guests £3. Information Sue Price 01297 552362. THURSDAY 22 AUGUST Benefit Advice Session an initiative by Dorset Welfare Benefits Partnership. Dorchester 9am – 12.30pm at Age UK Dorchester. To make an appointment, please contact Age UK Dorchester on 01305 269444 or at Rowan Cottage, 4 Prince of Wales Road, Dorchester DT1 1PW www.ageuk.org.uk/dorchester. West Dorset Ramblers 8.5 miles/13.7 km. Typical West Dorset Walk, Four Ashes, Lewesdon Hill, Beaminster & Stoke Abbott. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 897702. The Melplash Agricultural Society Show is one of the South West’s premier agricultural exhibitions and is held at The West Bay Show grounds,

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Bridport, Dorset. For details and tickets see www.melplashshow.co.uk. Wyld Morris are dancing at various times, near the ‘pub’ during the day at the Melplash Show. The Mothership Programme Rona Lee 5.30pm - 6.30pm workshop with Anna Best. Rona Lee is an artist whose work encompasses a range of media; photography, video, sculpture, performance and digital media, alongside other forms of engagement and intervention. The Mothership Summer Programme. held at Copse Barn, Dorset DT6 3TQ. me@annabest.info, mothershipresidencies.tumblr.com. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. Pub Quiz The Bell, Winsham. Every Thursday. Starts at 8.30pm. Teams of 4 entry 50p per person. Free round of drinks for the winning team. The evening ends with a roll over cash prize quiz. For details contact 01460 30677. FRIDAY 23 AUGUST East Devon Ramblers leisurely 5 mile circular walk from Colyton. 10am start. Dogs on short leads. 01297 552313. Summer Concerts at St Paul’s On Friday lunchtimes you can come and enjoy a tasty lunch, and follow it up with a short concert, featuring the renowned organ in the church, as well as other instruments. Lunches from 12noon for £4.50, concert tickets (bought on the day) are £5. Concerts begin at 1pm. www.honitoncofe.org/. Richard Lester (organ) “Baroque and rolls”. The Living Tree cancer self-help group. 2pm Tripudio. 2.15pm Social afternoon. Drop in any time between 2pm and 4.30pm at the Friends’ Meeting House, 95 South Street, Bridport DT6 3NZ. Tel 07341 916 976. www.thelivingtree.org.uk. Acoustic Night 7.30pm – 11pm All styles and forms of performance welcome – not just music. If you wish to perform please drop us an email at folk@chriswatts.org to secure a slot. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall.org.uk 01460 240 340. Frank Sinatra Tribute Frederic Gardner ‘does’ Ol’ Blue Eyes quite briliantly - this will be a magical evening of Frank’s best loved songs. With the Craig Milverton Trio and Martin Dale on tenor sax. 8pm. Tickets £20 (£35 with pre-show supper at 7pm – must be pre-booked). Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East

Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www.themeetinghouse.org.uk. FRI 23 – SATURDAY 24 AUGUST Uplyme Church Art Festival 10am 4pm. Free entry and parking – refreshments available. An exhibition of paintings, textiles, sculpture and 3D art by local artists. FRI 23 – MONDAY 26 AUGUST Exhibition and Sale of Modern and Contemporary Art and Antiques 10am-4pm. Kennaway House 01395 515551. Misterton Biennial Flower Festival at St Leonard’s Church (TA18 8LT), daily from 10am – 5pm entry is free. The theme this year is TV Series with some 19 displays such as ‘Allo ‘Allo!, Buttetflies, The Sky at Night to mention just a few. As always, you can expect to see some outstanding, imaginative and always beautiful displays. There will also be a home produce stall in the church yard and a good raffle with light refreshments (including ploughman’s lunches) available daily in the beautiful garden of Finials next to the church. Songs of Praise will take place at 6pm on Sunday 25 in the lovely old church - everybody welcome. Enquiries: 01460 78430/75025. SATURDAY 24 AUGUST Free live music by Steve Black, Alan West & Adam Sweet 11am – 3pm Americana from 11am, then from 1.30pm Cleo & The Asps: Bluesy Jazz and Latin from the banks of the Nile. This BBQ event forms part of the Music in the Garden season organised and sponsored each year by Axminster Arts. It will take place in the Courtyard Garden at the Arts Café Bar, The Old Courthouse, Church Street, Axminster EX13 5AQ. 01297 631455. Car Boot Sale At Winsham sports & social club between Chard & Crewkerne. Sellers £5 per car set up from 1.30pm (no new goods, trade or commercial). Gates open to buyers at 2.30pm. For details please call Debbie 01460 432815. The Martock Garden Society’s 130th Annual Sow in the Parish Hall at 2pm. Not just for plant lovers – there are new cash prizes for children, classes for crafts, photo of a lichen, of a vehicle, a freak plant, a model of any object. The brochure will be out by August and on Martockonline. Phone Fergus if any of this excites you on 01935 822202. Annual Show Winsham Horticultural Society Held in the marque at Winsham Sports & Social Cub. There are classes for cut flowers, pot plants, fruit, veg, home produce,


art, craft & photography plus special classes for the children. Everyone is welcome to enter be it one or multiple classes (25p per class, children free) Entries close Wednesday 21 August. Schedules are available from Winsham Village Shop. The marque will be open from 8am - 10.30am on the day for exhibitors to set up. The show opens to spectators at 2.30pm with presentation of cups at 4pm (previous cup winners please make sure you have returned them before the show date). Refreshments will be available. There will also be a car boot sale running at the same time (£5 per car) set up at 1.30pm gates open at 2.30pm. For more detail please call Chloe 01460 30032 or Debbie 01460 432815. We Love Little Mix This fun act is four hugely talented performers celebrating one of the UK’s finest girl bands. With breathtaking dance moves, replica costumes, and some of the finest vocals in the UK, this is a high-energy show packed with all of Little Mix’s greatest hits—DNA, Wings, Salute, Black Magic, Love Me Like You, Secret Love Song, and many, many more. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult. £15 advance, £17.50 on the door. Starts at 2pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. Lyme Regis Comedy Club with Tanyalee Davis Four acts are on the bill at our regular comedy night, headlined by a woman with a unique perspective and racy brand of comedy. Her solo show ‘Little Do They Know’ hints at her 3 foot 6 stature. She’s appeared in films such as Austin Powers, and supported Frankie Boyle on tour. £8 advance / £10 on the door Starts at 8pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. SUNDAY 25 AUGUST East Devon Ramblers moderate 9.5 mile circular walk from Aylesbeare. 10.30am start and bring picnic. Dogs on short leads. 01395 264868. West Bay RNLI Fun Day & Duck Race Fun & Games for all the family. Cream Teas & refreshments in the Salt House from 11am. Sea Rescue demonstration by Weymouth & Lyme Regis lifeboats at 1pm (weather & operations permitting). Dorset’s Giant Fete & Car Boot Sale! A whole host of great fun to be had this year. Plenty for the kids to enjoy. Dorset’s biggest Family fete and car boot, stalls, games, rides and much more. Grab yourself a bargain at the car boot and enjoy a drink in the sunshine from the beer tent. Open from 12noon - 5pm. Contact (Day)01308 422638 or (evenings)

01308 422638. Car Boot set up from 7.30am Call Richard for more information No booking required for Car Boot. Symondsbury, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 6HD. Entertainer Tony Lowe performing on the bandstand in Greenhill Gardens, The Espanande, Weymouth. Free Entrance 2pm – 4pm. A Terras Youth Team Event. Traditional Choral Evensong with the Whitchurch Occasional Choir. 6pm, Whitchurch Canonicorum Church. MONDAY 26 AUGUST Seaton Lions Club Book Stall 9.30am – 1.30pm The Square , Seaton. Charmouth Vintage Fair Community Hall 10am - 4pm Tel: 01298-560634. Garden visit with a difference: Black Shed (Sherborne DT9 4JX) is a cut flower farm with over 150 colourful, productive flower beds growing sophisticated selection of cut flowers and foliage. Traditional garden favourites alongside unusual perennials, grasses create a stunning display. Open 1pm - 5pm in aid of the National Garden Scheme charities. Adm £4 chd free. www.ngs.org.uk. Flower & Dog Show Whitchurch, Morcombelake & Ryall Flower and Dog Show. Entry to the show is £1.50 (children under 16 free). Dog show includes varied classes. There will be a bar, Morris Dancers, live music, stalls, ferret racing, skittles & classic vehicles. Held at the Whitchurch Canonicorum Village Hall, Dorset, DT6 6RF, 2pm 5pm. Enquires 07979 475120. TUESDAY 27 AUGUST Diesel Day 11am – 3pm Yeovil Railway Centre, Yeovil Junction 01935 410420 www.yeovilrailway.freeservers. com. U3A Monthly Talk The U3A (University of the Third Age) offers a wide variety of general interest groups for retired, and semi retired people in Bridport and the surrounding areas. 2pm in Bridport United Church Hall in East Street. The cost to non members for each talk is £2. Further Information can be found at www.u3asites.org.uk/bridport. Brian Freeland, Director and scriptwriter presents ‘The view from the Wings’. Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. WEDNESDAY 28 AUGUST West Dorset Ramblers 8 miles/12.9 km. Bridport Local Ramble. Bridport,

Allington, Bilshay, Moorbath, Symonsbury, Eype. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 424512. East Devon Ramblers leisurely 8 mile circular walk from Newton Poppleford. 10.30am start and bring picnic Dogs on short leads. 01395 513974. Coffee Morning 10am - 12noon Free Entry. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall.org.uk 01460 240 340. Worbarrow Bay and Tyneham Guided Walk 10.30am - 2pm Join Jurassic Coast Trust Ambassador John Scott for a geology walk to one of the Jurassic Coast’s most beautiful locations. Tickets £5, JCT Members £2.50. Visit jurassicoast.org/shop to book or call 01308 807000. AV&DCS Family Explorer Afternoon 2pm – 4pm (check times on website) Holyford Woods LNR, with Penny Evans. £5 per family. Book with EDDC at wildeastdevon.co.uk or 01395 517557. Arts in Residence Piano Recital by Peter Rhodes 4.30pm - 6pm. Mendelssohn, J.S. Bach, Mozart. Sidholme Music Room. Uplyme & Lyme Regis Horticultural Society Talk 7.30pm Uplyme Village Hall Talk ‘Plants of the Dolomites’ by Paul Cumbleton. THURSDAY 29 AUGUST West Bay Discovery Walks Discover the treasures of the seashore. (Stepping into Nature) 10.45am -11.45am West Bay is rich in history, culture and wildlife and is internationally recognised for its dramatic landscape. Through themed guided walks, taking about 40-60 minutes (1 mile distance), you can learn about and see what West Bay has to offer. Starting at the West Bay Discovery Centre (DT6 4EN). To book please call 01308 427288. This event is Free as it is funded by Stepping into Nature through the Big Lottery Fund. Coastal Wildlife Wellbeing Walk at the Chesil Beach Centre (Stepping into Nature) 11am A gentle, relaxing walk around Chesil Beach and the Fleet Lagoon, taking in the seasonal wildlife. Over 18’s only. All abilities welcome. This walk is dementia friendly, and particularly suitable for anyone wishing to discover the outdoors, lose weight, recover from illness or wanting to improve their mental health and wellbeing. This event is Free as it is funded by Stepping into Nature through the Big Lottery Fund. Meet at the Chesil Beach Centre, Portland (DT4 9XE). To book your place please call Chesil Team on 01305 206191.

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Lyme Regis Ghost Walk 7.30pm subject to the weather. Meet outside the museum. No unaccompanied children. Adults £8 ; 8 to 15 £4 ; 0 - 7 free. 0797 00 687 00 - but no need to book. Pub Quiz The Bell, Winsham. Every Thursday. Starts at 8.30pm. Teams of 4 entry 50p per person. Free round of drinks for the winning team. The evening ends with a roll over cash prize quiz. For details contact 01460 30677. Wyld Morris Dancers West Bay with guests Frome Valley Morris, 7.45pm centre of West Bay, 8.15pm Quarterdeck Tavern. FRIDAY 30 AUGUST Seaton Lions Club Book Stall 9.30am – 1.30pm The Square , Seaton. West Dorset Ramblers 7 miles/11.3 km. Bride Valley. Shipton, Chilcombe, Fish Ponds, Graston. Starts at 10am. Bring picnic, no dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 897702. East Devon Ramblers moderate 5.5 mile circular walk from Beer Cliff Top. 10am start. dogs on short leads. 01404 823644. Summer Concerts at St Paul’s On Friday lunchtimes you can come and enjoy a tasty lunch, and follow it up with a short concert, featuring the renowned organ in the church, as well as other instruments. Lunches from 12noon for £4.50, concert tickets (bought on the day) are £5. Concerts begin at 1pm. www.honitoncofe. org/. Andrew Carter ( organ) Lynn Carter (oboe) and Catherine Sweatman (soprano) “Song and Dance”. The Living Tree Cancer self help group 2pm Tripudio. 2.15pm Art with Libby. 2.30pm - 4pm Therapy- Anne Escott offering Foot Massage. Drop in any time between 2pm and 4.30pm at the Friends’ Meeting House, 95 South Street, Bridport DT6 3NZ. Tel 07341 916 976. www.thelivingtree.org.uk. Vimala Rowe/John Etheridge World music and jazz from top guitarist John Etheridge and vocalist Vimala Rowe. Refined jazz and blues tones shot through with tantalising touches of flamenco, Indian classical, and African timbres that beat at the boundaries of genre. 8pm. Tickets £16 (£31 with preshow supper at 7pm – must be prebooked). Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www. themeetinghouse.org.uk. Lyme Folk Weekend: Jon Boden Opening Lyme’s folk festival with a bang is Jon Boden, previously of Bellowhead. Support comes from the wonderful Askew Sisters. £20 advance and on the door Starts at 7.30pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.mari-

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netheatre.com. FRI 30 AUGUST – SUN 1 SEPT Lyme Regis Folk Festival See www. lymefolk.com for details. Including Popular local band HiDDeN will be appearing at Lyme Regis Folk Festival on Sunday 1st September. Prospect House Open Garden The prize-winning gardens will be open to the public under the National Gardens Scheme from 1pm - 5pm. The 1-acre garden, featured on BBC Gardeners’ World, is hidden behind stone walls with well-stocked borders with many rare shrubs, 250 varieties of salvia, other summer perennials and grasses. Tea and cakes are available on a patio with stunning Axe Valley views. Plants for sale. Prospect House is on Lyme Road, Axminster. Please look out for the yellow NGS signs. Entrance £4.50. Dogs on lead welcome. All proceeds go to the charities sponsored by the NGS including Macmillan Cancer Support, Marie Curie Cancer Care and Help the Hospices, among others. Local artist Zee Jones will be exhibiting her work. SATURDAY 31 AUGUST Big Breakfast / Brunch 10am – 12noon Last orders 11.30am. Only £4.50 for egg, sausage, bacon, tomato or beans, toast & tea or coffee. Extra portions 50p each. Vegetarian options available. Henhayes Centre - South Street Car Park, Crewkerne, TA18 8DA, 01460 74340. 40s Fashion Bridport Town Hall, 10am – 2pm free event, organised by the Bridport Heritage Forum. 40s Fashion, ‘Make do and Mend’, Knitting, Darning, Vintage Costumes, ‘Pop up’ 40s Fashion Shows. For more details contact Sheila Meaney on 01308 424169 or email: sheilannmeaney@ btinternet.com. Bridport & West Dorset Rambling Club 8 mile walk around the Isle of Portland 10.30am start. Bring picnic. No dogs. All welcome. Please call 01308 898002. Free live music by Unknown Quantity 11am – 1pm five-piece band performing a range of songs from the 60s onwards, using a variety of instruments, with interval music by Silver Chix: Female duo accompanied by ukulele and guitar This event forms part of the Music in the Garden season organised and sponsored each year by Axminster Arts. It will take place in the Courtyard Garden at the Arts Café Bar, The Old Courthouse, Church Street, Axminster EX13 5AQ. 01297 631455. CHILL-FEST Chillington Village (TA19 0PU) hold their annual festival in aid of St James Church, 11am

- 3.30pm, Adult entrance £1 for the whole event. The highlight is the Children’s festival with live music, games, face painting, various activities, nature trail etc (£5 per child for the whole event). There is a car boot sale (sellers set up from 10am, £5 per pitch, no food vendors), an Alice in Wonderland Flower festival in the Church, various arts, crafts, furniture and produce stalls throughout the village, a woodland nature walk, as well as Teas and Cakes, BBQ and Ice Creams. More details on Chillington Facebook page or tel 01460 55423. Bridport and District Gardening Club 2019 Late Summer Show in the United Church Hall, East Street, Bridport. The closing date for entries is 28th August from members or nonmembers, schedules are available on line from www.bridportgardeningclub. co.uk or from Ann Brown on 01308 424055. The show opens at 12noon until 3pm and entry is free. Teas and light refreshments are available and there will be a plant stall from 9am. The Ancestors A ‘Support The David Hall’ Event at 7.30pm. The Ancestors are a dynamic, four-piece, Yeovilbased band playing hits from the 90’s right through to the current day. Throwing in a mix of Rock and Pop tunes, The Ancestors can guarantee a great evening to get you dancing. They cover songs from artists that include The Kooks, The Cult, Stereophonics, The Killers, Hard-Fi, Maroon 5, The Dandy Warhols, David Guetta and Swedish House Mafia. Tickets: £10. No concessions. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall. org.uk 01460 240 340. Lyme Folk Weekend: Ninebarrow & Friends By popular demand, festival patrons will be bringing their unique ‘Ninebarrow & Friends’ show to Lyme Folk Weekend once again—this time with a whole new bunch of friends! £18 advance and on the door Starts at 7.30pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com.


Melplash — the show that nobody wants to miss FOR 172 years the Melplash Show in West Bay, Bridport has been celebrating the best of agriculture by the sea. This year’s one day farming, food and fun extravaganza takes place on Thursday 22nd August and is promising to be bigger and better than ever! Local farmers will as always be competing in the many livestock classes while other members of the local community will be vying for prizes in the handicraft, home produce and horticulture classes. There is an exciting timetable of attractions for all the family to enjoy both in the Bradfords Building Supplies main ring and in the Kitson & Trotman Solicitors countryside area including the grand parade of award winning animals, falconry, ferret and terrier racing as well as this year special main show attraction - the freestyle motocross rider Jamie Squibb and his team. For the younger generation there a packed programme of hands-on activities in the Discover Farming and Explore Farming marquees. In the popular cookery theatre, the Show welcomes Bridport born celebrity chef and restauranteur Mark Hix. Mark will be talking about, and demonstrating recipes from, his new book ‘Hooked—Adventures in Angling and Eating - which opens with the story of

his first catch in West Bay being cooked by his grandmother—the catalyst for his passion. He will be joined by other local chefs and drink experts including Helen Choudhury from the Taj Mahal, Jamie Pimbley from the Half Moon at Melplash, Lloyd Brown and friends from the Dark Bear and James Whetlor from Cabrito who will be showcasing ‘kid’ goat meat. Alongside there will be over 400 exhibitors and trade stands spread across three fields offering a wide range of products including the Food Hall which will be full of the very best food and drink from the South West. With the gates opening at 8.00 am and closing at 6 pm visitors of all ages are guaranteed a full day’s entertainment! Entry on the gate £17 for adults and children 16 years and under, go FREE. Buy your tickets in advance and save money - advance tickets can be bought from local venues or on-line at www.melplashshow.co.uk There is a free bus from Lyme Regis, Charmouth, Chideock and Bridport, free car parking at the Show site off the A35 and free Park and Ride sites around Bridport. All car parks will be well signposted, visit the show website for further information and timetables.

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Plan a Day Out in August D espite being known as a quiet month for many businesses the hospitality industry is busy and it’s also the month when there is no shortage of excuses for a day out. Here we feature some of the options available. So get your diary out and put these in in date order. South Perrott holds it’s annual village fair on August 11th this year from 11am to 4pm. This pretty Dorset village always has something to entertain the whole family. Wednesday August 14th is the date for the annual Gillingham and Shaftsbury Show. It is one of the largest one day agricultural shows in the south, held on the Turnpike Showground in North Dorset. This year looks all set to be one of the best events ever, with a record number of trade exhibitors, a great range of attractions for all the family and entries for the competitive classes being received at a record rate. If you want to experience real farming nostalgia, make a date

to visit Yesterday’s Farming on Saturday 17th and Sunday 18th at Leaze Farm in Hazelbury Plucknett. Arising from a meeting in 1972 of local people interested in vintage tractors and farming an organisation called the South Somerset Agricultural Preservation Club was formed and the first show was put on in 1973. It has been held every year since and has grown steadily from an event in two small fields to what you see today. Membership has since increased to 450 coming from all over parts of the United Kingdom, also Holland, Australia and Canada. Something for everyone at the Melplash Show Finish off the month on a high by visiting the Melplash Show in West Bay, Bridport on August 22nd. Always a popular event it is one of the South West’s premier agricultural exhibitions. The show is packed full of exhibits including livestock, horses, homecrafts and horticulture. There are over 400 trade stands selling everything from locally produced food to tractors… and plenty in between.


Courses&Workshops Tuesday 30 July Bridport Summer Yoga A different Yoga Teacher each week. Tuesday mornings 10am - 11.30am The Ballroom of The Bull Hotel, 34 East St, Bridport DT6 3LF (Public Car Parking is very near in East St car park). For information contact Corrie van Rijn on 01308 485544, corrievanrijn@ aol.com. Story telling with Martin Maudsley The Community Orchard 2pm - 3.30pm Ages: 5 to 12 years 15 places available Cost: £8 (£7 siblings and concessions). Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901. Wednesday 31 July Oops! Wow! A Dance Of Geometry with Jo Burlington and dancer Aimee Symes. Bridport Youth Centre, Gundry Lane Time:10am - 12noon Ages 5 – 9 years 15 places available. Cost: £10 ( £8 concessions and siblings) Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901. Gymnastics and games with choreographer and performer Xavi Monreal. St. Mary’s Church Hall 1.45pm - 2.30pm Ages: 4 – 5 years, 12 places available. Cost: £5 ( £4 concessions and siblings) Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901. Yoga, gymnastics and street dance with Xavi Monreal. St. Mary’s Church Hall South Street 2.45pm - 4pm Ages 6 – 9 years 15 places available Cost: £7 ( £6 concessions and siblings) **Please bring a Yoga Mat if you have one Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901. Thursday 1 August Dinosaurs Clay workshop 10am - 4pm, Lyme Regis Museum. Create a diplodocus or T Rex in clay, Explore textures and learn hand building techniques to create details and facial features. Drop in sessions included in the museum admission price. Elemental Art morning with community artist Kathy Kelly. Cooper’s Circle, Allington Hill (entrance Hospital Road) 10.30am - 12.30pm Ages: 5 years and over 12 places available. Cost: £9 (£7 concessions and siblings) Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901.

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From Wolf Hall to Poldark: Historical Dance Class meets 7.30pm - 9.30pm, St George’s Church Dorchester DT1 1LB. Taught by friendly specialist. No experience or partner needed. Wear light loose clothes & flexible footwear. £6 per stand-alone session, just turn up (every first Thursday, check before first time). Info Ann Hinchliffe 01935 472771 thedancingmaster@outlook.com. Stained Glass Make a stained glass angel, boat or cat decoration to hang in your window or adorn your house. With Sharan James. 10am - 1pm. £37.50. Places limited; advanced booking essential. Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www.themeetinghouse.org.uk. Thursday 1 - Sunday 4 August The Wildlife Garden Sketchbook The wildlife and vegetable garden at Kingcombe will provide inspiration and a variety of subject matter to illustrate, using a range of media, in a British made watercolour sketchbook. Any level of experience. Taught by Sarah Morrish. The course will start at 10am on Thursday with a morning session and will finish at 4pm on Sunday with afternoon tea. R £319 NR £208. The Kingcombe Centre, Lower Kingcombe, DT20EQ. T: 01300 320684. Visit www.kingcombe.org to book online. Friday 2 August By The Loom Craft Workshop A Dyeing Day to learn Acid and Natural techniques. More info or to book: 01404 831207 The Dye Garden/ Dye House Axminster Heritage Centre, Silver Street, Axminster, Devon, EX13 5AH. Jurassic Coast Clay Workshop 10am 4pm, Lyme Regis Museum. Have you been fossil hunting or seen the fantastic fossils in the museum? Bring the fossils to life learning how scientists think an ammonite looked when it lived in the oceans. Explore textures and learn clay coiling techniques. Drop in sessions included in the museum admission price. Fiery Dragons with local artist Darrell Wakelam. Broadoak Village hall, Broadoak 10.30am - 12noon Ages: 5 – 7 years 18 places available Cost: £8 ( £6 concessions and siblings) Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901. Pirate boats with Lyme Regis based artist Darrell Wakelam. Broadoak Village Hall, Broadoak 1pm - 3pm Ages: Ages 8 – 12 years 18 places available

Cost: £9 ( £7 concessions and siblings) Box Office: Bridport Tourist Information Centre, Bucky Doo Square, South Street, Bridport Telephone TIC: 01308 424901. Monday 5 August Family Beach Combing 2pm – 4.30pm £16 for one child & one adult, plus £5 per additional person. Leader : Sarah Johnson. An ideal opportunity to have some family fun on Seaton beach and in our light and airy creative space. Breathe in the sea air and see what we can find on the beach. We’ll then return to our workshop for some crafting fun. Coastal Craft Collective, 10 Marine Place, Seaton, Devon EX12 2QL 01297 691362 www. coastalcraftcollective.co.uk. Also 28 August 10am – 12.30pm. Tuesday 6 August Craft Afternoon 2pm Burton Bradstock Community Library. Artsreach Children event. Bridport Summer Yoga A different Yoga Teacher each week. Tuesday mornings 10am - 11.30am The Ballroom of The Bull Hotel, 34 East St, Bridport DT6 3LF (Public Car Parking is very near in East St car park). For information contact Corrie van Rijn on 01308 485544, corrievanrijn@ aol.com. Also on 13, 20 and 27 August. Adult Art Class every Tuesday 10am – 1pm, term time only at Whoopsadaisy, Silver St, Lyme Regis. Beginners and improvers welcome: Watercolour, acrylic, mixed media and drawing skills with Trudi Ochiltree BA Hons Fine Art, Art & Design PGCE. Half termly fee, equivalent of £15 per class depending on length of term. Taster class £7.50. Contact: 07812 856823 trudiochiltree@gmail.com www.trudiochiltree.co.uk. An Introduction to Bats Would you like to learn all about bats? Aimed at beginners, this workshop will introduce you to the basics of bat biology and ecology. Includes an evening session bat watching (weather permitting) and dinner. Led by Steve Masters. Arrive from 9.45am for morning tea. The course will start at 10am and finish later in the evening. £75 pp includes all tuition, morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner. The Kingcombe Centre, Lower Kingcombe, DT20EQ. T: 01300 320684. Visit www.kingcombe.org to book online. Tuesday 6 – Wednesday 7 August Getting Started with Family History - How to Research Back into the Mid 1800s Dillington House, Ilminster, looking at birth, death and marriage records and the census from 1841 - 1911. Tutor Bridport based family historian,


Jane FerentziSheppard. Fee is £105 for the two days and includes a three course lunch and tea and coffee during the day. For more information contact Dillington House on 01460 258613, dillington@ somerset.gov.uk www.dillington.com. Wednesday 7 August Dorchester Summer Yoga 10am – 11.30am and each Wednesday throughout August. Weekly drop -in classes at Dorchester Yoga and Therapy Centre - a different local, experienced teacher each week. A great opportunity to keep your practice going through the summer. Cost £8 per session, no need to book. For more information please contact Marj Snape – 07769949947 marjsnape@gmail. com or Sharon Cox-Button 07742821937 scoxbutton@gmail.com. Birds and Flowers Wire Sculpture Make beautiful wire hangings using wire. With Juliet Farnese. Suitable for all abilities. £35, plus £7 materials (payable to tutor on the day).10.30am - 3.30pm. Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East St, Ilminster TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. Wednesday 7 – Thursday 8 August Mosaic Workshop Wednesday 9.30am – 1pm, Thursday 9.30am – 11am £40. Leader : Alison Bowskill. Design a name plaque for your house, decorate a flower pot, a shaped picture or bring your own object to decorate. The first day will be designing and mosaicing and the second, allowing for overnight drying will be the final grouting stage. Coastal Craft Collective, 10 Marine Place, Seaton, Devon EX12 2QL 01297 691362 www.coastalcraftcollective.co.uk. Friday 9 August Cotton and Cold Water Dyes: Learn how to mix a range of colours, use a variety of techniques to apply the dyes and expect amazing results By the Loom - Axminster Heritage Spinning and Weaving group, friendly and supportive. £10 everyone welcome, beginners and the more experienced. 01404 831207 for more info or to book. 10.30am – 3pm at Dalwood Pavilion EX13 7EU. By The Loom - Axminster Heritage Spinning and Weaving Group.  Come along and learn new skills or use old ones with a friendly and supportive group.  £3 Everyone welcome; beginners and the more experienced. 10.30am 01404 831207 at Dalwood Pavilion EX13 7EU Saturday 10 August Chess Club Meet in LSI’s spacious indoor Courtyard. Introductory tuition for new players and competitors for those who know what they’re doing. All ages. All abilities. Every Saturday. 10am – 12noon. Free/Donation LSi Bridport, 51 East Street, Bridport DT6 3JX lsibridport.

co.uk. Punch Needle Wall Art 10am – 1pm £25. Spend a morning learning the relaxing craft of punch needle embroidery and create a gorgeous wall hanging. A perfect introduction for beginners. Coastal Craft Collective, 10 Marine Place, Seaton, Devon EX12 2QL 01297 691362 www. coastalcraftcollective.co.uk. Sunday 11 August From Wolf Hall to Poldark: Historical Dance Class meets 1.30pm – 4pm, Royal British Legion Hall, Victoria Grove, Bridport DT6 3AD.Taught by friendly specialist. No experience or partner needed. Wear light loose clothes & flexible footwear. £6 per stand-alone session, just turn up (every second Sunday, check before first time). Info Ann Hinchliffe 01935 472771 thedancingmaster@outlook. com. Tuesday 13 August Pottery Painting with Something Lovely Pottery Whether you are creative, looking to relax, make something special or just spend time with your friends and family; come along and have a go at painting pottery. 9.30am - 4pm. 1 1/2 hour slots available. Prices from £10 (includes paint, kiln firing and the finished piece). To book, contact: em@somethinglovelypottery.co.uk or call 07734 265524. Visit the website: www.somethinglovelypottery. co.uk Kennaway House 01395 515551. Also 20, 27 August. Bridport Summer Yoga A different Yoga Teacher each week. Tuesday mornings 10am - 11.30am The Ballroom of The Bull Hotel, 34 East St, Bridport DT6 3LF (Public Car Parking is very near in East St car park). For information contact Corrie van Rijn on 01308 485544, corrievanrijn@ aol.com. Also on 20 and 27 August.

materials and morning tea and coffee included, £40 per person per workshop (10% discount for booking all 4 sessions). www.jurassiccoaststudio.com 07973 769432. Something old, something new One day workshop. Make a patchwork cushion. Beginners welcome; a sewing machine would be an advantage. With Paula Simpson. 10am - 4pm. £30. Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www. themeetinghouse.org.uk. Saturday 17 August Beatrice potter inspired rabbits in clay 10am - 4pm, Lyme Regis Museum. Beatrice Potter stayed in Lyme Regis two years after the Tale of Peter Rabbit was published, she made several sketches of the town. The rabbits in her stories come to life in the illustrations. What kind of rabbit will you make in clay? Drop in sessions included in the museum admission price. Saturday 17 – Sunday 18 August Angels of Sound Weekend Voice Playshop and Pure Sound Therapy Practitioner Course Cycle 3, Module 1: 10am - 5pm Sat, 10am - 12.30pm Sun. Our Module 1 open to all is a perfect introduction to toning the chakras and overtoning, plus finding your individual Key Note to work with our Chakra Tones CDs in your own key, and dowsing the chakras for yourself and others. £55 for both days with advance/ early bird booking, otherwise £60 per module-includes Sunday’s Divine Union Soundbath. Attendees will need to bring their own pendulum dowser. Stour Row Village Hall, Stour Row, nr. Shaftesbury, Dorset SP7 0QG.

Wednesday 14 August Paper Making For Children 2pm – 4pm £15 Leader : Janine Ziolkowski. Your children can enjoy making paper from cotton and recycled paper. They can add petals, bits of thread, seaweed or photo copied pictures and more to personalise their work with different sizes and shapes. Coastal Craft Collective, 10 Marine Place, Seaton, Devon EX12 2QL 01297 691362 www.coastalcraftcollective. co.uk. Friday 16 August Collage and Recycling workshop 10am Burton Bradstock Community Library, Artsreach Children event. Textile Workshop - Introduction to felt making at The Durbeyfield, West Bay. 9.30am -3pm, all

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Sunday 18 August Dances With Shakespeare: Historical Dance Class meets 1.30pm – 4pm, Barrington Village Hall TA19 0JE. Taught by friendly specialist. No experience or partner needed. Wear light loose clothes & flexible footwear. £6 per stand-alone session, just turn up (every third Sunday, check before first time). Info Ann Hinchliffe 01935 472771 thedancingmaster@outlook.com. Monday 19 August House History 10am – 4pm hosted at Marsh Barn Farm, Burton Rd. Bridport. What resources to use when doing a house history project. Ideal for family and local historians. Tutor Jane FerentziSheppard, fee £30, includes material, coffee and biscuits, bring your own lunch. Plenty of parking, all on the flat. For more details contact Jane on 01308 425710 or email: jferentzi@aol.com. Monday 19 – Friday 23 August SummerMT@DYT 9.30am – 5pm Performance Friday 23 August, 7.30pm. Sunninghill Community Hall To book: phone 01305 266926 or email: finance@dorchesterarts.org.uk £125 for the week (some assisted places available, contact Dorchester Arts for more details.) Ages 10-18 A production in a week culminating in a performance where up to 30 young people take part in drama, song and dance. Tuesday 20 August Creative Arts Workshops 1.30pm 2.30pm Yoga-Dance freedom movement Then 3pm - 4pm Chair-based song and dance for over 50’s then 4.10pm - 5.30pm making basketry. adult sessions so Children interested must be accompanied. £4 per person per hour. Led by Petra 07719280375. The Salt House, by the bridge West Bay, Bridport. Willow Workshop Upcycled basket (discount-ask!) £55 Studi0ne, Broadwindsor Craft Centre, Dorset jojo.sadler@hotmail.co.uk josadlerforgednwillow.bigcartel.com 07531417209. Bridport Summer Yoga A different Yoga Teacher each week. Tuesday mornings 10am - 11.30am The Ballroom of The Bull Hotel, 34 East St, Bridport DT6 3LF (Public Car Parking is very near in East St car park). For information contact Corrie van Rijn on 01308 485544, corrievanrijn@ aol.com. Also on 27 August. Thursday 22 August Beach huts clay workshop 10am - 4pm, Lyme Regis Museum. A prominent part of the seaside is the colourful beach hut. Using air drying clay create your own unique beach hut, recreating the wood

38 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

textures in clay and personalising it with beach accessories. Drop in sessions included in the museum admission price. From Wolf Hall to Poldark: Historical Dance Class meets 7.30pm – 9pm, Castle Cary Market House BA7 7AH Taught by friendly specialist. No experience or partner needed. Wear light loose clothes & flexible footwear. £6 per stand-alone session, just turn up (every fourth Thursday, check before first time). Info Ann Hinchliffe 01935 472771 thedancingmaster@outlook.com. Friday 23 August The Octopus, Clay fun 10am - 4pm, Lyme Regis Museum. An intelligent creature. Will your octopus be a monster holding a boat in his tentacles or will it be chilled out on holiday holding an icecream and wearing sunglasses? Create something fun in clay. Drop in sessions included in the museum admission price. Textile Workshop Felt mosaics at The Durbeyfield, West Bay. 9.30am -3pm, all materials and morning tea and coffee included, £40 per person per workshop (10% discount for booking all 4 sessions). www.jurassiccoaststudio.com 07973 769432. Saturday 24 – Tuesday 27 August Self Cultivation + Creative Practice with Ryan Kiggell. A three day residential workshop in West Dorset. This is a self-cultivation retreat specifically for those with an artistic or creative practice, and any who are looking to galvanise, enrich and refresh their process. These powerful approaches to self cultivation, drawn largely from the trainings and philosophy of the Eastern internal arts, will consist of a range of static and moving exercises, rigorous bodywork, breathing / stillness practices and some practical seminars. Clearing the body of tension and stagnation, anchoring the mind and developing deep listening and observation are time-honoured methods in developing spontaneity, presence and insight - and with it connection to living sources of inspiration. Participants are invited to camp in the magical setting, close to the ancient Powerstock Common and West Dorset coast. Facilities are basic, but toilets and shower will be made available. All meals will be provided on site, cooked and prepared by a local caterer, with homegrown organic ingredients. The workshop offers a chance for participants to retreat from everyday responsibilities for a short while, and take time to immerse themselves in nature, good food, companionship, and personal retreat time. The cost of the retreat is £270, including 27 hours of training and all meals. Concessions are available for those in genuine need. email ryankiggell@

me.com if you want to sign up straight away. Powerstock West Dorset. Tuesday 27 August Bridport Summer Yoga A different Yoga Teacher each week. Tuesday mornings 10am - 11.30am The Ballroom of The Bull Hotel, 34 East St, Bridport DT6 3LF (Public Car Parking is very near in East St car park). For information contact Corrie van Rijn on 01308 485544, corrievanrijn@ aol.com. Wednesday 28 August Children’s Paint Pouring 1.30pm – 2.30pm or 4pm – 5pm £12.50 Leader : Gillian Beckman-Findlay. Suitable for children age 6+. Paint pouring uses acrylic paint along with a paint medium that encourages the paint to develop circular cells which create abstract masterpieces by letting the paint pigment basically run amok. There are endless creative possibilities. Coastal Craft Collective, 10 Marine Place, Seaton, Devon EX12 2QL 01297 691362 www.coastalcraftcollective. co.uk. Friday 30 August By The Loom - Axminster Heritage Spinning and Weaving Group Come along and learn new skills or use old ones with a friendly and supportive group.  £3 Everyone welcome; beginners and the more experienced. 10.30am – 3pm More info or to book: 01404 831207 The Bradshaw Meeting Room, Thomas Whitty House, Silver Street, Axminster, Devon, EX13 5AH.  Willow Workshop Bees £65 Studi0ne, Broadwindsor Craft Centre, Dorset jojo.sadler@hotmail.co.uk josadlerforgednwillow.bigcartel.com 07531417209. Textile Workshop 3D forms at The Durbeyfield, West Bay. 9.30am -3pm, all materials and morning tea and coffee included, £40 per person per workshop (10% discount for booking all 4 sessions). www.jurassiccoaststudio.com 07973 769432. Fri 30 August – Sunday 1 September Wallpaper Weekend Workshop Create your own plant-inspired repeat patterns and design before printing a length by hand. Taught by Hugh Dunford Wood. The course will start at 4.30pm on Friday with dinner at 6pm and an introductory session. Residents are welcome to arrive from 3pm. R £345 NR £261. The Kingcombe Centre, Lower Kingcombe, DT20EQ. T: 01300 320684. Visit www. kingcombe.org to book online.


MAKE YOUR OWN WALLPAPER With Hugh Dunford Wood at The Kingcombe Centre CREATE your own plant-inspired repeat patterns and design before printing a length by hand. We are really pleased to welcome back to Kingcombe, renowned artist and printmaker Hugh Dunford Wood for a fabulous weekend of creativity. There will be a natural progression from the simple beginnings of printing with potato cuts, which are great for small runs like a lampshade or an end paper. Then you’ll look at some classic patterns and work out what makes them successful; also you will be shown some less successful patterns (some being Hugh’s) for comparison. You will be encouraged to do some direct observational plant drawing to then use as a basis for an original design (which might even end up as an abstract). This will then be worked up in repeat (with guidance) and transferred in reverse onto a lino block, which will be cut and printed. Et voila, everyone there is a confirmed designer! The delight is not about the most successful design, but about the variety of possibilities which emerge as the students develop their individual work. Hugh’s aim is to demonstrate how it is possible to embark on this adventure, with some ease and considerable enjoyment. There is no mystery, no technical knowhow. It is all accessible and do-able by anyone who can wield a pencil. You don’t have to have particular drawing skills or artistic bent, just a willingness to explore. You will go home

with a set of cutting tools, a lino block and inspiration. Hugh Dunford Wood studied at the Ruskin School of Drawing & Fine Art at Oxford. He has painted and exhibited worldwide, and was Artist in Residence at The Royal Shakespeare Company, and several years later at the Globe Theatre when it first opened in 2000. After a time being mentored by Peggy Angus in applied design, Hugh had a textile design business for 20 years, before moving a couple of years ago to printing on paper as a small run business, the results of which you can see on www.handmadewallpaper.co.uk. Hugh has been teaching his unique wallpaper making and design course for many years. Residential: £345 pp includes 2-nights sole occupancy accommodation, full board including a home-cooked breakfast, tea/cake, lunch and 3-course dinner, all tuition/ activities and materials. Non-Residential: £261 pp includes all of the above except accommodation and breakfast. Start: The course will start at 4:30pm on Friday with dinner at 6pm and an introductory session. Residents are welcome to arrive from 3pm. Finish: The course will finish at approximately 4pm on Sunday with afternoon tea. What to bring: Drawing items, pencils, rubbers and designs for inspiration, plus an apron if you have one.

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News &Views

DONYATT

POWERSTOCK

WEST DORSET

The statue of an evacuee at Donyatt Hall has been damaged by vandals, causing frustration for volunteers involved in the old Stop Line junction, which was restored as part of a community project between 2005 and 2009. Vandals have struck there repeatedly. In November 2015 the figure, known as Doreen and based on a real evacuee, had to be made again following an arson attack. After the fire, restoration cost around £10,000, all raised by local individuals and businesses. Donyatt resident Nick Chalon is furious at the lack of respect being shown to the historic landmark. He says people have been sunbathing on top of the shelter and a boy was seen sitting on a top of a sign, when there are plenty of benches that can be used.

Eight homes built in partnership with Powerstock and District Community Land Trust and rural housing specialists Hastoe Housing Association on land donated by the Crutchley Estate have breathed new life into the village. The scheme was praised during last month’s Rural Housing Week, with Cllr Graham Carr-Jones, Dorset Council’s portfolio holder for housing, saying: “Forge Orchard is a perfect example of just how well community land trusts can work. It shows just what can be done if the community gets behind a scheme. I hope the success of such schemes as Forge Orchard inspires other communities to seriously consider CLTs too. Our Opening Doors programme has identified affordability as a major issue in Dorset and CLTs are one of the ways of breathing new life into villages with affordable homes for local people.”

An 18-month-old Shar-Pei fell down a 500ft cliff but survived for 45 days by eating sticks, stones and seaweed. Shadow, who went missing after slipping his harness between Golden Cap and West Bay, is now on the road to recovery. Extensive searches involved the West Bay Coastguard Rescue Team, local people and drones. The dog was found more than a month later by holidaymakers on the beach. He’s had to have surgery to remove the material from his stomach and an operation by a specialist orthopaedic surgeon to mend a badly healed leg fracture. Shadow’s owner Amber Whiting, who set up a Just Giving page for donations towards the cost of the surgery to his leg, said it had been a very long and emotional few months.

Community project attacked again

AXMINSTER

Plans for housing unveiled Proposals to build more than half the 850 homes in the town’s eastern urban extension have been unveiled by the Crown Estate. Plans for 441 dwellings have been submitted to East Devon District Council as part of the authority’s masterplan for the area. Around 110 homes—some 25 per cent—are described as ‘affordable’. The scheme will also provide the central section of the proposed relief road, as well as space for new offices, shops and community facilities. More than 160 local residents commented on the proposals following public consultation in February. It follows applications submitted earlier in the year by Persimmon Homes for 305 homes and 3.2 hectares of employment land to the north of the Crown Estate site and 104 homes to the south.

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Praise for village housing scheme

Missing dog’s long road to recovery

DORCHESTER

Plans for multi-storey car park

Plans to ease Dorset County Hospital’s parking problems with a multi-storey car park have been unveiled at a drop-in event. The hospital trust wants to develop the Dorchester site and expand services. If approved, the car park would be built on the south east corner, near Williams Avenue and Damers Road. This would enable land to be freed up for the trust to expand its emergency department and intensive care unit, along with an integrated care hub. The trust also wants to develop land it owns on the site of the former Damers School and the current trust headquarters as a mix of health and care-related facilities and housing to raise money to help pay for building clinical facilities. A planning application is due to be submitted later in the summer.


Packing for a Summer Holiday in 2019 Laterally Speaking by Humphrey Walwyn

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ff on your summer hols this year? Lucky you! But don’t pack too much stuff, particularly as airlines charge us increasing amounts for every bag carried in the hold. Here’s my lateral packing list to confuse you as to what to take… Passport / visas etc: I’m assuming that you’re off on holiday before the End of the World (otherwise known as Brexit—the No Deal Option) currently scheduled for Halloween October 31st. If so, just take your passport and all the usual essential identity stuff (out of date parking voucher from Crewkerne, Lidl Welcome Card, urine sample etc) to prove that you are whom you say you are. Of course, if you’re travelling post Brexit, then all bets are off. Nobody knows what you’ll need. It all depends upon the type of Brexit. You might need a European Visa, a copy of your birth certificate or even a mouth swab or a print-out of your DNA records… In the old days, a well-placed bank note used to work wonders as a bribe, but be warned that this can also send you to jail which would rather put a dampener on your holiday plans. Anyway, travelling after November 1st means you can’t be on a real summer holiday, so this magazine article doesn’t apply to you. If in doubt, scan your passport and send it as an email to your mobile phone. That way you’ve always got a copy. Unless you lose your phone… Your phone See above - your most important travel accessory and space saver. It’s a currency converter, multilingual phrase book, Sat Nav, tourist map, music player and camera all in one. It’s a wonder to me how we ever got anywhere or did anything without one. Use your mobile for all of these things and more, but never actually use it as a phone. You may want to speak to your darling kids and grandchildren and send them WhatsApp photos of the beautiful view from your hotel window but please don’t. Unbeknown to you, they were there last year. Besides, they

party rave. And if you don’t have spare ones, you’ll go and buy another pair at your beach boutique. I just know you will. And they’ll look like expensive ‘Dita MachSix’ or Prada (‘great value bargain, monsieur’) but in fact they’re an equally expensive North Korean copy. Not Gucci but Gwachi. Correct logo, but I’m afraid you’ve been done… Art Every year I take a sketchpad and paints because I’m sure I’ll want to try a bit of holiday painting. And every year, the same art set comes back unused in Sometimes, holiday stuff bought in Ibiza should stay in Ibiza… my suitcase. Why do I do this? Do I have a secret don’t really want to know where you longing to be a Monet or Manet? Obviare. It might also make them jealous and ously not. Why don’t I just accept the fact increase family disharmony. You will then that I can’t draw and have another holiday return to the UK to find that local Italotequila instead. Turkish telecoms have added a couple Clothes of hundred quid to your phone account Take the absolute minimum. This is a for unannounced data roaming charges. holiday not a fashion show. However, it’s Welcome home! a wonderful opportunity to clear out your Digital extras clothes cupboard, so pack a little special Don’t forget your chargers, headsomething to wear for that anniversary dinphones, power bank, spare USB cables, ner or the inevitable Caribbean theme dress adapters and voltage converters. You’ll evening. You know that frightful orange also have to allow an extra three kilos and bright green beach shirt you were once for all this wiring—much more if you’re given as a birthday present by a colouralso taking your laptop and your tablet blind old friend and have never actually and Kindle etc—but then I’d question worn? Finally—here’s its chance! And that why you’re going on holiday at all, if slinky all-too-revealing dress with the violet you can’t take even a tiny break from all watermelon design that you bought in Mayour emails and wall-to-wall watching of jorca after too many glasses of Pinot GriNetflix and BBC iPlayer. gio? You know—the one that you’ll never Drugs ever wear because it’s so obviously NOT I suppose it’s obvious but the older you? Yes—put it in your suitcase now. If one gets, the more packets of pills and you’re going to embarrass yourself, do it potions we have to take with us. Add this once in a far-off place where nobody another two kilos. Given my advancing will know who you are. Wear it and be the years, I am now a travelling pharmacy. talk of a strange town for a night. What I feel like I could probably set up a disa way to go in a blaze of fake satin glory! pensing service for half the guests in my Just make sure you leave it hanging on the Spanish hotel. back of your hotel room door when you Sunglasses leave. That way you’ve saved enough room Why do I always lose my dark glasses? in your suitcase to buy another embarrassTake spare sunglasses because you’re ingly bad taste article of clothing which bound to lose your best ones over the you can wear the following summer. side of a boat or sat upon during a beach

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Jurassic Coast Trust celebrates and looks to an exciting future

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his month marks two years since the Jurassic Coast Trust took over the full management responsibility for protecting and conserving the ‘Outstanding Universal Value’ of the 95 mile stretch of land from East Devon to Dorset, designated as England’s only Natural World Heritage Site. The ever-changing landscape of the Jurassic Coast brings with it a host of new challenges and opportunities which the charity has been busy embracing since the transition out of Local Authority management in 2017. As well as core conservation and protection work, which includes consultation on planning and development proposals and advising on coastal sea defence schemes, the Trust has been developing interpretation and education outreach projects and a joined-up volunteering and capacity building programme called the Jurassic Coast Volunteer Network. And,

in today’s increasingly challenging funding environment, there has been a need to prioritise work to build plans for the sustainable and secure future for the Trust in the future. A recent funding success includes securing a two-year core grant from the Garfield Weston Foundation to support the work of the Trust and to help build capacity to develop and deliver core conservation projects on the Jurassic Coast. The details for this work have yet to be set but will be shaped by input from over 80 partners along the Coast who are in the process of being consulted onm priorities and the details of a new five-year Partnership Plan for the management of the World Heritage Site. Fundamental to the work of the Trust, the Plan is part of the requirements of UNESCO and is central to maintaining World Heritage status. To compliment this core work, the inno-

Summer Inspiration on the Jurassic Coast-. Photograph Jurassic Coast Trust 42 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

vative and entrepreneurial aspirations of the Trust were recently recognised by ‘Power to Change’, a Charitable Trust who operate solely to support community businesses in England. The Jurassic Coast Trust was selected from over 230 applicants as one of 80 organisations across England to be included on the Power to Change Community Trade Up programme. The Trust will receive a grant to develop entrepreneurial ideas to develop financial sustainability through trade. Lucy Culkin, Acting Head of Operations at the Jurassic Coast Trust advised: “We are delighted to be recognised and supported by the Garfield Weston Foundation and Power to Change Charitable Trust. We will be using this funding to make a real impact on the protection and conservation work we deliver along the coast. We are excited about the opportunities this funding affords us and how we can put aspirations into actions in the coming months.” The Trust is currently delivering a busy and action-packed summer events programme, including learning outreach at local events and festivals, guided walks and children’s activities. From September, the new Partnership Plan consultation meetings will take place across the coast and information on dates and ways to contribute will be available on www.jurassiccoast.org Finally, the charity is also focusing on the important job of recruiting a new Chief Executive over the summer and into the autumn, as Chair Alexandra O’Dwyer explains: “We have a really important vacancy for a Chief Executive at the JCT and we’re looking for someone very special to lead the work of our organisation and to drive our ambitious plans, to motivate and inspire our staff, volunteers, partners and supporters and in particular to ensure that the new Partnership Plan is successfully delivered through building really effective relationships with stakeholders. You can find out more about the job at www.jurassiccoast. org/ceorecruit and you have until 16th September to apply. To be successful you will need senior level experience running an organisation, preferably a charity, so you understand all that this entails, from funding, finance and governance to human resources, project delivery and communications. While we would expect you to have a real interest in and understanding of heritage and conservation we aren’t specifically requiring candidates to have a scientific background, though it could be an advantage.”


Exhibition marks 1919 sale of village

Debut novel to raise funds for sexual abuse charity

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CERNE Historical Society has been awarded a grant of £6,700 by The National Lottery Heritage Fund towards the cost of this year’s centenary celebrations of the 1919 auction sale of Cerne Abbas by the Pitt-Rivers family. The grant, supplemented by money raised within the village has enabled the Society to put on an Exhibition to mark the centenary of this pivotal moment in the history of the village. On September 24th 1919 the Pitt-Rivers family, which had owned most of Cerne Abbas since 1705, put the village up for sale at auction. The auction took place at 1.30pm in Dorchester Town Hall and a total of £67,402 was raised from the 73 lots. The sale included houses, shops, farms, pubs and plots of land. Some lots were bought by the sitting tenant, some by other bidders. There will be a major exhibition in St Mary’s Church in the centre of Cerne Abbas from 25th September 2019 to 5th October daily, except for the 28th September, from 10am to 5pm. Using the original sale particulars and plans, maps, newspaper articles, photos old and new and recent research carried out by members of the Society the exhibition will provide details of all the properties sold in the auction and those who lived in and purchased them. Other displays will give more information on the background to the Sale, why the Pitt-Rivers family chose to sell at this point, a history and snapshot of the village as it was at this period just after World War One. Local schoolchildren will display the results of a photographic project and other work. More information can be found on the Historical Society website: cerneabbashistory.org

he Crazy Adventures of a Lovesick Angel is the first novel by former Australian Daily Telegraph journalist Jennie Jones. It is about a man who dies from a broken heart. He returns to earth as an angel with three tasks. He must help the woman he loves to chase her dreams, love herself and to meet Mr Right. Part novel/part self help book, it is very funny, but has a serious side. It looks at power imbalances between people, whether in romantic relationships, family members or at work, and how these affect our lives. Set in Weymouth, Dorset, it includes real places, and real-life interviews from dating experts, counsellors and workplace coaches. The book is self-published, and will be available from www. amazon.co.uk as a paperback £7.99 or ebook £2.99. Jennie has written this as a fundraiser for Stop It Now!, a charity that helps prevent the sexual abuse of children. The aim is to raise £5,000, which will help the charity to develop and run services that protect children from harm. This charity believes that such abuse is preventable, not inevitable. Their mission is to prevent such abuse by working with perpetrators (both adults and young people), and also by advising communities on this complex issue. Here’s a few of the great things they do: The Helpline: They’ve got a free and confidential helpline, (freephone: 0800 1000 900) which is used by more than 5,000 people each year. Callers include adults worried about sexual thoughts or behaviour of other adults and children, those worried about their own thoughts/behaviour, and also family and friends of people arrested for sexual offences. The charity estimates that 96% of repeat callers follow the actions they give them. Helping people to change their behaviour: Each year, the charity works with hundreds of people to prevent offending behaviour. For instance, they estimate that around 97% of the people they’d worked with, who had illegal online behaviour, said they had made great progress on their ability to reduce their risk of re-offending. Advising communities and families: The charity trains more than 1,500 professionals each year on how to better protect children. It also has lots of advice on their website for parents, with advice on how to create a safer environment for children, and—if needed— how to support them if they disclose abuse or run into trouble online. The book is available from July 1st from www. amazon.co.uk. For more information visit www. awaywiththeangels.com and www.stopitnow.org.uk. Jennie Jones

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Celebration Year for Colyford Goose Fayre Colyford Goose Fayre celebrates its 40th anniversary in September and founders George and Hilary Mabon share some memories.

The Colyford Goose Fayre song

‘Upon my wife, Hilary, and I returning from Singapore to live in Colyford, my in-laws (Harry & Lily Pady) retired to Holcombe bungalow. We took over Dare’s Farm, a 16th Centuary thatched longhouse, with nine bedrooms; little did we know that one day it would be full of friends & relatives staying for our first Goose Fayre in 1980. ‘One day my brother-in-law, Colin called in after finishing his milk round and we got talking round the table while having a cup of tea. We started talking about how fast the village of Colyford was growing and how the people living outside the boundary of the village felt left out as all the men were eligible to be burgesses who lived within the boundary but not those outside. ‘Each year since the 1900s the whole village were invited to beat the bounds; this was to show everyone exactly where the boundary was. On checking back through the historical records held by each mayor, I found that King John had granted Colyford permission to hold a yearly seven day Fayre to Sir Thomas Bassett in 1215 (the same man who was a signatory on the Magna Carta). ‘During this conversation, Colin suggested we had a Goose Fayre, the intention being, to bring the whole village working together in harmony. Before we knew it, our first batch of goslings were ordered and thus began the first Colyford Goose Fayre. ‘With her military background, Hilary was made general manager and used her training to draw up a plan of the field, generously loaned to us by Geoff and Lynn Marshall who owned the old manor, at this time. Months of planning went into making this idea come to fruition and gradually more and more villagers came on board; everyone bringing ideas and every organisation in the village sending representatives along to committee meetings until suddenly the last Saturday in September was upon us. Apart from all the planning on the field, a team of sewing ladies setup and the whole village had been encouraged to make medieval costumes and parade down centre of village led by mace bearer, village constable and mayor and his wife under a baldakin for opening at the feild; Joe made his famous plum wine; apple pies were made along with a huge ram roast, pancakes, ale and cider tents and a tea tent. The stalls were many and various but one restriction (which remains to this day) is no electricity is allowed on the field. Potters wheel, lacemaking, cider-making, a variety of games such as quintain a medieval game, skittles and ox-cart rides were very popular. Except for one incident at the first Fayre when one of the oxen sneezed and his head went to left and caught his horn on the rope attached to the toilet tent and pulled the toilet cover off with a poor gentleman sitting on the throne, to everyone’s amusement. The oxen were named Oxo & Bisto. The bodger was always popular along with the fortune teller, potter, Mummer’s play, with the cast including a local Doctor, Vicar and Mayor. The ox cart rides and greasy pole and marrow dangling were all well supported, ‘The local vicar had another ancient custom to perform on Fayre day the hard fasting ceremony, where couples from the village were invited to pledge there allegiance to each other  ‘After the Fayre, which included a pet’s corner, everyone pitched in clearing the field as much as possible. All the pets had to be returned back to the farm; the geese were auctioned off and one couple were seen roaring up Boss Hill in a cloud of smoke, engine at full pelt, sitting on a motor bike, with the husband driving and his wife sitting behind him with a goose under each arm, heading towards Lyme Regis! (wonder if they took off up to sky). ‘In the evening at Dares Farm our rooms even along our 20 yard by 6-foot upstairs corridor were full of people, where we all got together for a sing a long of ballads and folk songs and of course a rendition of the Colyford Goose Fayre song, accompanied by Humphrey Hick’s gin cocktails. ‘Lastly, the fortune teller (Jill’s) prediction that year was correct in 1979 when she told everyone it was going to be a fantastic success. It continues as we say happy 40th birthday to the Colyford Goose Fayre and here’s to the next 40 years. How right she was. Special thanks to Hilary, Colin and Vals in-laws and outlaws (from Isle of Wight) herdsman Chris and Audrey, Seaton Lions club and of course to all Colyfordians and Burgesses without there sterling support Goosey Fayre would not survive as long as it has.’

Come to the Colyford goosey fayre Upon a Michaelmas day There’s all to see and there’s lots to share For everyone come what may, There’s ale and cider for drinking men And cakes and buns for tea. There’s ringing the shoe and geese in the pen And plenty more to see.

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Try your skill with the English bow Or guessing the weight of a pig. There’s sheaves above a bar to throw And dancers doing a jig. There’s music wafting on the air That players sweetly play, So come to the Colyford goosey fayre Upon a Michaelmas day, So come to the Colyford goosey fayre Upon a Michaelmas day. Words by Dennis Warren Music by Mick Bye

This Year’s Fayre The 40th Colyford Goose Fayre is scheduled for Saturday 28th September 2019 During the afternoon there will be various demonstrations of traditional country crafts, falconry, fighting knights and cider-pressing. Opportunities to engage in circus skills, Morris dancing, skittling, archery, riding the quintain or fighting it out on the greasy pole will be among the entertainment provided. A huge variety of stalls and refreshment tents, including the traditional ram roast, contribute to a spectacular event with something for all of the family. The procession will move off from The Elms on the A3052 (By the Memorial Hall) at 1.30 pm. and make it’s way to the main site. The A3052 is usually closed for around 30/45 minutes for this event. The Fayre will open officially at 1.45 p.m. at the site just down Seaton Road (turn off the A3052 by the Post Office). There is a large car park which is accessed via Orchard Close. Car Parking is free. There is an admission charge to access the main site of £4 and entry is free for children under 14 when accompanied by an adult.


Never before told story of Dorset resident’s life in Afghanistan revealed in new book THE remarkable Afghan diaries of former Dorset resident, Jean Heringman Willacy, have now been released in a new book. The Keeper of Families: Jean Heringman Willacy’s Afghan Diaries published by AuthorHouse UK, reveals the astonishing double life of an intrepid American woman, at retirement age, alternating a quiet existence in picturesque, rural Dorset, with her other life in vibrant and volatile Afghanistan. In a story never-beforetold, The Keeper of Families is Willacy’s Afghan legacy of diaries, letters, and live tape recordings compiled and transcribed by her third daughter, Sue Heringman. Travelling back and forth, exporting the then-fashionable Afghan coats to the hippy generation, Willacy is witness to a brutal military coup, a society forcibly changed, and a refugee crisis of global dimensions unleashed. Fearing for her many friends, Willacy is transformed from enterprising businesswoman to staunch ally of an ever-growing number of Afghan refugees—their “Keeper of Families”—as they strive together to overcome the horrors of the Soviet-Afghan War and its aftermath. The book features: the shock of being an eyewitness to the communist coup, leading to the Soviet invasion; the realities of living in a Soviet puppet state; stories from the refugee camps in Pakistan and from refugees in exile around the world and the different perspectives of Afghan women on Afghan life. It also features dialogues with officialdom: fighting the tyranny of bureaucracy, as well as Willacy’s photographs and Afghan refugee children’s war drawings from a major art exhibition. Heringman notes that The Keeper of Families is a story that, tragically, remains all too relevant, as Afghanistan still makes headlines, and one refugee crisis follows another. She says, “I felt I owed it to my mother and her adoptive Afghan family to share all she had preserved of their life together, in her own narrative, that still resonates today. Hopefully, Jean and the refugees whom she championed can now live on and inspire others, just as she wished.” The Keeper of Families By Sue Heringman Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 372 pages | ISBN 9781728380636 Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 372 pages | ISBN 9781728380643 E-Book | 372 pages | ISBN 9781728380650 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

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100 Years Young!

Sketching walks through woods with Hardy’s Cottage artist in residence

Axminster Country Market joins the celebration

STARTED in WWI to help feed a hungry nation, Country Markets are celebrating their 100th anniversary this year. However, with no food miles, minimal packaging, full traceability and local produce, the celebrations are as much about the bright future of the markets as the long history. Selling purely locally grown fruit & veg, home-baked cakes & savouries, homemade preserves, homegrown flowers and a huge range of crafts, the markets are a nationwide co-operative of local producers, who produce food and craft to high standards and strict guidelines. It is a fantastic source of income for the home producers, and as its a national organisation, there is plenty of guidance and support. Axminster Country Market has been running for over 40 years, and every Thursday a loyal following visit for cakes, free-range eggs, amazing veg, beautiful crafts and of course, a nice chat. In July they held a special market, with tasters and drinks for all visitors, and the mayor and town crier joined them to celebrate 100 years of feeding the nation, and to look forward to the next 100 years of co-operative, sustainable production. Find them from 8.30 am-12 noon in the Masonic Hall, South Street.

No food miles, minimal packaging, full traceability & local produce

46 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

123 Hardy’s Cottage, Dorset © National Trust Images Robert Morris AN artist will take up residence in Thomas Hardy’s childhood cottage this summer, offering visitors the chance to see her at work and take part in sketching walks of the surrounding woods. Daria Lugina, from the United States, has just graduated in English and painting from Boston University. As part of her course, she studied Thomas Hardy. She said: “I wanted to explore his work through painting, as landscape is so important to him.” Daria will begin her residency on August 5 and will be at Hardy’s Cottage for three weeks. Each Thursday, she will take visitors on sketching walks of the surrounding Thorncombe Woods, which are managed by Dorset County Council. The walks, which are free, will last two hours, and artists are advised to bring their own sketchpads and pencils. More information about the event can be found at www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ hardys-cottage

Home Start volunteers needed to offer support to local families HOME Start West Dorset is a charity working with families with a child under five, who are in need of practical help and emotional support. Helen Horsley, Manager of Home-Start West Dorset said “This year we are celebrating 10 years of helping local families, without volunteers we could not offer the service we do and make a real difference to the families we support. We know our volunteers enjoy and get a lot from the role and many stay with us for a number of years” In September they will be starting a new volunteer training course and would love to hear from anyone with parenting experience who would like to join the team. Jacqueline, a recently trained volunteer said; “I have been a Home-Start volunteer for a year. I saw an advertisement in a local paper and went ahead and applied. I didn’t realise at that point how rewarding I would find the process and the great friends I have made along the journey. “I felt Home-Start West Dorset looked an interesting and unique project that could benefit many people in West Dorset. The training was always fun and informative and great preparation for supporting families. I support a family by being a listening ear, signposting and being practical help. This could mean accompanying a family to a hospital appointment, playing with children, passing on your skills to a family or gathering further support to address needs of the family. Home-Start West Dorset has been essential to gaining valuable advice and information to support my families. The journey has twists and turns along the way, but you are never alone. People with a wealth of experience are never too far away to listen to concerns and offer help and support.” Home Start works locally in West Dorset, Weymouth and Portland. The training course lasts 10 weeks and you need to have 2-3 hours a week available to support a local family. For more information call 01305 265072 or look at www. homestartwestdorset.com


A Look Back at AUGUST in the Marshwood Vale Magazine

2004 & 2009 HAVING produced the Marshwood Vale Magazine for the best part of twenty years, looking back over these pages from our 2004 and 2009 editions brings back many memories. Although our focus has always been more about community than image, it’s good to see that the beautiful black and white photographs that we refused to take off our front covers were as captivating then as they are now—as are the people behind those stories. Apart from the many fascinating articles on individuals and places that we have published over the years, there have also been many wonderful people contributing to this community venture. And one that stood out for so many years was Ron Frampton, who sadly passed away in June. It was looking back over some of the work he did that inspired us to produce this extended edition of the Marshwood Vale Magazine. We plan to produce the Marshwood + every month and use it to take a look back over previous years. Not only for those that enjoy remembering some of the special people and moments that we have highlighted over the years, but also for those that may either have missed an issue or simply weren’t around at the time. This month we have chosen front covers and a small selection of pages from 2004 and 2009—10 and 15 years ago. In August 2004 we published a photograph and short story about Michael Walton from Beer. Inside there were Outposts in the Community which included Palmers Wine Store and the Crown at Uploders. There was also the wonderful story of Ken Wheadon from Combe St. Nicholas, compiled by Ron Frampton in his Images of Everyday Life, as well as the story of Sherborne House as part of our Historic Impressions series. And of course, there was an interview with the late John Hubbard, the Chilcombe-based artist who supported and then inspired the ‘Marshwood Arts Awards and John Hubbard Prize.’ In August 2009 we featured Robin Mills’ conversation with Peter Thomas from Rampisham and learned about his life as a farmer turned craftsman. Rosie Boycott became a regular contributor and Derek Stevens wrote about his memories of World War Two. In 2009 the Abbotsbury-based gallery Dansel celebrated 30 years in business, this year they are still celebrating after 40 years selling woodwork, furniture and gifts made by Eypebased founders Danielle and Selwyn Holmes. In the same month, Mark Hix was offering recipes for tomatoes—useful information at this time of year. A lot has happened in the years since we first published our monthly look at the area around West Dorset, South Somerset and East Devon. And although the global landscape has changed dramatically, it’s fair to say that much of what we love about this area still retains a gentle magic that not only keeps people returning to visit and enjoy but also inspires other writers, photographers and historians to highlight and look anew at what we have featured for so many years. Long may that continue. Fergus Byrne

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FR EE

THE

MARSHWOOD VALE For West Dorset, South Somerset and East Devon

MAGAZINE August 2004-Issue 65

Michael Walton, photograph by Nathan Glover

Arts & Entertainment Food & Dining Gardening Interiors Health & Environment

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Outposts in the community Where to get your Marshwood Vale Magazine

Cover story

OUTPOSTS is a regular feature where we highlight some of the many outlets that carry your community magazine. Copies are available along the coast from Sidmouth in East Devon to Portland in West Dorset and in towns and villages from Ottery St. Mary to Yeovil. To stock the Magazine telephone 01308 423031.

Michael Walton, photograph by Nathan Glover

Palmers Wine Store, photograph by Belinda Silcox

Palmers Wine Store in Bridport’s South Street has a reputation as an excellent purveyor of fine wines. The store stocks over 300 wines, ports, sherries and spirits to suit all budgets and tastes. Palmers offers an invaluable advisory service and also has a sale or return policy. They offer a comprehensive range of bottled beers and minerals as well as their excellent draught beer, with three or four varieties available every day. Palmers Wine Store is open Monday - Saturday from 9am - 6pm. There is a customer car park at the rear. All enquiries 01308 427500 or email enquiries@ palmersbrewery.com.

A resident of Beer in East Devon, Michael Walton was born in London, in 1932. He went to a school founded by his mother, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire. When Michael was eight, he heard a reading of a letter written by the founder of the Order of the Cross, John Todd Ferrier. This began the inspiration for his life's work. From then on, the wonder of Ferrier's message was with him throughout his childhood and as a young man. Michael studied music and craftwork with Dolmetsh, later he spent three years at the Royal Academy of Music where he came under the

personal influence of Vaughan-Williams. The three years 1969-72 were spent creating music at Emerson College, with students of the Michaelic Impulse and under World Vision of Rudolf Steiner. In 1975, he began his career as an author and has published twenty-six titles. The final volume, Grail, has been read aloud in the Anchor Inn, Beer, his second home. Now, aged 72, he plans to retire or perhaps find a new career. He was dubbed ‘Bard of Beer’ two years ago and now feels that even more accomplishment is possible.

Come to the

114th Annual Show

Martock

The Crown Inn, photograph by Belinda Silcox

A warm welcome is assured at The Crown Inn, Uploders outside Bridport. The 17th Century pub was taken over by former Pub of the Year winners Rod and Joanie Johnson with their partner Phil Timms last year. The team have decided to open all day during the summer months and will be offering light refreshments and cream teas during the day. The Pub offers delicious freshly prepared and locally sourced food, with plenty of ‘specials’ and an extensive Palmers wine list. There is a non-smoking restaurant, good car parking and a pretty garden in which to enjoy the atmosphere of this friendly village pub. Summer opening times 11am - 11pm For enquiries or bookings 01308 485089.

Parish Hall

Saturday 28 August 2pm Grand presentation of trophies at 3 pm Sale of surplus produce etc Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 49


Images of everyday life Compiled by Ron Frampton

Ken Wheadon, photograph by Peter Livingstone

FOR this issue of Images of everyday life, Peter Livingstone met Ken Wheadon at his workshop in Combe St. Nicholas. “I was born in 1925 at Corfe, a village near Taunton. My father was one of seven children and my mother one of thirteen. Dad was a gardener for a local doctor. I went to Corfe school and didn’t leave the village until I was seven. When I was eight, I would snare rabbits and take them to the blacksmith to be collected by a Taunton man. My friends and me would put West of England hessian sacks over our heads for protection and crawl under the brambles at the local golf club, Pickeridge. We gathered up golf balls and would sell them back to the golfers. When I was eleven, I helped with the harvest after school, until it was dark. The highlight of my young life was to take the big Shire horses back to the stable. I’d then go back to the farmhouse for cheese and cider. In 1937, my father got a job as a maintenance engineer at Brecknell and Willis, a Chard engineering factory, and we moved to the nearby village of Combe St. Nicholas. I attended the village school from the ages of twelve to fourteen. Brecknell and Willis set up an iron foundry at Combe St. Nicholas and I began working there when I was fourteen as an apprentice pattern-maker. I made pretend wooden rifles for the Local Defence Volunteers (LDV was thought also to stand for Look, Duck and Vanish). Then I made racksaw benches which were used to cut up trees for the Devon War Agricultural 50 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

Executive, and cartwheels for Bunkhams of Highbridge, which were put on water carts towed behind steam rollers. Later, I would make exact wooden patterns for metal casts. For example, of large cogwheels, which were pressed firmly into sandboxes to form the moulds. The wooden templates would then be taken out and hot metal would be poured into the moulds to make the cast iron cogs used in huge machines. At seventeen, I was a sergeant in the Air Training Corps. I was confident that my skills and experience would be put to good use in the Royal Air Force, but things turned out differently. After sending troops to the front, the government had found that it did not have enough men left to work the coalmines. Ernest Bevin came up with a plan to redress that - the names of forty thousand boys and young men were chosen by lot, as their time came to be enlisted, to be miners. My name came out of the hat, and I was instructed to report to Chesterfield in Derbyshire to become one of ‘Bevin’s Boys’. I worked in the East Midlands coalmines for nearly four years. For a boy who had grown up with the sun on his face playing and working in Somerset fields, the conditions were dreadful. For eight hours a day, I’d work on my hands and knees in almost darkness, cutting out coal in a seam tunnel no more than two feet high. To get to the seam you’d be taken down in a lift and then walk perhaps two miles underground. I was finally released in 1947.

Life though has its compensations. While working in the Midlands, I met a girl called Doris, working in a grocer’s shop. She was sixteen and we have now been married for 56 years. We have three children, nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Our daughter, granddaughter, and two great-granddaughters have all attended the same village school as me, in Combe St. Nicholas. When I returned to Somerset in the late 1940s, I went back to work at Brecknell and Willis. Then three years later, I began odd jobbing on my own account. In the 1950s and 1960s, I worked building houses out of Devon Lady Cedarwood - a three bedroom house might sell for £3,500. Then again, I went back to odd jobbing, repairing farm equipment, making coffins, and so on. For the past twenty years, I’ve worked as a carpenter on the Colin Mear Engineering site at Combe St. Nicholas. I fashion wooden boxes to hold the finished engineering parts. I’m now 78 and will consider retiring when I’m 80. I’ve always kept myself busy. I was in the St. John Ambulance brigade for 50 years, and I’m a member of the Royal Life-saving Society. Though I still live only a few miles from my birthplace, my life’s journey has been a long, full and rewarding one.” Next month Ron will be meeting someone in South Somerset.


Historic impressions Sherborne House

Sherborne House, Dorset, photograph by Richard Sercombe

IF THE shimmering figures of Charles Dickens, Sir James Thornhill and William Charles Macready were to stand on the steps of Sherborne House today, the £3M needed to restore this magnificent building could be raised with little effort. These three - the literary genius Dickens, Britains first knighted artist Thornhill and the famous Victorian actor Macready have all travelled the stairs of Sherborne House and with their historic connection paved the way for what is today a thriving arts and cultural centre for Dorset. Although originally a Tudor building, built sometime after 1570, the house as it stands today was created by the Blandford Forum architect Benjamin Bastard in 1720 for Henry Seymour Portman. It was Portman who commissioned Sir James Thornhill, doyen of the English decorative history painters, to decorate the house. All the walls and ceiling were decorated by the artist and centred on the story of Ovid’s Metamorphosis of the Calydonian Hunt. His most famous murals are in the Painted Hall at Greenwich and in the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral and his murals at Sherborne House are some of the very few to be found outside London.

The preservation of the original fittings, panelling and plasterwork is remarkable especially given the history of the house after the death of Portman in 1728. It was leased out for nearly a century and then owned briefly by an affluent local farmer, James Toogood. In 1816 it ws sold to Edward, 2nd Earl of Digby for £2000 but again was not lived in by the owners, but by a succession of tennants including a silk manufacturer, a Major and a banker. A full inventory of the house, dated 1726, was recently unearthed in the Public Record Office at Kew. The Palladian house became home to a rather more famous character during the mid 19th century when William Charles Macready resided there. He was the leading actor manager of his day and at the pinnacle of his career decided to retire and move to Dorset. At Sherborne House he was visited by many noteable characters including his close friend Sir Charles Dickens. It was here that Dickens gave public readings including ‘A Christmas Carol’. In the 1930s the house was first leased and then sold to Dorset County Council where it then housed Lord Digby’s School. It remained a school, though changing to a

girls Grammer School following the 1944 Education Act, until it closed in 1992. The Sherborne House Trust was set up in 1995 in order to preserve and restore the building to its former glory and to be a regional centre for the visual arts. The plans for Sherborne House are extensive and will eventually offer inside and outside exhibiting space, workshop spaces, a restaurant and a shop. Most significantly, this prestigous house is set to become the permanant home for the collection of work by Dame Elizabeth Frink. Frink, the internationally renowned sculptor and accomplished print maker died in 1993 having moved to her beloved Dorset 16 years earlier. She held her first major exhibition at the Beaux Arts Gallery when just 22 years old and went on to have an illustrious career and was hailed as one of the great female sculptors of the 20th century. There is no doubt that Sherborne House is a valuable asset to the South West. Its recent appearance on the BBC’s Restoration programme has helped to highlight the need for serious effort to restore its splendour. Next month we will be looking at another interesting building. Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 51


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John Hubbard by

WHEN John Hubbard and his wife Caryl drove over Eggardon Heath on their first visit to Dorset, they were so moved by the landscape that they instantly fell asleep. ‘When we woke up, the clouds had cleared and it was brilliant sunshine’ recalls John ‘maybe it was divine intervention, because we have been here ever since’. That was back in 1961. The couple had come to Dorset on the advice of a well travelled artist friend who found the county especially beautiful. ‘We came to stay with friends of friends, but after the extraordinary drive, we found a house and started the process of moving here permanently within twenty four hours’. It is a wonderfully romantic story and one that John admits would be hard to repeat today, ‘You could do that sort of thing in the sixties. House prices were more manageable and Dorset was largely agricultural’. Forty years ago John was one of the very few contemporary artists working in Dorset. He was committed to developing his painting and raising his young family. As a result, he says he had a very different experience of the sixties than the one we are more familiar with today. John talks about the relationship between art and music during that time and the influence that art school had on wider culture. ‘There was an interaction then’ he says ‘that mixture of disciplines and crossing boundaries was fantastic’. His wife recently went to see the This was Tomorrow - Art and the 60’s exhibition at Tate Britain and commented that she was pleasantly surprised how lively and clever the work still is and there was an exchange of ideas between practitioners that is not often seen today. ‘There was a sense of a creative wave’ John remarks ‘We have had over 100 years of ‘modern’ art and throughout that time we see groups of great artists emerging in particular places at particular times. Certain artists work well in a shared environment, in close proximity to others but on their own they seize up. The present milieu of West Dorset is well-suited to community-minded artists but equally congenial to anyone.’ John has always worked alone. His studio is testament to the sheer volume of work he has produced and the continual striving that

John Hubbard, photograph by Dianne Dowling

Katherine Locke

marks the true artist. It has been said that he is an abstract painter; John describes himself a landscape artist. We could spend a lot of time discussing definitions, but however he is categorised, it is clear his fascination with the natural world remains a constant theme in his work. His large drawings in pencil and charcoal have a strong sense of the organic. His oil paintings, some of which are huge, are vivid explorations of the natural. Although John is American, his affinity with the British landscape is obvious. His interest in gardens resulted in a large body of work, some of which are currently on display in his gallery at Chilcombe. It is an impressive collection in a fantastic setting. His approach to the subject is always fresh and engaging. One critic wrote that John ‘is not a view painter but an observer of nature’ and we share the sense of the infinite variation of pattern and form being explored. John has had an almost unbroken painting career and belongs to a generation of artists who are still producing startling work well into their sixties and seventies. As John says ‘art is like telling a long story. It has lots of changes of plot and pace. The work evolves before you - there are good bits and not so good - some happy parts and some sadness. There is backtracking and interweaving - just like a good novel.’ John’s story is far from over. He is currently working on a new series of watercolours, including some inspired by the 65th Psalm, particularly the line ‘and the little hills rejoice on either side’. The work shimmers with translucent colour. ‘I first worked in watercolour on a trip to Greece’ he says. ‘My wife liked them, so I spent a long time on the telephone to Windsor & Newton finding out about the longevity of modern watercolours. I don’t want them to fade’. It seems clear on meeting John that his work, as well as his passion for it, is in no danger of fading yet. John Hubbard is Patron of Bridport Open Studios which is on August bank holiday. There will be an opportunity to see his work during Bridport Open Studios and at the Town Mill in Lyme Regis in November.

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Marshwood The

Vale Magazine

August 2009 Issue 125

FREE

Peter Thomas, photograph by Robin Mills

For West Dorset, South Somerset and East Devon thebestfrominandaroundthevalethebestfrominandaroundthevale 54 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


Robin Mills went to Rampisham, in West Dorset, to meet Peter Thomas, wood-turner and stick-maker. This is Peter’s story. ‘I’m a Wiltshire moonraker: born between Calne and Marlborough on the Wiltshire downs, and I grew up in a small village very much like Rampisham is today. Father was one of thirteen children: every one of his brothers and sisters farmed except him. So, sadly I was unable to inherit a farm, but there’s no doubt farming is in my genes. From a very early age I spent all my time on my uncle’s farm, and I can remember that all I ever wanted to do was farm. I think I soon realised that peer pressure and job competition meant that I should get as good an education as possible, so I finished up going to Wye College and got a degree in agriculture. I’m not sure it did me a lot of good. I didn’t have the capital to farm on my own account, so I went into farm management. The first couple of jobs I went for, I never even mentioned the degree as it would probably have been seen as a hindrance. In those days in farming, education meant you probably weren’t much good at the practical stuff. I’ve had the beard since then: people reckoned I was too young for the job, so I grew a beard, stuck ten years on my age and got the first job I went for. That was in about 1958. That farm was in Gloucestershire, near Stow on the Wold. We were there in 1963, all through the hard winter. We had our first child then, Wendy, and couldn’t get off the farm for eight weeks, snowed in. The dairy had just gone over from churns to bulk milk then, and obviously you couldn’t get milk out what with the 20ft snow drifts. So we got some churns dropped by helicopter, filled them from our new bulk tank and then I’d dig my way to Stow on the Wold, 5 miles away, to unload the milk, and often have to dig my way home again. That took all day, on a Fordson Major, no cab: in those days you didn’t know any different. The snow that year was still lying in the quarries up on the hills when we were haymaking in June. I worked in Warwickshire, and in Dorset, then it was back to Gloucestershire, where we were during the two drought years of 1975 and 1976. That farm went from 400 acres when I started, to 4000 acres during the next 18 months. They had land in Scotland, in Dumfries and Galloway, and I used to drive up there once a month to look after it. If the locals chose to lay on the Scots accent a bit thick, I couldn’t make out a word of it. In’76 we finished combining in the middle of July: the crop had just died. We tried to make second cut silage, mowing grass in the morning then baling it as hay in the afternoon. My last job came about in 1985, when

Cover Story

trunk rather than cut it up for fire wood. I started making little coffee tables and suchlike, but it never quite filled the gap. One day I saw a second-hand lathe advertised, so I bought it without seeing it. There was no point in going to look at it: never having seen a lathe working, I wouldn’t have known what I was looking at. I got it home, set it up, and spent the next few weeks really just making a mess of pieces of wood and tools. But I became absolutely hooked. And that’s how it all started: I never had any lessons, just learned by my mistakes I suppose. I built bigger lathes: the one I’ve got now will take blanks up to about 7cwt, but I had to buy an engine hoist to lift them into place! When we moved up here, I built the shed, deliberately quite small. I thought it might stay tidier that way, but that didn’t work. At first I was just making stuff to give to friends and family, and was really amazed when I took work to village shows to find people would buy it. At one stage we were doing about 30 shows a year. I insist on selling locally, though of course it Peter Thomas, photograph by Robin Mills goes all over the place afterwards. Nowadays I always do Dorset Art Weeks, and maybe 6 shows a year. I’ve I saw it advertised in the Farmer’s Weekly, got a tiny gallery here at home, and peomanaging a farm back in Dorset, and we’ve ple come to me. I’ll probably spend 6 or been here ever since. I’ve had to change 7 hours a day in here, turning wood, I just jobs in the past quite a lot: you have to, to love it. All my wood is sourced locally, off make any progress up the farming ladder. the estate or farms nearby. There’s no need The main attraction to the job here was the to travel far or import exotic timber, it’s all opportunity to run our own enterprise, in around us. this case sheep. My son Simon left college When I started doing the shows, I was to come and run the sheep flock, and a year shocked at people’s ignorance of the counlater my daughter Wendy and her husband tryside. Then the Dorset Coppice Group joined us, so we were running it as a famwas formed, and I joined because I thought ily business. Simon later fell in love with I could help educate the public about our Australia, backpacking there in 1991, and woodland heritage, and about the fact that then emigrated there with an Australian girl of all the imported rainforest timbers, none he’d met on our neighbour’s farm. Wendy was more attractive than our own indigand her husband now have a National Trust enous wood. farm down in Devon. That was all about the Most of what I use would normally fintime when things in farming were starting to ish up as firewood, or rot, and we have all get a bit sticky. We went from lambing 1200 this wonderful resource in our woods and ewes, a dairy herd, and 400 acres of arable, hedgerows not appreciated. So, as much to just me on my own buying in ewe lambs as anything now I’m on a bit of a crusade, and selling them a year later as two-tooths, to try and make people aware of this. I’d with the arable land put out to contract. never dream of cutting down a healthy By then we’d fallen in love with the living tree. Last year I was given 5 walnut area, especially Rampisham. Here, nothing trees that blew down: that’s a huge amount changes, and that’s by virtue of the fact it’s of timber. I’ve been at shows where people an estate owned village. What we all value looking at my work don’t even know it’s and love remains the same. So, I retired made of wood: or, that the oak, beech or early. I was 61, the children had left, my whatever species it’s made of, comes from legs weren’t too good and I needed a knee here. I find that quite sad: also that nowaoperation, and to be quite honest, I was disdays it’s so rare for people to make things illusioned with farming. When I started, I with their hands. When they do, and I teach never thought for one moment I’d be saying people occasionally, they love it, and it can that. But everything coming from governbe very therapeutic. All this mass-produced ment seemed anti-rural, and to me the fun stuff, there’s no life or soul to it: if what I had gone out of the farming life. do helps spread the word about the countryI’d always liked woodwork, and if a tree side a bit, I’m happy.’ blew down on the farm we always kept the

Robin Mills met Peter Thomas in Rampisham

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The Pig and I by Rosie Boycott WHEN I was a child, this was always the best week of the year. The school year was behind me and the long summer holidays beckoned tantalisingly. I lived most of my time outdoors. I had tree houses and houses made of straw bales in a nearby barn. A friend owned two ponies: together we’d ride for hours, constructing fantasies of being knights of old or wild west cowboys. I went fishing in a local stream with my father, catching the occasional trout and cooking it over a fire hastily constructed out of gathered sticks and eating it on the spot – just minutes after it had been swimming upstream. In the local churchyard I’d hunt for slow worms lurking beside grave stones, collecting them up and putting them in a box, fascinated by their sinewy bodies and shiny scaly skin. At night I’d fall asleep planning on what I’d do in the great out doors the following day. I thought it was a normal childhood, (and I thought it quite normal that we’d all occasionally break an arm or an ankle) but reading Richard Louv’s American best seller Last Child in the Woods has made me see just how privileged it was. Today’s kids might be well aware of the threat to their greater environment, to polar bears, the Amazon rainforest and ice-caps, but their actual contact with nature, in any real, physical sense, is rapidly fading. Nature, for most children, is something you watch. Even a car drive, where at least you’d see the fields and woods flashing past outside the window, has now been modernised with the introduction of TV screens on the backs of seats to entertain the kids. Louv – an author and activist for children’s health – believes that depriving children of their contact with nature leads them to suffer from what he calls nature-deficit disorder. The deprivation is not trivial. Echoing Edward O. Wilson’s concept of biophilia, or the need “to affiliate with other forms of life,” he is convinced that a relationship with nature is essential to a child’s development. They are not alone. A widening circle of researchers believe that the loss of exposure to natural habitats has enormous implications for human health and child development. Being alone with nature, as I was able to be as a child, gives you a grounding in being with yourself and learning to create your own entertainments or just to day dream. It was peaceful and, importantly, it was quiet. Today, in our modern world, we are, according to Louv, constantly on the alert, pursued by a stampede of cars, the non-stop and often threatening images on the TV which flood our living 56 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

rooms and our bedrooms. Most adults agree that it isn’t a good thing for their children to watch TV all the time, yet we make precious little effort to find alternatives and all too often the TV turns into a faithful and reliable substitute for creative play. In the US, six to eleven year old’s spend 30 hours a week in front of the box! But nature deficit disorder is a serious condition: it diminishes the use of the senses, promotes attention difficulties and leads to higher rates of physical and emotional illnesses. In cities, Louv believes, the disconnect from nature leads to higher incidences of crime. In the medical journal The Lancet, researchers from the university of Glasgow reported a study of toddler activity where small electronic accelerometers were clipped to the waistbands of 78 children for a week. They found they were only physically active for just 20 minutes a day. In our new, denatured world of “electronic detachment”, 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas; in the city of Los Angeles, only 30 percent of people are within walking distance of a park. Here in Britain, we live in equally urban world. Even in small towns and green suburbia, children are kept on a tight leash by parents fearful of traffic and sexual predators. Fears about ‘health and safety’ mean that most schools discourage children from the outward bound type of activities that were so common when I was a child. Today, what outdoor play there is, is usually in the form of organized sports. Indoor entertainment is extraordinarily seductive with the latest role-playing video game easily beating a jam jar full of caterpillars or tadpoles. What children are missing is unstructured play in a natural environment, a creativity uniquely stimulated by the complex and multiple “loose parts” of a wood or stream or even a wild area in an urban environment, overlooked by developers but providing plenty of scope for the imagination. Outdoor play is the time when creativity can run wild, whether a child is trying to damn a stream, dig a hole or build a fort. The process involves all the senses and can lead to flashes of insight and connection, an abiding sense of one’s place in the world. But at the very moment when our children’s connection with nature is becoming increasingly more distant, a growing body of research links our mental, physical and spiritual health directly with our association with nature. Some studies suggest that exposure to nature can act as a powerful therapy for attention deficit disorder. In Norway and Sweden, studies of preschool children found that those who played

on flat playgrounds fared worse than those who played among trees, rocks and hills. The latter group were not only fitter, but achieved far better agility and balance. Their mental health is also more resilient to stress and anxiety. The same holds true for adults: joggers who run through woods feel more restored, less anxious, angry and depressed than those who burn up their calories on the running machine at the gym. Louv gently chides environmental organizations for neglecting this crisis in childhood – this lack of intimacy with nature – in favour of the more “serious adult work of saving the world.” We ignore children at our peril. Their disaffection from nature could be the politics of the future. Their goodwill could be what truly saves the world. Louv advises parents to slow down and enjoy nature with their children, perhaps by simply taking a walk in the neighbourhood or gardening. It’s not as easy as it sounds. If you are a parent thinking about all this, you will do what parents do so well: obsess. Is your child a victim of nature-deficit disorder? Did you provide your daughter with enough outdoor unstructured play? Is it okay to go camping with Barbie dolls? Should you have bought her that iPod last Christmas? Louv knows this when he ends his book with a series of futuristic and hopeful scenarios: a vast network of bike paths, green cities, or “zoopolises,” that encourage wildlife by providing natural habitats and migration corridors to maintain genetic diversity in animal populations. Some of my own happiest childhood memories were being in the Brownies, an organisation that is woefully unfashionable today, but one that Louv passionately supports. I was taught how tie knots, build a fire, put up a tent, as well as the rudiments of carpentry. Most are now either forbidden or closely monitored because of health and safety issues. My ‘biology” class at school used to consist of wading through ponds looking for water-boatmen and pond weed: another activity that is largely unknown in schools today. Nature to me was a place where I found freedom and fantasy, somewhere where I was truly separate from the adult world: it was a place where I could invent my own games and learn to construct my own worlds, well away from the high tech solutions so favoured by today’s parents who mistakenly prize notions of ‘safety’ over the genuine creativity a child can achieve when he or she wholly engages with the natural world. We lose it at our peril.


30 years in Abbotsbury THE popular Dansel gallery in Abbotsbury is celebrating 30 years in the Dorset village this August. Dansel Gallery first opened in August 1979 selling woodwork, furniture and gifts made by Eype-based founders Danielle and Selwyn Holmes. Now 30 years later the gallery is a centrepiece of the Abbotsbury visitor scene, showcasing the handiwork of over 200 designers in wood from all over the country. Not only are all the items at Dansel made from sustainable sources but the owners have also planted a large area of native broadleaf woodland to put back some of what has been used. During the month of August there will be an exhibition of work designed for the anniversary, some from makers who have been with the gallery for over 20 years.

Dorset craftsmen exhibiting include, Peter Boyce-Tomkins, Frank Goddard, Martin Miller, Marcus Mindelsohn, David Moth, Angela Smith, Bill Pett, Paul Swatridge, Peter Vernon, Mark Vyvyann-Penney, Keith Woolacott amongst others. There will also be an exhibition of Dansel’s history, showing pictures of the changing interior of the gallery, makers who have supported them over the years and anecdotes from customers. Pictures of some of the special pieces the gallery has had, such as the full-size baby elephant and six foot high carved jeans curtain will be on show. There will also be free gifts, a prize draw for a one-off piece and other events. For more information telephone 01305 871515 or email danielle@danselgallery. co.uk.

Lidded Vase 2 by Derek Holdaway at Dansel Gallery, Abbotsbury Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 57


The view from the country Life during World War Two by Derek Stevens THE first German prisoners of war I saw were with a platoon of British soldiers relaxing for a break and a Woodbine cigarette just up the road from our house. One of the soldiers told me that the job of the POWs was to go ahead of the marching patrol and set up a pretend ambush. Being brimful of antiGerman sentiment, as you were in those wartime days, I felt this to be a bit dangerous for our soldiers and excitedly quizzed my Tommy friend about those two Huns. He suddenly alarmed me by shouting across to one of the Germans saying “Hey Fritz, little matey here wants to know how Adolph’s getting on”. The German beckoned to me with a crooked finger saying “Kommen sie hier”. I scarpered off down the road as fast as my 9-year old legs could take me, much to the great merriment of the soldiers. Captured Germans at the beginning of the war, mostly Luftwaffe and U-boat crews, were shipped across the Atlantic to North America, as it was feared that large numbers of POWs encamped in the UK would provide a mightily useful contingent of German servicemen in the event of a successful invasion by the Nazis. After D-Day, and with the growing success of the allied progress through Europe towards Germany, the number of POWs entering Britain grew to such an extent that the number of camps built to contain them grew from the original 2 to 600. The numbers of Italian POWs increased dramati-

cally after the collapse of their forces in North Africa. There were so many that the amount captured was reported back to England by acreage covered by the containment pens, rather than a head count. The use of Italian POWs from the sudden influx on British farms caused great alarm among the senior members of the Women’s Land Army. A cautionary letter was sent to all members of the WLA pointing out that although we would wish to think that the treatment of these POWs would be similar to kindliness we hope are being extended to our forces in similar circumstances, caution must be exercised if one finds oneself working alongside Italian servicemen in the hayfield. Rules of the Geneva Convention specified that prisoners of war could not be forced to work, they could; however, volunteer to do suitable work if they wished. The majority of POWs opted for work preferring to do so rather than hang about kicking the dust from the floor of prison pens. It was estimated that at one time 25% of Britain’s workforce comprised POWs, 22,000 in the building trade, 169,000 in agriculture. There was some resentment among the British at the fact that another ruling of the Geneva Convention was that POWs should be given the same ration allowance of food as British troops. This meant that POWs were getting a larger ration of cheese than British civilians. This was also a matter

58 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

of resentment among the French when it was found that captured Germans were receiving the same rations as American GIs. In the midst of the surrounding turmoil of the Battle of Normandy there was very little food to be had for the civilian popu-

for half an hour before the celebration of Mass which was then sung by a mixed congregation of English, Scotch, Irish, Spanish, French, Polish and German Catholics. Finally the service ended with the Poles singing some of their traditional

pily found that his family had survived the war and eventually returned to Germany keeping contact with the Lawrence family for many Christmases thereafter. Otto had a soldier colleague, Werner, who worked on another

Pulling his wedding ring off his finger he threw it with fury into the long grass of the field he was working in. lation. It should be mentioned here that in 1943 surprising reports were reaching Fleet Street that British POWs were being approached by German civilians begging for food. German POWs began to be repatriated in 1946. The last being members of the Waffen SS, an organization deemed to be criminal by the Nuremberg War Crime Tribunal, were not repatriated until 1949. After VE Day restrictions on movement were relaxed for POWs. Like some French POWs during the Napoleonic wars they became a feature of local life in some parts of Britain. Many friendships were formed, Christmas dinners shared and children delighted with wooden toys carved on behalf of Santa Claus. Many of those toys and carvings are cherished to this day. In 1946 a memorable Christmas service was held in the Honiton Catholic church of the Holy Family. German POWs had gone to great pains to construct a replica of the stable of Bethlehem. Carols were sung by a German choir

carols. The congregation was so large the main doors of the church had to remain open to allow those outside to be present. Similar Christmas services must have been celebrated throughout Britain at that time. In Burton Bradstock 48 German POWs marched from their hostel to the Congregational church led by their Lutheran Chaplain, the Rev. Helmut Spieth. They sang ‘Silent Night’, and joined with the congregation in other carols. After the service, members of the men’s club at the church entertained the prisoners in the Church Hall with refreshments, and each man was given a gift by the members, who were all British ex- servicemen Mrs. Valerie Watkins recalls Otto who lived and worked at the Lawrence family’s farm at Andrewshayes in Dalwood when she was a schoolgirl. She still has a small panel of wood worked and finely decorated with hot poker work. It reads, in German “North, South, East, West, home is where one finds the best”. He hap-

Dalwood farm nearby. One day Werner was to hear that his wife had formed a strong friendship with a Scottish soldier of the occupying forces in Germany. Pulling his wedding ring off his finger he threw it with fury into the long grass of the field he was working in. Werner had already suffered the grim experience of hearing that his twin brother had been killed on the Russian front. Eventually he was repatriated back to Germany where he married his widowed sister-in-law. Many thousands of POWs opted to stay in Britain, especially as their homes in Germany had become overtaken by the Soviet Empire. They became designated as Displaced Persons. One such DP, Henry Thoennissen, domiciled himself in East Devon. Remembered by many for his hard work, sometimes seen making his concrete blocks in the freezing cold and pouring rain, he is still hale and hearty at 89 years of age and living in retirement having established the local Axminster business of Westcrete Precast Concrete Ltd.


Tomatoes by Mark Hix

This month (in 2009) Mark Hix launches a series of no waste delicious recipes Clear tomato jelly with crab and cucumber Serves 4 This may look like a bit of a posh soup and not really Hix simple casual style, but when you have an abundance of a single fruit then you need to push the boundaries a bit. If it comes out looking a bit smart, then what the hell! This really is much simpler than it looks and you will be pleasantly surprised on how good the tomato liquid tastes. You don’t have to use crab in the recipe but this is a great time of year for them locally. The white and brown meat from one crab will be enough for a good amount of crab soup, plus a few sandwiches. My grandfather’s two greenhouses, jam-packed with tomatoes, are still a fond memory from my childhood. There was nothing fancy about his tomatoes – only one variety, Moneymaker, I seem to remember – and growing them was just an extension of his enthusiasm for gardening. Locals would show up and exchange a few coins for a pound or so of tomatoes, and often my tea-time snack was just a plate of sliced tomatoes with salt and vinegar and a thick slice of crusty bread. There was nothing special about the salt, just plain old low-grade table salt and Sarsons vinegar; I didn’t realise there was anything other than Sarsons then and in fact I still use it for tomato salads in my restaurants. The one problem with growing tomatoes here is our weather. We just can’t rely on getting consistent sunshine so we do tend to end up with quite a few green tomatoes, which have various uses including in chutneys and salsas or fried as in my recipe below.

1.5kg ripe tomatoes, halved 2 cloves of garlic, blanched in water for 2 minutes 300ml good quality tomato juice A few sprigs of basil Salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 leaves of gelatine (9g) For the garnish: 100g or so of freshly picked white crab meat 3-4cm cucumber, halved, seeded and cut into ½ cm dice 1 large tomato, skinned, seeded and the flesh cut into ½ cm dice 2tsp chopped chives Salt and freshly ground white pepper 1-2tsp rapeseed oil Coarsely blend the tomatoes, garlic and basil in a food processor with some freshly-ground black pepper and salt and 250ml of the tomato juice. Line a colander with double muslin or a clean tea towel and place over a large bowl. Pour the tomato pulp into the colander and leave overnight in the fridge to drain. The next day you should have about 600-700ml of clear juice in the bowl. Gently squeeze the remaining pulp to extract as much juice as possible. Soak three leaves of gelatine (four if you have more like a litre of tomato juice) in cold water until soft. Meanwhile, remove a small ladleful of the clear tomato juice and heat it in a pan. Squeeze the water from the gelatine leaves and stir them into the hot tomato juice until dissolved. Don’t boil it. Add this to the rest of the juice, add the remaining 50ml of tomato juice, stir well and put into the fridge for one to two hours until set.

To serve, mix the crab meat with the tomato and cucumber, season with a little salt and pepper and stir in the chives and olive oil. Give the now lightly jellied consommé a brief stir and transfer into chilled bowls. Spoon the crab mixture into the centre and serve. Tomato relish When I was making the clear jellied soup and looking at all the gunk left in the muslin after it had dripped through, I thought what a waste of tomato it was. I wasn’t going to throw it away, so I turned it into a home-made tomato relish. Put the tomato pulp from the recipe above into a saucepan with a litre of water and a vegetable stock cube, and season with salt and pepper. Bring to the boil and simmer for 30 minutes. Dissolve a tablespoon of cornflour with a little water and stir it into the sauce. Add about 4-5tbsp of tomato ketchup and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes and season to taste. Use as a dipping sauce, barbeque or hamburger relish or spread on hot toast. Fried Green tomatoes in Cider Batter Serves 4 If you are stuck with green tomatoes that just won’t ripen, then try these. They make a great snack, starter or an accompaniment to grilled or barbecued meat and fish. 4 medium green tomatoes, cut into ½ cm slices Sea salt to serve Vegetable or corn oil for deep frying For the batter 300g self raising flour 50g cornflour About 500-600ml cider Salt and freshly ground black pepper To make the batter, mix the flour and cornflour together and add enough cider to make a thick batter, then season and leave to rest for half an hour. Preheat about 8cm of oil to 160180°C in a large, thick-bottomed saucepan or electric deep fat fryer. Test a piece of tomato in the hot oil to ensure the batter is the correct thickness and coating the tomatoes nicely. If it’s not, adjust the batter with more cider or flour. Dip the tomato slices in the batter and fry in batches then drain on kitchen paper and scatter with sea salt. Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 59


House&Garden

Write just 50 words!

Charmouth Community Library has launched a 50-word short story competition Stories must be exactly fifty words excluding the title (maximum of 15 words). It has to have a beginning, middle and end, and not just be a description. Hyphenated words will be accepted as one word. There are no restrictions on topics, style, or presentation, but it must be in English and unpublished work. There are three classes with prizes for first, second and third in each. 1) under 12 . 2) under 18 . 3) open to all ages. Entry fee is ÂŁ2 and entries must be received by September 30th. Enter on their website www. CharmouthCommunityLibrary. digitalfox.uk

60 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 61


Vegetables in August By Ashley Wheeler

AUGUST—the time of plenty (sometimes even too much if good organisation and planning hasn’t been taken into account). Successional sowings are the key to managing outputs from the vegetable garden, but also to ensure the highest quality of produce is maintained throughout the summer. By staggering sowings Successions of lettuce you can avoid having too much of one thing at one time. It also ensures a consistent supply of produce from the garden through the summer months rather than being in an all or nothing situation. Lettuce and other salad leaves are a classic example of this, where it will run to seed relatively quickly during summer, so sowing every few weeks will ensure a steady supply. We sow six lots of lettuce between the middle of February and the end of June which gives us harvests from early April until sometime in October normally. Sowing in mid-February, mid-March, end of April, mid-May, early midJune and then finally at the end of June ensures that as one planting begins to go to seed the next succession is planted and ready to harvest. We stagger radish sowings about every two weeks from early March until mid-May which means that we have a continual supply during the spring and early summer, whilst spring onions are sown from mid-January to mid-April to provide bunches until July (when they tend to get rust where we are). We also successionally sow peas, beetroot, fennel, chard, coriander and dill amongst other things—all for the same reasons—to ensure a consistent supply. One new crop that we have tried this year is Aztec broccoli (also called Huauzontle—literally meaning hairy amaranth and part of the Chenopod family—amaranth, beets, chard and fat hen). It is as easy to grow as fat hen and very productive. We sowed two batches—in the middle of March and end of April, sowing around 3 seeds per module of a plant tray, then planting out at around 30cm along the row, with rows spaced about 60cm apart. We started harvesting from early July. You can simply snap off the top 3-6 inches of flowering stem, and it just keeps sending out sideshoots and can be harvested until around mid October. As the nights start to cool the leaves start turning red too. It can be blanched like any green and has a very spinachy taste to it. We will certainly be growing more next year, and thanks to the Real Seed Catalogue for continuing to provide us with exciting new things to try.  WHAT TO SOW THIS MONTH: endive, winter purslane, salad mustards (best sown direct) such as Golden Streaks, Purple Frills, rocket, land cress, chard, leaf radish, texsel greens, lettuce, fennel (early in the month), broad beans (for tips in salads) & peashoots, autumn radish and turnips, chinese cabbage and pak choi (early in the month), parsley (for overwintering in polytunnel/glasshouse), corn salad & spring onions & spring cabbage (all late in month for overwintering) WHAT TO PLANT THIS MONTH:  OUTSIDE: fennel, beetroot, lettuce, chard, kohl rabi, chicory, salad leaves: buckshorn plantain, salad burnet, chervil, endive, turnips and winter radish (sown direct), pak choi and chinese cabbage INSIDE: summer purslane, goosefoot OTHER IMPORTANT TASKS THIS MONTH:  Keeping on top of taking old crops out and planting with new crops is still important throughout August. There is still plenty of time to get late crops in the ground, and as we roll into September it can almost be like a second spring (with the benefit of already warm soil) Generally it is a time to harvest—keeping on top of harvesting courgettes and beans will keep them going and mean that they don’t get too big or too stringy. 62 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


Countryside in a bottle at John Bright

John, Bridget and Beth Bright and team celebrate the opening at their Salway Ash country store

JOHN Bright Fencing and Country Store has turned milkman. Their new organic milk vending machine is situated in a Swiss-style chalet right outside the Salway Ash country store and is open every day from 7am to 7pm. The organic milk comes from Holy Cow, a local farmer’s herd of Jersey cows grazing on rich pastureland and is dispensed in reusable glass bottles or your own container. “We wanted to give people the choice and convenience of buying really fresh local milk while supporting our local farmers,” said Beth Bright. “The milk is from a herd of beautiful Jersey cows and tastes like the countryside in a bottle, it’s deliciously moreish!” Best explained that there is no plastic, it’s low on food miles and being organic, is better for people, the cows, nature and the environment. The milk is kept at a constant 3°C temperature and after each transaction the machine automatically steam cleans the dispenser. The vending machine milk is always less than 48 hours old and has a shelf life of five days from purchase. It comes in 1 litre and 250ml glass bottles and costs from £1.30. Payment is made by card. The chalet also features a separate vending machine with yoghurt, cheese, eggs and bacon. Perfect for breakfast! John Bright Fencing & Country Store is at Paverlands Farm, Salway Ash, on the Broadwindsor road out of Bridport. Telephone 01308 421545 or visit www.johnbrightfencing.com.

Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 63


August in the Garden

By Russell Jordan

GARDENS have a memory. What is happening in your garden, on any particular day, is not just a reflection of the prevailing conditions but also of factors that have influenced it over the whole time it has been in existence. The factors affecting plant growth / survival are cumulative and can either be very subtle, acting over a long time, or, such as in the case of catastrophic weather events, very dramatic and immediately obvious. There are certain things that are performing much better this year than I can ever remember them doing previously; Acanthus mollis (bear’s breeches) being a case in point. Originally mine were planted right up against the house which, being poorly built after Victorian subscription, has no damp course or ‘real’ foundations. Acanthus is so massively rooted that it was in danger of coming up through the floorboards on the inside of the house! That was almost twenty years ago—I dug it up and moved it, to a restricted position on the road side of the curtilage, and it has been there, totally uncared for, ever since. It is in poor soil, exposed to winter cold, but, importantly, it gets a total baking in the summer sun plus extra root warmth due to the brick retaining wall which absorbs heat during the day and releases it over night—just like a storage heater. Over the years its flowering has been fairly ‘up and down’. Last year, during what was a relatively hot and dry summer, it flowered ‘OK’—nothing special. This year it’s flowering its socks off, one of the best displays it has ever produced. This is not because of the recent warm weather, it is the cumulative effect of the weather and cultural factors that have acted on it over the last two decades that it’s been under my care. The heat last summer was the biggest factor in determining that it should be putting on a ‘career best’ performance now. I expect that next year, having partially exhausted itself, it will not flower so well—whatever happens in the intervening period. Knowing that it comes from places with relatively poor soils influences my decision in what to do next. If I tried to feed it, by adding a fertiliser for example, to address the ‘exhaustion’ I know that it would react, being a bit of an opportunist, by producing lots of extra leafy growth. This would actually reduce its flowering potential for next year.

64 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

A more ‘greedy’ perennial plant, lilies grown in borders for example, need copious feeding after flowering, while still leafy, in order to build up the flowering potential for next year. If I treated my floriferous herbaceous perennials, in the same way that I treat the tough old ‘bears breeches’, then they’d never flower again and might actually fade away. It’s all about ‘horses for courses’—and understanding what you are dealing with. The point of this is that gardening is a long-term pursuit, the horticultural equivalent of ‘spinning plates’! I often bang on about certain gardening tasks, like watering / feeding plants that are confined to pots and containers, because they really do need to be done, in a timely fashion, or else the plants will soon die and any long-term, cumulative, factors become completely irrelevant. The whole “Right Plant, Right Place” philosophy is perhaps the most important horticultural maxim that anyone attempting to garden should try to master. The late, and great, Beth Chatto was the greatest exponent of this approach to gardening and her writings on the subject cannot be bettered. Planting the right plant, for the conditions that you are expecting it to thrive in, is the best route to allow it to gain maximum benefit from it’s place in your garden. Getting that bit right really takes the pressure off you, as custodian, in every cultural intervention that you will do over the whole lifespan of that plant and, by extension, over the whole life of your garden. The fact that my Acanthus is flowering so well right now, and not coming up through the floorboards of my front room, is because I was able to recognise that its thug-like roots are best contained within retaining walls. Its origins in hot, baked, climates mean that repositioning to a south-facing position gives it the best chance to fulfil its maximum flowering potential whenever it can respond to a favourably hot summer. This may be an extreme example but I’m trying to explain that if you get these things right in the first place then it makes your life so much easier for the long haul. On a more general note; shrubs flower best on wood which has been ‘ripened’ by the sun the previous year, so they may, like my thuggish Acanthus, show the effects of the previous year’s conditions rather than the current ones. On the other hand, shrubs


which flower after the longest day tend to flower on shoots grown that year so they will be less affected by what took place the previous year and will reflect their current growing conditions more religiously—I think I may quit there because I’m managing to confuse myself... Containers may well have to be watered and fed this month to keep bedding plants and annuals flowering for as long as possible. Unless you added a slow release fertiliser to the compost, when you planted them up, there is a good chance that the containers will have had all their nutrients exhausted by now. When watering towards the end of the growing season use a ‘high in potash’ feed, such as tomato feed, as this is biased towards flower and fruit formation rather than excessive leafy growth; the last thing we need right now is more soft, green, growth. This is the best time to plant bulbs which flower in the spring. It may seem very early, and a bit depressing to have to consider the end of summer just as things have started to hot up, but it really is best to get them in as soon as possible. Tulips are the exception to the ‘plant now’ rule, due to cultural reasons (‘Tulip Fire’) but if you order them now at least you get first pick of the crop as the most popular / newest varieties (for me it’s always ‘Abu Hassan’) sell out quickly. The horticultural reason, for getting hold of spring bulbs now, is to reduce the time between the bulbs being harvested by the grower before getting re-established in your own garden / pots. Although they are happy to become ‘comatose’, once harvested, all the time that they are out of the soil, even if stored correctly, they are deteriorating. The smaller the bulb the more prone they are to dessication between lifting and replanting—this is the major factor behind tiny bulbs, such as snowdrops, generally being recommended for planting ‘in the green’.

Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 65


PROPERTY ROUND-UP

Far from the Madding Crowd By Helen Fisher

MONKTON £800,000

A fabulously presented 4 bedroom detached former farmhouse with many original features. Sweeping driveway and part walled mature garden with far reaching views plus kitchen garden. Additional bluebell woodland area, greenhouse and wood store. Ample parking. All set in about 6.3 acres. Humbert’s Tel: 01404 46222

NORTH CHIDEOCK GUIDE £600,000

A Grade II listed detached period property of immense charm and character. Set within the middle of a valley, away from traffic with views in all directions. With open fireplaces, timbered ceilings and planked doors. Well stocked gardens with veg bed, fruit cage and pond. Ample parking. Symonds and Sampson Tel: 01308 422092

BURRIDGE £565,000

A very appealing detached house in a small hamlet. With 3 bedrooms, spacious kitchen and sitting room with Inglenook fireplace. South facing with views over the large, well stocked gardens and countryside beyond. Plus a semi-detached barn with pp. Additional workshop and garages. Gordon and Rumsby Tel: 01297 553768 66 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

MAIDEN NEWTON £1.225M

A substantial contemporary 3 storey family home in a private, elevated position with far-reaching countryside views. Light filled, well proportioned rooms throughout. Impressive features inc: oak framed vaulted ceiling and large glass windows and doors. Plus detached coach house. Gardens with terrace and garaging. Jackson-Stops Tel: 01308 423133

PILSDON GUIDE £925,000

A spacious and versatile detached home in a wonderful, private rural position with outstanding far-reaching views. Dating back to the 1870s with 2 stone outbuildings offering annexe potential. Mediterranean-style walled courtyard garden, complete with hot tub. Ample parking and garage. All set in approx 1 acre. Stags Tel: 01308 428000

WEYMOUTH £2.25M

A substantial Victorian country house set within park-like grounds with a nature reserve to the front and the sea beyond. Large, light filled kitchen with 4 oven Aga. Extensive cellars below. Plus self contained annex. Additional former coach house with private walled garden. All set in approx 11 acres. Knight Frank Tel: 01935 812236


Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 67


PAIN BAGNE Pain Bagne is the perfect picnic fodder. A good rustic bread is essential. The whole lot is tightly wrapped and placed in the fridge the day before, then transported to your picnic, sliced up and served like cake. An important addition is the olive oil and vinegar gravy for drizzling over. Carry this along in a separate jar and shake well before serving.

LESLEY WATERS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • •

1.

Preheat the grill.

2.

Cut the peppers in half, remove the core and seeds and drizzle with a little oil. Grill for 5-10 minutes, until the skin blackens and begins to blister. Remove the pepper from the grill and place in a plastic bag. Set to one side and leave to cool.

3.

Mix together the balsamic vinegar, olive oil and garlic. Slice the loaf in three, horizontally. Generously sprinkle each slice with the oil and vinegar mix.

4.

Peel the skin from the pepper and cut into strips. Scatter each slice of bread with the pepper strips and other filling ingredients. Drizzle over a little extra olive oil and balsamic vinegar, season well and (carefully!) reassemble the loaf.

5.

Press the layers well together and wrap the loaf tightly, in cling film. Cover with a plate and weight down lightly, then leave in a cool place for at least two hours or overnight before serving. Serve, cut into cake like wedges, drizzled with a little extra gravy.

4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 large clove garlic, crushed 6 tablespoons virgin olive oil 1 large granary cob loaf salt & freshly ground black pepper

For the filling • 2 yellow peppers • 85g tomorosso tomatoes in oil (drained weight) • 480g can Marangio grilled artichoke hearts, drained • 30 black pitted kalamata olives • 200g Greek style fiesta cheese, roughly crumbled • 2 large ripe avocados, peeled & sliced • Large handful fresh basil leaves For the ‘gravy’ • 4 tablespoons virgin olive oil • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar Serves 10-12

68 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


Food&Dining

Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 69


PEA SALAD Although you can buy peas, sugar snaps and mangetout all the year round, this is a great salad that utilises the whole of the pea family, shoots and all. If you grow peas in your garden you can just snip the shoots and flowers off.

MARK HIX

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • •

1.

A couple of handfuls of pea shoots 60-70g small peas 60-70g sugar snaps, halved lengthways 60-70g mangetout, shredded

For the dressing • 1tbsp Chardonnay or a good-quality white-wine vinegar • 2tbsp vegetable or corn oil • 2tbsp rapeseed or olive oil • 1tsp Dijon or Tewkesbury mustard • Salt and freshly ground black pepper • A few sprigs of mint, chopped

2.

Mix all the ingredients for the dressing together, leave to infuse for an hour and strain through a fine-meshed sieve. To serve, toss all the ingredients together and garnish with extra torn mint leaves.

Serves 4

HIX Oyster and Fish House is Mark’s local restaurant that overlooks the harbour in Lyme Regis and boasts the most stunning panoramic views across the Jurassic coast—this is easily one of the most picturesque spots to enjoy British fish seafood. To book please call 01297 446 910. 70 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


Kings Arms Inn is coming back to life and needs a new tenant

The Kings Arms in Stockland is getting a fresh face

AFTER buying the Kings Arms Inn in Stockland near Honiton, the local community are well on the way to reopening this once-famous destination pub, which has been closed for six years. The ancient building is being rethatched, rewired and freshened up inside by an enthusiastic band of supporters working with skilled local tradesmen. Local people are turning out in droves to help renovate the pub and its gardens, which are now looking stunning. Restaurant

areas are being redecorated and the furniture refinished, with the kitchen completely renewed to modern hygiene and safety standards. Some of the past history of the pub has been learned during the ongoing renovations, including the possibility that the main part of the present building was once the stables for passing horse traffic. The community owners are now actively seeking tenants to help return the pub to its former glory, serving good wholesome food and fine wines and ales to people

throughout the area, and providing comfortable accommodation for those who wish to stay in the village. The tenancy is a very attractive prospect for someone who wants to develop a profitable business in this lovely East Devon village set in the heart of the Blackdown Hills AONB. More information can be found on the owner’s website https://scpl.org.uk/, or by emailing them directly if you are interested to contact@scpl.org.uk.

Join Lesley in Queen Mother’s Square LESLEY Waters joins the chefs in the demo kitchen at this year’s Dorset Food & Arts Festival which returns to Queen Mother Square in Poundbury August. The day always showcases the very best that Dorset has to offer with a huge array of stallholders, a packed programme of mouth-watering cooking demonstrations and live music. Keeping the festival as green as possible, the stallholders are encouraged to use biodegradable or recyclable cups and dishes. The festival will be open from 9am to 5pm on Saturday 3rd August, which coincides with the Saturday closest to the late Queen Mother’s birthday.

August 2019 Food Markets Please check dates and times with venues or organisers

Sat 3rd Thu 8th Fri 9th Sat 10th

Thur 15th Fri 16th Sat 17th Thur 22nd Sat 24th

Poundbury, Queen Mother Square - 9am - 1pm Shaftesbury, Town Hall - 9am - 1pm Wareham, Town Hall, East Street - 9am - 1pm Blandford, Blandford Forum - 9am - 1pm Bridport, Arts Centre, South St - 9am - 1pm Martock, Moorlands Shopping - 10am - 1pm Yarcombe, Village Hall - 10am - 12noon Purbeck, Commercial Road, Swanage - 9am - 1pm Honiton, St Paul’s Church, High St - 8.30am - 1pm Sherborne, Cheap St - 9am - 1pm Wimborne, Market Square - 9am - 1pm Crewkerne, The Henhayes Centre - 9am - 1pm Wareham, Town Hall, East Street - 9am - 1pm Dorchester South, High Street - 9am - 4pm Barrington, Village Hall, 10am - 12noon Yeovil, Middle Street - 9am - 2pm Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 71


Guest Recipe

© Corey Schweikert

PETER GORDON Peter Gordon was born in Whanganui, New Zealand, and collated his first cookbook aged just four. At 18 he moved to Melbourne where he lived for five years, training and working as a chef in various restaurants. Eventually his spirit of adventure and culinary curiosity led him to travel through Asia for a year, from Indonesia to India. This life-changing experience was to become a major influence on his culinary style, and he went on to earn an international reputation as the ‘godfather’ of fusion cuisine. These days, Peter has restaurants in London (The Providores and Tapa Room in Marylebone) and Auckland (Bellota and The Sugar Club, the fourth iteration of the iconic restaurant brand). Peter has written eight books and contributed to a dozen others. In 1999, Peter was the first to receive the New Zealander of the Year Award from The New Zealand Society, London and in 2009 he was awarded an ONZM (Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit – the NZ equivalent of an OBE) for services to the food industry, presented by Her Majesty the Queen at Windsor Castle. www.peter-gordon.net

POACHED CHICKEN SALAD with green beans, peaches & pecans The chicken is cooked in a Chinese fashion: poached and left to rest in the hot ‘stock’ which finishes cooking it gently and keeps it juicy. The stock from it will be delicious – you can freeze it for later use or use within a few days in soups, risottos or stews.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• 1 large chicken (about 1.5 kg); buy the best-quality bird you can afford • 300 ml white wine (not too sweet) • 2 bay leaves • 2 thumbs ginger, skin scrubbed and finely sliced • 1 handful of your favourite herbs • 2 onions, peeled and quartered • flaky sea salt • peel and juice of 2 tangerines • peel of 1 lemon and juice of 2 lemons • 6 peaches • 250 g fine green beans, blanched and refreshed • 150 g pecan nuts, toasted • 50 ml olive oil • 1 tbsp honey • 2 tsp grain mustard

1.

Serves 6

2. 3.

4.

5. 6.

7. Eating Well Everyday by Peter Gordon, published by Jacqui Small rrp£22.00 Images © Manja Wachsmuth

8.

Place the chicken in a deep pot with the next five ingredients on the list, a few teaspoons of flaky salt and the peel from the tangerines and lemon. Cover with cold water and bring to a gentle boil, skimming off any foam that rises. Put a lid on and cook at a rapid simmer for 30 minutes. Take off the heat and leave to cool with the lid on. It’s important you keep the lid on to ensure the chicken cooks through. Take the chicken from the stock and peel the skin off the bird, discarding it. Pull the legs from the carcass and remove any meat, tearing it into thick strips; likewise remove the breast meat from the carcass and tear that into thick strips. Put the meat in a bowl. Spoon a few tablespoons of the stock over the chicken. Remove the stones from the peaches, cut into wedges and add to the chicken along with the beans and pecans. Mix the olive oil with the reserved citrus juices, honey, mustard and salt to taste. To serve, pour the dressing over the chicken, toss and divide among six bowls or plates.


PEOPLE IN FOOD & DRINK

Chris Onions - photograph and words by Catherine Taylor

CHRIS ONIONS WHAT a wonderful name to have as a chef; Chris Onions. Chris’s surname is something he proudly celebrates, with an onion featuring in the logo of The Old Dairy Kitchen, part of Trill Farm. The business was set up by Chris five years ago, based in the eponymously named Old Dairy, part of the collective of independent, organic and sustainably run enterprises operating at the 300-acre farm just outside Axminster. A large kitchen greets visitors, with wooden tables adorned with wildflowers, welcoming diners and course attendees alike. Large Kilner jars bursting with a rainbow of preserved produce divide the dining and kitchen area. Chris is an advocate of using everything he can from as local a source as possible. Vegetables are grown a few meters away by the organic fruit and vegetable business, the meat from neighbouring pastures. Opening the doors for lunch twice a week and catering for the events that take place on the farm, this chef is always busy. Chris also runs courses, sharing the information he has gleaned over the years, as well as his highly anticipated monthly feasts, celebrating the abundant seasonal produce available. Chris grew up in Scotland on the island of Islay. He knew from a young age that he wanted to go into the catering business. He travelled to Australia, learning all he could, his path then diverting him to Scandinavia to cook at a project offering care and training for a variety of disadvantaged groups as part of a Care Farm Cooperative. Some years later the opportunity arose to come to River Cottage HQ with a sea urchin diver, who Chris had befriended. Chris’s cooking path now steered him south, so energised was he by what he had seen at River Cottage, determinedly seeking and finding a job there, integrating himself as part of the team. He lived on Trill Farm, so when the opportunity to run his own business there arose, he jumped at it. Always finding new ways to preserve and serve his food, Chris is passionate about what he does. This summer he anticipates evenings by the beach catching fish, going for walks, picking what’s available and getting stuck into the vegetable garden himself. But most of all, he’s eagerly awaiting the arrival of his baby with partner Anna, due to emerge into a world of natural eating and sustainable nourishment this Autumn. Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 73


Fishing in the computer age By Nick Fisher

T

etris is probably the most boring computer game in the world. I know this because I was introduced to it by two young lads aged about six and eight, some years ago when I was in Bermuda, with my wife. A good friend of mine had rented a villa on the sun-kissed azure blue lapped luxury island and had kindly invited me and Helen to spend part of our time away with her family. It was a fully equipped luxurious villa complete with a magnificent swimming pool and a classic view of the rocky, jagged, fish fertile shoreline. Among the classy facilities provided was a big scale computer, on which among many other things, was this dreaded game, Tetris. If you don’t know what it is, I can’t really help. I’ve mentally deleted all details. It’s kind of a cross between a chess game and Space Invaders, where you move shapes around and build walls and try to beat an invisible opponent. Whatever, it took me very few minutes of sitting in front of this screen to know I didn’t need to know any more. As far as I was concerned it was a huge soul-sucking black hole of potential time wasting. It was a time robber. A chronological super highwayman waiting to hold up people’s lives and filch them of their precious waking hours. Which is exactly what I saw it do. My friends two sons, and her husband, became addicted to the game. Hour after hour they’d sit in front of the screen or sit behind each other, as they took it in turns to play. Outside, the sun shone, the shore hugging fish fed and the pool remained unrippled. My wife and I swam uninterrupted by boyish shouting and leaping. I wandered down to the rocks alone most days to fish for weird species with bread flake and slimey creepy things prised from between wet rocks. Still, these two boys stayed indoors, foregoing the wonders of the Caribbean for the technological hypnosis they’d unwittingly enslaved themselves to. Their dad worked in computers. Their lives from this tender age was always accompanied and embellished by the latest technological advancements. They had Internet before I’d even heard of it. They had email addresses and dotcom profiles practically before I’d worked out how to use an answerphone. These boys are truly 21st Century. They’re not just computer literate. They are computer multi-lingual. They are totally at ease with

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caught a new recruit. So, I was amazed, when this year, he came back to see me again with even more requests for information and tips. I was quite unnerved. Why should he want to try again when he’d been so let down by his speculative enthusiasm last time? Anyway, I did my bit. Handed over rigs. Tackle and tips. And told him to ring me if he wanted any advice. To my surprise I got a call on my mobile when I was on holiday on a barge with my family, from Oliver, asking my advice. For days he and his mate had flogged technology. Now, they’ve all grown up and the seas. And in return got nothing. are technophiles of the first order. Nice boys. Nothing. He wasn’t so much despairing as Polite. Educated. Funny. But existing in a beaten. What could I do? He was trying all computer world that means very little to me. the right stuff, feathering for mackerel, float Then a strange thing happened. I met up fishing for gar and pollock, ledgering for... with the family years later for a few days on well for anything eager enough to eat a bait. the Scilly Isle of Tresco. As always, I went What else could he try? fishing. I collected limpets off the beach and What else could I say? All I could suggest went wrasse fishing off the rocks. is an old trick that sometimes works. Take a On the third or fourth occasion the young- tough bladed knife down to the beach and est son, now 13 asked to come with me. prise off a bucket full of limpets. Crush A strange request for a lad who had never them up with stones, shell and all. And chuck shown any interest in anything that wasn’t them a handful at a time, every five minutes, powered by micro-chips. But one which I off your favourite rock spot at the start of was thrilled to accept. the ebbing tide. I set him up with a rod, a simple running Chuck them in and around a nearby kelp ledger rig a squashed up slimey limpet, and a bed. Feed the crushed shells and limpet flesh spot out on the tip of a gently wave-lapped like ground bait. Then fish over the fishyrock. He sussed out casting pretty quick. His stinking ooze with a limpet on a smallish razor sharp mind working out the physics hook, foot above a three ounce lead. Move it and the angles and weights and measures in around keeping it close to the rocks and the minutes. And just as the night fell and the kelp. Be prepared to lose a few rigs on the tide ebbed, he caught a small pollock. rocks. He was excited. Interested. But not what This is what I told him. He took it all on you’d exactly call hooked by the experience. board. And in his quiet serious and polite The following year, before heading off on way, thanked me for my advice. I had little his annual holiday to Tresco he came to visit hope. How could a day or two limpet crushme to ask about what sort of fishing tackle ing compare with hours on end staring at the he should take to have a go on his own, or adventures of pneumatic breasted computer rather with his equally inexperienced mate. fantasy goddess like Lara Croft on her sexuI lent him a telescopic rod, a reel, some ally potent Tomb Raider quest? rigs and some advice. He caught nothing. AbIn my heart of hearts I knew this was a solutely nothing. Him and his mate tried long young man who’d peeped out of the trench and hard and came back with a big fat zero. of technology and smelled the fish. But I have to say, I was gutted. I kindled a would retreat forever again as the things with small flame of hope that he might discover fins failed to deliver the goods. fishing and be lured away from his computer Two days later, a message on my mobile world for just long enough to get a good from Oliver was accompanied by squeals old fashioned buzz. But he was let down. and shrieks of hysterical happiness. Noises The fish wouldn’t play. He’d wasted hours I’d never heard him utter before. A call back of his holiday searching for bait, flinging confirmed the noises of joy. A two and a lead off rocks, getting in tangles, losing gear half pound wrasse had been caught. and didn’t even get one solitary fish for his A fish died and young life had been saved. trouble. Shame on you sea. You could have Fishing One. Computers Nil. Oh yes. Oh yes.


Arts &Entertainment

From Parrhasius to Damien Hirst, Arts Awards have made an impact

Parhasius triumphed

THROUGHOUT history, art competitions and awards have been an important part of western civilization and culture, and today thousands of artists enter them each year. For emerging artists, these initiatives can be the first time their work is presented to the public. Historically, patronage, commissions and opportunities were the prizes for winners. Today, just by entering art competitions, an artist or maker can gain more renown and allow fellow peers and judges to understand their unique perspectives and technical abilities, as well as give affirmation of their ideas. Even from the 5th Century BC, art competitions have been important for artistic renown. Zeuxis and Parhasius (Parrhasius) were two Greek artists who competed against each other to see who was the better painter. The famous ancient historian Pliny tells us that Zeuxis created a beautiful painting of grapes so deceptive, that real life birds flew down to eat them. Parhasius was thought to be the lesser of the two painters but won hands down after Zeuxis asked if he would remove the curtain from his painting. The curtain WAS the painting and Parhasius triumphed, receiving wide acclaim, leaving Zeuxis in second place. Jumping to 17th century France, King Louis XIV created a completely different kind of competition. He established the Académie de France, which, surprisingly, wasn’t in France, but in Rome. He wanted young French artists to be given an opportunity to study at this prestigious school, so created an art competition called the Grand Prix de Rome. Whoever won the contest in each category gained the privilege of living in the gorgeous Palazzo Mancini, the home of the Academy, paid for by the King. If this hadn’t been an incentive to enter the competition, I don’t know what would’ve been. The Academy was a cultural metropolis for the winner and was an opportunity for artists to expand their skills, whilst at the same time

advertising the French government’s need to continue artistic education and sustain the visual arts for future generations. Turning towards a more contemporary competition, the Turner Prize was first awarded by the Tate Gallery in 1984 and was founded by a group called the Patrons of New Art. It was formed to encourage rising interest in contemporary art and is the artistic equivalent to the Booker Prize for literature. Each year there is a new panel of judges, including gallery directors, curators, critics and writers, all from Britain. The wide range of winners, such as Chris Ofili, Damien Hirst and Rachel Whiteread are so diverse that the competition confirms enthusiasm of contemporary art, started by the Dada Movement in the 1900s. William Rose’ success story should give hope to anyone entering competitions, that anything can happen. ‘Drawing’ magazine holds an annual drawing competition called the Shades of Grey and winners are awarded a year’s subscription, and their work published in the magazine. Rose’s work featured on the front cover of the magazine in 2010 when he won the competition, and miraculously ended up working on a film with the Eastwood’s in California, when they spotted his work on the front cover. The film, Carmel-by-the-Sea, is based on a child art prodigy, and Rose was asked to be the artist behind the child’s designs. Along with being housed in a multi-million dollar house, his career took off. His work has since been exhibited in numerous exhibitions and galleries in Kansas, and all because he entered a competition he thought would only bring him a scrap of recognition. Ultimately, competitions showcase talent, expose and challenge artists to test themselves and bring opportunities never thought possible. Anyone who enters an art competition is a winner. Mamie Colfox


Natural Response Driven to explore our relationship with environment and landscape Tania Kovats has travelled the globe working on incredible sculptural installations. She talked to Fergus Byrne about her love of sculpture and a career that nearly didn’t happen. She is selecting sculpture for the 2019 Marshwood Arts Awards.

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n an essay about the artist Tania Kovats, writer Philip Hoare describes her work as re-animating “the myths and realities of landscape in her imagination and ours.” He sees her “continually building and rebuilding it like a brick wall in her head.” It’s a description I’m reminded of as she talks about her motivation and the response to the environment which inspires her to create extraordinary sculptural pieces. The motivation is something she has never been able to pin down, but the response is constant. ‘I’m just very driven with what I do’ she says. ‘I just don’t think I could do anything else; it’s what I was made for.’ She describes it as like an engine that’s always on. ‘There’s always another work that needs to be made.’ The need to dissect, explore, investigate and interrogate the landscape, indeed the environment around her, is physical. She loves the tactile nature of sculpture. Her current exhibition ‘Divers’ at Berwick Visual Arts in Berwick-upon-Tweed involved filling wetsuits

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with concrete, and after setting, peeling off the rubber remains of the suits. The result is extraordinary, but she recalls the process as a ‘real wrestle’, although conversely, she also found it ‘a deeply erotic experience’. Despite casting in concrete, her current material of interest is water, and the ‘Divers’ are inverted as if they are diving through the floor—a probe ‘testing human limits’. Moving to live by a mill in Devon has had an influence on her work. She began to concentrate on water as her source of inspiration and material. She visited the Arctic which had a ‘massive impact’ helping her to see how places she had visited previously— jungle and desert—interconnected with the Arctic and with each other. ‘Water is the connecting element’ she says, realising that all the landscape works she had done before were made by water. ‘Water is the sculptor.’ From glaciers making valleys to rivers making a gorge, she sees water as a ‘dynamic force’. Looking back on earlier work, even TREE, a commission from


Opposite page: TREE, 2009 (before and after. Sea Mark, 2016. Little Vera 1998. This page: Diver, 2019 Over page: Tilted, 2002


‘You have to seek it out... becoming visible is so important’ the Natural History Museum to celebrate the bicentenary of Charles Darwin, looks like water. The final result is the shape of a tree embedded into the roof of the Natural History Museum. ‘It looks like a delta’ she says. ‘The tree is a big straw sucking up fluid.’ Water might be a fitting symbol of the ebb and flow of her creative journey to date. Her deep affinity with sculpture got off to a shaky start at the Royal College of Art where she felt ‘the place was sort of haunted by people chiselling on stone and macho bronze casting.’ She knew that wasn’t what she wanted and battled with the traditional interpretation of the word ‘sculpture’. However, a spell in Rome on a scholarship changed her view. Spending time immersed in the relationship between sculpture and architecture, the city and the body helped her realise she didn’t have to be scared of ‘the S word’ anymore. ‘It is who I am, it is what I do’ she says. ‘Sculpture is the most incredible thing ever.’ But things might have been very different. Told by a tutor at the Royal College of Art that she probably wouldn’t have an exhibition until she was in her forties and more likely would give up, get married and have children, was a shocking and potentially deflating experience. However, she dispatched that prophesy to its rightful place by winning the Barclays Young Artist Award in 1991. She remembers attending the opening night at the Serpentine Gallery where she was the only woman exhibiting alongside people like Peter Doig and Douglas Gordon. Each selected artist was given a cheque, and she recalls feeling ‘cross’ when all the names were read out, and hers wasn’t. Deflated and angry, her mood suddenly changed on hearing that there was one more announcement—the overall winner was Tania Kovats. ‘I was so excited’ she recalls. It was one of the turning points in her career. One that helped her to understand the need to become visible and the value of initiatives like Arts Awards. ‘You have to seek it out’ she says of success and recognition. ‘Becoming visible is so important. They call it an artwork and some of that work happens in the studio with just you and the object, but so much of it happens beyond that. Engaging with the world, being present, making the work present, that’s all part of the artwork.’ She agrees that for many artists being brave and promoting their work can be an uncomfortable experience but explains: ‘You have to balance that introverted process with putting yourself out there.’ Tania Kovats ran the MA Drawing at University of the Arts London until 2018 when she was appointed Professor of Drawing at Bath Spa University. She has work in collections including Arts Council Collection, UK, the British Council Collection, the Contemporary Arts Society, London and the Victoria & Albert Museum and is represented by the Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London. Tania will be choosing sculptors to exhibit alongside her at the Marshwood Arts Awards 2019 in November. For information or to submit work for consideration visit www.marshwoodawards.com

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Museums&Galleries 1 – 31 AUGUST John Boyd: A Take On Turner ‘En Plein Air’ Free/Donation LSi Bridport, 51 East Street, Bridport DT6 3JX lsibridport. co.uk. UNTIL 4 AUGUST Art in Squares This special exhibition is being hosted by The Gallery, Symondsbury, the new home of Lyme Bay Arts CIC, the group made up of local artists who organise showcases and events around our region. In this one, a wide diversity of subjects, creative processes and styles will be on display: the only key requirement being that all the artwork must be in 16” squares. To join the group or be kept informed of Lyme Bay Arts’ future programmes, email them at contact@lymebayarts.co.uk or visit them via Instagram, Facebook or Twitter (lymebayarts). The Gallery, Symondsbury Estate, Bridport DT6 6HG. 10 - 21 AUGUST Terra Incognita Lyme Bay Arts CIC officially launches its new exhibition space, The Gallery, Symondsbury, on 10 August with Terra Incognita, a showcase of recent paintings by Andy Rollo, a lecturer in art and design at Yeovil College, which will run until 21 August. Andy is “excited about exhibiting at Symondsbury for a number of reasons. Firstly, the work I have been producing over the course of the last ten years has been inspired in part by the geology and history of Dorset and in particular the Dorset Ridgeway and Jurassic Coast. Secondly, I feel that this new gallery provides a good opportunity for me to raise my profile. It’s a beautiful location in the midst of the landscape of Dorset. Thirdly, it is exciting for a new gallery to open that provides opportunities for work to be exhibited that isn’t quite as traditional—work that doesn’t only respond to a specific place but delves more into imaginary landscapes and foregrounds

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visual language elements like shape, line and colour.” To join Lyme Bay Arts or be kept informed of its future programmes, email them at contact@lymebayarts.co.uk or visit them via Instagram, Facebook or Twitter (lymebayarts). The Gallery, Symondsbury Estate, Bridport DT6 6HG. UNTIL 11 AUGUST Eduardo Paolozzi - General Dynamic F.U.N. Exhibition hang at AUB curated by William Hernandez Abreu. A Hayward Touring Exhibition from Southbank Centre, London. Eduardo Paolozzi: General Dynamic F.U.N. presents 50 screenprints and photolithographs by the pioneer of Pop Art, Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (1924-2005). Created between 1965 and 1970, Paolozzi’s canny alchemy is vividly apparent in General Dynamic F.U.N. The series illustrates how the selfstyled ‘Wizard in Toytown’ employed the technologies of mass-reproduction to gorge on its idols – the household names and familiar faces of consumer advertising, high fashion and Hollywood in the 1960s. Block B, Foundation Studies Building, AUB Bournemouth www.aub.ac.uk. 27 AUGUST – 7 SEPTEMBER Town & Country New work by wildlife artists Jackie Cox and Chris Sinden. Free. Ilminster Arts Centre, The Meeting House, East Street, Ilminster. TA19 0AN. 01460 54973. www.themeetinghouse.org.uk. UNTIL 6 SEPTEMBER Paint Freedom: exhibition by Bob and Roberta Smith Bob and Roberta Smith is a contemporary British artist best known for his slogan art. Paint Freedom is a new exhibition of portraits and landscapes and the works are in collaboration with the National Trust’s People’s Landscape project. The exhibition has been created by Bob and Roberta, together with members of the public. The exhibition will be on display throughout the museum. Free with

valid Museum Annual Pass. National Trust members get £1 off entry, and there is free entry to the museum for Arts Fund Members. For more information visit shirehalldorset.org or call 01305 261849. Shire Hall, Dorchester. UNTIL 18 SEPTEMBER Igniting Sight Contemporary artists inspired by JMW Turner. Fred Cuming RA, Luke Elwes, Vanessa Gardiner, Frances Hatch, Janette Kerr RWA RSA Hon, Alex Lowery. Sladers Yard, 5 W Bay Rd, West Bay, Bridport DT6 4GD. 01308 459511 www.sladersyard.co.uk. UNTIL 31 OCTOBER Crime & Punishment Concerned with the harshness of Georgian and Victorian justice, with specific reference to West Dorset. Plenty to interest children. Beaminster Museum Open Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Bank Holidays 10.30am - 4pm; Sundays 2pm - 4.30pm. Tel: 01308 863 623. website:www. beaminstermuseum.co.uk. D-Day+75 The Role of West Dorset in the preparation for the invasion and the invasion itself, with special reference to the American 16th Infantry regiment and the 1st Dorset Regiment. Open Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Bank Holidays :10.30am - 4pm; Sundays 2pm 4.30pm. Tel: 01308 863 623. website:www. beaminstermuseum.co.uk. Down the Slipway at West Bay Discovery Centre. The harbour of West Bay no longer shows any visible signs of its shipbuilding past. However, during the period 1769-1879 over 350 ships were built here. We will be bringing the shipyard back to life and discovering some of its secrets in this anniversary year. (Part of Turner events in Bridport.) Open daily 11am – 4pm excluding Mondays. Admission free, donations welcomed. Further details visit www.westbaydiscoverycentre.org.uk.


BridLit 2019 – brightening up the dark days of winter

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ickets go on sale for Bridport Literary Festival events this month, with this year’s event bigger and better than ever. It really is a feast for lovers of reading and writing in all genres, with talks, workshops and discussions in and around the town. ‘There’s something for everyone this year,’ said festival director Tanya Bruce-Lockhart. ‘We’re looking forward to a brilliant festival.’ The 15th BridLit runs from Sunday 3 to Saturday 9 November in venues throughout the

town. This year’s event sees a diverse line-up of speakers in a star-studded programme, including the new Poet Laureate Simon Armitage, novelists Melvyn Bragg, Sadie Jones, Deborah Moggach, David Nicholls and Max Porter as well as nonfiction historians Max Hastings, Tom Holland and Tim Bouverie and journalists Lindsey Hilsum, Steve Richards and Channel Four News’s Matt Frei, who is guest speaker at the George Millar Literary Dinner. Armitage will be speaking at this year’s Bridport Literary Festival on Sunday 3 November at the Electric Palace. He is the UK’s 21st Poet Laureate, following in the footsteps of William Wordsworth, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, John Betjeman and Ted Hughes, and is one of the country’s foremost poets. Tanya Bruce-Lockhart said the BridLit team was delighted to be welcoming Armitage. ‘He is known and respected across the world for his witty and profound take on modern life.’ A Professor of Poetry at the University of Leeds, Armitage has published 28 collections of poetry. His work has been studied by millions of children as part of the national curriculum and in 2010 he received a CBE for services to poetry. His latest collection of poetry is Sandettie Light Vessel Automatic, applauded by his Poet Laureate predecessor Dame Carol Ann Duffy for being ‘boundary-breaking . . . poems of emotional weight and musical grace from the fabric of our everyday lives.’ Says Armit-

age: ‘Ever since my earliest encounters with poetry I always believed it had the persuasive power to operate beyond the printed page and away from traditional literary environments.’ Nature writers Stephen Moss (birds) and Peter Marren (butterflies) and national treasure Henry Blofeld are also on the BirdLit programme, along with Jason Goodwin, who lives locally, a discussion on spirit of place with local authors Rosanna Ley, Gail Aldwin and Maria Donovan and a life writing masterclass with Dr Celia Brayfield. Some people base their winter breaks around the festival. Last year, Maggi Ouin, from Broadwindsor, was accompanied by four old schoolfriends she’s known for 58 years. They come to stay with her and enjoy all that Brid Lit has to offer. Valerie Barnes, from Bridport, has been attending the festival for years. Last year she was accompanied by her friend, Lynne Boot. Val said: ‘Brid Lit director Tanya Bruce-Lockhart has access to so many interesting and iconic people and everyone who doesn’t get tickets ends up being upset because they’ve missed it.’ • Festival Friends enjoy priority booking two weeks before tickets go on sale to the public. To find out more about becoming a Friend or for more information about BridLit 2019, visit www. bridlit.com. The box office at Bridport Tourist Information Centre is open to the public for bookings from August, telephone 01308 424901.

Simon Armitage, photograph Peter James Milson

Maggie Ouin, second left, and friends

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MARZIA COLONNA Collages and Sculpture coming to West Bay

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MarziaColonna 2016 Iris and Peonies 60x60cm

MarziaColonna 2016 Two Ink Pens 17x17cm

Marzia Colonna

2014 Mother Earth bronze

Marzia Colonna

2018 Mozart in the Studio 30x30cm

Opposite page: Marzia Colonna 2018 Shining Through 20 x 20 cm Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 83


SLADER’S Yard in West Bay is delighted to announce a new exhibition of Marzia Colonna’s collages and sculpture. Including over 40 recent collages with bronze sculpture, framed drawings and giclee prints, the exhibition will be immensely attractive with prices to suit a wide range of budgets. Marzia Colonna’s great talent is to take us directly into her subject matter. Whether she is working in collage or in sculpture, she is able to convey the physical sensations of being in a particular place, time and situation. ‘I try to become a part of my subjects, animate and inanimate, to get to the essence of what they are,’ she says. Achieving that, she takes us along with her. Described by Adrian Hamilton (The Independent) as ‘some of her most exciting and pleasurable works,’ Marzia Colonna’s collages capture the exceptional landscape of West Dorset with the eye of someone who knows and understands it, in different weather and times of year, with a wonderful sense of space and light. Her still lives and flowers are beautifully observed and often from her studio and garden. Her disciplined approach to collage underpins the work with a strong abstract quality of mark and pattern. Her collages are made entirely from paper painted by her beforehand. ‘When I work with collage I feel I am sculpting with paper and painting at the same time. It is fast and furious work; holding on to and trying to replicate the memory of the landscape that I have experienced, not just visually in its form and colour, but also in the impact created in my mind by the wind, sun, rain, smells and sounds.’ Colonna’s sculpture is at the heart of her work as an artist. Roger Berthoud writes, ‘Her sculpture is based on the human form, which she uses to express what we all share as human beings. It fascinates her that wherever we come from, whatever our race or religion, we feel the same basic needs and desires. She sees the body as the vessel of human emotion, touching in its combination of fragility and strength. Many of her bronzes, and indeed of her paper sculptures, reveal the tenderness with which she views her fellow human beings.’ (Colour and Form, Sculpture and Collage Marzia Colonna 2002) The sculptural works in this exhibition are concerned with the metamorphic female form. Relating the young girl’s development to nature, a butterfly emerging as a young girl in Chrysalis, the nymph rising from the sea in Young Venus. Similarly tender but with a more solid base, is the strong punctured form of Mother Earth. Colonna works intuitively, reaching for the sensations she wants to communicate with a lifetime of craft, technique and experience to call upon.

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Marzia Colonna was born in Pisa in 1951. She entered art school aged 12 and continued to study at the Academia di Belle Arti in Florence. In 1970 she moved to England with her husband Robert Montagu. Her first solo exhibition in London was in 1979. Since then she has exhibited regularly. Her work is in many private and corporate collections in Europe, the United States and Australasia. Since 1985 she has lived and worked in West Dorset. A major sculpture was purchased in 2001 by the Jerwood foundation and in 2002 by Newby Hall sculpture collection. Public commissions include a crucifix for Salisbury Cathedral (2002), ‘St Adhelm’ for Sherborne Abbey (2004), ‘Mermaid’ for the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy (2007), ‘Kite Flyer’ for Winchester (2009) and ‘Earth and Sea’, a life-sized piece in Krakow. She is represented in London by the Portland Gallery. This is is her fourth major exhibition at Sladers Yard. Sladers Yard, Contemporary Art, Furniture & Craft Gallery West Bay Bridport Dorset DT6 4EL Open: Mon to Sat 10am – 4.30 pm, Sundays 12 – 4.30 pm All work can be viewed and bought on www.sladersyard.co.uk t: 01308 459511 e: gallery@sladersyard.co.uk

Opposite page top: Marzia Colonna 2016 Chrysalis bronze. Opposite page below: Marzia Colonna 2018 Walking at West Bay 60x100cm.

This page: Marzia Colonna Dried Flowers and Coral ink and gouache 76x55cm

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PREVIEW On Stage - In and Around the Vale Actiontrack Show Build SOUTH PETHERTON

SOMERSET’s Actiontrack arts organisation runs a five-day summer school for local youngsters, culminating in a performance at the David Hall at South Petherton on Friday 2nd August at 4pm. The performance at the end of the Actiontrack Show Build summer school is open to young people, parents, families, friends and patrons of the David Hall. It is a chance to see what South Somerset youngsters have created from scratch, says Mike Penn, the Petherton Arts Trust chairman: “The Actiontrack Show Build helps our young folk to develop their communication skills, boosts confidence and promotes teamwork in a way that will stay with them for life.”

Creative summer fun VILLAGES

WORRIED parents wondering how they can keep their children occupied during the summer holiday will find plenty of inspiration in the Artsreach summer programme, which runs to 30th August. The theme for this year’s activities is The Lost Words, Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris’s inspirational book, which uses the magic of words and imagery to revive our love of nature. The Artsreach summer activities range from arts and crafts to music, theatre, outdoor adventures, storytelling and more. Sarah Butterworth’s Woodspeak Creators sessions in Evershot and the Kingcombe Centre at Toller Porcorum invite children to create a new language using images and sounds from the woods, and make woodland sculptures from wire and coloured tissue. Dorset Forest School hosts outdoor

Holiday fun with Artsreach summer activities adventure workshops including making leaf-print bunting, natural painting, copper jewellery design, willow-weaving and games at Piddletrenthide, Milborne St Andrew, Portesham and the Kingcombe Centre. Parents and children can take part in an interactive session of making music, dressing up, singing songs and creating stories as Treehouse Theatre brings Storybox to Charmouth, Sturminster Newton and Milborne St Andrew. For parents and toddlers there is a fun-filled session of baking bread, singing songs and doing arts and crafts followed by a puppet show with Fiddlesticks at Milborne St Andrew. Jo Burlington brings Potato Sack Creatures to Piddletrenthide, and Vicky Ashford invites youngsters to create a printed banner, mobile or clay sculpture using found and foraged materials such as leaves, seed pods, pine cones and conkers in a Wild Art session in Burton Bradstock. Artist Fran Quinlan leads a Let’s Get recycling craft workshop at Burton Bradstock, while 3D sculptor Darrell Wakelam returns to create magnificent 3D animals including hares at Toller Porcorum and kingfishers in Martinstown. Learn the art of stone carving with Bec Freiesleben at Toller Porcorum and enjoy Martin Maudsley’s storytelling performance, The Lost Stories, with traditional folktales

and legends about plants and animals, at Charmouth. Squashbox Theatre brings a new show, Curious Creatures Wildlife Park, uncovering the mysteries of the animal kingdom to Martinstown, with puppetry, storytelling, live music and comedy. Booking is recommended as workshops have limited places and often sell out. For full details pick up the Artsreach Summer Activities programme or visit www. artsreach.co.uk

Music for the moon BURTON BRADSTOCK

BURTON Bradstock Festival of Music and Art, from Saturday 10th to Sunday 18th August, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the moon landings, when Neil Armstrong became the first man to set foot on the moon and uttered the famous words: “One small step for man; one giant leap for mankind.”. Artistic director, violinist David Juritz says: “He became the first person to achieve what humans have dreamed of for millennia. We’re going to celebrate those dreams throughout the week with music by Debussy, Schoenberg and Haydn, inspired by the moon and stars.” The line-up of musicians is familiar and impressive as always, including harpist Eluned Price, accordionist Milos Milivojevic, pianist David Gordon, violist Yuri Ghislin, cellist Adrian Bradbury, guitarist Craig Ogden, and David Juritz, as well as the Atea Wind Quintet, virtuoso jazz violinist Christian Garrick, and the London Tango Quintet. The concerts all take place in the village’s St Mary’s Church. The festival exhibition is in Burton Bradstock village hall throughout the week; there is a tea party with music

THE JOY OF CHAMBER MUSIC PURBECK International Chamber Music Festival, this year from 28th August to 1st September, brings some of the world’s leading musicians to a range of historic and intimate venues in Swanage, Studland, Corfe Castle and the surroundingt villages. Under its artistic director Natalie Clein, the Dorset-born cellist and former BBC Young Musician of the Year, the Purbeck International Chamber Music Festival has become one of the most exciting events in the regional arts calendar. This year’s performers include pianist Katya Apekisheva, lutenist Elizabeth Kenny, cellists Guy Johnston and Abel Selaocoe, didgeridoo player Martin Dillmann (pictured), violinist Jennifer Pike, mezzo soprano Olivia Ray and historian Philip Mansel. 86 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


PREVIEW of audio for compilations, radio and the web using his vast experience and record collection. In tandem he has enjoyed a career as chief designer for Ninja Tune since the early 90s, running parallel with his music making. In 2010 he was responsible for the entire look and design of the Ninja Tune XX campaign and releases that celebrated 20 years of the label.

The Patchwork Elephant BRIDPORT

CORDUROY, the Acid Jazz quartet that influenced Blur come to Lyme Regis in August

in the rectory garden on Sunday 11th, and the gala concert, featuring most of the week’s performers, on Friday evening. The programme for the finale includes the world premiere of David Gordon’s Il Filo, concerto for guitar and accordion.

Beautiful Days ESCOT PARK

The Stranglers, photograph David Boni THE Levellers once again headline their unique independent music featival, Beautiful Days, at Escot Park near Ottery St Mary. The festival has been running for 16 years, this year from 16th to 18th August. The festival’s starry line-up also includes Skunk Anansie, Ziggy Marley, the Sleaford Mods, the Black Seeds, the Stranglers, Kate Rusby, Cara Dillon, Karine Polwarth, Hothouse Flowers, Steeleye Span, Ferocious Dog, Seth Lakeman and comedians John Shuttleworth and Robin Ince. There are several stages, site art installations, a wild spa, crafts, a healing garden, children’s area, walkabout theatre, play zones in campsites, family camping, real ale bars from Otter Brewery, folk sessions and a vast selection of food and craft stalls. Beautiful Days has no sponsorship, branding and does not advertise.

The Fabric Four are back LYME REGIS

CORDUROY, the Acid Jazz quartet that influenced Blur and was in the top five of the NME Readers’ Best Live Act awards, bring their blend of upbeat funk and jazz to the Marine Theatre at Lyme Regis on Saturday 17th August at 8.30pm. The self-styled Fabric Four made a strong impact to match their music—with their black turtle necks, goatee beards, charm and visual style, they were a cross between Bop musicians and Greenwich Village bohemians. Last year three of their albums, Dad Man Cat, High Havoc and Out Of Here were reissued, and a new studio album, The Return Of The Fabric Four. This takes twin brothers drummer Ben and keyboardist Scott Addison, bassist Richard Searle and guitarist Simon Nelson-Smith back to their roots with 12 tracks that evoke the archetypal 1960s spy film, with split screens, car chases, secret agents in black specs and fawn macs and girls in kinky boots and knitted dresses. Among the bands influenced by Corduroy were Blur, who invited the quartet to play at their 1994 Alexandra Palace extravaganza alongside Supergrass and Pulp.

Kraftwerk remix LYME REGIS

DJ Food comes to the Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis, on Friday 2nd August, with a gig celebrating the German electronic pioneers Kraftwerk. The Ninja Tune and Solid Steel legend presents Kraftwerk: Klassics, Kovers and Kurios, taking the electronic pioneers’ various eras, looks and line ups and combining them into a 90 minute collage of electro and techno. From 1995’s Recipe For Disaster onwards, DJ Food has mixed hundreds of hours

ELMER the elephant is not your typical grey animal—he is a joyous jumble of patchwork colours. But what happens when he gets tired of being different? Find out in Elmer The Patchwork Elephant Show at Bridport Arts Centre on Tuesday 6th August at 2pm. Selladoor Theatre’s show is adapted from the much-loved children’s book series by David McKee, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. Elephants, as everyone knows, are big, have trunks, and are grey. But fun-loving and brilliantly colourful Elmer keeps everyone in a playful mood, until the day he gets tired of being different and tries to blend in with the herd. With a menagerie of 21 loveable puppets, the show tells the tale of an elephant who stands out with his patchwork-coloured skin and his sense of humour—and who discovers that his friends have always valued his unique characteristics. The show’s subtle message that it is always best to be yourself, combined with the vibrant colour and cheeky humour of the main character, makes Elmer a great show for toddlers and children of all ages

The Pirates of Penzance NOTHE FORT

OPERA Anywhere comes to the atmospheric and historic Nothe Fort at Weymouth on Thursday 8th August at 7pm with a sparkling production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance. A swashbuckling farce of delightful music and razor-sharp wit, The Pirates of Penzance is complete with brave(ish) pirates, a completely dotty Major-General, his beautiful unwed daughters and a bumbling bunch of hopeless but hilarious policemen. With such famous songs as I Am The Very Model Of A Modern Major-General, A Policemen’s Lot Is Not A Happy One, and Poor Wand’ring One, this is a fantastic family friendly mix of comic characters, witty dialogue, and great music—perfect entertainment for a summer’s evening. GP-W

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Celebrations and poignant moments for folk fans

Sam Sweeney and his band will be playing music from their poignant new album, The Unfinished Violin, at Lyme Regis Folk Weekend and Sidmouth Folk Festival.

Poignant story at Lyme Folk LYME REGIS

FOLK music often connects us with our past, but there is a specially moving connection at this year’s Lyme Folk Weekend, when Sam Sweeney and his band perform The Unfinished Violin as the finale concert on Sunday 1st September. The concert features music from Sam’s album of the same name, and centres on the extraordinary story of one very special instrument. Sam, a veteran of folk supergroup Bellowhead, and BBC 2 Folk Musician of the Year winner, bought the fiddle in a music shop in Oxford having been captivated by its “really pure and melancholic tone”. After taking it home, he looked inside the body and was surprised to see a signature— that of Richard S Howard of Leeds, dated 1915. “But it looked like it hadn’t been around for that long,” says Sam. The owner of the music shop had bought the violin at an auction when it was still in pieces in an old manila envelope, and had put it together and offered it for sale. After some more research, Sam began to uncover the true history of the instrument and the story of the man who had originally made it. Richard Spencer Howard, a musician and instrument-maker, had begun crafting the violin before being called up to serve in the First World War. He was killed before it was completed and he had had a chance to play it. Private Howard joined the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (West Riding) in 1916 and died on the first day of the Battle of Messines in Belgium on 7th June 1917. Sam recorded his debut solo album, The Unfinished Violin, using the instrument to play traditional tunes which the Army marched to and an original composition, 88 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

Rose Howard, named after the maker’s daughter. In 2017, Sam invited relatives of Private Howard to join him at the soldier’s grave side in Ypres, where he played the violin on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the soldier’s death. “Playing over the grave was incredibly emotional,” he said. ‘“We all just stood there sobbing. He was unknown, and all of a sudden there I was playing his fiddle to him.” The story was turned into a live show, Sam Sweeney’s Fiddle: Made In The Great War, and then developed into the new album last year. You can catch Sam, playing Private Howard’s violin, and his band, performing the whole repertoire from The Unfinished Violin at Lyme’s Marine Theatre, at the final concert. Other highlights include Jon Boden and the Askew Sisters playing at the Marine on Friday 30th August, and Dorset folk duo Ninebarrow on Saturday 31st August—plus the usual gigs in pubs, morris dancers and more around the town. Tickets are available from the Lyme Folk website, or from Lyme Regis Tourist Information Centre on 01297 442138.

Celebrating 65 years SIDMOUTH

MAKING music together has been a human activity since the first human banged a bone on a tree trunk. And folk festivals have been celebrating traditional dance and music for many decades—this year Sidmouth Folk Week, celebrating its 65th anniversary this year, running from 2nd to 9th August. The line-up includes Richard Thompson, Cara Dillon, Martin Carthy, Seth Lakeman, Sam Sweeney, Flook, Julie Fowlis, Steve Knightley, the Spooky Men’s Chorale, Nan-

cy Kerr and James Fagan, John Kirkpatrick, Lady Maisery and Belshazzar’s Feast. There has been a folk festival in Sidmouth in the first week of August every year since 1955. There are concerts in marquees and a variety of venues around the beautiful south Devon resort, attracts tens of thousands of music-lovers with more than 700 events, appealing to fans of every variety of folk music. With “an ear to the past and an eye on the future”, the festival features established stars and emerging talent; major concerts, roots parties, intimate sessions, ceilidhs and folk dancing, storytelling, fun family and youth-centred activities, hands-on workshops and spectacular dance displays. All this plus an always inspiring selection of crafts and food and drink from the South West.

Big names for Purbeck folk HARMANS CROSS

PURBECK Valley Folk Festival 2019, from 15th to 18th August, has an impressive line-up at its new location on a farm near Harmans Cross, with headliners Thea Gilmore, Cara Dillon and Karine Polwart. It really is a festival for everyone, with lots of activities and entertainment for children and a line-up of established and rising stars for music-lovers. There are five stages in barns, with concerts, workshops, sessions, Purbeck Rising (bringing new talent to the our stages), Purbeck Poetry Slam, children’s area (crafts, storytelling, puppet shows, theatre and games, circus skills, clowns), youth music workshops, craft area and more. Other performers this year include Afro Celt Sound System, Flook, Marry Waterson and Emily Barker, Sam Kelly and The Lost Boys and Martha Tilston.


CALL FOR ENTRIES Marshwood Arts Awards 2019 First launched over ten year’s ago, The Marshwood Arts Awards has become one of the most anticipated exhibitions in the South West. This year’s show will take place at Bridport Arts Centre from November 9th to December 7th and a total of seventeen artists/makers will be chosen to exhibit with the selectors below for what promises to be a unique and exciting exhibition. CATEGORY: PAINTING & DRAWING Selector: Dave White A Fine Arts graduate of the Liverpool John Moores University, Dave White is a contemporary British Artist who’s exhibitions include Shanghai, New York, Rotterdam, Miami and London, with solo exhibitions in London, Copenhagen and Los Angeles. In 2018 he created a hand painted Rhino for Tusk which was installed for a month on New Bond Street in London and auctioned at Christie’s alongside works by Harland Miller, Marc Quinn, Gavin Turk and The Chapman Brothers. davewhiteart.com CATEGORY: SCULPTURE Selector: Tania Kovats Tania Kovats is renowned for producing sculptures, large-scale installations and temporal works which explore our experience and understanding of landscape. Her work was the subject of a major solo exhibition at The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh in 2014. She was Course Director, MA Drawing at UAL, Wimbledon and is Professor of Drawing at Bath Spa University. She is also the author of Drawing Water (2014) and ‘The Drawing Book: A Survey of Drawing – The Primary Means of Expression (2017).

CATEGORY: PHOTOGRAPHY & DIGITAL MEDIA Selector: Brian Griffin Guardian Newspaper’s ‘Photographer of the decade’ in 1989 Brian Griffin has also been described as ‘the most unpredictable and influential British portrait photographer of the last decades’ by the British Journal of Photography and was feted as ‘one of Britain’s most influential photographers’ by the World Photography Organisation in 2015. He received a Honorary Doctorate from Birmingham City University and in 2016 was inducted into the Album Cover Hall Of Fame. www.briangriffin.co.uk

CATEGORY: APPLIED ARTS Selector: Kate Malone Recently featured as a judge on BBC2’s The Great Pottery Throw Down Kate Malone is known for creating large, complex sculptural vessels—though her works include everything from egg cups to building facades. Works are now in collections including at the Ashmolean Museum, the Victoria & Albert Museum and Manchester Art Gallery. www.katemaloneceramics.com

CATEGORY: APPLIED ARTS Selector: John Makepeace John Makepeace started his career as a designer and maker in 1959. His passion for designing furniture for individual clients has grown steadily alongside his love of our indigenous woodlands and transforming their produce into artefacts for the future. Each becomes a landmark in the evolving story of fine craftsmanship in wood. www.johnmakepeacefurniture.com

To submit work for the 2019 Marshwood Arts awards visit

www.marshwoodawards.com/enter

The final date for receipt of applications is September 19th 2019. Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 89


UK premier for this year’s Shute Festival N

ow in its fourth year, Shute Festival returns on the weekend of the 13th and 15th September 2019 with a programme of diverse speakers and events. This year, the festival will host the UK premier of an award winning documentary, Free Men, about the life of death row artist Kenny Reams. He will be dialing in from his 9 x 4 foot cell for a Q&A after the screening. This is a particular coup for the festival and stems from a connection with one of the directors, Samantha Knights QC, who worked on Kenny’s appeal as an intern in the US in 2000. Located in the stunning surrounds of East Devon’s AONB, the festival will begin with a free walk to the medieval King John Oak in Shute’s former deer park, led by Legacy to Landscape. A diverse

90 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

and enticing array of talks and speakers are lined up thereafter, including Tim Pears on his latest book The Redeemed (the last in his West Country Trilogy); Isabel Bannerman on her forthcoming book, Scent Magic: Notes from a Gardener; Owen Matthews on his Sunday Times top 100 listed new book, An Impeccable Spy, and Christina Lamb, the Sunday Times chief foreign correspondent. Forensic scientist Angela Gallop CBE will be speaking about her work on some of the UK’s most high profile murders, whilst poets Anthony Wilson and Fiona Benson will be reading and speaking from their published work. Nick Jubber will also be discussing his acclaimed travel book, Epic Continent. The festival will highlight some very topical issues this year, including Jaz O’Hara speaking about her transition from the fashion world to setting up an NGO


working with migrants and refugees, and David Jones, founder of Just One Ocean, speaking about plastics in the seas. “We are completely thrilled to have such a diverse array of speakers coming to beautiful Shute,” said Paddy Magrane, codirector. “When we started in 2016, we couldn’t have imagined how the festival would take off ”. An important aspect of the festival is how it supports the local community, channeling any profits back to the primary school at Shute and the fabric of the local church, which provides an atmospheric venue for the talks. The festival has also run an outreach programme for the primary school each year with a variety of workshops. There’s also an entirely free children’s programme during the festival itself. Over the years, children have enjoyed film, pottery, bushcraft, Bollywood dancing and land art workshops. Local businesses have been very supportive of the festival with Beviss & Beckingsale and Kilmington Garden Club already committed to sponsoring events, alongside Londonbased barristers’ chambers, Matrix. “It is wonderful to have this support, which makes the festival financially possible,” said Samantha Knights. Tickets are now on sale on line at www.shutefest.org.uk and at Archway Bookshop, the independent Axminster-based shop which has run the festival’s pop up store from the outset.

Angela Gallop

Christina Lamb, Sunday Times war correspondent

Tim Pears

Jaz O’Hara

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On Screen - In and Around the Vale

Doris Day in Pillow Talk

Thursday 1 August Pillow Talk (1959, PG) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 11am £6 (11am, ticket includes hot drink and pastry) 01308424204 www. bridport-arts.com. An absolute classic starring Rock Hudson, Doris Day and Tony Randall. At Eternity’s Gate (12A) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 7.30pm £6/5/4 01308424204 www.bridport-arts.com. Famed but tormented artist Vincent van Gogh spends his final years in Arles, France, painting masterworks of the natural world that surrounds him. Friday 2 August Can You Ever Forgive Me? (12A) Presented by Petherton Picture Show. When Lee Israel falls out of step with current tastes, she turns her art form to deception. Stars: Melissa McCarthy, Richard E Grant, Dolly Wells. Tickets: £5. No concessions. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton,

92 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall. org.uk 01460 240 340. Thursday 8 August Mary Poppins Returns (U) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 11am £6 (includes pastry and drink) 01308424204 www.bridport-arts.com. Decades after her original visit, the magical nanny returns to help the Banks siblings and Michael’s children through a difficult time in their lives. Mr Turner (12A) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 7.30pm £6/5/4 01308424204 www. bridport-arts.com. Eccentric British painter J.M.W. Turner (Timothy Spall) lives his last 25 years with gusto and secretly becomes involved with a seaside landlady, while his faithful housekeeper (Dorothy Atkinson) bears an unrequited love for him. Saturday 10 August Sometimes Always Never (12A) 7.30pm

Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80 Family of four £22. Bill Nighy stars alongside Sam Riley and Alice Lowe in this stylish and heartfelt comedy-drama about a scrabble obsessed tailor searching for a lost son. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton. co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Mary Poppins Returns (U) presented by Hinton St. George ‘Flix in the Stix’ in the Hinton Village Hall at 7.30pm. Tickets £5 in advance from the Village Shop and Dorothy’s Tea Room, or £5.50p on the door. Doors open 7pm. To reserve Tickets please contact Bob Kefford on 01460 72563. Decades after her original visit, the magical nanny returns to help the Banks siblings and Michael’s children through a difficult time in their lives. Emily Blunt takes over seamlessly from Julie Andrews to much acclaim. Silent Movie Night presented by Beer Regatta in collaboration with Beer Film Society and Friends of Beer Wurlitzer. Come and see one hour of comedy magic starring legends Laurel & Hardy, Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton accompa-


nied with live music from Britain’s first Wurlitzer Cinema Organ played by Trevor Bolshaw. This unique event will be held at the Congregational Church, in Beer. Doors open at 6.30pm with the programme starting at 7pm. Refreshments will be available. Book your tickets now to take advantage of the discounted price of £8, available from Beer Village Stores – or £10 on the door – and guarantee your seat. For more information contact BFS chairman Kevin Fahey on 07887 870323 or email him at: kevinwfahey@btinternet. com or BFS secretary Ros Stephenson on 07766 727273 or ros.stephenson161@ gmail.com. School Of Rock Pop Up cinema event in Seaton. Bring a blanket or camping chair and watch the film under the stars. Cliff Field Gardens, Seaton, Gates Open from 7.30pm. Film starts shortly after sunset (approx 9.15pm). Plus: Food, Snacks, Bar and Music before the film starts. Tickets: Adult: £10 (£11.29 w/booking fee) Child: £7 (£8.14 w/booking fee) 12 years and under. Buy tickets online at: https:// seatonschoolofrock.brownpapertickets. com/ Please see website for the event full terms & conditions: https://agd733.wixsite.com/seatonoutdoorcinema/links. Tuesday 13 August Tom Jones (12A) This hugely successful adaptation (both commercially and critically) of Henry Fielding’s seminal novel makes a fine tribute to the late Albert Finney. A series of misadventures ensues as young Tom looks to sow his wild oats around Dorset locations. Includes a brief introduction by Hollywood-raised film historian Karol Kulik. Duration 129 minutes £6 advance. £7.50 on the door Starts at 7.30pm The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. Thursday 15 August Mid-August Lunch (U) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR. 11am £6 (includes hot drink and pastry) 01308424204 www.bridportarts.com. An affable bachelor, Gianni who still lives with his elderly mother, has coasted through life and has no complaints about that. Soon, Gianni is taking care of several mothers and trying to stay afloat. An Accidental Studio (2019) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 7.30pm £6/5/4 01308424204 www.bridport-arts.com. Charts the early years of HandMade Films as seen through the eyes of the filmmakers, key personnel, and the man who started it all: former Beatle George Harrison. Starring Michael Caine, Helen Mirren, Terry Gilliam and Richard E Grant.

Friday 16 August Men in Black: International (12A) 7.30pm Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80 Family of four £22. The MIB have always protected the Earth from the scum of the universe. In this new adventure, they tackle their biggest, most global threat to date: a mole in the organisation. Stars Chris Hemsworth, Tessa Thompson and Liam Neeson. The Beehive, Honiton. www. beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Green Book (12A). 8pm presented by Petherton Picture Show. A working-class Italian-American bouncer becomes the driver of an African-American classical pianist on a tour of venues through the 1960s American South. Stars: Viggo Mortensen, Mahershala Ali, Linda Cardellini. Tickets: £5. No concessions. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall.org.uk 01460 240 340. Saturday 17 August Sometimes, Always, Never (12) Halstock Village Cinema in Halstock Village Hall. An endearing and quirky drama about words and loss. The story of family with an exceptional Scrabble vocabulary but who cannot put their words to use and communicate with each other. Bill Nighy and Jenny Agutter star. All tickets £6 from Halstock Shop or on the door. Licenced Bar opens at 7pm for 7.30pm start. Thursday 22 August Horrible Histories: The Movie – Rotten Romans Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 11am £6 (includes drink and pastry) 01308424204 www.bridport-arts.com. Atti, a smart and quick-witted Roman teenager, manages to upset Emperor Nero with one of his schemes. For punishment, Atti is sent to work in a cold and wet Britain where he also meets the Celts. We Are The Animals (15) Bridport Arts Centre, 9A South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR 7.30pm £6/5/4 01308424204 www.bridport-arts. com. Manny, Joel, and Jonah tear their way through childhood. Jonah, who is the youngest, becomes increasingly aware of his desperate need to escape. Driven to the edge, Jonah embraces an imagined world all his own. Friday 23 August Yesterday (12A) 7.30pm Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80. Directed by Danny Boyle, screenplay Richard Curtis. A struggling musician realises he’s the only person on Earth who can remember The Beatles after waking up in an alternate timeline where they never existed. The Beehive,

Honiton. www.beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Saturday 24 August Toy Story 4 (U) 3pm Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80 Family of four £22. When a new toy called “Forky” joins Woody and the gang, a road trip alongside old and new friends reveals how big the world can be for a toy. The Beehive, Honiton. www. beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Tuesday 27 August Cabaret (15) A magnificent Liza Minnelli plays Sally Bowles, an eccentric, promiscuous performer at the Kit Kat Club. Through her eyes—and those of the emcee, a superb Joel Grey—we witness the end of the Weimar republic and the rise of the Nazi party. Includes a brief introduction by Hollywood-raised film historian Karol Kulik. Duration 124 minutes £6 advance. £7.50 on the door Starts at 7.30pm. The Marine Theatre, Lyme Regis www.marinetheatre.com. Friday 30 August Nostalgic Cinema: Lady and the Tramp (dementia-friendly screening) 2pm £3.80 - includes tea and biscuits 1955. Disney’s classic canine romance about a street dog who comes to the aid of a pampered house pooch and her pups. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton. co.uk Box office 01404 384050. Spider-Man Far From Home (12A) 7.30pm Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80 Family of four £22. Following the events of Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man must step up to take on new threats in a world that has changed forever. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton.co.uk Box office 01404 384050. The Keeper (12A) 8pm presented by Petherton Picture Show. The Keeper tells the extraordinary love story between a young English woman and a German PoW, who together overcome prejudice, public hostility and personal tragedy. Stars: David Kross, Freya Mavor, John Henshaw. Tickets: £5. No concessions. The David Hall, Roundwell Street, South Petherton, Somerset TA13 5AA www.thedavidhall. org.uk 01460 240 340. Saturday 31 August Horrible Histories: The Movie Rotten Romans (PG) 3pm Adult £6.80, U16 £5.80 Family of four £22. Teenager Atti is forced to join the Roman Army when one of his clever schemes falls foul of Emperor Nero. He is sent to “miserable, cold, wet Britain” where “the natives are revolting, quite literally. The Beehive, Honiton. www.beehivehoniton. co.uk Box office 01404 384050.

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PERFORMANCE MONDAY 29 JULY BATH, Theatre Royal, Rupert Everett and Katherine Parkinson in Uncle Vanya, new version by David Hare, to 3 Aug: Ustinov Studio, Vanessa Redgrave in Vienna 1934-Munich 1938, to 3 Aug. BRISTOL, The Passenger Shed, Wise Children in Mallory Towers, to 18 Aug. BROWNSEA ISLAND, Poole Harbour, BOAT in Richard III, to 9 Aug, alternative nights for weather. www.brownsea-theatre. co.uk ILMINSTER, Dillington House, guitar festival, Katonah Twins, Tarrega, Tedescho, Morricone, Katonah, 8. PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal, Calendar Girls - the Musical, to 3 Aug. SIDMOUTH, Manor Pavilion, Double Death by Simon Williams, to Wed. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Pirates of the Pavilion, summer pantomime, and Tues. TUESDAY 30 JULY AXMINSTER, Burrow Farm Gardens, Folksy Theatre in Mister Magnolia, open air, 4pm. BROADCLYST, Killerton, The Lord Chamberlain’s Men in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, open air, 7pm. FORDE ABBEY, Folksy Theatre in The Comedy of Errors, open air, 7pm ILMINSTER, Dillington House, guitar festival, Copenhagen Guitar Duo, Albeniz, de Falla, Piazolla, 8pm. LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, The African Queen, 1951 film, 7.30. PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal, The Lab, Faggot, play by Colin Davey, and Wed. WEDNESDAY 31 JULY DUNSTER, Castle, The Lord Chamberlain’s Men in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, open air, 7pm. HONITON, Beehive, Honiton Community Theatre in The Sound of Music, to Sat, 7pm, Sat mat 2pm. ILMINSTER, Dillington House, guitar festival, Prague Guitar Quartet, inc Rodrigo, de Falla, Lucas, Duarte, 8. LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, Measure for Measure live by satellite from the RSC, 7pm. SEATON, The Gateway, Measure for Measure live by satellite from the RSC, 7pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Lollypops and Moptops. THURSDAY 1 AUGUST AXMINSTER, Burrow Farm, Folksy Theatre in The Comedy of Errors, open air, 7pm. BRIDPORT, Hyde Gardens, Folksy Theatre in Mister Magnolia, open air, 2pm. Electric Palace, Hayseed Dixie, 8. GREAT TORRINGTON, Rosemoor Gardens, Box Tree in The Legend of King

Arthur, open air, 5pm. ILMINSTER, Dillington House, guitar festival, Gitarissima from Vienna, Bizet, Tchaikovsky, Gershwin, Elgar, 8. SIDMOUTH, Manor Pavilion, Alan Ayckbourn’s Table Manners, and Fri, and 10-14 Aug. TAUNTON, Brewhouse, Amazing Animals, activities for the family, to 22 Aug, various times. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Night Fever, tribute to BeeGees. FRIDAY 2 AUGUST EXMOUTH, Pavilion, Into the Shadows, tribute. FORDE ABBEY, Folksy Theatre in Mister Magnolia, open air, 5.30pm. ILMINSTER, Arts Centre, Pete Allen Jazz Band, 8. LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, DJ Food, Kratwerk: Klassics, Kovers and Kurios, 8. SHERBORNE, Castle Gardents, llyria in Frankenstein, open air, 7.30. SIDMOUTH, various venues, Folk Festival, with Richard Thompson, Steve Knightley, Lady Maisery, Lindisfarne, Ralph McTell, Kitty MacFarlane, etc, to 9 Aug. SOUTH PETHERTON, David Hall, Actiontrack Show-Build performance, 4pm:Can You Ever Forgive Me, Moviola film, 8pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Leather and Lace. SATURDAY 3 AUGUST BUCKLAND MONACHORUM, The Garden House, Box Tree in The Legend of King Arthur, open air, 6pm. DORCHESTER, Poundbury Queen Mother Square, Dorset Food and Art Festival. KIMMERIDGE, Bay, Miracle Theatre in A Perfect World, open air, 7. AR WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, The Drifters. SUNDAY 4 AUGUST HESTERCOMBE GARDENS, Folksy Theatre in Mister Magnolia, open air, 5.30pm. TORQUAY, Cockington Court, Illyria in Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, open air. Torre Abbey, Folksy Theatre in The Comedy of Errors, open air, 7.30pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Navi in The King of Pop, Michael Jackson tribute. MONDAY 5 AUGUST WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Pirates of the Pavilion, summer pantomime, and Tues. TUESDAY 6 AUGUST BRIDPORT, Arts Centre, Elmer the Elephant, children’s show, 2pm. PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal, Motown the Musical, to 17 Aug.

PORTLAND, Pensylvania Castle, Folksy Theatre in Mister Magnolia, open air, 2pm. WEDNESDAY 7 AUGUST ABBOTSBURY, Sub Tropical Gardens, Festival Players in Much Ado About Nothing, open air, 7pm. BARNSTAPLE, Arlington Court, The Pantaloons in Sense and Sensibility, open air, 6pm. BATH, Theatre Royal, Felicity Kendal in The Argument, to 24 Aug. PLYMOUTH, Devonport Park, Heartbreak in Private Lives, open air, 7pm. THURSDAY 8 AUGUST EXMOUTH, Manor Gardens, The Pantaloons in Sense and Sensibility, open air, 7pm. Pavilion, Roy ”Chubby” Brown. PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal, Drum Studio, The Narwhal Ensemble, new work showcase, to Sat. WEYMOUTH, Nothe Fort, The Pirates of Penzance, 7. Pavilion, Crocodile Rock. FRIDAY 9 AUGUST EXMOUTH, Pavilion, Fastlove, George Michael tribute. GREAT TORRINGTON, Rosemoor Gardens, Heartbreak in Gangsta Granny, open air, 5pm. HONITON, Beehive, The Darkside of Pink Floyd, 7.30. ILMINSTER, Arts Centre, Matt Carter Septet, jazz, 8. LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, T-Rextasy. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, The Sound of Springsteen. SATURDAY 10 AUGUST BRIDPORT, Arts Centre, ABBA Forever, tribute, 7.30. BROADCLYST, Killerton House, Heartbreak in Gangsta Granny, open air, 6pm. BURTON BRADSTOCK, various venues, Festival of Music and Art, to 18 Aug. KINGSWEAR, Coleton Fishacre, Heartbreak in Private Lives, open air, 6.30pm. LYME REGIS, Pine Hall, Jazz Jurassica, Matt Carter’s Magnificent Seven. Marine Theatre, The Story of the Beach Boys, 8. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Lipstick on Your Collar. SUNDAY 11 AUGUST BURTON BRADSTOCK, Rectory Gardens, tea party with music, 3pm. St Mary’s Church, evensong, 6.30. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Gary Delaney, Gagsters Paradise.

Rural touring organisations AR = Artsreach, TA = Take Art, Via = Villages in Action 94 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


PERFORMANCE MONDAY 12 AUGUST BURTON BRADSTOCK, St Mary ’s Church, Castaway, cellist Adrian Bradbury talks to David Juritz, 12.30pm: Kabantu, African and world music, 7pm: David Juritz, violin, Eluned Pierce, harp, Milos Milivojevic, accordion, Debussy, Nyzhnyk and Kusyakov, 9.45. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Pirates of the Pavilion, summer pantomime, and Tues. TUESDAY 13 AUGUST BURTON BRADSTOCK, St Mary’s Church, David Gordon, piano, David Juritz, violin, Yuri Zhislin, viola, Adrian Bradbury cello, Beethoven Symphony No 3 for chamber orchestra, 12.30pm: Chris Garrick Quartet, jazz, 7pm: Adrian Bradbury, cello, Milos Milivojevic, accordion, Piatti, Angelis, Semenov, Stravinsky, 9.45. LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, Tom Jones (1963 film), 7.30. PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal, Drum Studio, Jane Spurr, work in progress, and Wed. WEDNESDAY 14 AUGUST BURTON BRADSTOCK, St Mary’s Church, Atea Wind Quintet, Musgrave, Putt, Parker, Jolivet, Patterson, 7pm: Festival musicians, Schoenberg’s Verklartenacht, 9.45. EXETER, Powderham Castle, Festival Players in Much Ado About Nothing, open air, 7pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Bows and Bunny Ears, a tribute to Ariana Grande and JoJo Siwa, 6pm. THURSDAY 15 AUGUST BURTON BRADSTOCK, St Mary’s Church, Festival musicianss, Brahms, Lauro, Saint-Saens, Poulenc, 12.30pm: The London Tango Quintet, Piazzolla, Pugliese, Salgan, Troilo, 7pm: Craig Ogden, guitar, Alena Walentin, flute, Anna Hashimoto, clarinet, Rebay, Bozza, Borne, 9.45. EXMOUTH, Pavilion, Bows and Bunny Ears, tribute to Arianna and JoJo.

HONITON, Beehive, Five Seasons: the Gardens of Piet Oudolf, documentary, 7.30. PURBECK, Purbeck Valley Folk Festival, with Thea Gilmore, AfroCelt Sound System, Cara Dillon, Karine Polwart, Flook, Sam Kelly and the Lost Boys, Marry Waterson and Emily Barker, etc, to Sun. SIDMOUTH, Manor Pavilion, Perfect Wedding, by Robin Hawdon, to Wed. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, 80s Mania.

Fools in Much Ado About Nothing, open air, 7on,

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST BRIDPORT, Electric Palace, Apocalypse Now: Final Cut, 1979 film, 2019 final cut, 7.30. BURTON BRADSTOCK, St Mary’s Church, Festival Players, Haydn, Popper, Offenbach, Gordon, Rolla, Borodin, Ball, Kodaly, 7pm. ILMINSTER, Barrington Court, Three Inch Fools in Much Ado About Nothing, open air, 7pm. OTTERY ST MARY, ESCOT, Beautiful Days, Skunk Anansie, Ziggy Marley, The Levellers, Seth Lakeman, Jon Boden, Kate Rusby, Steeleye Span, Karine Polwart, Thea Gilmour, Tom Robinson, comedy and more, to Sun. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, The Best of That’ll the the Day.

THURSDAY 22 AUGUST SIDMOUTH, Manor Pavilion, NJ Crisp’s Dangerous Obsession, to Wed.

SATURDAY 17 AUGUST LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, Corduroy, Brit pop band, 8.30. SUNDAY 18 AUGUST BRISTOL, SS Great Britain, Darkstuff in Moby Dick, to 26 Aug. DORCHESTER, Maumbury Rings, Boxtree Theatre in The Legend of King Arthur, 5pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Carpenters Gold. MONDAY 19 AUGUST WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Pirates of the Pavilion, summer pantomime, and Tues. TUESDAY 20 AUGUST EXETER, Powderham Castle, Three Inch

WEDNESDAY 21 AUGUST HONITON, Beehive, Causley and Coldfield, music and readings, 2pm. PLYMOUTH, Theatre Royal, Alexandra Burke in The Bodygyard, to 31 Aug: Drum Studio, TRP Young Company in Influence, to Sat. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, The Rat Pack Revue.

FRIDAY 23 AUGUST ILMINSTER, Arts Centre, Sinatra Tribute with Frederic Gardner and the Craig Milverton Trio, 8. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Fastlove, George Michael tribute. SATURDAY 24 AUGUST LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, We Love Little Mix, 2pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Martin Kemp, 80s DJ set. SUNDAY 25 AUGUST EAST HOLME, Holme for Gardens, Chapterhouse Theatre in Pride and Prejudice, open air, 7.15pm. LYME REGIS, Marine Theatre, LR Comedy Club with Tanyalee Davis, 8. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Showaddywaddy. MONDAY 26 AUGUST EXETER, Powderham Castle, Chapterhouse Theatre in Pride and Prejudice, open air, 7pm. WEYMOUTH, Pavilion, Pirates of the Pavilion, summer pantomime, to Wed. TUESDAY 27 AUGUST BRIDPORT, Electric Palace, Bridport Musical Theatre Co in Legally Blonde the Musical, to Sat, 7.30, Sat mat 2pm.

Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 95


Health&Beauty

Headline Speakers announced for

Wellbeing by the Lakes Festival Wellbeing by the Lakes has announced wellness guru Liz Earle MBE and mindfulness meditation expert Gelong Thubten as their headline speakers. A brand new three-day festival Wellbeing by the Lakes will be exploring what it means to be mindful and how to live well in our fast-paced modern world. It will offer a curated blend of expert talks, live performance, meditation, movement sessions, wholesome food and healing therapies at one of the UK’s most unique festival locations—deep in the Dorset countryside at beautiful sculpture park Sculpture by the Lakes. Day tickets to the festival start at £30 and the event will run from

96 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

Thursday 19th September – Saturday 21st September 2019 10am5pm, with late night performance and live music on Friday and Saturday evening until 10pm . Liz Earle MBE is a wellbeing entrepreneur, TV presenter and the author of over 35 books on a range of health, beauty and wellbeing topics. Her number-one bestselling books include The Good Menopause Guide and The Good Gut Guide, both of which have received extensive praise and helped to transform many lives. Gelong Thubten is a Buddhist monk, meditation teacher and author. He specialises in teaching mindfulness meditation internationally and works with major global companies, including Google.


Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 97


inspiring talks on a wealth of wellbeing topics

Thubten has also collaborated with Ruby Wax on her popular bestseller How to be Human and is currently accompanying her on her UK tour of the same name. Thubten is the author of A Monk’s Guide to Happiness, published in June 2019. The festival’s programme aims to inspire and revitalise. Visitors will be able to broaden their knowledge by sampling a wide range of innovative and traditional wellbeing practices. Alongside inspiring talks on a wealth of wellbeing topics there will also be a variety of classes designed to get bodies stretching and minds unwinding, including different styles of yoga, classic Pilates, expressive dance techniques and qigong to name but a few. Visitors will also have the chance to take part in guided mindfulness and mediation workshops, and sound baths where attendees can relax and let therapeutic sounds wash over them. Or they can try their artistic hand at one of the many creative therapies on offer, indulge in some healing, peruse the stalls, and wander the sculpture gardens, all while enjoying deliciously wholesome, home grown food. Throughout the three days there will be live acoustic music form a range of artists as well as the chance to take part in traditional Tibetan workshops and watch folklore performances. Throughout the festival the Tashi Lhunpo monks will be creating an intricate Chenrezig (Wheel of Compassion) sand mandala. A mandala is an intricate and exquisite image or pattern made with coloured sand via an entrancing process of pouring, smoothing, and blending. It will take them three days to complete the stunningly complex design—upon which the mandala will be destroyed and washed away. This process is not merely an opportunity to witness the creation of some truly astonishing art. It is also designed to teach people about letting go of attachments, and about the transience of even the most beautiful things. A simple but powerful visual experience, which visitors have the unique opportunity to be a part of. All in all, this brand new festival offers a wealth of things to see and experience, all set within the beautiful surrounds of Sculpture by the Lakes. Sculpture by the Lakes is nestled in 26 acres of Dorset’s glorious countryside. Visitors can enjoy reflective lakes, the fast flowing River Frome, streams, landscaped gardens, and meandering paths through wild unspoilt scenery with far reaching views across the water meadows, all interspersed with monumental sculptures by world renowned sculptor Simon Gudgeon. For a full line-up of guest speakers and workshop leaders and to buy day tickets and 3-day passes please visit www.wellbeingbythelakes.co.uk.

98 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 99


Health&Beauty Connecting people for care in people’s homes ANITA Wingad from the Dorset Enterprise Development Programme for Community Catalysts working in partnership with Dorset Council wants to know if you have an idea that could help people? (older or with health needs) or if you are already helping people would you like to do more? Or maybe you know someone who does? Are you looking for work that fits in with your home life?

Museums

The Dorset Enterprise Development Programme for Community Catalysts can help you turn your ideas into reality by offering: a friendly and supportive point of contact, support to develop your idea, practical information on regulation, training, useful connections and much more! There are many opportunities in your area, be in control of your career / home life balance and use your skills to

Please telephone or check website for directions and opening hours Bridge Street, Lyme Regis. 01297 443370.

ALLHALLOWS MUSEUM

CHIDEOCK MUSEUM

High Street, Honiton. 01404 44966.

Church of Our Lady, North Road, Chideock. 01308 488348.

www.honitonmuseum.co.uk

www.chideockmartyrschurch.org.uk

AXMINSTER HERITAGE

COLYTON HERITAGE CENTRE

Barrack Road, Weymouth. 01305 766626.

Silver Street, Axminster. 01297 639884.

Market Place, Colyton

www.fortressweymouth.co.uk

www.colytonheritagecentre.org

PORTLAND MUSEUM

www.axminsterheritage.org

CREWKERNE & DISTRICT

BEAMINSTER MUSEUM

The Heritage Centre, Market Square, Crewkerne. 01460 77079.

217 Wakeham Portland. 01305 821804.

Whitcombe Road, Beaminster. 01308 863623.

www.crewkernemuseum.co.uk

www.beaminstermuseum.wordpress.com

DORSET COUNTY

BLANDFORD MUSEUM

High West Street, Dorchester. 01305 262735. (Closed)

Bere’s Yard, Blandford Forum. 01258 450388. www.blandfordtownmuseum.org

BRIDPORT MUSEUM

South Street, Bridport. 01308 422116. www.bridportmuseum.co.uk

CASTLETON WATERWHEEL

Oborne Road, Sherborne. www.castletonwaterwheelmuseum.org.uk

CHARD MUSEUM

Godworthy House, High Street, Chard. 01460 65091. www.chardmuseum.co.uk.

help others have a better quality of life. A spokesperson from Creative Companions said: “ I’m really pleased to be working with Anita from Community Catalysts, she has been there as a sounding board for my ideas and when I was ready to make a start in developing my small business she was encouraging and objective. My business offers people day to day support such as help with shopping, planning and cooking meals, help with domestic administration and keeping the home tidy, we also can bring creative activities such as art, craft, gardening to people at home, If you are ready for a new challenge or already run a small business and have lots of ideas about what people in your community need, Community Catalysts are the people to talk to.” www. creativecompanions.org.uk For more information call Anita on 07407789131 or email anita.wingad@ communitycatalysts.co.uk.

www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

EXMOUTH MUSEUM

Sheppards Row, Exmouth. 07768 184127. FAIRLYNCH MUSEUM

27 Fore Street, Budleigh Salterton. 01395 442666. GROVE PRISON MUSEUM

Governors Gardens, The Grove, Portland. 01305 715726. ILCHESTER COMMUNITY

High Street, Ilchester. 01935 841247. LYME REGIS MUSEUM

100 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031

NOTHE FORT

SIDMOUTH MUSEUM

Hope Cottage, Church Street, Sidmouth. 01395 516139. THELMA HULBERT GALLERY, ELMFIELD HOUSE

Dowell Street, Honiton. 01404 45006. THE MILITARY MUSEUM OF DEVON AND DORSET

ROYAL ALBERT MEMORIAL MUSEUM Bridport Road, Dorchester. 01305 264066. & ART GALLERY

Queen St, Exeter, EX4 3RX. 01392 665858. SEATON JURASSIC

The Underfleet, Seaton 01297 300390 https://seatonjurassic.org/

SEATON MUSEUM

Town Hall, Fore Street, Seaton. 01297 21660. SHERBORNE MUSEUM

Church Lane, Sherborne. 01935 812252. www.sherbornemuseum.co.uk

SHIRE HALL MUSEUM

High West Street, Dorchester. 01305 261849 www.shirehalldorset.org

www.keepmilitarymuseum.org

TOLPUDDLE MARTYRS MUSEUM

Tolpuddle, nr Dorchester. 01305 848237. TUDOR HOUSE

3 Trinity Street, Weymouth. 01305 779711 or 812341. www.weymouthcivicsociety.org

WATER SUPPLY MUSEUM

Sutton Poyntz Pumping Station, Sutton Poyntz, Weymouth. 01305 832634 www.wessexwessex.co.uk

WEYMOUTH MUSEUM

Brewers Quay Hope Square, Weymouth. 01305 457982 www.weymouthmuseum.org.uk


Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 101


Services&Classified SURFACE PREPARATION

Alberny Restoration In-house blast cleaning for home and garden furniture, doors and gates. Agricultural/construction machinery and tooling. Vehicles, parts and trailers etc. 01460 73038, email allan@alberny.co.uk, FB Alberny Sandblasting

RESTORATION Furniture restoration. Antiques large and small carefully restored. City and Guilds qualified, ten years experience in local family firm. Phil Meadley 01297 560335

CURTAINS

SITUATIONS VACANT

Little Curtains. Handmade Curtains, Blinds and Cushions. Contact 07443 516141 or 01308485325

Mar 20

MUSIC Piano, violin, theory tuition at your home. Highly qualified teacher. 20 years experience. Adults and children welcome. Beginners to advanced. Dr Thomas Gold 07917 835781 Aug 19 FOR SALE

oct 19

ELECTRIC BIKE HIRE Electric Bike Hire from Monkton Wyld Holiday Park 40 - 60 miles of power assisted peddling Detailed routes available. 01297 631131

T20 diesel engine and box axel in bits. Offers please ring 07767 268801

To advertise on these pages telephone 01308 423031

Monthly Quiz –

Kathmandu Animal Treatment Centre We rescue animals in Nepal creating a healthy rabies free dog population in Kathmandu. We are looking for an animal lover to act as voluntary Treasurer. The Board of Trustees meet four times a year in Lyme Regis. The present Treasurer who has been in the post for 10 years will be able to guide and give support where required. Contact Carl Salter on 01297 443334 merrylymeregis@gmail. com For more details on our charity visit www. katcenter.org.np

FOR SALE Electric roller shutter door approx 2140 3.05w £200. Tel 01308 458816 Renovated shepherd’s hut Photos available 01308 459001 £5,500 ono.

gift. £5.00 Trident thermostatic mono bloc chrome on brass bath tap as new £5.00 EInhell AKL4. 12v car battery charger ex condition, hardly used £8.00. Hilka twin handled car polisher, hardly used vgc £10.00 Tel: 01460 63866 / 07968 053268. Noritake (Isabella) 6 coffee cups & saucers c1963 unused as new £52 07805 975215. FOR SALE Settee 3 seater. Free, buyer Campingaz 907 full bottle collect. Quality wooden (2.75 kg), bought a few years frame, separate cushions, ago and never used, £10. green damask washable 01308 488053 zipped cushions. 01963 Silverline rechargeable 250670 screwdriver with accesso- Model Church, furniture ries. Brand new unwanted including pews, 2 minia-

ture bibles [new testament written inside] piano, vicar etc. Connection to electricity will light up stained glass windows. Width 3’ 2, Height, 2’. Buyer collects. £80 ono. Tel 01308 456243 Premier 18”Hunting Saddle used. Black. Full bridle with martingale. Tack box on wheels - £650 Tel. 01460 249618 Fold away In-Car Screenshade Wallace and Gromit “Windows are our Speciality” £10 Boxed 01297 24384 Grandmother Clock – Immaculate modern reproduction high quality 8 day weight-driven German movement with Wesminster chimes and strike/silent lever in a lovely mahogany case. Approx 5ft. tall. Can deliver and set up for a small additional charge. £245. Tel: 01404-758709 Exercise bike as new £10 07565 526524.

Win a book from Little Toller Books

Send in your answer on a postcard, along with your name and address to: Hargreaves Quiz, Marshwood Vale Magazine, Lower Atrim, Bridport, Dorset DT6 5PX. Study the clues contained in the rhyme and look carefully at the signposts to work out which town or village in South Somerset, West Dorset or East Devon is indicated. The first correct answer drawn out of a hat will win a book from local publisher Little Toller Books. There is no cash equivalent and no correspondence will be entered into.

Last month’s answer was Harpford. The winner was Mrs Dargue from Chard.

102 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


WANTED

PEOPLE AT WORK

Dave buys all types of tools 01935 428975 Oct 19 Secondhand tools wanted. All trades. Users & Antiques. G & E C Dawson. 01297 23826. www.secondhandtools. co.uk.

Feb 20

CLAIRVOYANT

Postage stamps. Private collector requires 19th and early 20th century British. Payment to you or donation to your nominated charity. 01460 240630. Vintage & antique textiles, linens, costume buttons etc. always sought by Caroline Bushell. Tel. 01404 45901.

ELECTRICAL

Dec 19

Jake Lanning, photograph and words by Catherine Taylor

Wanted. Blacksmith, Silversmith, Bookbinding, Engineering, Glassblowing, Foundry tools & equipment. 07875 Jul 19 677897

JAKE LANNING

Stamp collections wanted. Anything postal related considered. Phone 075275 38863

RENTAL

BUILD

House wanted to rent. 1 or 2 bed house with garden Near Axminster, rural preferred. Must be dog friendly! Contact Naomi naomi_eden@hotmail. co.uk

FOR SALE Keelson vintage fishing rod thirty pounds 01308 897385 Giant Dash 4 bicycle, hardly ridden, £200 Bosch PST 54E Jigsaw with pack spare blades, £15 Berghaus 25ltr freeflow pack, brand new, never used £20 Osprey Porter 46 travel pack, nearly new, £50 Phone 07447 660827 (Axminster based) Car trailer - W4ft x L6ft x H18ins. Length incl. Towbar 8ft 8ins. Made by Bridport Trailers, wood on

galvanised metal frame, hinged rear section, ladder rack, lights, tyre size 5.00 x 10. About 15 yrs old but in good condition and lightly used. £300. Tel 01297 32169 (Axminster). TimberPro Chainsaw, little used/excellent condition. 2 stroke motor/ tools/ instructions/ mixing bottle/ carry bag. Good starter.

2 new spare chains. £89 01305 777002 Maslin Pan, stainless steel, Kitchen Craft, 9litres, hardly used (in original box) £20 01297 489631 Lakeland Food/Cake mixer, hardly used, Pink and white. £25. John Lewis office chair, tan leather, signs of wear £30. 01297 631025

SECOND in command of a team of 12 volunteers that live and work in the local community, Jake Lanning is Deputy Station Officer of the West Bay Coastguard Rescue Team. A volunteer himself, he fits his commitments to the Coastguard around working full time as TV and Film Producer at Underground Media. Attending on average one to two call outs a week, 50 to 70 a year, as well as training every couple of weeks and attending PR events, the role is not for the faint-hearted. Never knowing what situation he is going to face when the alert goes out, being a Coastguard is exciting, operating where ambulances can’t go, but also extremely demanding. Often members of the community are unaware of the sacrifices made by Jake and his peers in order to help those in need. As a child he spent all his holidays around West Bay, always out on the beach and swimming in the sea. Jake then became a member of the beach lifeguard team at Weymouth, enjoying helping keep people safe and coming to the aid of those in trouble. Finding it humbling to be able to help and make a difference, the first thing Jake did when he and his wife decided to move to Bridport was apply to join the Coastguard. They met in London, where Jake worked for many years. A professional dancer, Dee was being filmed for a programme and decided the cameraman, Jake, looked like someone she wanted to get to know better. Things worked out well for the couple and after years of eating out whenever they liked, enjoying all that’s on offer in central London, when Dee became pregnant they decided to move out. Now living in Bridport with Dee and his two young boys, Jake is able to work from home most of the time, juggling his company with local commitments, when he’s not travelling for work. He looks after the children in the evenings when Dee is teaching a dance class, reserving Friday nights for the two of them. Date Friday is always something they look forward to, curled up on the sofa together, possibly with a Chinese takeaway, and some gritty TV series on the screen. But if the pager goes off, no matter how comfortable Jake is, he’ll be up and away, off to help someone he’s likely to have never met before, or indeed again. Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 103


FOR SALE Electric sewing machine. Toyota 221 tabletop model in case. Hardly used, excellent condition. £25. Please ring 01460 234755 Black Bakelite vintage telephone. Early 1950’s. Base numbers 332L PX55/2A. With sliding drawer. £50. Please ring 01460 234755

Shower enclosure side screen - Made by Crosswater, model Simpsons DSPSC0800, 800mm. Ht 1950mm, clear tempered glass, quality product. Installed for two days, but was wrong size for our shower. Reboxed, with fittings. £60 ono. 07761 469676.

1930s mirror 36inch x 30inch ideal for garden use £25.00. 0129722603 Rockery stone various sizes and some hardcore Free to collector 01297 22603 Tow bar mounted Cycle Rack, as new, a bargain at £35. 01395 516435 Sidmouth

FREE ADS for items under £1,000 Classified advertising in The Marshwood Vale Magazine is normally 95 pence+VAT per word in a box. This FREE ADS FORM is for articles for sale, where the sale price is under £1000 (Private advertisers only — no trade, motor, animals, firearms etc). Just fill in the form and send it to the Marshwood Vale Magazine, Lower Atrim, Bridport, Dorset DT6 5PX. or email to info@marshwoodvale.com. (Please do not send in all capital letters). Unfortunately due to space constraints there is no guarantee of insertion of free advertising. We reserve the right to withhold advertisements. FOR GUARANTEED CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING PLEASE USE ‘CLASSIFIED ADS’ FORM

Name.....................................................Telephone number ................................. Address................................................................................................................. Town.................................. County.................... Postcode ..................................

STORAGE

104 Marshwood + August 2019 Tel. 01308 423031


FOR SALE Washbasin with pedestal “Heritage” complete with taps. In excellent condition. Only £35.00 lot. Telephone no. 01297 551375 IKEA Leksvik shelving, 6 shelves Height 79” 36” Wide 12” Deep. Pine finish, good condition £25. Phone 01308 423680...Bridport Free Sofa. 3 seater, separate cushions in green damask. Good quality hardwood frame. New owner collects. 01963 250670 (Milborne Port) Axminster live revolving lathe centre code 340138. £10 ono. Please phone 01404 42081 Attractive small Pine Dresser with two upper glass doors and shelf, 2 drawers and lower cupboard with 2 doors and shelf, vgc. £180. Tel 07905 945585 Pine Victorian Farmhouse Table with drawer, £100. Tel 07905 945585 2 x IKEA Tall Units with shelves and cupboard with two doors and shelves, vgc. £35 each. Tel 07905 945585 Two versatile two-tier wooden trolleys, 70cm x 50cm x 62cm. £20 each. Tel 07905 945585 Coffee Table with toughened glass top and slatted lower shelf. £40. Tel 07905 945585 Small wheeled TV /Stereo Stand, 2ft x 1ft x 14ins high. £5. Tel 07905 945585 Small Pine Cupboard with shelf and drawer. £25. Tel 07905 945585 Yamaha 12-string acoustic guitar with cut away and built-in pick up. Vgc £150. Tel 07905 945585. 2 x Garden Benches, £10 each. Tel 07905 945585 Small round two-tier Art Deco Table, £15. Tel 07905 945585 Rival Popcorn Maker, unused, £10. Tel 07905 945585 Van-dal Winton Lunar Print shoes 7EE 2”heel. Worn indoors only for 2 hours. Cost £75 will accept £50 ono 01460 63580. Portable manual typewriter in carrying case very

good condition new ribbon £25 01963 23333 (Dorset) Dolls House Seaside Villa Boxed ready to build quality kit bargain £60 07773356867. Large white framed mirror Classic French style good as new 25.5inch x 35.5 inch £60 01308 482759. Ladies vantage golf clubs; 3,5,7 titanium woods. 5,6,7,8,9 irons, S.W & P.W, putter. Bag & Trolley £50 01308 301279. Ladies Sunderland golf jacket, medium, £20. Weatherproof trousers, £10. Footjoy Aqualite shoes, size 5 £20 VGC 01308 301279. TV 19” £20 ono buyer collects 01305 781657. Freeview PVR Humax with instructions £25 ono Buyer collects 01305 781657. Pre recorded videos mostly films, £1 each. Ring for list 01305 781657 buyer collects 01305 781357. Wade collectors clubs newsletters from 1984 to 2001 inc American one £5 01305 781657. Indoor water feature bowl with pebbles £10 ono buyer collects 01305 781657. Round Oak table 165cm (5’5”) diameter, detachable base. Possible transport help. West Dorset £600 ono 07976968195. Circular oak dining table, 130cm diameter, seats 6/7. Made by local craftsman £300 01297 598946. Man’s ATB bicycle Peugeot 15 Gears good condition £35 01308 427479. Ambassador dual motor recliner chair season evergreen material new £1200 asking £800 ono never used 4.5years guarantee left 01297 551208. Hornby ‘O’ clockwork 0/4/0 tanks £30 each, trucks £15, points/rails £40, hymac ‘O’ diesel bo bo £25 each, green 1946 0/4/0 battery ‘o’ £20 each, outdoor track/ points £30 01305 834554. Ikea Billy Bookcase £25, scale electric slot car set track/cars/stand £80 ono (1960s). New breadmaker

£30. BT answerphone/ fax £20. 1945 Wooden dolls house £20. Child car seat £10 (booster) 01305 834554. Spun aluminium rise & fall light fitting Danish £25. New Kango baby to 1yr sleeping bag £10. Railway world magazines 1960/1969 £2 each. Inner tent with ground sheet for caravan awning new £30. Ground sheet, caravan awning new £35 01305 834554. Boxed vintage model cars trucks Lledo / corgi boxed £4 / £8. New unused childs bikes girls and boys £5 - £8. Hornby Double 2 rail A4 golden Plover £80 01305 834554. Hornby OO guage locomotives B12 4/6/0 £45. Class 5 5138 £50. B12 green LNER £45. Fowler 2.6.4T £60. Folwer 43775 4F £45. Britannia BR green £50 01305 834554. Plus various other railway kit for sale. Call to enquire. Terracotta flower-pots, twenty, up to 8 inches across £20. With nine free terracotta drain pipes, too narrow for wine bottles 01460 64392. Hakenochloa beautiful big Japanese yellow grass. Eleven inch pot width £8 each. With mature free primroses, strawberries, lavender, bergenia etc 01460 64392. 4 x 3m x 112mm black PVC gutter new £18. Venetian blind 3m x 3.5 drop 25mm metal slats beige £25 good condition 07594687485. Brown leather stressless recliner chair with footstool cost £900 will accept £250 or near offer 01297 24084. Vinyl LP albums, mostly 1960s folk, 25 in total, many rarities £75 Dorchester 07719535094. Two seater sofa as new cost £1000, light grey with blue flower bargain £200 ono 01308 427850. Canal enthusiast? Collection of thirteen books including Narrow Boat by Tom Rolt £25 Dorchester 07719535094.

Marley modern roof tiles reclaimed brown, condition is used, 500 plus, buyer must collect. For price phone 07305084486. Drive away Awning fits Omnistor 5002 awning ‘Outdoor Revolution’ brand. Morelite XL complete as new £150 01297 20750. Lladro Nao Ballerina Statues £10 each 07565526524. John Deere ride on 17hp V-twin tractor with out cutting deck vgc £500 01460 54104. Brass rubbing 31” x 11” Margret Peyton 1484 Seeham Cambs Sir Robert Bunes Action Suffolk 1302 £10 01308 425459. Three weaving grides also two incerts £140 also neck covers mangers 01460 54104.

Ercol dresser blonde elm 120cm W, 160cm Ht, immaculate condition £325 ono – can deliver 01297 551408. Garden Picnic Chairs x 2; Folding Stools x 2; Parasol; Seat Pads & Cushions x 4 each. All dark green. £25.00 Tel: 01404 549503 Bloomberg Fridge white H56, w21.5, D2’ 4 shelves salad drawer, wine rack, excellent condition, hardly used £65. Sienans Dishwasher D2’ x w17.5”, H33.5 hardly used £45 01404 881098. Laura Ashley wing armchair ex con £80. Men’s red mountain 19” frame bike ex con £75. Casio keyboard £25. Prestige automatic pressure cooker £20 ono 01308 459940. Sturdy folding guest bed unused £40 01308 485269.

CHIMNEY SWEEP

Tel. 01308 423031 Marshwood + August 2019 105


Profile for Marshwood Vale Ltd

Marshwood + August 2019  

Mor of the best from in and around the Vale

Marshwood + August 2019  

Mor of the best from in and around the Vale

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