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THE STORIES THAT SHAPED OUR GENERATION

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Contents

The Marquette Journal | October 2010 | Vol.106, Issue 1

Features 14 |

9/11: THEN AND NOW When the planes hit, the country erupted in panic and sadness. Now, nine years later, we remember what it was like to grow up in a time of terror.

16 | DIGITAL GET DOWN

Being the generation all about ourselves isn’t easy. From Twitter to Facebook we use it all. Our parents just need to catch up.

17 | TURNING (GENERATION) ME ON

Reality TV has become more than just a treat on TV, it’s become an obsession.

23 | JUICED UP

Baseball is America’s favorite pastime, but some of its heroes have broken our hearts.

College Life 05 | CHEERS TO

22 YEARS The start of a 25 page look into the last two decades of popular culture.

06 | HOW TO GET AN A IN...CALCULUS 07 | ENGINEERED FOR PERFECTION

If you are what you eat, than you might be genetically modified. Find out what makes this food so different, and maybe even better.

08 | BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS

Students in the College of Education look to bring bilingual learners to new heights.

Journal Jabber 09 | THE GIRL AND THE TORSO

A taste of the magazine’s literary past.

10 | GETTING MYSTERIOUS

How to plan the “perfect” murder mystery party.

30 | JOURNEY: KARA SCHNEIDEWEND

Stylephile 12 | THE RETURN TO CLASS

Old school elegance for the everyday student.

MJ Active 27 | BUILDING MORE THAN MUSCLE

Marquette’s Rec Center finds itself undergoing a makeover per the student body’s request.

28 | ALLERGEN(ERATION)

Struggling to find options to eat on campus, some students are forced to bring allergy-free food to the dining halls on their own.

29 | BACKED INTO A CORNER

Coming to college has never been so difficult. www.marquettejournal.org

3


Those who can’t do, teach

O

ctober’s issue highlights stories that shaped the millennial generation: reality television and professional steroid use, the impacts of 9/11 and political infidelity (our online exclusive feature), the major events in popular culture and we even touched on the green movement and social anxieties. Yet, none of these stand out as being the most influential story to me.

Editor’s Letter

2010 | 2011 STAFF Patrick Johnson Editor-in-Chief Brooke McEwen Managing Editor

Rebecca O’Malley Creative Director

Joey Kimes Sarah Krasin AJ Trela Features Editor Departments Editor Director of Photography Alise Buehrer Stylephile

Alex Engler College Life

Jen Michalski MJ Active

Ryan Riesbeck Journal Jabber

Alyssa Ahern Sarah Butler Molly Crego Marissa Evans Reporter Reporter Reporter Reporter Colleen Herrmann Mark Ayers Joseph Scannell Heather Ronaldson Reporter Reporter Reporter Reporter Simone Smith Emily Pettinger Ryan Ellerbusch Michelle DeCamp Reporter Reporter Reporter Reporter Kaleigh Sheahan Matt Mueller Laurie Osman Kate Randich Reporter Online Reporter Designer Designer Kelly Pechan Joe Buzzelli Dylan Huebner Eric Ricafrente Designer Designer Photographer Photographer Alex Alvarez Crystal Schreiner Tim Gorichanaz Photographer Photographer Journal Interactive Lauren Frey Mark Amantea Patricia Marra Advertising Director Sales Manager SMI Director

Those who can’t do, teach? A statement I’ve heard my whole life. Ever since I was young, teaching was all I wanted to do. Now, as I sit in front of my laptop thinking about my last academic semester at Marquette, I know that those who do, were taught. As a future educator, Columbine is the biggest story to shape me. It is hard to really conceptualize how this would have changed me as a future teacher back in 1999. I was only 10 years old with Pokémon on the brain. However, it was an event that shook the educational system for years to come. Columbine made me realize that education, and the classroom, are incredibly powerful things. The teachers and students stood up for the future of others, the future of educational security. They were the difference. I want to be the difference (I guess that’s why I chose Marquette). I’ve learned my classroom should not just be about teaching classic literature or advising newspapers. My classroom is about my students: their education, well-being, happiness and experiences. As a generation focused on ourselves, tech and the now, my request is we acknowledge the teachers who have gotten us where we are. Everyday they go to school, for you. Teachers don’t go into the field because we expect to make money. We do it for the kids. Just think about it: if anyone shaped you, it was probably the teachers you’ve had along the way. Next time you hear those who can’t do, teach. Remember those who taught you, and that those who do, were once taught.

Dr. Stephen Byers Kimberly Zawada Dr. Lori Bergen Publication Adviser Business Manager Dean, College of Communication To advertise in The Marquette Journal, contact Student Media Advertising at 414-288-1748. T he Marquette Journal is produced by students at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is published four times a year with online digital supplements. N o part of T he M arquette J ournal may be reprinted without permission of the staff . R eaders are encouraged to send comments and concerns to editor @ marquettejournal . org , or to T he M arquette J ournal , 1131 W. W isconsin A ve ., JH006, M ilwaukee, W is. 53233.

4 The Marquette Journal

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Patrick Johnson Editor-in-Chief


JOURNALEDITORIAL

o o t t s s r r e e e e h C s Ch ea s r r a e Y 2222 Y ion

in r Op a l u Pop The

➤ By

Patrick Johnson

It's hard to believe we planned an entire issue of the magazine without really recognizing pop culture. Yeah, we talk about reality television and managed to sneak a famous superhero on the cover of the magazine, but that's it. So... the editorial board sat down and thought about how to fix this. The Popular Opinion was going to have to return for another "hoorah" this issue. There was just no way around it. What this means: for the next 25 pages of the magazine, you, the reader are going to get my picks for the biggest pop culture events and icons impacting generation ME. We'll start at 1988 and go all the way to 2010. No worries, I made sure to add a little bit about why each thing is on the list. You probably won't agree with everything I have to say, or even all the choices. In the end, it doesn't matter. It is my opinion, and it is the popular one. To read the entire column, go to www.marquettejournal.org

1988

Dustin Hoffman charmed the hearts of millions as an autistic savant in Rain Man, Tom Hanks got Big and Michael Jackson topped the charts with "Dirty Diana." My Pick: Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice. Unfortunately it works as well as locking yourself in a dark bathroom, staring at the mirror and chanting for Bloody Mary. www.marquettejournal.org www.marquettejournal.org 5 5


COLLEGELIFE

How to get an in Calculus

➤ By

Joe Scannell It would seem that in polling the general

student body, one of the most difficult and challenging subjects of study is calculus. Whether it is because it is one of the most advanced levels of mathematics, or because it actually has nothing to do with calculators, the bottom line is that “calc” is one of the most dreaded subjects on campus. Luckily, here to help is Stephen Merrill, a mathematics, statistics and computer science professor in the College of Arts and Sciences.

MOST IMPORTANT: It is all about the attitude – and time commitment. According to Merrill, the greatest challenge in learning Calculus is students’ perception of calculus. “Misjudging the difficulty of the course — it will take more time and effort than anticipated,” Merrill said. Simply adjusting your frame of mind before entering the classroom could prove very valuable. “The computational aspects are easiest to learn. Practicing the steps in homework and examples leads to only the first level of understanding,” Merrill said. Merrill said he found students most often struggle with understanding the concepts — why you are computing and what to compute. “It requires more time and effort than the first level,” he said. This is not your grandfather’s math class, kid; this course is tough. If Dr. Merrill could pass one piece of advice to a future student before the first day of class, it would be this:

onto specifics… Get the tools What kind of article would this be if we only left the reader with the fear of God in their eyes? The Marquette Journal has the inside scoop on how to really get an “A” in calculus. First, there are

[

FOUR “big ideas:”

[

limits, derivatives, integrals and the Fundamental Theorem.

“Each of these ideas is subtle and tricky (after all, it was invented by some of the smartest people that ever lived),” Merrill said. Okay, so no secret there: calculus is difficult— all of it. But is it necessary to read the textbook? Or, more important, to pay attention to the lecture?“They complement each other. I see it as two voices explaining the same thing. It is most essential to make sure the lecture and notes are in order,” Merrill said. “These are the clues to how best to approach the material. Mastery will require also listening to the second voice.” Alright, that’s fair. You have to read the book and listen to the lecture for true mastery, but he also mentioned that tests vary, but they tend to emphasize the lecture. Still, this isn’t exactly revolutionary information. Is there a proven and effective way to study that might give a student an advantage?

So there you have it. In short, this course will challenge your time management and if you can commit the effort, you will see results. 10/10

“Assuming that a good understanding and an ‘A’ is the desired goal, all the steps are necessary,” Merrill said. According to Merrill, the first step is to review the examples in the text and lecture. Then attack the homework. After that, focus on understanding the “why” and “how” of the new idea and how it fits with what was previously discussed. Finally, read the section to make sure you understand the lesson.

BUT ☞ we will move

“Get ready to spend more time than you do on most classes. Keep up and get help at the first sign of falling behind.”

6 The Marquette Journal

 You have to do it ALL.

Blue

you need.

Calculators will be mandatory for the class, so Merrill said to learn how to use it. The instructors will vary about how that use is tested or not, but learning how to use the calculator expands the value of the math learned — beyond the limitations of your algebra skills,” Merrill said.

So use the information above, work hard and succeed!

So, students, there you have it. How to get an ‘A’ in calculus. We never said it would be easy! Work hard and that ‘A’ will be yours!

In the words of Merrill: difficulty “ofThecalculus is

primarily the time required. If you commit the time, the payoff can be quite large.


COLLEGELIFE

Engineered for Perfection A trip to the grocery store never seemed so daunting

Illustration by: Dylan Huebner

➤ By

Simone Smith

Is your food natural or organic? Is it really? And what’s the difference? Genetically modified foods have caused much debate in scientific ethics since their introduction in the early 1990’s. While some believe that genetically modified foods can solve world issues as hunger and a bigger profit for the producer, some believe that they can be harmful to consumers. “Genetically modified foods are foods that have had their genes spliced so that they exhibit more desirable traits,” said Mary Germain, inventory manager at Riverwest Co-op. Those desirable traits can be anything from ‘built in’ resistance to pesticides and droughts, to traits that help preserve the product during travel. This unnatural food production led consumers to seek an alternative. Enter such grocers as Whole Foods, Outpost, and the Riverwest Co-op, which sell only organic, non-genetically modified foods. “We look through all of the ingredients to make sure that the food is organic,” Germain said. “All foods that are certified organic cannot be genetically modified.” She insists looking through the ingredients is a necessity because products that are genetically modified are becoming more and more prevalent in much of what we eat. “Corn and soy are the two most common genetically altered foods. They are in everything,”  Germain said. Maurice Sharpe, a junior in the

1989 1989

College of Arts and Sciences agrees. “Preservatives are in everything, our food has to last longer,” Sharpe said. Champions of genetically modified foods praise their ability to make everyone happy: cheaper for the producer, a bigger yield and accessible consumption. Yet, opponents refuse to get caught up in the hype. “Even though genetically modified foods allow those in agriculture to produce abundant yields and make more money, science cannot keep up, and their consequences are unknown,” Germain said. Franco Milani, assistant professor of food science at the University of WisconsinMadison, presents the contrary. Milani acknowledges there are harmful and beneficial effects to using genetically modified foods, but believes the producers and the Food and Drug Administration would not allow their production if it weren’t necessary. “There better be a very

A gallon of gas cost $.97, Ted Bundy got the chair and the Gameboy was released in Japan.

Green from the Ground Up Full story online by Colleen Herrmann

good reason to consider going commercial with a genetically modified [food],” Milani said. World hunger has been one of the causes of the production of genetically-altered foods, as they are cheaper to produce and are manufactured to sustain different conditions. “It is important to consider that we need to feed 6 billion people on the planet now, and perhaps 12 billion by the year 2050,” Milani said. “We have run out of agricultural land and unless we are willing to stop the expansion of human populations, we will have many hungry people in the future.” Milani praises genetically modified foods as they have allowed us do more with less land. “The risk is worth trying to take agriculture to the next level of output,” Milani said.

The Discovery Learning Complex, which began being built in March 2010, focuses on saving energy as well as making advancements in the study of environmental engineering. The building is LEED certified, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environment Design. The center also qualifies as a LID, (Low Impact Development). Professor Charles Melching in the department of Environmental and Civil Engineering said, “As more research is done proving to better the environment, the trend toward green design will only escalate.”

My Pick: Even though this was the year Morgan Freeman got to cart around Miss Daisy, the breadwinners of 1989 are still one of pop cultures biggest successes. The yellowest skinned family on television, the Simpsons, take the cake.

www.marquettejournal.org

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Photograph by: Crystal Schreiner | College of Education senior Nicole Thompson is a secondary education and Spanish double major

COLLEGELIFE

Breaking Down the Barriers The College of Education pushes to bring bilingual education to the forefront ➤ By

The Legacy of the Law Full story online by Sarah Butler “In all the years I have been associated with the law school, we produced very qualified law practitioners, regardless of the building’s size,” said John Kircher, professor of law. “However, the new building should produce an atmosphere that will be more pleasant to our students and cause them not to seek departure from the facility as soon as classes end.”

1990 1990

Molly Crego

Imagine for a moment you are a child heading off to the first day of school. There are classmates, teachers, chalkboards and books just waiting for you to use. There is one big problem: you have no idea how to speak English. At home your family speaks Spanish — all the time and always has. This situation is far from uncommon in Milwaukee. Now educators from Milwaukee Public Schools and Marquette are trying to do something about it by adding bilingual education to their curriculum. However, not without some controversy. Stemming from the fact that bilingual education was originally designed to ease immigrant children into an English speaking classroom the controversy erupted. However, many believe this type of educational program has far extended its intended mission and has led to a segregation between English and non-English speaking students. The bilingual education community in Milwaukee offers various options depending on any given student’s situation: English as a second language stand alone programs, two-way bilingual programs, developmental programs and immersion programs. Hayes Bilingual School is part of the Milwaukee Public school system offering grades K4 through fifth grade and has been in operation since 1995. Hayes operates as a bilingual education school. The school offers a two way dual immersion setting: A portion of their

student body is Spanish language dominant and another portion are English speaking dominant. The goal of Hayes, and other schools like it, is to have every student successfully complete the program and obtain a basic proficiency in both languages. “Any student that is able to complete a dual language education program will benefit in all academic areas,” said Yolanda Hernandez, principal of Hayes. Not only does Hernandez see improvements in dual language proficiency, but it also aids in helping the students learn other subject matter more efficiently in their dominant language. “As an educator it is important to maintain all of a student’s academic content areas,” Hernandez said. “If a student is asked to dismiss the only language that they proficiently speak their academic success in areas such as math, science, or social studies will drop.” At Hayes every single teacher is bilingually certified, and now Marquette University’s College of Education is offering the same opportunity to their students. Martin Scanlan, an assistant professor in the College of Education, played an integral role in having the new bilingual certification approved by the university.

Demi Moore molded clay as sexual as she could, Johnny Depp wielded hands of knives and MC Hammer and Vanilla Ice tried to make America think their parachute pants were the greatest thing since sliced bread.

8 The Marquette Journal

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Lighaty Gr

“At the end of the day the mission of our school is to give our students the tools they need to help address injustices in the world,” said Scanlan. “One such injustice occurs in our educational system when students are asked to ignore their native language instead of building upon that strength and helping them to become a better student because of it.” Colleen Cary, a recent graduate of the College of Education, received her degree in childhood education and Spanish. Although the first Marquette students who will graduate with the bilingual certification will not be until 2012, Cary said she understands the benefits that teachers have when they are able to work with students who are dominant in Spanish but learn in an English speaking environment. “Forcing the English language on students who are not native English speakers can create an environment filled with anxiety,” said Cary. “But if I, as an educator, can create a comfortable learning environment using the student’s dominant language in other academic areas, this will benefit the student immensely.”

My Pick: Julie Roberts made it okay for a prostitute to shop on Rodeo Drive in Pretty Woman.


JOURNALJABBER

&

Litera

The Girl

ry

the Torso

➤ By

Drew Zagami

Photograph by: Crystal Schreiner

The girl’s torso was a mirror, four-sided like a box and solid, spanning from the bottom of her neck to the top of her hip. It had always been that way. “What do you mean, she has a mirror for a body?” her mother had asked the nurses after waking up. It had been a difficult Cesarean section, as is expected from a child composed mostly of highly reflective glass. Her mother thought that she was delirious from the medication, and when the nurse handed her the child—wrapped in a blanket, with just the subtlest glimmer of glass peeking out from the V of the blanket’s neck—she cradled her in her arms, convinced that she was hallucinating. She unwrapped her child enough to unleash the full front of the mirror and looked into it. She told herself the image of the bloated woman in the mirror of the baby wasn’t being reflected, but projected. She told herself it was all a dream, that she was imagining it all. “What does our daughter look like?” she asked her husband as she turned her head away from the baby. “She looks like…” he said as he leaned over the bed to peer at his reflection in the baby’s torso. He scratched at his face. “She looks like me.” The mother cried. To read the rest of “The Girl and the Torso,” go to www.marquettejournal.org

1991 1991

Nirvana and grunge hit the scene, Pee Wee Herman was caught with his pants down and Rollerblades were the biggest fad to roll into the year.

My Pick: Even though sex, drugs and rock ‘n roll was pretty obvious in 1991, nothing tackled all of those issues and more than Beverly Hills, 90210. America’s favorite zip code spawned one of the most popular television shows of all time.

Green

www.marquettejournal.org

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JOURNALJABBER

Getting Mysteri us

MJ PARTY PLANNING

As a journalist, sometimes going into the field is necessary. Never ones to refuse to take assignments seriously, The Marquette Journal Editorial Board decided to take a hands-on approach for planning the “perfect” murder mystery party.

Photo courtesy: Garrison Gunter

In the collegiate world of tight budgets and busy schedules, the party committee took some liberties with the traditional murder mystery party methods. After securing a kit — copyright 1993 — from Value Village, The Journal is proud to present Murder Mystery: Collegiate Revision.

10 The Marquette Journal

10/10


JOURNALJABBER

?

Invitations

Game Instructions: Elaborate invitation cards that included directions for game play and costume suggestions were included. Journal Revision: Exclusive invitation e-mail blast. Subject line: “Who dunnit?”

? Materials

Game Instructions: Our kit came with scene-setting narration on a cassette tape, read by a fictional character named Dr. Jock McClew. Journal Revision: Anyone have a cassette player we can borrow?

? Munchies

Game Instructions: “Guests will enjoy sipping spritzers of white wine and ginger ale. Rum and Coke was the drink sensation and there is wicked glee in serving potato chips and dip from the hollowed red cabbage. As the guests enter the dining room, the asparagus and strawberry salad is in place. Beef, rice and vegetables are served from the side board.” Journal Revision: Whether hosting your party in a residence hall or apartment, ask your attendees to bring a snack to share. No one arrived to our party with a hollowed red cabbage, but popcorn, chocolate-covered pretzels and Rice Krispie bars were true crowd pleasers. And after solving the mystery, the 21 and up crowd can gather to enjoy the “drink sensation” of their choice.

? Setting

the Scene

Game Instructions: “This is a sit-down dinner for six at a blackpaisley-clothed dining table. Four gleaming brass candle holders with white candles are placed on each side. Tie each napkin with black lace ribbon and a white carnation tucked into each. Change the music as you sit down so that Frank can be heard.” Journal Revision: Despite our cassette tape hiccup, the creative Journal team set the scene with a dramatic improvisation. But unfortunately, black paisley tablecloths and brass candle holders are in short supply on Marquette’s campus. We made do with sitting on the floor and cueing up the Frank Sinatra Pandora station

? Playing

the Game

Game Instructions: In the spirit of Student Media, our mystery revolved around the ghastly murder of a fictional newspaper mogul. All participants immediately became suspects and received a booklet with an introduction to their characters and rules of the game. After acting out dialogues that gave context to the murder, players were individually given new clues and accusations with which they could confront the other suspects. Journal Revision: When planning your party, invite your most extroverted and creative friends. Our accusation sessions were cacophonies of bad English accents, outrageous revelations and (fictional) affairs. The setting may be a college apartment, but the experience is whatever you and your guests make of it.

? Solving

the Crime

Game Instructions: According to game rules, the narrator on the cassette was the only person who knew which participant was actually a murderer. Journal Revision: Resigning ourselves to an anticlimactic ending, the team cast a “Survivor”-style vote with a neutral onlooker and vowed to track down a cassette player in the morning. Little did we know our Journal Jabber Editor, Ryan, was informed by his instructions halfway through the game that he was guilty. After the group falsely accused one of the Journal’s designers, Ryan came clean in a dramatic confession.

www.marquettejournal.org

11


Photographs by: Brooke McEwen

{

n r u t e R class to


➤ By

Model above, left : Sarah Tomczyk, Senior, College of Communication Dress and necklace, courtesy of Fred Boutique. Coat, H&M. Shoes, Seychelles. Sunglasses and tights, Anthropologie. Handbag, Dooney & Bourke. All other accessories, vintage or model’s own.

Model above, right : Lita Smith, Sophomore, College of Communication Dress and necklace, courtesy of Fred Boutique. Coat, Urban Outfitters. Shoes, MaxStudio. Sunglasses, Target. Socks, Polo Ralph Lauren. Handbag, Rebecca Minkoff. All other accessories, vintage or model’s own.

Alise Buehrer

Between our reality TV shows and obsession with Lady Gaga, we’ll always be the generation with an edge. But after the casual grunge of the nineties and rockstar glam of the noughties, we’re ready to dress up. As the leaves fall, we’ll don our ladylike hats and pretty peep-toes in an ode to all things Mad Men and Coco Avant Chanel. Boys and girls will become ladies and gentlemen in this season’s elegant classics, which are anything but a passing fad. Gen Y may have a rebellious streak, but this fall we’re surprising everyone by throwing trendy for a loop. What goes around comes around, and vintage glam is back in season. Long, ladylike coats are an investment that will stay in your closet for decades. From Jackie Onassis to Blake Lively, these go-to frocks have been loved by stylish women throughout history. Camel is this season’s most popular neutral.  Whether present in your trench, fur accents or oversized sunglasses, it’s a glamorous shade that will warm your from look head-to-toe. Rich jewel tones like teal, ruby, gold and amethyst bring elegance and interest to everyday ensembles. Tell your own color story with dresses, jewelry and leg wear in these deep, sultry hues. Vintage shapes and silhouettes have been revived this autumn. Appeal to your polished side with A-line dresses, classic pumps and structured handbags that mimic the 40s and 50s (and dress your date in a three-piece suit!).

Black

www.marquettejournal.org

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Feature

9/11 & I

➤ By

our generation: then and now

Marissa Evans t seems like Sept. 11, 2001 happened just yesterday. Images of planes crashing, fire burning, firefighters and law

1992 1992

Welcome to Wayne’s World, home to Madonna’s x-rated sex book and the land of the romance god, Fabio.

14 The Marquette Journal

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Photograph by Matt Morgan.

2010: NINE Y Fire fighters sift through the rubble after the attack on the World Trade Center September 11, 2001. Nine years later, MU faculty and students are still affected by the attacks.

enforcement officers scrambling to help citizens, the World Trade Center collapsing, people running and American flags waving. The details of that day can be eerily clear for some. Think about it: Where were you that day?

What were you doing at the time you heard about it? By the numbers, 2, 977 people died that day. Nearly 3,000 children lost a parent. The United States State Department says 90 countries around the world lost a citizen in the attacks. Lives were changed forever but American patriotism was at its peak in the early 2000’s.

My Pick: Billy Ray Cyrus said it best: ”Don’t break my heart, my achy breaky heart.” I think you all understand.

Waldo went missing for the first time, dinosaurs came back to life and Waco, Texas was the home to one of the most violent sieges in history.

1993 1993


YEARS LATER The terrorist attack in 2001 led to a war invasion in March 2003. According to the website icasualties.org – a site that tracks casualties of Operation Iraqi Freedom since 2003–4,736 American troops have perished in battle. A war, restrictions, conspiracy theories and suspicions have been ongoing aspects of American life for the past nine years. These impacts have not left Marquette students unscathed. While in elementary school, Lauren LaBarge, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences, found herself crying once she learned what had happened. She found that although she was “too young to understand the implications” of the terrorist attack, she still “picked up the emotions as a child.” Labarge said she has seen “the good and bad of the situation.” While she is proud of the surge of patriotism, she still worries about her older brother who is a senior at the United States Military Academy at West Point. After next year, he will most likely be deployed to Afghanistan. “It’s scary but I’m ultimately proud of him,” LaBarge said. “It’s hard to watch him struggle, but if he wants to honor his country then I want to be honored with him.” Tony Nicholson a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore had a different reaction when he was watching the news on 9/11. “I remember watching on television and thinking, ‘what can I do?’” Nicholson said. When he came to Marquette his question was answered. Nicholson enrolled in Marquette’s Reserve Officer Training Corps, specifically in the Army branch. He found the 9/11 attacks solidified his decision to be a part of the military one day. “I wanted to help those who suffered. I figured I could pay them back by joining the military,” Nicholson said.

The saying within the ROTC program – “we wear this uniform so others don’t have to” – also inspired him. Nicholson wanted to be a part of ROTC because “everyone else is serving and no one else should have to serve alone.” Many Marquette students from the affected areas saw the impact of the terrorist attacks first-hand. Micaela Robb-Mcgrath, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, is a native of the Washington, D.C area. In 2001 she lived in a northern suburb 40 minutes away from the Pentagon. She remembers being in seventh grade when the 9/11 attacks occurred and hearing the announcement over the school intercom. Many of Robb-Mcgrath’s classmates had parents working at the Pentagon during that time. “We actually got to go home from school early because a lot of parents were concerned that there was going to be another attack,” Robb-Mcgrath said. “People were worried about biological attacks, and anthrax came not too long after, it was a scary time. No one knew what was going on and people were going wild. Being in seventh grade and not understanding the situation fully was scary.” Now, just over nine years later, Robb-Mcgrath finds her home to be much different than what it once was. For her, 9/11 has changed the way people interact with the city. “Prior to 9/11 D.C was fairly open,” RobbMcgrath said. “ I don’t remember lots of gates. You could drive past the White House back then but now things are much more closed off.” Syracuse, N.Y. native John Heflin was an 11-year-old boy on 9/11. He said he found being unable to comprehend the situation, the uncertainty and the anxiety to be the most scary aspect of the attacks. Now a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, Heflin said he has seen New York transform. “I think the residue of 9/11 is seen everyday. There are barricades in (New York City) around

My Pick: The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers burst onto the scene and fought their way into the hearts of millions of children. I still have a soft spot for the Pink Ranger.

1994 1994

government buildings and in airports, and we’re supposed to now be constantly vigilant in our communities,” Heflin said. But Heflin thinks the impact of 9/11 is subconscious. “We’ve been crafted into a new brand of Americans in terms of how we interact with one another and how we see the world,” Heflin said. According to the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division’s website, Arabs, Muslims, Sikhs, South-Asian Americans and those perceived to be members of these groups were victims of increased numbers of bias-related assaults, threats, vandalism and arson in the United States after 9/11. Shazeen Harunani, a Muslim and senior in the College of Health Sciences, remembers what that day was like in Oregon, Ill. “I remember people telling my parents, sister and I to stay down in the car and make sure we were not seen. People were worried because we were Muslim,” Harunani said. But Harunani said one of her friends at the time began wearing the hijab – the traditional head covering worn by Muslim woman – shortly after 9/11 because she was still proud of what her faith meant. “I’ve become more aware but I would say I’ve never felt a difference,” Harunani said. “I see it more as a rallying cry. Terrorism exists everywhere and no religion or group has a monopoly on it.” Harunani said she thinks 9/11 is used more and more as a catch phrase, particularly in the media. “People look at Muslims differently since 9/11, and they use it as a way to justify it,” said Harunani. It’s been nine years since the attacks and life has gone on, but the impacts remain in their own way. Think about it: How are you feeling those impacts today?

O.J. Simpson got chased, Forrest found out how he really got into school and how life is like a box of chocolates and Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock found themselves stuck on a bus with a bomb strapped on it.

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Feature

D

I

The techonological divide in society and education ➤ By

G

I

T

GET

Kaleigh Sheahan

Let me set up two scenarios for you: my morning routine and my father’s. It’s seven a.m., and although we’re states apart, we both roll over every morning to hit our alarm clocks; my father’s playing classical music and mine blasting Sean Kingston. As he goes out to grab the paper, I check my Facebook. When I tire of social networking I send a quick text home, “Good morning, I love you, have a good day, TTYL!” Minutes later I receive a phone call, not only is my father incapable of responding to my “e-mail” but he also wants to know what T-T-Y-L means. Although we lived under the same roof for 18 years, there lies a gap — no a canyon — between my father and I — technology. There is no definite clarity as to who is and who is not a ‘native’ to the digital generation. However, if they have ever started a story out by saying ‘Back in my day…’ chances are they’re a digital immigrant, a.k.a my father. The idea of digital ‘natives’ and ‘immigrants’ was formed by Marc Prensky, an internationally acclaimed writer in education and learning, in his article “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants” published in a 2001 issue of On the Horizon. The defining line between these two terms is how these groups are influenced by technology: it’s the difference between understanding it or adapting to it. The technological bandwagon has left the immigrants clinging on for dear life, or falling off. Linda Menck, professional in residence, said, “I know I’m what you would consider a digital immigrant… I still own my first mobile phone, a bag phone as large as a good size purse.” Menck is also the owner of an iPhone, several iPods, a Macbook Pro and an iPad filled with apps [applications] she “can’t live without.” Chances are Menck is more tech-savy than most college students. However she explains that she also feels it is a necessity to keep up with technology. And 16 The Marquette Journal

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with good reason as argued by Prensky. “The single biggest problem facing education today is that our Digital Immigrant instructors, who speak an outdated language (that of the pre-digital age), are struggling to teach a population that speaks an entirely new language,” wrote Prensky. Gee Ekachai, an associate professor in the college of communications, highlights her years of education as an example of the evolution in technology. Throughout middle school and high school she had to take notes in a notebook, read hard copy textbooks and write papers with paper and pen. Typed papers didn’t become mandatory until she was working on her master’s degree in 1981, and when she did type them… it was on an actual typewriter. “Computers were the cutting edge,” said Ekachai. “But nobody used them except the hightech IT people.” Now she uses blogs and twitter in her classroom. “Not only is it a convenience,” she said. “We [educators] need to make sure that the information we are trying to teach can be absorbed by our students in ways they understand.” The days of paper worksheets, notebooks and having to read out of hard copy textbooks are left in the dust. Now, it is not a transition that only educators are having to make. Ellen Panther, a college of communication freshman said, “the problem with technology is that something will always go wrong,” “I had an English paper I had to turn in and it didn’t upload to D2L. My teacher had to E-mail me asking me where it was. It would have been so much easier to just print it out and turn it in to my teacher.” As much as many technological advances make day-to-day tasks more convenient they also can cause the most frustrating of tribulations for

A

DOW

L

N

digital immigrants as well as digital natives to fall victim to. “At times it may seem ridiculous that my mom still needs my help to figure out how to send an e-mail. But at the same time it’s really important that I do help her,” said Panther. “She just wants to be able to be on the same page as everyone else.” A scientific study performed by the Pew Research Center tested different age groups for problem solving methods and thought process. They found entirely different results between digital ‘natives’ and ‘immigrants’ due to technological influence. While ‘natives’ are capable of taking a technological problem by the hard drive and showing it who’s boss; ‘immigrants’ are more likely to run in the opposite direction — thankfully Best Buy invented Geek Squad. Advancements in technology occur every day. Something is always better, smaller, more convenient, and easier to use. After trying to help my father for months, I figured out T-9 was just never going to work for him. He was upgraded to a new cell phone, with a keyboard, which he uses to text me all the time. Now he wants me to set him up a Facebook account…wish me luck.


Feature

Turning

[Generation]

me on

➤ By

Alexandra Engler

From “Survivor” to “The Bachelor” and on to Snooki and GTL, we are a generation obsessed with reality television


Reality

Power On

E

very show had its cult following and almost everyone with a television had their show. Were you a “Survivor” kid? Did you ever dream of being lost on an island so you too could acquire the same fame as Richard Hatch (the original winner and infamous supporter of “the birthday suit”), Colleen Haskell (who went on to star in the 2001 film “The Animal” co-starting Rob Schnieder) or Elizabeth Hasselback (now co-host of “The View”). And then there was “The Bachelor” with a long line of girls waiting for the final rose. “Laguna Beach” spawned into a generation split between “Team LC” and “Team Kristin.” Maybe you even owned one of the thousand T-shirts from Hollister, which sported the same slogans. It was so popular that supporting teams is still in fashion. Thankfully choosing between “Team Edward” and “Team Jacob” hasn’t made it to reality show status. No matter which show (or shows) you watched weekly, the genre that slowly turned “reality” into TV over more than a decade — show-byshow and addictive character-by-character — changed what this young generation defined as “real” and “TV.”

1995 1995

The Grateful Dead weren’t coming back to life, Microsoft released Windows 95 and Jumanji lulled America into one of the most twisted, yet lovable, games of chance.

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Draaryk G

For one day, The Marquette Journal transformed a TV Studio into a reality photo shoot extravaganza. Staged Photographs by Crystal Schreiner Behind the Scenes Photographs by Alex Alvarez

My Pick: Woody, Buzz and Bo Peep made their way into the hearts of millions and set the stage for one of the most tearful good byes a decade later. We were able to say hello, partner, but now all we can think of is so long.


Clockwise from left to right: Cyrus Karshenas, Ben Braun, Lex Rice, Tyler Frost , Olivia Klamm, Kiarri McBroom, Katie Snodgrass

1996 1996

Osama found a hiding place in Afghanistan, Global warming began to heat up and the United States was set ablaze by aliens in Independence Day.

My Pick: Do you really wanna zig-a-zag-ah? Yes, the Spice Girls were the biggest British Invasion since The Beatles, and they were only getting started. The group went on to top the charts numerous times and had one of the most successful reunion tours of all time.

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Reality

The Social Game Reality television began with MTV’s 1992 series “The Real World,” a social experiment designed to show how people from different backgrounds react when made to live together. Later, more social experiment-styled shows like “Survivor” and “Big Brother” hit mainstream airwaves. These shows combined game show aspects of the past with 24 hour filmed real-life drama much like by “The Real World.” Soon the generation that was introduced to reality TV was enthralled; with watching contestants battling it out during challenges and during normal activity. However, these shows also dealt with issues such as race and sexual orientation. The third season of “The Real World” broached the topic of AIDS education when MTV cast HIV-positive, Pedro Zamora. “That show was ground-breaking,” Erik Ugland, an associate professor in the College of Communication, said about the early seasons of “The Real World.” However, Ugland argues that from there, “The Real World” took an ugly turn — along with most reality TV. “Its evolution — or devolution — over the past 18 years is a microcosm of what has happened with reality TV,” Ugland said. This devolution included the increased use of stereotypes.

Making the Character Stereotypes make it easy for viewers to follow the show without too much confusion. This makes reality TV ideal for “TV window shoppers,” according to Ugland, because it has no elaborate plot twists and, for the most part, uses a simple and standard model for development. Moreover, there is little-to-no character development of the cast members. “Many of (reality show) cast members are selected precisely because they fit a preconceived character profile,” Ugland said. “You can turn on any episode of ‘The Real World’ or ‘Big Brother’ and immediately identify who is supposed to be the tramp, the stud, the alcoholic, the naive small-towner and so on.” These stereotypes and characters became television’s new celebrities. Most reality TV

1997 1997

shows had them and soon the viewers became accustomed to them — even expected them. Even shows that follow the lives of already established characters, such as celebrities or celebrity wannabes, follow a standard formula that is followed through the shows’ seasons. Anwar Ali, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences, said most of the reality TV he watches seems to focus on a few characters put in drama-filled situations. “The people are obviously real and that might be their personality, but the situations they get put in are fabricated and the plots come from those situations,” Ali said. “The characters are pushed into the plot and act in the way that the producers want them to react.” Reality TV’s presence has grown substantially in recent years — so much so that reality TV is now dominating television programming. Its presence is so large that many students have now started to see and experience the outcomes.

Back when movie tickets were only $4.29, Harry Potter enchanted the British population in his first adventure with the Philosopher’s Stone and Princess Diana became a martyr to the world.

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Reality TV has, to an extent, an impact on our social life and our generation,” said Grace O’Brien, sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences. “Even at college there are like a thousand ‘Jersey Shore’ parties to go to.” And sure enough, most Saturdays it is not hard to find a party to go to where students can put in Snooki’s sky-high bump, fake tans and “jersylicous” outfits. While dressing up like a reality TV show character is not necessarily a disastrous consequence, some believe there can be negative results from watching reality TV.

The Realities of Reality TV “There is always going to be that small aspect of ‘oh my life needs to be more like that, because that is how it is supposed to be,’” O’Brien said. “People start casting their lives toward the media

My Pick: The Titanic resurfaced to shatter all box office records and sink any competition. It wouldn’t be until James Cameron brought Avatar to the big screen that Titanic was returned to the bottom of the ocean.


Clockwise from left to right: Ivy Awino, Megan Fabisch, Ashley Sinclair, Richie Burke, Maria Owens, Sarah Bowen

portrayal rather than what their lives should be or what they are.” Corrine Stubbs, a senior in the College of Communication, said she thinks the danger goes much further, and watching too much reality TV actually impairs students’ knowledge of anything else. “This affects college students because it allows them to be unaware of newsworthy material and information,” Stubbs said. “We are concerned with things that are incredibly meaningless.” And it is not just students who see the consequences. Ugland agrees that the consequences of becoming a reality TV-obsessed generation are not beneficial. “Reality TV is never good for you,” Ugland said. “Every show you watch represents an hour of your life that you could have been doing something more productive.” But he said reality TV is not completely dangerous — under certain conditions.

1998 1998

“I can’t say that it is harmful,” Ugland said. “As long as you understand the editorial license the producers are taking and that the shows are really crude amalgamations of truth and fantasy.” But in a genre named after reality itself, many viewers say they don’t see any real substance. “It is clear that reality TV is not all that real,” Ugland said. “But the harm is mitigated by the fact that we know it’s not real. Even the contestants and cast members seem to know that they will likely be misrepresented from time to time.” O’Brien, who watches about four to five reality TV shows, said she knows “reality” is a pretty small portion of the shows and it “defeats its own purpose.” Stubbs agreed. “Reality television is very superficial,” Stubbs said. “There is no depth to it, and it seems the issues that the characters on the shows are concerned with are incredibly trivial.” More and more of shows, such as “Jersey Shore,” pop up every year, and Ugland said this

Google and the iMac were unveiled, Shakespeare fell in love and Spielberg saved Private Ryan while securing a Best Director Oscar. The Winner: the little blue dress had a little white stain. Clean much?

1999 1999

increase is because reality TV is so easy to produce. “The shows are gold mines for television producers because the production values are minimal,” Ugland said. “There are no elaborate sets, no screenwriter and there are abundant opportunities to weave in product placements.” In fact, according to Ugland, shows like “The Apprentice” and “Trading Spaces” were made specifically to advertise products on set. Television producers would not be creating these shows so frequently if there were not in such a high demand. Reality TV also brings in high ratings. Over the summer, reality TV shows like “The Bachlorette” and “Hell’s Kitchen” consistently brought in weekly “Top 10” ratings according to the Neilson Ratings, a rating system by Neilson Media Report that keeps weekly track of television viewers. These reality TV shows had consistent weekly followers in the millions. With numbers like these, reality TV must have something to offer.

Britney Spears dropped the mouse ears for pigtails, Barbie officially becomes a cougar at age 40 and Ty Warner launched “The End,” a bear to signify the end of the beanie baby line.

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Clockwise from left to right: Irene Jaskolski, Ben Braun, Isabel Gonzalez, Jordan Schrader, Teresa Bartnicki

Staying Tuned In Television viewers said they are drawn to reality TV for a several reasons. Reality TV is easy to follow, it creates an escape for an otherwise busy life and it shows life through another perspective. Reality TV viewers, such as Stubbs, said most reality TV is easy to understand because it is all so similar. “One common trait one can see amongst reality TV shows is their lack of originality,” Stubbs said. “Most of the shows seem to all be revolved around the same topics.” Stubbs said reality TV offers college students a way to relax after a hard day – which she said might explain why they are so popular with her generation. “The shows are appealing because they provide background noise,” Stubbs said. “They have no depth, and sometimes, after a long day focused on school or books or work, it’s nice to unwind and not use your brain for a bit and veg.” Another reason reality TV is so popular is

2000 2000

because it can show the life other perspectives. In social experiment reality programs, the viewers can learn about people with different backgrounds and experiences, much like the original concept behind “The Real World.” Ugland said some shows, such as “The Amazing Race,” are “at least mildly educational and do not pander to the audience’s worst impulses.” But thanks to recent changes in the reality TV genre, seeing different characters’ daily lives may not be for the best. Stubbs said she views modern reality TV characters as a “what not to do.” “Sometimes, watching people on reality shows makes me even feel better about myself,” Stubbs said. “As though my issues aren’t that bad or that things could always be worse.” From Saturday night parties to long hours surfing reality television shows, reality TV has influenced a generation of current college students across the nation. O’Brien said this trend has her wondering: “What does it mean for the next generation?”

The midnight that silenced the world (for all of ten seconds until everyone realized the world wasn’t, in fact, going to end), millions watched Richard Hatch in his birthday suit in “Survivor’s” first season and Scary Movie started to poke fun at the horror industry.

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My Pick: Election 2000 made us second guess Florida’s ability to vote. The sun must really cause brain damage.


Photographs by: A.J. Trela

JUICED

Up

Feature


Steroids

Some of America’s greatest heroes chose to forgo the gym and picked up a syringe full of liquid muscle: anabolic steroids

T

➤ By

Jennifer Michalski

ake me out to the ballgame, take me out with the crowd, buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack, I don’t care if I ever get back, let me root, root, root for the home team, if they don’t win it’s a shame, for it’s one, two, three strikes you’re out at the old, ball game!” America has had an ever-lasting romance with that old, ball game since the 1850s. The greats, Babe Ruth, Willie Mays, Joe DiMaggio and Hank Aaron, remain honored in the National Baseball Hall of Fame while the treasured ballparks, including Boston’s Fenway Park and Chicago’s Wrigley Field, are just as legendary as the men who ran their bases. Baseball’s most memorable moments range from pennant races to pitchers’ shutouts to the baseball strike in 1994-’95, which left that season without a World Series. And then there was the 1998 season’s homerun race between Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire. Prior to that season, Roger Maris had set the home run record at 61 in 1961, and there it remained until McGwire hit 70 in 1998. Meanwhile, Sosa’s RBI and base stealing record rocketed him to a 1998 National League MVP award. Together, McGwire and Sosa were credited as being baseball heroes, provoking greater interest in baseball and renewing peoples’ love of the game following that 1994 strike. But these “heroes” turned out to be not so heroic after all. Last year, The New York Times reported Sosa tested positive for performance enhancers in 2003, a year that was perfectly timed with his

2001 2001

epic feats. And this past January, McGwire admitted to using steroids for almost a decade, a time span that included his 1998 record-setting home runs. McGwire’s scandal was uncovered following a baseball-conducted survey of 1,198 players in 2003 to determine the necessity of steroid testing in Major League Baseball. The results spit out a list of 104 steroidpositive players, including New York Yankees third baseman turned celebrity, Alex Rodriguez. Even though there were years of rumors, “A-Rod” didn’t come clean until February 2009. He admitted to using performance enhancers between 2001-‘03, during which seasons his home run average was 52 — compared to an average of 39 homeruns in his other seasons. Yankees fan Tyler Weinrich, a former Marquette student and current junior at Villanova University, said he took the news harshly. “I had actually fiercely defended him in the past, so needless to say I was pretty shocked and didn’t see it coming,” Weinrich said. After coming clean, Rodriguez told ESPN in 2009, “I felt a tremendous pressure to play, and play really well. I had just signed this enormous contract … I felt like I needed something, a push, without over-investigating what I was taking, to get me to the next level.” William Moore, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said “It’s like if Michael Jordan turned out to have springs in his shoes that helped him jump so high. That’s what it would be like. It’s like having your idol turn out to be a cheat,” he said. “That’s what steroids carry with them.” Like many athletes who have admitted to steroid use, Rodriguez claimed to not have known what he was taking at the time. McGwire denied steroid use on many occasions, including an infamous 2005 House Government Reform

committee’s hearing, at which he avoid questions about his history of steroid use. “What’s worse is the good players deny it (using steroids), adding insult to injury,” Moore said. A 2005 Gallup poll showed fans’ opinion of McGwire has fallen to 53% from 87% in 1998. “They have all lost some credibility, mostly because Canseco and Rodriguez were good before the steroids,” Mezzanotte said. So now, America’s favorite past time and its seemingly glorious authenticity are tarnished with the lies and scandals surrounding steroids. Over the years, headlines have repeatedly strewn with athletes’ admittances of steroid

Wikipedia struck fear in teachers everywhere, Nicole Kidman dropped trow and provided us with Lady Marmalade and the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor for a second time … this time just happened to star Josh Hartnett and Kate Beckinsale having a romp in between the sheets while they both thought Ben Affleck died. Classy.

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My Pick: Everyone’s favorite computer fruit released its biggest creation: the iPod.


use, apologies to their leagues and requests for forgiveness from their fans. And this ‘old’ ballgame, a romantic part of American culture, was indeed becoming a thing of the past. “We are certainly in a different era than when Babe Ruth hit home runs left and right using nothing but beer and hot dogs as his performance enhancers,” Weinrich said. With the help of player Jose Conseco’s book, in which he admitted his own steroid use and noted steroids’ prevalence in the MLB, a score of wellknown sluggers became targets of investigation. Throughout the 2000s, big names including Rafael Palmeiro, Roger Clemens, David Ortiz, Manny Ramirez and Jason Giambi all made headlines for

2002 2002

illegal steroid use. But the center of the scandal remained with seven-time MVP, Barry Bonds. Bonds was the highlight of the 2003 Bay Area Laboratories Co-Operative scandal, which was attributed to spurring the “steroid era” in baseball and essentially staining many athletes’ careers. The laboratory produced a variety of illegal performance enhancers, some of which could even remain untraceable in a drug test. While Bonds underwent federal investigations for his steroid use, he was also passing Hank Aaron’s career home-run record. In that same 2009 ESPN interview, Rodriguez indicated the prevalence of steroids early this decade, and said, “We’re in the era of BALCO.”

Water is found on Mars, Kelly Clarkson was made famous for winning the first American Idol and M. Night Shyamalan creeped us out with crop circles.

What comes with the shroud of steroid controversy in professional sports, are the continuous doubts about players’ abilities. “Steroids makes us question if the players are really that good. ‘Did he actually do it himself, or was it the steroids?’ Those questions make American sports less genuine and authentic than they once were,” Moore said. According to a 2005 Gallup poll, one in four baseball fans believe steroids are ruining the game of baseball. In a July article, The Montreal Gazette reported July’s All-Star game’s ratings dropped 16% from last year, scoring among the worst TV ratings in history. “Even if they had great careers, you always

My Pick: A tie between Nelly telling us it is acceptable to take off our clothes because of temperature increases and Fear Factor making it okay to eat animal genitalia. Great year 2002 was.

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Steroids wonder how much of it was their talent and how much of it was because they used steroids,” said Emma Mezzanotte, a junior in the College of Business Administration. “Players like Barry Bonds and Alex Rodriguez have talent because they got to the major leagues in the first place, but would they have had as much success if they had never used steroids?” Though the steroid scandal spotlight has remained mostly on professional baseball, Olympic athletes have also taken heat after testing positive for performance enhancers. Another BALCO customer, track superstar Marion Jones, admitted to using a steroid called “the clear.” As punishment, in 2007 the International Olympic Committee stripped Jones of her five Sydney Olympic

medals and world championship titles dating back to Sept. 2000. She was also required to return $700,000 in prize money she received in that time frame. Even though Jones announced her retirement upon admittance, she was also suspended until October 2009. A 1984 Olympic questionnaire conducted by Jay Sylvester of Brigham Young University showed 68 percent of the athletes had taken anabolic steroids at some point in their career. While performance enhancers have remained a dark shadow in professional athletics, the generation of steroid use has become increasingly prevalent at the college level. The National Collegiate Athletic Association reports an increase in the number of student-athletes who are using steroids. In 2008-

“A 1984 Olympic questionnaire... showed 68 percent of the athletes had taken anabolic steroids at some point in their career.”

2003 2003

393 tornadoes breezed through the midwest, Columbia exploded over Texas, the Human Genome was considered complete (minus the last 1%) and Roy was attacked by a tiger.

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’09, 72 tested positive, while 57 tested positive in the year prior. The NCAA conducts year-round drug testing for Division I football and baseball programs, Division II football programs and various Division I and II athletic programs. The first uses of synthetic anabolic steroids date back to the 1950s, when John Ziegler, a doctor for the USA weightlifting team, found out a Russian trainer at the 1954 Vienna Weightlifting competition, was feeding his athletes testosterone to improve their performance. Ziegler concocted various forms of anabolic steroids, which were later banned by the IOC because of the drugs’ adverse effects on athletes’ prostates. Anabolic-androgenic steroids, which can be administered orally, through injections or through skin patches, present a long list of harmful side effects to users. The drugs mimic sex hormones and work to increase protein synthesis in cells, helping to build cellular tissue in muscles. Although anabolic steroids present a long list of harmful side effects, the most common include acne, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and gynecomastia (male breasts). Females who use steroids are prone to testosterone-induced male characteristics: body hair growth, voice deepening and skin coarsening. Prolonged use of steroids increases risks for liver damage, cardiovascular disease, decreased sperm count, potential infertility, cancer and increased irritability, or “roid rage.” And because intravenous administration of steroids is common, the risk of contracting HIV is prevalent. “Instead of the ability being strived for on a fully natural path, steroids offer a quicker finish,” Moore said. In recent years, the steroid scandal has hit Cooperstown, N.Y., where the Baseball Hall of Fame resides. Debate surrounds the question of whether to open the Hall of Fame to athletes linked to performance enhancers. While the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, who votes for the inductees, has made it clear it is unwilling to bring steroids into the hall, such restrictions would include notable record breakers: McGwire, who broke Maris’ singleseason homerun record; Bonds, who broke Hank Aaron’s career record; Rodriguez, who has potential to break Bond’s record; and Clemens, who has seven Cy Young awards. Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Bunning has said, “There is no place for cheaters in the Hall of Fame.” Yet, Moore said steroids will never replace skill. “Barry Bonds had a lot of skill before his steroids accusations. And he deserves a Hall of Fame spot regardless,” Moore said.

My Pick: Michael Jackson began a decline he would never recover from. From the 20/20 live-in at Neverland to his being accused of multiple accounts of molestation, the king of pop seemed to be pushed off the the mountain.


ACTIVE

Building more than

Muscles

The student body asked, but will they receive an updated Rec Center? Mark Ayers

Perhaps one of the most unsung perks of college campus life is the plethora of options one has to entertain him or herself with. From lectures and concerts to intramurals and career counseling, the list goes on and on. But one of the most used, yet least appreciated amenities is the recreational complex, or more commonly: the Rec Center. On college campuses across the nation, gyms and rec centers are everywhere. Some colleges have only one with a basketball court or two, a weight room, a few auxiliary rooms and maybe a pool. Others have a handful of rec centers scattered across their campuses: some specialize in cardio workouts, sports team facilities or straight-up pumping lead. No matter what you’re looking for, whether it’s staying in shape, getting in shape, warding off the freshman 15 or bulking up, rec centers offer something for everyone. As Marquette begins to consider renovating its facilities, a look at the various infrastructures in colleges around the country may inspire ideas or give caution to ventures. Do universities look simply for the cheapest run-of-the-mill experience? Do they look for unique attractions that enhance the student experience and help define the university? Citing the MUSG Fall 2009 Student Survey, senior in the College of Arts and Sciences and MUSG President Meghan Ladwig highlighted a number of things students are looking for. “Students have expressed an interest in a rec center that incorporates a broader idea of wellness; specifically, the physical, mental, and emotional wellness that fits in with the greater

2004 2004

Photograph by: Brooke McEwen

➤ By

Jesuit mission of cura personalis,” said Ladwig. “Per the legislation, funding from MUSG was allocated under the condition that student input be taken into consideration at all levels. The Office of Student Affairs has been instrumental in holding these meetings with student groups, and student government.” Perhaps they look at other criteria, such as environmentally-minded facilities. Take for example the University of Colorado which has two state-of-the-art facilities as well as five playing fields and a challenge ropes course. There are numerous studio rooms for small group and private workouts and one of the centers even houses a tanning salon. The constantly updated facilities are supported through bonds passed by the student body, which has an active hand in the planning and development. “Per the legislation, funding from MUSG was

The miracle of TiVo, America could pause TV over and over again to see Janet Jackson’s exposed breast during the halftime show of the Superbowl.

2005 2005

allocated under the condition that student input be taken into consideration at all levels,” said Ladwig. “The Division of Student Affairs has been instrumental in holding these meetings with student groups and student government.” The approach to college workout centers varies from school to school. While students and faculty differ on some things they’d like to see, most agree that any changes will be welcome, and in the spirit of Marquette’s recent infrastructure development, nothing is set in stone forever. Ladwig spoke of how searching for new ideas for the Rec Center is not over. Ladwig said, “Executive Vice President Joey Ciccone and I have also traveled to a few schools in the Chicago area to look at the facilities of different campuses, comparing them to our own and brainstorming new ideas for the future.”

We learned cowboys fall in love too, prisoners went on a hunger strike in Guantanamo Bay and Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, destroying economy, lives and a society.

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ACTIVE

Photographs by: Crystal Schreiner

Photograph Courtesy: William Jones

Allergen(eration) GlutenFree Baked Mac and Cheese Ingredients: 2 cups cooked gluten-free macaroni (can be found in pasta aisle at most grocery stores) 4 cups milk 2 cups grated cheddar cheese Salt & pepper to taste (optional) 4 tablespoons cream cheese (small cubes) Directions: Preheat oven to 350°F. In a casserole dish or metal baking pan, layer the ingredients in order; cooked macaroni, milk, cheddar cheese, and cream cheese. Top with salt and pepper. Bake at 350°F for 10-12 minutes. Bon appétit!

2006 2006

The search for the right food continues ➤ By

Heather Ronaldson

Like a growling bear it encroaches on students’ concentration in the library, demanding attention and dictating all thoughts and desires — the midday munchies. Students swarm the cafeteria, hoping to calm the growling beast. Two fatal words on the ingredients list deter one student’s search — contains gluten — leaving him to continue his hunt for allergen-free sustenance. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and oats — “basically everything in the dining hall [has gluten],” said gluten-intolerant Mary Rose Gietl, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences. Those with malabsorption syndromes like gluten

Pluto was demoted, Google spent billions on YouTube and reality television proved that America can’t figure what’s actually fact or fiction.

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intolerance experience gastrointestinal distress, constipation, bloating or diarrhea, should the ingredient be ingested. Gluten, tree nuts and dairy create a troublesome trio of food allergies, stopping students from indulging in traditional campus meals like McCormick’s legendary soft-serve ice cream or Cobeen’s sandwich bar. “I ended up not using a lot of my meal plan because I would just eat in my room to avoid eating anything with gluten,” said gluten-intolerant Karley Brumder, a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. Before each semester, students can schedule one-on-one appointments with dining hall representatives to explain their allergy and dietary needs. Director of Residence Dining Operations, Kevin Gilligan said, “We want students to let us know if they have special dietary needs so we can accommodate them. We work with the customer to achieve the best possible outcome.” Marquette’s sensitivity to food allergies grows with each semester. In the spring, Schroeder, dining hall, cafѐ Italiano offered wheat and rice noodle substitutes. Soy milk is also available at all dining halls, Brew Bayou’s and Marquette Place. In past years, students did not like the flavor, “We tried again this past semester and

it was received well so we will continue it,” Gilligan said. “Balancing Mind Body and Soul” is Marquette’s holistic approach to wellness and fitness. To educate about special diets, food allergies and nutritional balance, the affiliated website offers online tools like a BMI and the Nutrition Calculator. “It is not about fads or diets…it is about maintaining balance in one’s life,” the website reads. To maintain nutritional balance, students with allergies incorporate a myriad of produce into their diets — some that must be purchased if not provided in the dining halls. Gietl purchased gluten-free food to avoid ingestion, but was immediately accommodated by the Cobeen dining staff after voicing her dietary needs. “I told the main chef [about my allergy] and he was very nice about it. They got gluten-free bread and so I was able to have sandwiches, which are so great,” she said. Allergen free meals are prepared on demand and are custom made since there is only a small demand for them, Gilligan said. “[We] treat each case individually,” Gilligan said. Sodexo and Marquette’s three-year dining improvement project is slowly revealing itself this fall. One addition includes an information board with nutrition facts, Gilligan said.

My Pick: Thousands of televisions, walls, picture frames, vases and faces were broken thanks to Nintendo’s most athletic game system. The Wii managed to find away to not only make America fit, but to also add a few extra expenditures along the way.


ACTIVE

Photograph by: Eric Ricafrente

Backed into a Corner

You sit, wondering who really likes you. Maybe you’ll talk. Not today. The anxiety kicks in. ➤ By

Alyssa Ahern

The transition into college brings a mix of emotions for most students. In some cases, feelings of uncertainty bring anxiety that lasts them all four years of college and beyond. Social phobia is a silent handicap that affects many college students. The thoughts of embarrassment, humiliation, failure and harassment haunt students, causing them to be closed out and seem unsocial. Students affected by this phobia can end up viewing the university experience as a nightmare, instead of a joy. “I get nervous in all my classes because I keep wondering what people think of me,” said Cary*, who is going to be a sophomore. She became social phobic in high school. “I thought coming to college would help me come out of my shell, but it has only made it worse.” Cary, although suffering from social anxiety disorder, now has a boyfriend, has more

2007 2007

confidence and is more open. She admits to needing a lot of attention from her boyfriend in order to not stress on her fear. Marissa*, a senior at Marquette said, “ I have been shy since preschool, and it has carried with me ever since.” Cary also said growing up, she was always intimidated by people. For Marissa the shyness she had as a child has now become part of her life. “I am so embarrassed because I am going to be 22 years old and I fear rejection,” Marissa said. Marissa admitted to hiding her social phobia from her friends and she does have a social life on campus. This results in deep anxiety for her, and she admits to drinking more than she should. She says her behavior is loud and obnoxious, but alone she picks at her skin and cries because she feels everyone hates her. Lacking the ability to approach a crowd of people, or make friends, these students tend

The Deathly Hallows became the last of the Harry Potter series to hit bookshelves, Fisher Price recalled thousands of toys and a black man and a woman became the major contenders for the U.S. Presidency.

2008 2008

to hide their fears behind substances such as alcohol. Drinking in college is socially acceptable, so social phobic’s feel accepted instantly with a drink in hand. Chelsea Gasaway, a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a psychology major, said, “social phobia has no cure and while many come out of their shell, many can’t.” Also, living in a world that is fueled by social media such as Facebook and Twitter, Cary and Marissa had a hard time adjusting to these media. Marissa choose not to have one until college and even now she rarely uses it for fear and insecurities about people judging her. Social phobias affect all aspects of a person’s life. We all can remember our first day. “Multiply your first day fears by ten, and that’s what a social phobic lives with everyday,” said Gasaway. *Student’s names were changed for privacy

Obama makes a change and gets a large population to vote him into the presidency and writers went on strike making television and movies a little less than impressive.

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Kara Schneidewend Psychology MINOR(S): Human Resources and Family Studies GRADUATION YEAR: 2011 ACTIVITIES: Sigma Kappa Sorority, Psi Chi, Rho Lambda MAJOR(S):

In 200 words of less, what are your thoughts on… ➤ REALITY TELEVISION: “Reality television creates a blurry distinction between what truly happens in society and a producer’s depiction of reality. Shows that claim to be ‘reality’ actually disturb our generation’s view of what is real. It makes for good entertainment, but we must be aware that it’s still not reality or the norm for behavior.”

➤ POLITICAL INFIDELITY: “People take what political leaders do in their personal lives as a representation of their morals and values. Political leaders are acting more like celebrities, and their actions seem to be becoming more acceptable. This infidelity reflects a negative light on the entire country, and its citizens.”

2009 2009

The king of pop and the queen of pin-ups pass away and Lady Gaga confused us into making her one of the hottest musicians around. “Glee” also proves high school stereotypes are cool.

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➤ 9/11 AND HIGH SECURITY: “The 9/11 attacks opened the eyes of American citizens, and the world. After this, a typically calm person walks onto airplanes with a fast-beating heart or knot in his or her stomach. The resulting high security at airports may be extreme at times, but it’s better to be safe than sorry.”

➤ PROFESSIONAL STEROID USE: “Athletic ability is difficult to measure these days due to professional athletes using steroids. Athletes’ natural abilities aren’t enough to win anymore. Because of the highly competitive nature of sports, it’s easy to overlook long-term risks of steroid use for short-term gains of enhanced performance.”

2010 2010

Biebs gets popular, Steve Jobs unveils the iPad and Lindsay Lohan finally became sober (for a couple weeks until she failed another drug test).


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