Issuu on Google+

1


The Africa Studio Design to Build: Housing for the Malamulo Hospital Philadelphia University Fall 2013

2

3


Foreword

Acknowledgments

Titled “Designed to Build,� this Philadelphia University Design 9 Architecture Studio is an applied research and design studio, contributing to the practice of humanitarian architecture in the global context through the design of housing for the Malamulo Hospital, in Malamulo, Malawi.

Philadelphia University Faculty Dr. Alex Vinograd Dr. Amy Keenum Mthabisi Masilela Professor Greg Lucado & Construction Management Program

The studio will design and develop construction documents for the construction of 2-4 housing units to be built by local contractors, using local construction materials and techniques.

4

5


The Students

Marian Jony

Eike Maas

David Trapp

PhilaU Architecture ‘14

The Africa studio consists of ten students from Philadelphia University’s 5th year B. ARCH program during the fall semester of 2013.

6

Nicole Boris

Fatema Kanji

Thomas Frank

Nhan Lieu

Mike Rothman

Natasha A. Trice

Brandon Saiz

Professor Chris Harnish

CH

7


Project Overview Titled “Design to Build,” Philadelphia University’s Design 9 architecture studio is an applied research and design studio, focusing on the practice of humanitarian architecture in the global context through the design of housing for the Malamulo Hospital, in Malamulo, Malawi. The aim of the studio is the design and development of a complete set of construction documents for 2 – 4 housing units to be built by local contractors, using local materials and construction methods. The project is not speculative; rather it is designed to be built. Background: Malamulo Hospital In the rural community of Malamulo, the directors of the local hospital seek housing for visiting doctors and medical students from the University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi. The Malamulo Hospital provides healthcare to a catchment area of 129,000 people from two surrounding districts who are among the poorest in Africa. Only four full-time physicians (two Malawi-trained & two US-licensed) comprise the staff who serve the hospital’s 275 bed capacity. The hospital relies on assistance from local and international donors, most importantly visiting medical volunteers. Unfortunately, the hospital struggles to recruit long-term visiting doctors and faculty partially due to inadequate housing. Project Description: Housing The clients request a thoughtfully designed building and site solution that is contextually appropriate, environmentally responsive, beautiful, affordable, and buildable by local contractors. The students aim to produce an appropriate housing solution that responds to the needs of the client, users and surrounding community. The greatest challenges faced by the designers are the difficulties of designing in a foreign country, the inability to visit the site, and the need to satisfy multiple cultural sensibilities.

8

9


The Site

16°10’9.03”S / 35° 6’27.10”E The site currently available for construction is roughly a ½ hectare plot in a semi-dense residential neighborhood of modest single family and duplex housing serving the hospital and local community. The site is on a north-facing hillside, with mountain views to the northwest. It contains mature papaya, banana, and mango trees along its perimeter. Environmental and climatic conditions include high levels of solar exposure, significant rainfall in the rainy season, challenging drainage issues, and lush fertile soils.

10

11


12

13


Site Attributes Panorama

Site Attributes

Neighbors

14

Views to the West

Mango Trees

Banana Trees

Papaya Trees

15


To be successful, housing must respond to multiple communities and constituencies, and satisfy a broad range of private to public design issues.

16

Funders/Client Non-profit organizations financially support this project. Their finances are often sparse with a somewhat inconsistent inflow. They require a thoughtful building that is environmentally responsive, affordable, and results in high user retention.

17


Neighbors

Users

Native Malawian families dwell in the neighborhood surrounding the site. The design solution should be contextually appropriate and should encourage a harmonious relationship between the hospital associates and the Malamulo community. Its construction should adhere to the native building culture, employing local contractors, utilizing local construction techniques, and presenting an appropriate aesthetic.

The users are the visiting medical practitioners who will be the residents of the completed housing solution. The residents are individuals of many cultural backgrounds and will also likely include doctors’ families. Though their daily life will be spent working long days with little free time, it is important they have comfortable spaces to relax alone, to cook and eat, and to socialize with housemates, neighbors, and the community.

18

19


Challenges

Two Users Groups

Doctors + Faculty: Room for Four Inhabitants per Unit In some cases, doctors will come with families. Other times, they may need room for guests. Faculty may also share units with colleagues. These users will spend up to 5 years in this housing. Two Units These units needs two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen, and a living room. They should be comfortable without the need to actively heat or cool. They must be secure, but not imposing.

How do we provide housing for doctors and students at the Malamulo Hospital?

Buildable with accessible materials and local builders. The cost must correlate with recently built duplex units.

Medical Students: Multiple Inhabitants per Unit Students will spend several months in this housing and will be sharing bedrooms and bathrooms. Spaces must be comfortable, meeting students’ expectations of housing in their typical urban environments. It must be organized efficiently with space for studying and for relaxing in community. Ability to Phase As client funding fluctuates and the need increases over time, this scheme should consider phasing. This would allow Malamulo Hospital to host some students with relatively low upfront cost and grow their student housing as needed. Buildable with accessible materials and local builders. The cost must correlate with recently built duplex units, as it breaks down per person.

20

21


Constituent Considerations

Constituents

How do we satisfy the constituents?

Clients

The project seeks to find a balance between the needs of the clients, users and community. The design intent is guided by this variety of constituent needs.

The finances of the project funders are often scanty and infrequent. They need a prototype for a scheme that is cost-effective, durable, easily-maintained by hospital staff, and contributes to user-retention.

How do we satisfy the constituent design forces?

CLIENT

Funders

Funders

Financial Viability Cost Low maintenance Marketability Recruiting

low maintenance low overhead costs low construction costs marketability

Successful Housing

USERS Doctors & Faculty Medical Students

22

Comfort

happy doctors places for family living positive community reception

Cultural Cohesion

happy students

NEIGHBORS Malawian Community

unique experiences places for study

Malamulo Hospital

High User Retention

Educational Experience

Loma Linda and U of Malawi

23


Constituents

Constituents

Neighbors

Users: Doctors and Medical Students

The design should encourage a harmonious relationship between the hospital associates and the residents of the Malamulo community. The design solution needs to adhere to the native building culture, employ local contractors, utilize local construction techniques, and present an appropriate aesthetic and typology.

The users daily lives will be spent working long days with little free time, it is important they have comfortable spaces to relax alone, to cook and eat, to study and to socialize with house mates, neighbors, and the community.

Local Residents Comfort

Supports Local Economy not taxing to local resources

uses local workers

familiar/local materials

adjustability

doesn’t displace nodes/paths doesn’t obstruct views outdoor relationship boundaries of controlled space familiar scale

Patients & Families

24

Respect for Context

privacy thermal comfort tactility user adjustability low maintenance security shade

doesn’t disrupt atmosphere

provides space for interaction Community Interaction

adequate lighting collaborative space quietude

Long-Term Doctors

School Experience

having clean laundry

community barbeques working at desk watching the sunset morning tea a goodnights sleep tending the gardens hot shower reading a good book napping in shade having friends over at night conversation studying with classmates familiar meal

Home Experience

25


Constituents

Conceptual Experience

User Moments

watching the sunset watching the sunset

Doctors’ Housing crying on someone’s shoulder crying on someone’s shoulder

barbeque for the community watching barbequethe for sunset the community

hot shower after a long day cryinghot onshower someone’s aftershoulder a long day

During the design process, user activities are evaluated based on the degree hot shower after a long day This process aims to appropriate for various tasks. guarantee that the users will have comfortable spaces, suitable for various activities.

barbequeofforprivacy the community and sociability

The users desired activities are considered, and organized in terms of their privacy levels CONCEPTUAL EXPERIENCES | DOCTORS COMMUNAL

many people involved

morning tea morning tea

working at desk working at desk

having friends over at night morning tea over at night having friends

tending the gardens working at desk tending the gardens

tending the gardens

having friends over at night

napping in the shade napping in the shade

a good night’s sleep having a goodclean night’slaundry sleep

studying with classmates napping in thewith shade studying classmates

a good night’s sleep

Kicking a ball with neighbor kids

Familiar meal with family and friends studying with classmates

PUBLIC

having clean laundry having clean laundry

PRIVATE

Barbeque for the community

Working at desk Having friends over at night

Conversation with neighbor Watching the sunset

Morning tea Crying on someone’s shoulder A good night’s sleep reading a good book watching sunset reading athe good book

conversation with neighbor crying on someone’s shoulder conversation with neighbor

kicking a ball with neighbor kids reading good book barbeque the community kicking aafor ball with neighbor kids

familiar meal with family and friends conversation with neighbor hot shower after a long dayand friends familiar meal with family

kicking a ball with neighbor kids

Reading a good book

Hot shower after a long day familiar meal with family and friends

Tending the gardens Napping in the shade Laundry

PERSONAL

one or two people involved

26

27


Spatial Experience

Adjacencies of Spaces

Doctors’ Housing

Doctors’ Housing

Appropriate levels of privacy and sociability are determined for different parts of the program. Program is designed around user activities.

Relationships are found between programmatic spaces that will foster appropriate environments for different user activities.

SPATIAL EXPERIENCES | DOCTORS

COMMUNAL

barbeque for the community

kicking a ball with neighbor kids

Office

Kitchen Semi-public outdoor space

Semi-public outdoor space

Office Kitchen working at desk

Shared khonde

Shared khonde Bathroom

having friends over at night reading a good book Living room

Personal khonde

conversation with neighbor

watching the sunset

morning tea crying on someone’s shoulder Bedroom a good night’s sleep

Bedroom

tending the gardens napping in the shade having clean laundry

hot shower after a long day Bathroom PERSONAL

28

Living room

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

familiar meal with family and friends

Personal khonde

29


Spatial Organization

Spatial Organization

Doctors’ Housing

Doctors’ Housing

Semi-public outdoor space

Kitchen

Bathroom

Kitchen

Bathroom

Bedroom

Kitchen

Office

Bedroom

Bathroom Office

Office

Office

Bathroom

Bathroom

Bathroom

Kitchen Bedroom

Personal khonde

Bathroom

Bedroom

Bathroom

Bedroom

Living room

Shared

Bedroom Shared khonde

Living room

Bedroom

Personal khonde

Bedroom

Living room

Personal khonde

Living room

Personal khonde Semi-public outdoor space

30

31


Spatial Diagram

Plan

Doctors’ Housing

Doctors’ Housing

Bedroom

Living room

Living room

Bedroom

Bedroom

Personal khonde

Bathroom

Kitchen

Bathroom

Kitchen

Office

Office

Semi-public outdoor space Shared Khonde

Semi-public outdoor space

Bathroom

Bedroom

Bathroom

Personal khonde

Semi-public outdoor space

Semi-public outdoor space

Semi-public outdoor space

32

33


Section

Conceptual Experience

Doctor Moments

Student’s Housing

The design provides appropriate spaces suitable for various activities, and allows the users to live comfortably.

The users desired activities are considered, and organized in terms of their privacy levels

CONCEPTUAL EXPERIENCES | STUDENTS COMMUNAL

many people involved

Barbeque for the community

Kicking a ball with neighbor kids

Familiar meal with family and friends PUBLIC

PRIVATE

Studying with classmates

Having friends over at night

Conversation with neighbor Watching the sunset

Tending the gardens

Morning tea

Morning tea Crying on someone’s shoulder

Barbeque for the community

Having clean laundry

A good night’s sleep

Reading a good book

Hot shower after a long day

Having friends over at night

Tending the gardens Napping in the shade Laundry

PERSONAL

one or two people involved

34

35


Spatial Experience

Adjacencies of Spaces

Appropriate levels of privacy and sociability are determined for different parts of the program. Program is designed around user activities.

Relationships are found between programmatic spaces that aim to guarantee the building will foster appropriate environments for different user activities.

Students’ Housing

Students’ Housing

CONCEPTUAL EXPERIENCES | STUDENTS COMMUNAL

barbeque for the community

kicking a ball with neighbor kids Shared living room Semi-public outdoor space

Semi-public outdoor space Shared living room studying with classmates

Shared kitchen and dining

Shared kitchen and dining

having friends over at night reading a good book

Bathroom

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

familiar meal with family and friends

Khonde watching the sunset

conversation with neighbor

Morning tea crying on someone’s shoulder Bedroom a good night’s sleep

Bedroom

tending the gardens napping in the shade laundry

hot shower after a long day Bathroom

Khonde

PERSONAL

36

37


Organization of Spaces

Organization of Spaces

Students’ Housing

Students’ Housing

Semi-public outdoor space

Bedroom Bathroom

Bathroom Bathroom

Bedroom

Bathroom

Bedroom Bedroom

Shared living room Bathroom

Bathroom Khonde

Khonde

Shared kitchen and dining

Bathroom

Shared kitchen and dining

Bedroom

Bathroom

Bedroom

Khonde

Shared living room

Khonde

Semi-public outdoor space

38

39


Plan Diagram

Plan

Students’ Housing

Bathroom

Bathroom

Students’ Housing

Bedroom

Bedroom Khonde

Semi-public outdoor space

Khonde

Shared dining

Bathroom

Bedroom

Shared kitchen Laundry

40

Shared living room

Khonde

Bathroom

41


Section

Student Moments The design provides appropriate spaces suitable for various tasks, and allow the users to live comfortably.

Successful housing creates a comfortable environment for its users. Conversation with neighbor Having clean laundry

Morning tea Having friends over at night Studying with classmates

42

43


44

45


The Climate

The Climate

Designing for Thermal Comfort

The Hot + Dry Season: Sept - Nov

Seasonal Changes Malawi experiences three seasons: a cold, dry season; a hot, dry season; and a warm, rainy season. The weather is warm and wet from December to April with up to 845mm of rainfall. The environment is cold and dry from May to August, and hot and dry from September to November. Sun Malawi is located in the southern hemisphere, only about 1,800 km from the equator and therefore the sun generally maintains a high position in the north side of the sky. Throughout most of the year the sun reaches a height of 54 to 74 degrees to the north. In the summer it reaches a height of 82 degrees to the south.

The full year of hourly temperature reports with the days of the year on the horizontal and the hours of the day on the vertical. The hourly temperature measurement is color coded into meaningful temperature bands: cool is the darkest grey (50°F to 65°F), comfortable is dark grey (65°F to 75°F), warm is light grey (75°F to 85°F), hot is the lightest grey (85°F to 100°F)

Hot + Dry Season

Rainy Season

62

Hot+Dry Season

Cold + Dry Season

6 pm

West

Hot

Wind Predominant winds flow from the east, northeast and southeast. Picking up speed in the warmer months, it can reach speeds up to 28km/h.

North

Ventilating

90°

12 pm

75°

Warm Shading

Diagram A full year of hourly temperature reports with the days of the year on the x-axis and the hours of the day on the y-axis. The hourly temperature measurement is color coded into meaningful temperature bands: cool is the darkest grey (50°F to 65°F), comfortable is dark grey (65°F to 75°F), warm is light grey (75°F to 85°F), and hot is the lightest grey (85°F to 100°F).

46

60°

Comfortable

Sep Oct

45°

Cool

6 am

Impermeable

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

South

Aug

6 A.M.

East

6 P.M.

47


The Climate

The Climate

The Rainy Season: Dec - April

The Cold & Dry Season: May - Aug

98

51

Rainy Season

Cold+Dry Season West

West

North

90°

90°

75°

75°

60°

60°

45°

45° South

North

East

South

6 A.M.

48

6 P.M.

6 A.M.

East

6 P.M.

49


Case Study: Existing Hospital Housing

2

7m

2

11m

2

2

2

84m 2 2

2

2

2

Program There are two duplexes, each have two joined units with two bedrooms, a kitchen, dining room, lounge, bathroom, laundry room, powder room, and two khondes. Size and Price Each duplex accommodates four individuals, eight people altogether. The four units each contain 88 square meters (950 square feet) at $256 per square meter ($24 per square foot), for a total of $22,500 each. Altogether, the project offers 1,160 square meters (3,800 square feet) and costs a total of $90,000. Understanding These duplexes fail to provide an appropriate contextual response, thermal comfort, or innovative construction techniques. They do not facilitate any social relationships between one another or with the surrounding community. The rooms are very closed off and private, offering very little airflow. They do not actively employ passive systems such as natural ventilation or rainwater collection.

50

51


Duplex Images

52

53


Comparative Precedent

Comparative Precedent

Existing Duplexes

What did we extract?

No personalized outdoor space No backup systems

54

Burglar bars

No semi-public outdoor space No passive cooling strategies

Inefficient use of space Inability to adapt to user preference

55


Local Construction Methods Malamulo, Malawi

Lifestyle In contrast to Northern cultures, the Malawian lifestyle is outdoororiented. Malawians spend the majority of their time outside and usually enter buildings to cook and rest.

Successful housing uses contextual materials and methods through innovative and responsive design techniques.

Typology The majority of dwellings in Malamulo are small, modest residences. Malawian families tend to share houses of a single room. Kitchens are usually detached from the house due to the excessive heat created from cooking. Most houses contain porches called khonde. Roofs tend to be single- or doubledpitched. Materials Bricks are the most common building material. They are either sun-dried or kiln-fired on site. Plaster is available to cover interior or exterior walls. Concrete is rather expensive and therefore reserved for floor slabs. Steel window and door fittings can be purchased on main roads. Roofs are commonly constructed of thin corrugated metal sheets or clay tiles. Wooden beams or local gum poles support the roof. Additional materials may be transported from larger cities such as Blantyre, but it is costly.

Window and door frame market 56

Detached Kitchen

Local construction 57


Typical Construction Methods

Construction Analysis

Local Building Culture

What did we extract?

70mm 100mm

230mm

Standard Brick Dimensions

58

Prefabricated Door Frame

Site

Gum Poles

Transportation

59


Vernacular Housing Neighboring House

Vernacular Housing What did we extract?

North-facing windows

60

Front porch connects to the community

Passive cooling through large north-facing overhang

Semi-public garden

61


Studio Guiding Principles

Rainwater Capture

Collect and utilize rainwater on site for potable water and irrigation

Vegetation

The client asked for a replicaple prototype for any site but gave us a potential site for this excersise.

Incorporate local vegetation and gardens

Energy

Maximize day lightning and minimize electricity use with sustainable techniques

Contextualization

Understand the existing population as well as vernacular building technology, building program, and materials.

62

Innovation

Understand local materials and practices to develop innovative solutions

Comfort

Balance the expectation of the user including independence and privacy, with integrating a communal feel, and thermal comfort of people living there Efficiency

Make the community self-sufficient by incorporating efficient systems to the units as a whole

Systems

Understand local materials and practices to develop innovative solutions

63


Students’ Housing

64

65


Final Proposal Student Housing

Our housing proposal cuts down on size compared to the duplex, while providing compact, but functional space. One bedroom unit is for 2 people, who share a bathroom. The Communal Unit includes kitchen, dining, and lounge space that 6 people can share. We created a phasing plan suggesting that it would be cheaper in the long run for clients if they built initially one bedroom unit and one communal space. The other bedroom units could be added on over time when the client receives extra funding. This saves costs because you are not building a whole new living and kitchen space every time you build a new bedroom unit.

66

67


Site Plan

Site Axon a. low planted gardens b. high planted gardens 1. outdoor community space 2. gravel patio 3. planting beds 4. pergola A. bedrooms B. bathrooms C. living room D. kitchen E. dining room

bedroom bathrooms gravel patio dining room kitchen living room pergola outdoor public space planting bed

a planting bed low planted garden high planted garden low planted garden

A B

E

D C 1 3

3 2

B

a

68

b

b

3

b A

4

2

3

B

3

B

A b

a b

b

69


Phasing Diagram

Duplex Comparison

D U P LE X

S T U D EN T S ’ H OU S IN G

OVERALL

P R IVAT E

SH A R E D

Phase 1

+

Phase 2

Phase 3

IN D O O R

OUTDOOR

70

71


Conceptualization

Floor Plan

Student Housing

16 m2 12 m2

4 m2

22 m2

13 m2

5 m2

20 m2

*cont.

72

73


Section & Elevation

74

Section & Elevation

Longitudinal Section of Bedroom and Communal Unit

Longitudinal Section of Private Unit

North Elevation of Bedroom and Communal Unit

South Elevation of Private Unit

75


Section & Elevation

Cross Section through Both Units

West Elevation of Both Units

76

East Elevation of Communal Unit

77


Communal Area

Communal living room

78

Prrimary circulation path

79


Private entry to bedroom unit

80

Bedroom

81


Comparative Graphs

Estimated by Construction Managment Program

Chart Title 6 People/ Unit Phase 3: $ 12,379.29

$ 56,302.31 Phase 2: $ 10,505.82 Phase 1: $32,867.2

1

2

3

Duplex: Chart Title

4 People/ Unit

Phase 2: $22,500

Community Space 82

$45,000

Phase 1: $22,500

Circulation Entry looking Pergola southwest

1

2

83


Details corrugated metal roofing

bamboo screen

vent extraction unit

roof tie

2x2 timber framing

.5 m on center

corrugated metal roofing

gum pole purlin 100mm dia.

2x2 timber framing

wood framing

gum pole purlin 100mm dia.

wall mounting bracket

brick drip shelf soldier course

concrete lintel window window frame leveling grout brick drip shelf soldier course

gum pole post 100mm dia. 900mm high planter box soil

electric fan

concrete screed floor 100mm

enviro loo (composting toilet)

wire reinforcing damp proofing (DPM)

drying plate liquid overflow valve

sand blinding

standard concrete mix

gravel and brick rubble min 150mm thick

sand or ash

0

700mm deep concrete footing

0

Bamboo clerestory

84

1000 mm

1000 mm Composting toilet wall section

85


Details corrugated metal roofing

corrugated metal roofing

2x2 timber framing

2x2 timber framing .5 m on center

gum pole purlin 100mm dia. bamboo screen wood framing

dropped ceilling

bamboo screen

bug screen behind the bamboo wood framing concrete lintel bamboo pergola

gumpole post sleeve and bolted connection

gum pole post 100mm dia.

finish plaster 20-50 mm

rebar tie

gum pole purlin 100mm dia.

gum pole post 100mm dia.

operable window

concrete

window frame

bamboo frame to gumpole post bolted connection

leveling grout brick drip shelf soldier course

Gum Pole Detail

concrete screed floor 100mm

soil

concrete screed floor 100mm

wire reinforcing

900mm high planter box

wire reinforcing

damp proofing (DPM) sand blinding

damp proofing (DPM) sand blinding

gravel and brick rubble min 150mm thick

gumpole to concrete connection

gravel and brick rubble min 150mm thick concrete footing

concrete mix

500mm deep concrete footing

0

0

1000 mm

1000 mm Front Porch Detail

Dining room wall section

86

87


Doctors’ Housing

88

89


Final Proposal Doctors’ Housing

To engage doctors and hospital faculty with meaningful living situation, this project seeks to create a sense of home using varying degrees of privacy and community. As the built form responds to the climatic conditions of the site, it becomes a comfortable and cool space to inhabit. As its organization creates space for solitude and for community, it allows users to rest as they need and socialize as they want. The two houses site on the site in a way that encourages movement and community between them, creating space for gathering and eating. Between four units and two kitchens, there are opportunities to spend time with neighbors but also to be in quiet personal space. As private spaces, like bedrooms, are buffered by semi-private spaces, like living rooms, they become places of retreat from busy days at the hospital.

Courtyard Perspective

90

91


Site Plan

Site Axon a. low planted gardens b. high planted gardens 1. porch 2. gravel patio 3. drainage trench 4. gravel entrance path 5. gravel laundry area

gravel laundry area bathrooms bedroom living room/kitchen bedroom gravel entrance path porch drainage trench gravel patio

drainage trench low planted gardens porch drainage trench high planted gardens low planted gardens

A. bedrooms B. bathrooms C. living room/kitchen

a b 1

3

5 A

B

B

C a

A

2 b 3

92

a

4

93


Perimeter Landscaping

Floor Plan

= 2,5m

=

2,5m

0,5m

2,5m

0,8m 1,0m

low planted gardens drainage trench

2,0m

high planted gardens paved khonde 3,0m

gravel patio gravel patio drainage trench

1,8m

1,0m 2,5m 2,5m

2,0m

gravel laundry area

0,8m 2,0m

94

95


Elevations

Elevations

South Elevation

North Elevation

96

Communal Kitchen Closed

Communal Kitchen Open

97


Section

1m

4m

1.3m

2m

2m

.8m

.5m

overhang

living room

hallway

eating area

kitchen

pantry

overhang

Kitchen/Living Room Section

98

99


100

101


Circulation Diagrams

Duplex Comparison DUPLEX

DOCTORS’ HOUSING

OVERALL

P R I VAT E

SHARED

INDOOR

OUTDOOR

102

103


Rainwater Harvesting

To calculate how much municipal water will be needed every year, it is important to understand the roof area, the amount of rainfall, maximum consumption per month, and maximum storage capability. The months where the resident will be using more water than collecting are May, June, July, August, September and October. The months that the tanks will be completely empty are July, August, September and October. Our calculations show that it is necessary for the house to tap into municipal lines for an estimated 45,000 liters of water per year which is 41 percent of the total water usage per year.

Rainwater Site Plan

Storm water Management / Rainwater Catchment Systems

December

January

1. 2. 3. 4.

100

November

3,300L underground cistern Brick trenches Solar hot water heater Borehole and tank stand

February

75

50 25

March October

1

2

-1%

3

-167%

Square Meter of Roof – 443sq.m

April

September

Max amount of potable water used per month – 9,000 Liters Maximum storage capability – 13,200 Liters

4 -116%

-59%

August

May -58%

July

104

-99%

June

105


Septic Site Plan

Water Systems Section

Waste / Black-water Management

Rain Water _ Potable Water _ Grey Water _Black Water

1. 2. 3. 4.

1. Rainwater falls off roof

Black-water piping 6,600L septic tank Distribution box Percolation piping

2. Rainfall is collected in trench and filtered through large grate 3. 3,300L underground cistern stores rainfall 4. Water is then pumped into filter 5. Water run through a triple filtration system 6. Water line penetrates building and follows gumpole structure

3

7. Water line follows the central, vertical wall to roof plane where solar hot water heater is located

2 1

4

8. Water is heated in solar hot water heater

7

9. Water follows structure back into the building above the bathroom

8

10. Water line splits for shower and sink

6

11. Shower line

10

12. Sink line

9

13. Greywater filter

11

14. Greywater used in toilets 15. Waste exits building

12

1

16. Waste to septic tank

14

5

15

13

2

16 3m

1.3m

2m

1.6m

Bedroom

Hallway

Bathroom

Overhang

3 4

106

107


Water Systems Plan Rain Water _ Potable Water _ Grey Water _Black Water

Potable Water Storage Tank

Optional Structures for Tank Specifications

decking joists (“c� purlin) main bearer

girder

brace

B

C

A

main

D E

Tank Size Liters

anchor plates

108

3,785 Liters

7,460

A 600mm 600mm B 1,295mm 1,752mm C 1,832mm 2,476mm D 550mm 550mm E 75mm 75mm

109


Structural Brick Pier

Brick Wall with Transom Jalousie

Bedroom: Load Bearing Condition

Bedroom: Non-Load Bearing Condition

.5 m on center corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panels

gum pole 100mm

corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panels bug screening at roof cavity 2x8 blocking gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing (purlin)

2x2 timber framing (purlin)

softboard ceiling fixed to subframing to be painted

1m overhang

1m overhang

bug screening behind vent operable louver

finish plaster 20mm-50mm tile floor concrete screed floor 100mm wire reinforcing

wire mesh reinforcing

damp proofing (DPM) sand blinding

garden: 0.6m edge of garden soldier course

gravel and brick rubble min 150mm thick

trench: 0.8m

garden: 0.6m edge of garden soldier course trench: 0.8m

interior wall height 35 bricks 3.5m interior wall height 35 bricks 3.5m

110

111


Window Type 1 and Transom Jalousie

Floor to Ceiling Brick

Bedroom: Non-Load Bearing Condition

Living Room: Non-Load Bearing Condition

roof tie corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panels bug screening at roof cavity 2x8 blocking gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing (purlin)

corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panels bug screening at roof cavity 2x8 blocking gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing (purlin)

aluminum gutter 2m overhang

bug screening behind vent operable louver 3m overhang

925mm steel window frame leveling grout brick drip shelf rowlock garden: 1.8m edge of garden soldier course

garden: 2.7m edge of garden soldier course trench: 0.8m

interior wall height 28 bricks 3m

112

interior wall height 28 bricks 3m

113


Window Type 2 with Transom Jalousie

French Doors

Living Room: Non-Load Bearing Wall

Shared Space to Living Room Threshold

Gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing (purlin) French doors

corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panels 2x2 timber framing (purlin) gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing (purlin)

corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panels bug screening at roof cavity 2x8 blocking gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing (purlin)

soft-board ceiling fixed to subframing to be painted concrete lintel wooden door frame

bug screening behind vent operable louver 3m overhang

1,500mm steel window frame leveling grout brick drip shelf rowlock

garden: 2.7m edge of garden soldier course trench: 0.8m

interior wall height 28 bricks 3m

114

115


Operable Table Aperture

Details

Foundation and 2-Wythe Wall Assembly

Kitchen and Central Space Interaction

central khonde #,#m

kitchen #,#m

1. Brick Dimensions Typical brick dimension 230mm x 100mm x 70mm 2. Wire Mesh Reinforcing Recommended to be layed every fifth course 3. Finish Plaster Recommended to be 20mm-50mm in thickness

gum pole 100mm 2x2 timber framing

corrugated metal roofing insulated sandwich panel

4. Mortar Joint Thickness The recommended joint thickness is 20mm

2x2 timber framing

steel barndoor wheel steel barndoor wheel track

gum pole purlin 100mm

steel barndoor hanger slatted wood barndoor

2x2 timber framing

bolt lock 90*-stop door hinge slatted wood panel

softboard ceiling fixed to subframing to be painted

stainless steel i-bolt, 5mm dia.

1. BRICK DIMENSIONSthe typical dimension of brick is 200mm x 100mm x 70 mm

tile floor concrete slab

2. WIRE MESH REINFORCINGrecommended to be layed in every fifth course

wire mesh reinforcing

3. FINISH PLASTERrecommended to be 20-50 mm in thickness

reinforced concrete lintel

4. MORTAR JOINT THICKNESSthe recommended joint thickness is 20mm

damp proofing (DPM) sand blinding

stainless steel j-bolt, 5mm dia. nylon marine-grade cord, or stainless steel chain counterweight, max. 5kg or 1/2 weight of wood panel if cord, aluminum tie-down cleat; if chain, chain hook pre-cast concrete sill

finish plaster 20mm-50mm

wire mesh reinforcing

gravel and brick rubble min 150mm thick Finishplaster plaster finish 20mm-50mm 20mm-50mm Wire mesh wire mesh reinforcing reinforcing

20cm

10cm

OPERABLE TABLE APERTURE

20cm

KITCHEN: KITCHEN AND CENTRAL KHONDE INTERACTION

50cm

116

TYPICAL 2 WYTHE WALL ASSEMBLY

11_20_13

117


Details

Details

Steel Window and Door Hardware

2-Wythe, Non-Load Bearing Wall Connection

Steel anchors secure the window frame to the wall construction Window type 1 - 925cm height

convective zone for warm air venting

Window Type 2- 1,500cm height

Two-wythe brick 2 wythe brick 2 wythe brick 1 wythe brick 1 wythe brick concrete Concretelintel lintel concrete lintel

air cooled by conduction w/ earth

cross-ventilated zone for cool air intake

Glazing and silicone insert

One-wythe brick

Steel angle

steel angle steel angle

1m

4m

1.3m

2m

2m

.8m

.5m

overhang

living room

hallway

eating area

kitchen

pantry

overhang

Window sill

OR CONNECTION DETAIL CONNECTION DETAIL

118

11_20_13 11_20_13

119


Details

Details

2-Wythe, Non-Load Bearing Wall Connection

Brick Pier Roof Connection

Roof tie Corrugated roof and insulation sandwich panel

Corrugated roof / insulation Sandwich panel 100mm gumpole

Bug screening

2x2 nominal framing

2x8 nominal framing

100mm gumpole 2x2 nominal framing

2 WYTHE BRICK ROOF CONNECTION DETAIL

120

11_20_13

121


Process

122

123


2

The Africa Studio Design to build: Housing for the Malamulo Hospital

The intent of my design addresses the dichotomy between Western standards of comfort and Malawian cultural tradition. Malawian cultural tradition is the “group” over the individual. This can be seen particularly through community kitchens, which I incorporate into my design. It was crucial, during this schematic design phase, to respond to user comfort, respond to vernacular customs, and respond to climate. I responded to user comfort by making three subsequent zones throughout progression of the site in which the doctors could choose their personal level of comfort, these zones are either private, semi-private, or communal spaces. By separating the living and cooking spaces, my design directly responds to vernacular customs. By incorporating a partially submerged strategy into my design, the living area becomes secondary and partially hidden, which proclaims the kitchen as the hearth of very day life. Simultaneously, this strategy forces my design to acknowledge sustainable practices by optimizing passive sustainable systems such as using earth as geothermal energy, a manual rain water collection cistern system, and clerestory windows.

DESIGNED TO BUILD:

HOUSING FOR THE MALAMULO HOSPITAL NE INTRODUCTION In a new country, with new people, culture, and customs, visiting medical staff members need to establish a sense of home in which they can rest their bodies and minds. When people engage in a multi-sensory experience- little moments where they connect strongly with their surroundings, they will establish a psychological connection to place. Memories will form and begin to create a sense of place, unique to each user. As staff members spend time in community with one another and alone in their own space, the memories they create and the moments of space within the site will invoke a sense of peace that will be especially important as they are burdened with tough days at the hospital. Established with an efficient use of space and materials, these moments harness the beauty of the site, as well as a gradient of seperation that facilitates retreat for those seeking a physical and mental break.

50

SE

Winter

74

Spr/Aut

98

Summer Aerial Site Views

-1.23m

PRIVACY Varying degrees of privacy throughout the site and in the homes encourage a balance of togetherness and comtemplative isolation. Space allows the staff to invite the community in for a meal, but it also enables solitude. In-between spaces, like the indoor living space and covered porches, buffer the threshold between solitude and society as they facilitate smaller gatherings of friends and family. Moments around the site allow individuals to rest- a staircase leads down the hill to a bench in the shade of the mango tree and bamboo screens on small-scaled porches provide covered outdoor space for one or two people. The visiting staff will need solitude to build new relationships, rest to work hard, and a home to break out of their comfort. This proposal aims to take care of its inhabitants, equipping them to make a difference.

Site Plan

Hospital Cooridor

Community Market

Communal Kitchen

North/South Section

University of Malawi Terraced Garden

2

= 16 m 2

= 7m

4

SUMMER WIND

1 2

WINTER WIND

3

5 2

3

STORMWATER DRAINAGE

3

5m CONTAINED BAMBOO GROWTH

4

6 TO HOSPITAL

PUBLIC SPACE INTERSECTS PRIVATE

2

6

4m

2m

5

PLAN NOT TO SCALE

3.5m

A PLACE TO STORE YOUR THINGS AND DISPLAY YOUR PHOTOS

SUMMER SUN

WINTER SUN

SITE ENTRY

1

EAT TOGETHER UNDER THE GUM POLE CANOPY

MASTER BEDROOM

2

BEDROOM

3

LIVING ROOM

4

KITCHEN

5

PORCH

VENTILATION GRADIENT OF PRIVACY WITHIN EACH HOME

2

= 10 m

5

WATER COLLECTION

Consolidating into two units fosters community, but it also opens up spaces for individuals seeking solace in stillness. It forms nooks and crannies for one person with a book, a few people picking and eating fruit together, and impromptu late night conversations.

2

= 7m

The Africa Studio

1 ANTICIPATED DENSITY OF PEOPLE ON SITE

COMMUNITY In this proposal, each building houses two units that share one kitchen. Shared cooking and eating space enables community and relieves tasks as duties may be split or shared. Combining a two-bedroom unit with a one-bedroom unit encourages a more interesting mix of inhabitants. An older doctor may prefer her own one-bedroom; a young family may reside in a two-bedroom. In the neighboring building, there may be four single young doctors. When they come together under the gum pole pergola with other internationals and Malawians alike, a diversity of stories may be shared in one experience.

= 15 m2 Existing Hospital Housing

NORTH

3.5m

1

2.5m

Initial Competition

4

5 SECTION 1:50

2

= 18 m

2

= 21 m East/West Section Final Product

1

Cultural Response

Climatic Response

Reevaluated Program

Minimizing Unnecessary Area

ALONE TO WRITE 3 SIT IN A JOURNAL

PLAY SOCCER WITH KIDS

2 FROM THE COMMUNITY

2D to 3D idea transformation

THOMAS ROBERT FRANK

AFRICA STUDIO: HOUSING FOR THE MALAMULO HOSPITAL

Program Organization

TAKE A NAP IN THE SHADE

1

Competition TAKE A BREAK TO EAT

4 FRUIT IN THE GARDEN

NE WINDS PASSIVE VENTILATION

KITCHEN

Malamulo Hospital in Malawi faces complex political and cultural issues such as poverty, healthcare and the integration of the hospital employees to the local community. The hospital is within reach of an estimated 129,000 Malawians thus it offers a variety of services to treat a wide range of illnesses and procedures that patients are in need of. Employees of the hospital come from a diversity of backgrounds such as African, American and European just to name a few. Western doctors often experience frustrations with access to adequate technology and resources and integration with the local community.

NORTH

LIVING SPACE

The design aims to create a comfortable, affordable housing capable of being constructed by and coexisting with the indigenous population. Comfort will be dependent on environmental consideration, accessibility to privacy, and aesthetics. Environmental comfort is addressed in building orientation and passive shading strategies. There are various levels of privacy to the site and home which allow for the doctors to be as social or private as they please. The construction of the building falls within the building culture of Malawi through simple brick construction with a timber and corrugated iron roof. Coexistence with the indigenous population is established in vernacular building methods and materials but to reinforce this connection while addressing comfort for the doctors I have considered the spatial layout and the cour of the home. Folkers states that the cour of the African home is often seen as the exterior area of the home between the kitchen and the bedrooms. In the design this is an interior living room with very transparent edges to feel as though it is not an interior space.

PAVILION MOMENT DIAGRAM

BED

BATH

M. BED

BATH

SITE DRAINAGE

SE WINDS PASSIVE VENTILATION

BUILDING B PROGRAM PRIVACY LEVELS

PAVILION

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

BUILDING B

BUILDING A PASSIVE VENTILATION DIAGRAM

MALAWIAN CORE IS THE EXTERIOR SPACE BETWEEN THE KITCHEN AND THE BEDROOMS. TYPICALLY, MALAWIANS ONLY GO INDOORS TO COOK AND TO SLEEP. GENERALLY THE KITCHEN IS SEPARATED BECAUSE OF THE HEAT THAT IS PRODUCED DURING THE PREPARATION OF THE MEAL.

IN WESTERN CULTURE, THE KITCHEN IN OFTEN THOUGHJT OF AS THE HEART OF THE HOME. TYPICALLY FAMILIES AND FRIENDS GATHER IN THIS SPACE WHILE THE FOOD IS COOKING, CONVERSING WHILE WAITING TO EAT THE MEAL.

THE INTENT IS TO MAKE THE BUILDING REFLECTIVE OF BOTH CULTURES AND COEXIST SIMULTANEOUSLY. THE HEART OF THE HOME WILL BE A MEDIUM SIZED LIVING ROOM WITH TRANSPARENT EDGES TO FEEL AS THOUGH YOU ARE OUTSIDE YET GRANTING A LEVEL OF HOME COMFORT TO THE DOCTORS.

NORTH

FLOOR PLAN BUILDING A

HOT WET HUMID SUMMERS COOL DRY WINTERS

SITE PLAN

SECTION CUT BUILDING A

1/4”=1’

NORTH EASTERN SUMMER WINS

PASSIVE SOLAR SHADING

SOUTH EASTERN WINTER WINS

SITE PLAN

2

1/4”=1’

SECTION BUILDING B

1/4”=1’

1. Living Room (32 m2) 2. Kitchen (7 m2) 3. Master Bedroom (13 m2) 4. Bedroom (11 m2) 5. Outdoor Leisure (18 m2) 6. Outdoor Workspace (20 m2) 7. Bathroom (4 m2) 8. Community Area

the goal of this project was to design housing that creates a gradient between public, semipublic, and private spaces. also the housing should be customizable and the user could potentially expand. while accomplishing all of these factors, it is necessary to respond to the climactic conditions of the site and think about different ways to passively cool the building.

DESIGN TO BUILD:

HOUSING FOR MALAMULO HOSPITAL site and conditions:

character scenarios:

orientation: due to the sun angles and lack of vegetation, anything facing northwest will be under harsh heat during the later hours of the day

Individual-

rainwater harvesting

water drainage

public vs. private

structure grid

garden spaces

cross ventilation: Lake Malawi and Indian Ocean provide winds that come from the eastward direction and wind speed increases during hot months

Isolation Personal Space Oasis Comfort

transverse section 1/8” - 1’-0”

chimney effect: the average monthly temperature tells us that passive cooling strategies like trapping or pushing hot air up will be effective for most of the year natural daylight: thin walls with a thick roof are the desirable conditions to block the sun which shines relatively overhead because Malawi is so close to the equator

Close Relationship-

layout: an open layout is the best way to achieve most passive strategies considering that air circulation is of a priority concern

Intimate Duality Trust Companion

temperature (°C) wind speed (M/S) rainfall (MM)

site plan 1/16” - 1’-0”

equator

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec. 24.09 23.82 23.53 22.63 21.41 19.83 19.98 21.95 25.21 26.57 26.43 24.86 4.21 4.03 4.28 4.1 4.33 4.55 4.95 5.11 5.58 5.84 5.89 4.85 208 184 151 52 13 8 8 4 4 30 90 188

Two passive strategies are prevalent in my design, the first is controlling the sun, and the other is harvesting the wind. To handle the sun I placed the temporary programs, the linen closet and bathrooms, on the northwest side of each building which would essentially acting as a barrier between the heat from the sun and the rest of the spaces. Another way in which the building is passively cooled is through cross-ventilation. The form responds to the eastward winds by utilizing both negative and positive pressure to force fresh air through the building when the openings are used properly.

14:00 17:00

Close FriendshipRelax Fun Movement Entertain

91° 90°

project development:

summer: 98° equinox: 74° winter: 50°

11:00 8:00

86°

cross ventilation

considering the climate, it was important to understand how wind flows through the building. cross ventilation helps passively cool the building, thus creating a comfortable space

79°

N

solar paths / angles

when designing this set of housing, it was necessary to understand solar angles and paths. since the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, i chose to keep the bedrooms on the eastern side of the house. this would help the bedroom stay cool at night. also the over hangs on the roofs and trellis help passively cool the building as well.

food production

in each house there is an option to produce your own garden. i wanted there to be a connection between the kitchen and garden.

public, semi-public, and private spaces

a main concern for international doctors is having their own private comfort space. i wanted to ensure that while still having that area all to themselves i wanted there to be interaction between the doctors and community members in order to enrich everyone’s experience. by creating a gradient of these spaces the user has an option to control their privacy level.

rainwater

to respond to rainwater, i plan to have a cistern at the bottom of each hill that collects water and uses the greywater for the toilets, and to irrigate the gardens.

malleability

when designing this housing, i wanted their to be options for the user to decide on their housing. they can chose how many bedrooms they want and what kind of garden they want; this also presents an opportunity to allow for growth. if the user decides to expand their housing during their stay, then it is easy to do so.

Near AssociatesSimilarities Broad Work Casual

began by addressing duplex units

grouped and separated kitchens and living area

engaged site by establishing public and private

climatic response to wind harvesting for cross ventilation

climatic response to sun and also engage exterior spaces

create spaces relatable for the character scenarios

Communal ActivityGeneric Positive Neighborly Generous

124

The big focus for my project is to establish a comfortable relationship between exterior and interior spaces from both a Northerner’s perspective and a Malawian’s perspective. In the traditional setting, if a Northerner is doing nothing, they are going to inherently reside indoors until they decide to do something or move outside; if a Malawian is doing nothing, they are going to inherently be outside until they choose to go in for something. I believe that finding the medium ground between exterior and interior space is essential to figuring out a comfortable format for this housing project. The major move I used to help achieve this was separating the kitchen out from the rest of the house; doing so provides much less square footage from combining spaces, breaking the spaces down into smaller areas creates more thermally comfortable areas, engages the beautiful outdoors that Malawi has to offer, and also creates a potential for a co-op scenario. Traditional Northerner:

Traditional Malawian:

Project:

need personal space want view open concept layout cool tempurature community space

separate kitchen brick exterior porch opportunity for garden open layout

In order for this project to be successful my design will establish a transparent relationship between the exterior and interior spaces where both parties, Northerner’s and Malawian’s, have comfortable spaces on both sides of the spectrum from personal space to public space. Each house has 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, a laundry room and then a living space which has a fridge and some counter space for any snack or refreshment; then a community kitchen is shared equipped with all the utilities needed for a kitchen, plenty of seating and an area designated for cleaning dishes.

plan longitudinal section 1/8” - 1’-0”

site section

climate response

section

125


Initial Competition What did we extract individually? SITE PLAN

PROGRESSION FROM PRIVATE TO PUBLIC SPACE

FLOOR PLAN 1/8”=1’-0”

GARDEN PERSPECTIVE

HOT SEASON WIND BEDROOM

PRIVATE SPACE

CLEANING/ LAUNDRY

SEMI-PRIVATE SPACE

CLEANING/ LAUNDRY

BATHROOM

PUBLIC SPACE

BEDROOM

LIVING SPACE KITCHEN

Nhan Lieu

BATHROOM

Natasha A. Trice

LIVING SPACE KITCHEN

COURTYARD

GARDEN

N

LIVING SPACE KITCHEN

SMALL BEDROOM

WATER TANK HOUSINGS

BEDROOM As the housing was designed for the doctors or medical students that come from the city, the design proposed a progression of publicity that help the user to easily adapt to the new rural environment of Makwasa. The design included four unit of housings, surrounded an open-courtyard. Each units have a master bedroom with bath, one to two small bedrooms, a common bathroom, a living space with kitchen, and an outdoor cleaning/ laundry area. In the order of usage, the users will rst experience the comfort private bedroom; then a semi-private shared living space/ kitchen. After getting familiar with the environment, the users was encouraged to start interact with the community by using the active courtyard with the shaded “buffer zones.”

LIVING SPACE KITCHEN

BATHROOM BEDROOM

cases

Malawian Community

COURTYARD PERSPECTIVE

cour

Nicole Boris

cases

cases cases

Michael Rothman

126

Outdoor Lifestyle Sense of Community

Program Organization

NHAN LIEU DESIGN 9 - FALL 2013 09/13/2013 PROFESSOR HARNISH

Cultural Response

BEDROOM CLEANING/ LAUNDRY

BATHROOM TRASH AREA

BEDROOM CLEANING/ LAUNDRY

In order to deal with all the natural hazard that usually happen in Malawi, such as drought and ood, several passive sustainable strategies were proposed. Clerestory windows were suggested with an angled-roof that allow more heat rise from the housing in the hot season and more sunlight in the cold season. As the site was located on a steep hill, stepped garden was used a strategy for water management: it allow more water captured in the drought season. Moreover, water tanks were proposed on-site to help capture more rain water, directly from the gutters. Most of the window opening facing north east, which allow for cross ventilation. Bedrooms were planned in the corner of the unit to gain maximum cross ventilation in the private area. Considering the Malawian culture, the design suggest outdoor laundry area; and the kitchen spaces were placed around the courtyard with direct connection which allow for cultural outdoor cooking as well.

cases

LIVING SPACE

ate Priv SECTION

Private

ublic

DESIGN TO BUILD: MALAMULO HOSPITAL HOUSING

Semi-P

Public Community Garden

Private

Space

Marian Jony

lic

Semi-Pub Dining

Fatema Kanji

127


frustrations with access to adequate technology and resources and integration with the local community.

LIVING SPACE

e of being constructed by and coexisting with the deration, accessibility to privacy, and aesthetics. hading strategies. There are various levels of privacy as they please. The construction of the building falls a timber and corrugated iron roof. Coexistence with the materials but to reinforce this connection while addressing f the home. Folkers states that the cour of the African and the bedrooms. In the design this is an interior living ce.

ouses two units that share one kitchen. Shared es community and relieves tasks as duties may two-bedroom unit with a one-bedroom unit BED mix of inhabitants. An older doctor may prefer M. BED family may reside in a two-bedroom. In the y be four single young doctors. When they pole pergola with other internationals and BUILDING B PROGRAM ories may be shared in one experience.

PUBLIC SPACE INTERSECTS PRIVATE

What did we extract individually?

PRIVACY LEVELS

PAVILION

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

BED

BATH

M. BED

BATH

SE WINDS PASSIVE VENTILATION

SE WINDS PASSIVE VENTILATION

MALAWIAN CORE IS THE EXTERIOR SPACE BETWEEN THE KITCHEN AND THE BEDROOMS. TYPICALLY, MALAWIANS ONLY GO INDOORS TO COOK AND TO SLEEP. GENERALLY THE KITCHEN IS SEPARATED BECAUSE OF THE HEAT THAT IS PRODUCED DURING THE PREPARATION OF THE MEAL.

IN WESTERN CULTURE, THE KITCHEN IN OFTEN THOUGHJT OF AS THE HEART OF THE HOME. TYPICALLY FAMILIES AND FRIENDS GATHER IN THIS SPACE WHILE THE FOOD IS COOKING, CONVERSING WHILE WAITING TO EAT THE MEAL.

THE INTENT IS TO MAKE THE BUILDING REFLECTIVE OF BOTH CULTURES AND COEXIST SIMULTANEOUSLY. THE HEART OF THE HOME WILL BE A MEDIUM SIZED LIVING ROOM WITH TRANSPARENT EDGES TO FEEL AS THOUGH YOU ARE OUTSIDE YET GRANTING NORTH A LEVEL OF HOME COMFORT TO THE DOCTORS.

EAT TOGETHER PRIVACY LEVELS

UNDER THE GUM POLE CANOPY

6

BUILDING B

BUILDING A

BUILDING A PASSIVE VENTILATION DIAGRAM

GRADIENT OF PRIVACY WITHIN EACH HOME

1/4”=1’

VENTILATION

NORTH

PASSIVE VENTILATION DIAGRAM

FLOOR PLAN BUILDING A FLOOR PLAN BUILDING A

WINTER S

SITE ENTRY

SITE DRAINAGE

PAVILION

BUILDING B

HE INTENT IS TO MAKE THE BUILDING REFLECTIVE OF BOTH ULTURES AND COEXIST SIMULTANEOUSLY. THE HEART F THE HOME WILL BE A MEDIUM SIZED LIVING ROOM WITH RANSPARENT EDGES TO FEEL AS THOUGH YOU ARE OUTSIDE ET GRANTING A LEVEL OF HOME COMFORT TO THE DOCTORS.

PAVILION MOMENT DIAGRAM

BUILDING B PROGRAM

BATH

TO HOSPITAL

NORTH

Private

ters community, but it also opens Trapp up spaces for David lness. It forms nooks and crannies for one le picking and eating fruit together, and ons.

BATH

NE WINDS PASSIVE VENTILATION

LIVING SPACE

Private

Initial Competition

atients are in need of. Employees of the hospital come ust to name a few. Western doctors often experience ation with the local community.

The design aims to create a comfortable, affordable housing capable of being constructed by and coexisting with the indigenous population. Comfort will be dependent on environmental consideration, accessibility to privacy, and aesthetics. Environmental comfort is addressed in building orientation and passive shading strategies. There are various levels of privacy to the site and home which allow for the doctors to be as social or private as they please. The construction of the building falls within the building culture of Malawi through simple brick construction with a timber and corrugated iron roof. Coexistence with the indigenous population is established in vernacular building methods and materials but to reinforce this connection while addressing PAVILION MOMENT DIAGRAM SITE DRAINAGE comfort for the doctors I have considered the spatial layout and the cour of the home. Folkers states that the cour of the African home is often seen as the exterior area of the home between the kitchen and the bedrooms. In the design this is an interior living room with very transparent edges to feel as though it is not an interior space.

Shared

of their comfort. This proposal aims to take care KITCHEN ues such as poverty, healthcare and the integration of h of an 129,000 thus it offers a m toestimated make a Malawians difference.

1/4”=1’

PASSIVE SOLAR SHADING

PASSIVE SOLAR SHADING

Thomas Frank PLAY SOCCER WITH KIDS

2 FROM THE COMMUNITY

HOT WET HUMID SUMMERS COOL DRY WINTERS

SITE PLAN

NORTH EASTERN SUMMER WINS

SECTION CUT BUILDING A

HOT WET HUMID SUMMERS COOL DRY WINTERS

SOUTH EASTERN WINTER WINS

1/4”=1’

SECTION BUILDING B

1/4”=1’

NORTH EASTERN SUMMER WINS

SOUTH EASTERN WINTER WINS

SITE PLAN

SECTION BUILDING B

1/4”=1’

What is home when you’re thousands of miles away from it? The definition of “home” is nebulous at best and varies from person to person and culture to culture. And yet, home is one of the most fundamental pillars in our lives; it’s where we keep all of our familiarities, our memories, the details of our lives that make us human. Without “home,” we are lost. When two very distinct cultures intersect, as is the case at Malamulo, this unsettling realization can become oppressive and fatiguing. With the stress of running a busy hospital already omnipresent, home is what we need to keep doctors happy and patients healthy.

Eike Maas

So, how can we find home or make one where the West and Africa meet? It begins with understanding the humane details of how people destress, interact, and open their minds to one another. 1. Malawian culture and Western cultures are different... but some things unite us all. Community spaces allow everyone to intermingle, make friends out of acquaintances, and escape the stresses of the hospital by socializing in both new and familiar ways. 2. Family can be both those related by genetics and those related by good will, and at the end of the day family is a way to escape the struggles of adapting to a new culture, a new climate by feeling comfortable and at home.

Community

community.1

Community forms around sharing experiences that push the boundaries of our knowledge, ethics, and familiar ways of living. Spaces where people are pushed from their comfort zones in exciting ways are spaces that provoke this bond. Gardens and a terrace open to the neighbors and an open front lawn abutting the main footpath encourage people to say hello, mingle, share meals and share lives.

Family

Solitude

family. family.

Encounterswith withfamily family&&friends friendshappen happenininaavariety varietyofofspaces spacesthroughout throughoutthe thesite site Encounters 22 and andhome. home.Porches Porcheswith withelongated elongatedroof roofoverhangs overhangsprovide provideareas areasfor forpeople peopletotocongregate congregate

outdoorsininthe theshade shadeand andfeel feelatathome homewhile whilestill stillbeing beingpart partofofthe thebigger biggerpicture. picture.Indoors, Indoors, outdoors open-plannedkitchen/living kitchen/livingrooms roomswith withclerestory clerestorylighting lightingand andventilation ventilationprovide providecool, cool, open-planned coveredspaces spacesfor forspending spendingtime timeaway awayfrom fromthe thehustle hustleand andbustle bustleofofthe theunfamiliar. unfamiliar. covered

self.33 self.

Timealone alonecan canbe befound foundout outon onthe thegrounds groundswhile whilegardening gardeningorortaking taking Time walk,but butalso alsounder undercover coverfrom fromthe theelements elementsininsmall smallporches porchesadjacent adjacent aawalk, eachbedroom. bedroom.AAscreened screenedwall wallseparates separatesthese thesespaces spacesfrom fromcommunal communal totoeach areasand andan anopen openvista vistaofofthe thevalley valleyand andmountains mountainsprovides providesaabeautiful beautiful areas backdroptotoquietude. quietude. backdrop

3. Sometimes it’s important to have time alone... time to ponder, grieve, nap or read. A mindful solitude can be the most enveloping escape of them all, and being able to find personal space is vital to finding a long-term home. By carefully planning for these types of events and interactions, we can create an environment in which home happens.

128

Relax... it’s just

129


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 1: Students’ Housing 2N Trice, Boris

Design to build: Housing for 2N Phasing

Site: 16°10'9.03"S

/ 35° 6'27.10"E

Elevation Options Matrix

Exsisting Duplexes

Communal

$

7m 2

14m

6m

2

5m

4m

_

11m

Aerial Perspetcive 2

2m

3m

Program Organization

2m

2

7m

10m

2

11m

5m

2

2

Phase 1

2

Aerial View - Site in Context

Guiding Principles

Design Intent

$5,625 Bed Unit

14 x

$80k $60k

35775K

$24,525 Communal Unit

$40k $20k

$10k 2

5m

3m

Duplexes

Proposal

Phasing Comparison

2

16m

Kitchen Elevation

16 x

$120k

$30k

24m

$5,625 Bed Unit

$100k

$40k

$20k

2m

2

2

$140k

$50k

2

131m

84m 2 2

2

$180k $160k

2

17 m

2

front

80k $70k $60k

4m

The intent of this project is to design vernacular architecture that is self-sustainable, meets the needs of Malamulos medicals students and the clients, and co-exsist within the local Malawian community.

$

Comparative Case Study

Six person equivalent

Price per Phase

*Cont.

back

50

Winter

74

Spr/Aut

98

Summer

Rainwater Capture Collect and tilize rainwater on site for potable water and irrigation

$90k $80k

Systems are located facing the extents of the site- forcing a uniform water collection system

$70k

$22,500 1/2 Duplex

$60k

$242.00

$238.00

$50k

$3.50

45000K

$22,500 1/2 Duplex

$40k $30k $20k

NE

Concept

SE

Phasing

Vegetation

Path to Hospital

Dinning and kitchen are shared among 6 residents and promotes a cummunal aesthetic

Incorporating local vegetation and gardens

NW Views

$10k

Circulation is central to create a cohesive community

Price to bed Ratio Price per Sq Meter

Site Solutions

Uncovered circulation connects all housing on site

Phase 2

Energy 6x

Maximize day lighting and minimize electricity use with sustainable techniques

Proposed housing is suitable for 6 residents. Plumbing located facing the edges of the site to hide from inward faced buildings

Porch Elevation

Innovation Understanding local materials and practices to develop innovative solutions

Private

Sustinability Diagrams

Comfort

N

Balancing the expectation of user, including independence and privacy, with integrating communal feel, and thermal comfort of people living there

Cistern & Sturcture Axon

Efficiency Making the community self sufficient by incorporating efficient systems to the units as a whole

Pergola

Phase 3

Site Plan

Entry

Circulation

Communal Unit

Bedroom Elevation

130

131


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 1: Students’ Housing 2N Trice, Boris

This housing proposal cuts down on size compared to the duplex, while providing compact and functional space. One bedroom unit is for 2 people, who share a bathroom. The communal unit includes a kitchen, dining room, and lounge space for 6 people. A phasing plan suggests that it would be cheaper in the long run for the clients to initially build one bedroom unit and one communal space. The other bedroom units could be added over time as funding becomes available.

Phase 1

+

Phase 2

Dinning and kitchen are shared among 6 residents and promotes a cummunal aesthetic

Uncovered circulation connects all housing on site

6x

Proposed housing is suitable for 6 residents. Plumbing located facing the edges of the site to hide from inward faced buildings

Phase 3 132

133


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 2: Students’ Housing FN Kanji, Lieu

SUMMER: 98°

EQUINOX: 74° WINTER: 50°

Shading and Passive Cooling Techniques The solar systems we incorporated into the design of this project includes the overhang roof and the bamboo screening. The overhang provides shade which helps keep the building cool. The bamboo screen helps diffuse the light.

1. Living Room / Kitchen 2. Bedroom 3. Bathroom 4. Community Area

Septic Systems The septic tank we’ve incorporated collects all the waste in a septic unit, where the water gets clean, then the water gets disperesed from the distribution box through the absorption tubes into the site.

Natural Ventilation The way we incorporated cross ventilation, was through our fenestration. The window location helps the wind move throughout the space. In the bathrooms we wanted to incorporate transom and clerestory windows to help with the ventilation in that space as well.

Rainwater and Greywater Capture Cistern Our cistern system collects the rainwater that goes to the rain garden, that water is used to flush the toilets in our housing unit. Jojo Tanks The jojo tanks we have incorporated, collect the roof run-off and connect to the sinks.

1 bedroom

1 person per room

10 m2

$1000

floor plan 1/8” - 1’-0”

proposed housing v. duplex the duplex is both expensive and inefficient.

$160,000.00

DESIGN CONCEPTS: The main things we wanted to tackle while we were designing this project are:

USER

3. Systems and Context Sustainabilty is important, this housing complex basically needs to be completely off the grid, how do we respond to that, and what systems can we incorporate? Another important concept is to think about how this housing unit coexists with the other buildings in the area.

COMMUNITY

2. Comfort To resond to comfort, we want to understand the user and what they need. They’re young, single, and social people so how do we design a space geared towards that? We also wanted to think of different ways to encourage the students to stay for longer periods of time. Also we want to think of thermal comfort.

$50,000.00

$140,000.00

GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1. Vernacular Context We wanted to find a way to incorporate some of the Malawian culture through agriculture and vegetation. This could potentially help support the local ecology. We wanted to get a good grasp of the climate of the site. Also we wanted to understand the existing population as well as vernacular building technology, building program, and materials.

$45,000.00

site plan 1/16” - 1’-0”

$120,000.00

$40,000.00

$100,000.00

$35,000.00

Cost per Bedroom

CLIENT

2. Comfort In order to encourage people to stay for longer periods of time, how do we make them feel comfortable? It is important to think of different social interactions the students will face. Security and thermal comfort is also important to think about.

site pictures

Total Cost

1. Budget: The client has an unpredictable budget, they never know how much money they have that they can fully spend on a project. How can we find away to make this construction as cost efficient as possible? Along with that how do we make this project easy to maintain?

$80,000.00 $60,000.00

3. Passive System We want to find ways to passively resolve the issues of ventilation, shading, day-lighting, and vegetation

$30,000.00 $25,000.00 $20,000.00 $15,000.00

$40,000.00

$10,000.00 $20,000.00

$5,000.00

$1

4. Active Systems Active systems we really want to focus on rainwater collection and management. So how we resolve storm run-off, roof run-off, and ground run-off. We also wanted to consider where we could use cisterns or jojo tanks in order to collect water for the housing unit

2

3

4

5

6

7

Number of Student

8

9

10

11

12

$-

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Number of Student

duplex v. proposed housing

5. Innovation As for innovation, we wanted to find ways to incorporate the local materials in creative ways. Along the same lines, we wanted to think of different construction methods that would be easy for the locals to understand and build, and they need to be easy to maintain. Lastly, and most importantly we want to find ways to make all of these methods cost effective.

cost analysis

east elevation 1/8” - 1’-0” wall section 3/4” - 1’-0”

134

short section 1/8” - 1’-0”

bamboo screen detail connection

135


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 2: Students’ Housing FN Kanji, Lieu

This scheme studies the idea of phasing, which was instrumental in trying to create an innovative strategy to make this design costeffective. Each unit starts off with three bedrooms, one bathroom, and one kitchen and living area. One bedroom unit would house one person, and then there would be three people per bathroom. The completed project would have six bedrooms per complex. An optional phase includes an outdoor pavilion that can be used as a communal gathering space. Because the project is built in phases it increases the cost-efficiency of the project. The largest cost would be the initial construction, adding the additional bedrooms would not be as large of a cost.

136

137


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 3: Doctors’ Housing FMS Frank, Maas, Saiz

gum pole purlin 100mm grout fill to roofing (a vernacular building method)

gum pole truss 250mm

wood plank under gum poles (2x8) 50mm x 200mm

corrugated metal roofing

steel tie-down wood to brick aluminum gutter

steel ventilation grate

pre-cast concrete lintel 50mm x 200mm

gum pole 200mm

metal window casing

COMMUNAL INTERACTION

INTIMATE BENCH

2,500Lt JoJo tank window frame

window

leveling grout brick drip shelf soldier course 2-BEDROOM HOUSE

rubber moisture barrier

finish plaster 20mm - 50mm

3-BEDROOM HOUSE

Bedrooms:

2

Bathrooms:

1

Accomodates: 2 - 4 individuals (bedrooms may be either shared or contain a large bed for 1 or 2 people)

concrete screed floor 100mm thick

wire mesh reinforcing metal mesh reinforcing moisture barrier

tile floor

Total Area: Interior: Exterior:

71.5 sq m 60.5 sq m (%) 11 sq m (%)

Program Use Private Space: Social Space: Interior: Exterior: Communal Space: Utility:

23.6 sq m (%) 29.6 sq m (%) 23.9 sq m 5.7 sq m 5.3 sq m 13 sq m (%)

Bedrooms:

3

Bathrooms:

2

Accomodates: 3-5 individuals (2 of the bedrooms may be either shared or contain a large bed for 1 or 2 people) Total Area: Interior: Exterior: Program Use Private Space: Interior: Exterior: Social Space: Interior: Exterior: Utility:

86.9 sq m 72.9 sq m (%) 14 sq m (%) 41.8 sq m (%)

LIVING / KITCHEN

PICNIC TABLE

35 sq m 6.8 sq m 31.1 sq m (%) 23.9 sq m 7.2 sq m 14.1 sq m (%)

gravel and brick rubble 100mm thick

PRIVATE & SOCIAL SPACE The definition of ‘home’ is nebulous at best and varies across people and cultures. Yet, home is one of the most fundamental pillars in our lives; it’s wherever we keep all of our memories, the details of our lives that make us human. Without ‘home,’ we are lost. When two starkly different cultures with different definitions of ‘home’ intersect, home can be hard to define for both the locals and those just arriving. It can be hard to find or retain a place for familiar habits to exist. This is the case in Malamulo, and with the stress of running a busy hospital already omnipresent, home is what doctors need to stay happy and keep patients healthy. So, how can we find or make home where the West and Africa meet? It begins with understanding the humane details of how people de-stress, interact, and open their minds to one another. By carefully planning for these types of events and interactions, we can create an environment in which ‘home’ happens.

N

SITE PLAN

16°10'9.03"S / 35° 6'27.10"E 10mm = 1m

0

1m

5m

10 m

In order to assure doctors and/or students staying at these houses personal comfort, privacy and sociability are each vital. The residents need a place to escape and find solitude, while at other times opportunities for social interaction. The

organization aims to create social opportunities at a variety of scales. The organizations of entrances and porches allow either greater or lesser opportunities for social encounters depending on location. For example, the houses are grouped in sets of two which have adjacent porches within an 8m distance allowing cross-porch conversation if desired; as well as a more intimate grass area containing a picnic table. The four houses are organized so that more public spaces of each house(front porch, kitchen, and living room) are facing the site’s path entry and the walking path within the site while the more private spaces(bedrooms, bathrooms, and private porch) are located in the back of each house and not visible from walkways. The public and private spaces of each house are clearly divided by a hallway which establishes a barrier which visitors should understand not to enter(or enter for the bathroom and experience privacy). Additionally, there are plans for foliage spaces surrounding each house with suggestions for varying distances and heights for plants against different program uses of the houses in order to create more privacy for certain spaces within the houses.

JoJo

2x wythe foundation wall 1000mm in height

DETAIL SECTION 100mm = 1m

social porch

planting bed

2,6 m

0,5 m

neightborhood circulation __ m

FLOOR PLANS

2-bedroom & 3-bedroom houses 15mm = 1m

138

garden / trench system

kitchen

3,0 m

4,0 m

hallway 1,6 m

bathroom

garden / JoJo

2,2 m

2,4 m

SECTION 25mm = 1m

139


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 3: Doctors’ Housing FMS Frank, Maas, Saiz

In order to assure doctors and/or students staying at these houses personal comfort, privacy and sociability are each vital. The residents need a place to escape and find solitude, while at other times opportunities for social interaction. The organization aims to create social opportunities at a variety of scales. The organizations of entrances and porches allow either greater or lesser opportunities for social encounters depending on location. For example, the houses are grouped in sets of two which have adjacent porches within an 8m distance allowing cross-porch conversation if desired; as well as a more intimate grass area containing a picnic table. The four houses are organized so that more public spaces of each house(front porch, kitchen, and living room) are facing the site’s path entry and the walking path within the site while the more private spaces(bedrooms, bathrooms, and private porch) are located in the back of each house and not visible from walkways. The public and private spaces of each house are clearly divided by a hallway which establishes a barrier which visitors should understand not to enter(or enter for the bathroom and experience privacy). Additionally, there are plans for foliage spaces surrounding each house with suggestions for varying distances and heights for plants against different program uses of the houses in order to create more privacy for certain spaces within the houses. PRIVATE & SOCIAL SPACE The definition of ‘home’ is nebulous at best and varies across people and cultures. Yet, home is one of the most fundamental pillars in our lives; it’s wherever we keep all of our memories, the details of our lives that make us human. Without ‘home,’ we are lost. When two starkly different cultures with different definitions of ‘home’ intersect, home can be hard to define for both the locals and those just arriving. It can be hard to find or retain a place for familiar habits to exist. This is the case in Malamulo, and with the stress of running a busy hospital already omnipresent, home is what doctors need to stay happy and keep patients healthy. So, how can we find or make home where the West and Africa meet? It begins with understanding the humane details of how people de-stress, interact, and open their minds to one another. By carefully planning for these types of events and interactions, we can create an environment in which ‘home’ happens. In order to assure doctors and/or students staying at these houses personal comfort, privacy and sociability are each vital. The residents need a place to escape and find solitude, while at other times opportunities for social interaction. The

140

organization aims to create social opportunities at a variety of scales. The organizations of entrances and porches allow either greater or lesser opportunities for social encounters depending on location. For example, the houses are grouped in sets of two which have adjacent porches within an 8m distance allowing cross-porch conversation if desired; as well as a more intimate grass area containing a picnic table. The four houses are organized so that more public spaces of each house(front porch, kitchen, and living room) are facing the site’s path entry and the walking path within the site while the more private spaces(bedrooms, bathrooms, and private porch) are located in the back of each house and not visible from walkways. The public and private spaces of each house are clearly divided by a hallway which establishes a barrier which visitors should understand not to enter(or enter for the bathroom and experience privacy). Additionally, there are plans for foliage spaces surrounding each house with suggestions for varying distances and heights for plants against different program uses of the houses in order to create more privacy for certain spaces within the houses.

141


Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 4: Doctors’ Housing JRT Jony, Rothman, Trapp

JOJO

JOJO

SITE

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

B U ILD IN G

Situating the housing on the higher, flatter part of the side creates a density for community-building, allows for easier construction, and enables terraced gardens to grow on the north/west facing slope.

3

Drainage and irrigation work with the slope as well, while personal spaces are built in through benches and stairs.

1

2

NG

P R I VATE

GRADIENT OF PRIVACY WITHIN EACH HOME

2

12p m

2

9a m

3

4

SUMME R WI NDS

- Manage rainwater for collection and reuse. - Thermal comfort through air movement and shading.

7

1

3

PLAN 1:100

- Central utilities and integrative systems.

6 2

- Spatial comfort for an individual and a community.

5

4

1 2

- Innovative applications of accessible materials. PROPORTION OF HOUSES LIMITS EXPOSURE TO HARSH WEST LIGHT AND MAXIMIZE EXPOSURE TO HIGH NORTH + SOUTH LIGHT

ANGLE OF NORTH HOUSE INCREASES AIR MOVEMENT ON SITE

T R E N CH E S

1

MASTER BEDROOM

2

BEDROOM

3

LIVING ROOM

4

KITCHEN

5

LAUNDRY

6

PANTRY

7

COVERED PORCH

STACK EFFECT DOUBLE ROOF SYSTEM

M AT ERIA LS

DOUBLE WALL SYSTEM VERTICAL SUN SHADES

COMMUNITY

VENTILATION SYSTEM

AFRICA

DRAI NAG E WI NTE R WI NDS 3pm

SUMME R SUN

MALAWI

SHARED

16 GAUGE CORRUGATED METAL

PRIVATE

S

MALAMULO HOSPITAL

SCREEN PERFORATED BRICK BAMBOO

9a m

METAL MESH BAMBOO

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

16 GAUGE CORRUGATED METAL

16 GAUGE CORRUGATED METAL

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

DOUBLE WYTHE BRICK

30 MM X 20 MM CONCRETE LINTEL

16 GAUGE CORRUGATED METAL

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

WINDOW, TYP.

PRIVATE

LARGE WINDOWS

OPEN

CONCRETE SILL

COMMUNITY GATHERING SMALL GROUP SPACE GARDENS

DOUBLE WYTHE BRICK

REMOVED BRICK

REMOVED BRICK

5m

-

PERFORATED BRICK (SMALL OPENINGS)

SOLID BRICK WITH 3D EFFECT

NORTH

LIVING ROOM

LIVING ROOM

BEDROOM

WEST

10 CM SLAB WITH DRIP EDGE

10 CM SLAB WITH DRIP EDGE

10 CM SLAB WITH DRIP EDGE

BRICK FOUNDATION

BRICK FOUNDATION

BRICK FOUNDATION

BRICK FOUNDATION

2

BEDROOM

C ROSS V E NTILATION

WATE R C OLLE C TION + USE ROOF + JOJO TANKS

DOUBLE ROOF CLERESTORY

OPEN / SEMI - OPEN

BEDROOM 2. 95 X 3. 2

3.5m

3

CR OS S VENT I LAT I ON T H R OU GH S H A R ED S PA CE MOVEMENT T H R OU GH KI T CH EN T O B A CK OF H OU S E VI EW S FOR S H A R ED S PA CE PA NT RY + LA U ND RY CLOS ET EXT R A B ED R OOM + B AT H R OOM

4

BEDRO O MS

K IT C HEN

WALL SECTIONS NOT TO SCALE INDO O R

T H R EE

142

PROGRAM RESPONSE

SITE RESPONSE

BEDROOM 2. 75 X 3. 2

LO UNG E 2. 95 X 4. 1

LO UNG E 2. 95 X 4. 1

BEDROOM 2. 95 X 3. 2

T HIS PRO PO S A L

2 0 ,0 0 0 L JO JO TA N K

91%

FEB R U A RY

100%

MA R C H

100%

A PR IL

67%

MAY

14%

JU N E

-4 1 %

JU LY

-9 6 %

A U G U ST

-1 5 4 %

SEPTEMB ER

-2 2 1 %

O C TO B ER

MA I NTA I N D EFI NI T I ON OF S H A R ED S PA CE I MPR OVE CR OS S VENT I LAT I ON I N KI T CH EN A LL B AT H R OOMS ON NORT H S I D E FOR ENVI R O- LOO T OI LET S

CLIMATIC RESPONSE

KITCHEN 2. 75 X 3. 9

JA N U A RY

SECTION 1:50

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

KITCHEN 2. 75 X 3. 9

O V ERA L L

TWO

ROOF SINGLE ROOF SEMI - OPEN

KITCHEN 2. 75 X 3. 9

4 ,0 0 0 / MO N TH / PER SO N

NORTH

10 CM SLAB WITH DRIP EDGE

1

JOJO

2m

DU PL EX

STEEL BAR TRUSS LAID EVERY 3RD COURSE

PERFORATED BRICK (LARGE OPENINGS)

4m

TWO SINGLE WYTHE BRICK WALLS WITH 10 CM GAP SOUTH

COMMUNITY

REMOVED BRICK

SINGLE WYTHE BRICK

STEEL BAR TRUSS LAID EVERY 3RD COURSE

DOUBLE WYTHE BRICK

WALL

JOJO

DOUBLE WYTHE BRICK

REMOVED BRICK

T W O U NI T S W I T H S H A R ED KI T CH EN / EAT I NG PR OPORT I ONS OPT I MI ZE CR OS S VENT I LAT I ON EA CH R OOM H A S OPENI NGS ON T W O S I D ES

CONCRETE SILL

KITCHEN 2. 75 X 3. 9

ONE

SINGLE WYTHE BRICK

WINDOW, TYP.

VENT

ELEVATION 1:100

BEDROOM 2. 75 X 3. 2

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING 16 GAUGE CORRUGATED METAL

BAMBOO

OPENING

KITCHEN DINING LAUNDRY PORCH

WATER C O LLEC TIO N

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

20 MM X 20 MM CONCRETE LINTEL

12p m

SHARED

C O MPA R ATIVE DATA

D EV EL O PM EN T O F PL AN

8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING 16 GAUGE CORRUGATED METAL 8 CM GUM POLE FRAMING

J O J O TA N K + I R R I GAT I O N

HOUSING UNITS FRONT PORCH SMALL GARDEN

SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

WI NTE R SUN

- Humble design strategy that fits into the context.

SITE RESPONSE

PUBLIC SPACE INTERSECTS PRIVATE

LIVING

SITE PLAN NOT TO SCALE

3pm

PROGRAM RESPONSE

3.5m

G

CLIMATIC RESPONSE

Oriented in such a way that maximizes ventilation and minimizes the direct impact of harsh sun, the houses make use of passive systems that create comfortable and healthy spaces throughout the year.

3

1 ENIN

SOCIALIZI

The site approach creates an area of density at the top, allowing terraced gardens along the slope with quieter spaces for individuals or groups to enjoy their environment. The bar scheme can harness the wind flow on the site and responds appropriately to the sun. The communal space it creates in between enables visiting faculty to engage the local community and provides an atmosphere in which cultures can meet.

7

3

2

GARD

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

2.5m

INTRODUCTION To engage doctors and hospital faculty with a meaningful living situation, this project seeks to create a sense of home using varying degrees of privacy and community and establishing a multisensory experience with the surroundings. As the built form responds to the climatic conditions of the site, it becomes a comfortable and cool space to inhabit. As its organization creates space for solitude and for community, it allows users to rest and socialize as they want.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

4

6

ANTICIPATED DENSITY OF PEOPLE ON SITE

The two houses sit on the site in a way that encourages movement and community between them, creating space for gathering and eating. Between four units and two kitchens, there are opportunities to spend time with neighbors but also to be in quiet personal space. As private spaces, like bedrooms, are buffered by semi-private spaces, like living rooms, they become places of retreat from busy days at the hospital.

3

5

1

4

P R I VAT E

HOUSING FOR THE MALAMULO HOSPITAL

SHARED

DESIGNED TO BUILD:

-2 5 5 %

N O VEMB ER

0

DEC EMB ER

40%

O U T DO O R

SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT

143


PERFORATED BRIC (LARGE OPENING

P R IVAT E

PROPORTION OF HOUSES LIMITS EXPOSURE TO HARSH WEST LIGHT AND MAXIMIZE EXPOSURE TO HIGH NORTH + SOUTH LIGHT

ROOF

S H AR E D

Mid-Semester Critique Scheme 4: Doctors’ Housing

P R IVAT E

CR OS S V E N T I L AT I ON

SINGLE ROOF SEMI - OPEN

ANGLE OF NORTH HOUSE INCREASES AIR MOVEMENT ON SITE

WINTER WINDS

JRT Jony, Rothman, Trapp

MATERIALS 3pm

9am

COMMUNITY

T RE N C H E S MINIMUM 1m OVERHANG ON NORTH SIDE

J O J O TA N K + I RRI G AT I O N

T REN C HES

MINIMUM .75m OVERHANG ON SOUTH SIDE

JO JO TAN K + IRRIGAT IO N

S

WINDOWS ON TWO SIDES OF EVERY ROOM

12pm

NORTH

MINIMUM 1m OVERHANG ON NORTH SIDE

SCREEN

WINDOWS ON TWO SIDES OF EVERY ROOM NORTH

D R AI N AGE

PERFORATED BRICK BAMBOO

METAL MESH BAMBOO

VERTICAL LOUVRES AT 37° ON WEST SIDE

BAMBOO

TREE ON WEST SIDE

DRAIN AGE 3pm

OPENING

VERTICAL LOUVRES AT 37° ON WEST SIDE

The site approach creates an area of density at the top, allowing terraced gardens along the slope with quieter spaces for individuals or groups to enjoy their environment. The bar scheme can harness the wind flow on the site and responds appropriately to the sun. The communal space it creates in between enables visiting faculty to engage the local community and provides an atmosphere in which cultures can meet.

GA RD

EN IN

VENT

LIVIN G

G

SOCI ALIZI

S UM M E R W IN D S

LARGE WINDOWS B EDR OOM 2 .7 5 X 3 .2

NG

K ITCHEN 2 .7 5 X 3 .9

OPEN

K ITCHEN 2 .7 5 X 3 .9

B EDR OOM 2 .9 5 X 3 .2

S UM M E R S UN

K ITCHEN 2 .7 5 X 3 .9

L OU N GE 2 .9 5 X 4 .1

K ITCHEN 2 .7 5 X 3 .9

L OU N GE 2 .9 5 X 4 .1

B EDR OOM 2 .7 5 X 3 .2

B EDR OOM 2 .9 5 X 3 .2

WALL -

PERFORATED BRICK (LARGE OPENINGS)

PERFORATED BRICK (SMALL OPENINGS) D UP L E X

CR O S S V E N T ILAT IO N

3

ROOF

3

5

1

6

3 pm

K I T CH E N

I N D OOR

1

ANGLE OF NORTH HOUSE INCREASES AIR MOVEMENT ON SITE

OUT D OOR

3 2

1

S UThe Mtwo Mhouses ER sitSonUtheNsite in a way that encourages

movement and community between them, creating spaceROOF for gathering andOPEN eating. Between four units and DOUBLE / SEMI - OPEN two kitchens, there are opportunities to spend time with CLERESTORY neighbors but also to be in quiet personal space. As private spaces, like bedrooms, are buffered by semi-private spaces, like living rooms, they become places of retreat from busy days at the hospital.

1 2 pm

BEDROOM 2.75 X 3.2

NG

KIT C HEN 2.75 X 3.9

KIT C HEN 2.75 X 3.9

KIT C HEN 2.75 X 3.9

KIT C HEN 2.75 X 3.9

BEDR O O M 2.7 5 X 3. 2

ON E

W IN T E R W IN D S

12pm

5m

4m

T W O UN I T S W I T H S H AR E D K I T CH E N / E AT I N G P R OP ORT I ON S OP T I M I Z E CR OS S V E N T I L AT I ON E ACH R OOM H AS OP E N I N GS ON T W O S I D E S

2

BEDROOM 2.95 X 3.2 4

1

LOUN GE3 2.95 X 4.1

WAT E R CO LLE CT IO N + US E R O O F + JO JO TAN KS

LOUN GE 2.95 X 4.1

7

2

3

PLAN 1:100

6 2 5

4

1 2

2m

3.5m

WAT

9am

3pm

BEDROOM 2.95 X 3.2

P RI VAT E

SO CI A LI ZI

2.5m

G

1

3.5m

DE V E LO P M E NT O F P LAN

LI V IN G

4, 000 / M ON T H / P E R S ON

Oriented in such a way that maximizes ventilation and minimizes the direct impact of harsh sun, the houses make use of passive systems that create comfortable and healthy spaces throughout the year.

SH AR ED

ENIN

7

3

2

WAT

B E D R OOM S

SINGLE ROOF SEMI - OPEN

4

SOLID BRICK WITH EFFECT T H I S P R3D OP OS AL

BU I L D I N G

OV E R AL L

4

GARD

PRIVATE

MINIMUM .75m OVERHANG ON SOUTH SIDE

TREE ON WEST SIDE

GUIDING PRINCIPLES - Humble design strategy that fits into the context. - Manage rainwater for collection and reuse. - Thermal comfort through air movement and shading. - Central utilities and integrative systems. - Spatial comfort for an individual and a communit - Innovative applications of accessible materials.

SHARED

W I N T E R S UN

P RI VAT E

INTRODUCTION To engage doctors and hospital faculty with a meaningful living situation, this project seeks to create a sense of home using varying degrees of privacy and community and establishing a multisensory experience with the surroundings. As the built form responds to the climatic conditions of the site, it becomes a comfortable and cool space to inhabit. As its organization creates space for solitude and for community, it allows users to rest and socialize as they want.

S UM M E R S UN

3pm

WAT E R COL L E CT I ON + US E R OOF + JOJO TAN K S

TWO

WINT ER S U N

1

MASTER BEDROOM

2

BEDROOM

3

LIVING ROOM

4

KITCHEN

5

LAUNDRY

6

PANTRY

7

COVERED PORCH

4, 000 / M ON T H / P E R S ON

STACK EFFECT

CR OS S V E N T I L AT I ON T H R OUGH S H AR E D S PACE M OV E M E N T T H R OUGH K I T CH E N T O B ACK OF H OUS E V I E W S FOR S H AR E D S PACE PAN T RY + L AUN D RY CL OS E T E X T R A B E D R OOM + B AT H R OOM

DOUBLE ROOF SYSTEM

DOUBLE WALL SYSTEM

VERTICAL SUN SHADES VENTILATION SYSTEM

THREE

M AI N TAI N D E FI N I T I ON OF S H AR E D S PACE I M P R OV E CR OS S V E N T I L AT I ON I N K I T CH E N AL L B AT H R OOM S ON N ORT H S I D E FOR E N V I R O- L OO T OI L E T S

DU P LE X

TRENCHES

144

T HI S P RO P O S A L MINIMUM .75m OVERHANG ON SOUTH SIDE

MINIMUM 1m OVERHANG ON NORTH SIDE

J OJ O TANK + I RRI GATI ON

WINDOWS ON TWO SIDES OF EVERY ROOM NORTH

D R AIN AGE

145


Final Construction Documents Student Housing

MALAMULO HOSPITAL MEDICAL STUDENT HOUSING

3NF

3NF Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Picnic Bench

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Date

Description

Date

Terraced Gardens

Communal Gathering Area

JoJo ta nks

CO-HOUSING

A301 A302 A303 A400

Sheet Name COVER SHEET SitePlan Foundation Plan Phasing Communal Unit Bedroom Unit Communal Unit Elevations Bedroom Unit Elevations Interior Elevations Communal Interior Elevations Private Sections

A500 A501 A502 A503 A504 A505 A600 A601 A700 E200 S200 S201

Sheet Name Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Details Details Schedules Electrical Plan Structure Pergola

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

COVER SHEET

SitePlan

Project Number Date Drawn By

Scale

146

0-G000

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

507-3.1 12/16/13 TF

Project Number Date Drawn By

1

Site 1 : 100

Scale

A100

1 : 100

12/16/2013 11:31:31 PM

0-G000 A100 A200 A201 A202 A203 A300

CO-HOUSING

Sheet List Sheet Number

12/16/2013 11:31:25 PM

Sheet List Sheet Number

147


3

-

3NF

13.15

A400

---

3NF

3.08

2.86

6.57

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

5.77

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

2.69

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

2.69

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

1 A400

3.39

0.68

0.47

2.53

13.36 3.60

No.

4.77

Description

Date 3.65

4.77

2.10

PHASE 2

No.

Planters

PHASE 3

Description

Date

2.10

2.84

4.52

2.69

3.39

4 A400

4.77

1.83

3.60

3.60

CO-HOUSING

1.07

CO-HOUSING

2.70

1.80

1.57

0.90

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Foundation Plan 507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date Drawn By

1

FOUNDATION PLAN 1 : 50

Scale

148

A200

1 : 50

2.47

7.40

2

Phasing

5.42

A400

PHASE 1 N

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date

12/16/2013 11:31:36 PM

N

6.81

Drawn By

1

PHASING PLAN 1 : 50

Scale

A201

1 : 50

12/16/2013 11:31:48 PM

3.60

3.37

3.78

2.86

3.07

6.62

5.77

4.49

149


3NF

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

0.50 4.63

3.31

3.04

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

1.32

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

2.64

2.25

1.00

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

4.31

1.28

1.82

3NF

2.28

1.62

Date

5.77

1.19

0.69

1.04

Date

1.89

0.62 1.26

2.69

3.10

1.53

1.29

0.53

1.99

Description

7.10

6.84

3.57

No.

5.34

0.61

1.70

0.66

1.68

Description

0.39

No.

1.33

0.88

4.56

1.37

3.97

0.00

1.96

1.37

3.42

CO-HOUSING

5.41

CO-HOUSING

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital Bedroom Unit

Drawn By

COMMUNAL UNIT PLAN 1 : 25

Scale

A202

1 : 25

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date 12/16/2013 11:31:55 PM

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Date

150

4.99

5.42

Project Number

1

3.39

Communal Unit

N 8.30

N 4.99

Drawn By

1

BED UNIT PLAN 1 : 25

Scale

A203

1 : 25

12/16/2013 11:32:42 PM

0.90

0.63

0.50

0.59

151


3NF

0.94

3.55

1.47

2.16

3NF

Top of Window 2.47

Exposed Brick 1.20

Bamboo Screen

Corrugated Metal Roofing 0.16

1.09

Top of Beam 3.41 Top of Window 2.47

Metal Roof Gutter

1

3.25

1.37

1.16

0.64

1.16

Ground Floor 0.00

Ground Floor 0.00

0.42

2.30

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

North Elevation_ Communal 1 : 50

3

1.91

0.58

2.23

0.58

2.35

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

0.50

Top of Beam 3.41

Concrete Lentil & Sill

Top of Window 2.47 Planter Box

2.47

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Bamboo Screen

Top of Window 2.47

0.55 0.99

0.58

No.

Description

Date

Dimensional Lumber Purlins

No.

Description

Date

1.00

Metal Roof Gutter

2.26

North Elevation_ Bed Unit 1 : 50

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Corrugated Metal Roofing

0.58

3.06

0.30

0.40

1.00

1.27

Planter Box

Ground Floor 0.00 0.77

4

1.16

0.42

0.58

1.71

1.74

Ground Floor 0.00 2.35

1.03

South Elevation_ Communal 1 : 50

1

0.58

2.05

1.16

0.74

1.16

Bed Unit South Elevation 1 : 50

Gum Pole Framing

Top of Beam 3.41

1 1/2" / 1'-0"

Level 7 3.40

1 1/2" / 1'-0"

1 1/2" / 1'-0"

3.56

1.20

Bamboo Screen

3.73

Top of Window 2.47

2.70

3.60

Metal Roof Gutter

Exposed Brick

Bamboo Screen

Top of Window 2.47

Concrete Lentil & Sill

Gum Pole Framing

1.27

Cistern Platform

3

1.16

0.63

3.79

Ground Floor 0.00

CO-HOUSING

East Elevation_ Communal 1 : 50

2.01

2

2.74

Level 13 1.00

1.46

2

1.16

1.30

2.40

East Elevation_ Bed Unit 1 : 50

Bedroom Unit Elevations

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number

Drawn By

0.52

West Elevation_ Communal 1 : 50

Scale

152

CO-HOUSING

0.81

Malamulo Hospital

Date Ground Floor 0.00

3.65

Communal Unit Elevations

French Doors

Concrete Beam

2.60

Malamulo Hospital

A300

1 : 50

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date 12/16/2013 11:32:50 PM

0.82

Top of Beam 3.41

1.16

Drawn By

Scale

A301

1 : 50

12/16/2013 11:33:00 PM

Ground Floor 0.00 0.65

153


3NF

0.91

3NF Consultant Address Address Address Phone

5

Elevation 2 - b 1 : 30

1.83

0.61

1

Elevation 2 - c 1 : 30

No.

7

Elevation 2 - d 1 : 30

8

Elevation 3 - a 1 : 30

9

1

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Description

Elevation 5 - c 1 : 30

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Elevation 5 - d 1 : 30

5

Elevation 6 - a 1 : 30

6

Elevation 6 - b 1 : 30

7

Description

Date

Elevation 6 - c 1 : 30

CO-HOUSING

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Interior Elevations Communal

Interior Elevations Private

Elevation 3 - d 1 : 30 Scale

154

3

CO-HOUSING

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Drawn By

11

Elevation 5 - b 1 : 30

No.

4

Date

Elevation 3 - c 1 : 30

2

Date

Elevation 3 - b 1 : 30

Project Number

10

Elevation 5 - a 1 : 30

A302

1 : 30

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date Drawn By

8

Elevation 6 - d 1 : 30 Scale

A303

1 : 30

12/16/2013 11:33:21 PM

Elevation 2 - a 1 : 30

12/16/2013 11:33:11 PM

0.61

2

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

155


Solar Hot Water Heater Gum Pole Rafters

Top of Window 2.47

Concrete Sill

Top of Sill 1.27

3NF

3NF

1.17

0.10

Plaster over Brick

Ground Floor 0.00 3.96

1

0.68

1.62

Bedunit_Transverse 1 : 50

Solar Hot Water Heater

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Concrete Countertops

Bamboo Screen

Top of Window 2.47 1 A500 2.47

1 A504 Planter Box

4 A503

Ground Floor 0.00 3.42

4

3.43

0.88

3.39

0.60

No.

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

3.96

CommunalUnit_Longitudinal 1 : 50

Solar Hot Water Heater 1 1/2" / 1'-0"

Composting Tiolets Metal Roof Gutter

Top of Window 2.47

Top of Sill 1.27

2.54

Rainwater Cistern

Ground Floor 0.00 2.12

2

1.04

0.61

2.25

0.39

3.65

CO-HOUSING

CO-HOUSING

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Sections

Wall Sections

Communal Unit_Transverse1 1 : 50

Gum Pole Pergola with Bamboo Covering

Top of Sill 1.27

3 A502

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Ground Floor 0.00

Date Drawn By

3.19

3

0.39

2.64

0.50

2.50

1.29

1.19

1.68

1.17

Communal Unit_Transverse2 1 : 50

Scale

156

A400

1 : 50

507-3.1 12/16/13 NL

Project Number Date Drawn By

1

Outdoor Porch Wall Section 1 : 10

Scale

A500

1 : 10

12/16/2013 11:33:37 PM

2A501 ---

12/16/2013 11:33:26 PM

Electrical Panel

2.64

Top of Beam 3.41

157


Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Description

Date

CO-HOUSING

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Wall Sections

Wall Sections

Drawn By

Living Room Wall Section 1 : 10

Scale

A501

1 : 10

507-3.1 12/16/13 NL

Project Number Date 12/16/2013 11:33:42 PM

507-3.1 12/16/13 NL

Date

158

Date

CO-HOUSING

Project Number

2

3NF

Drawn By

3

Bedroom Wall Section 1 : 10

Scale

A502

1 : 10

12/16/2013 11:33:46 PM

3NF

159


Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Description

Date

CO-HOUSING

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Wall Sections

Wall Sections

Drawn By

Bedroom Section at Door 1 : 10

Scale

A503

1 : 10

507-3.1 12/16/13 NL

Project Number Date 12/16/2013 11:33:52 PM

507-3.1 12/16/13 NL

Date

160

Date

CO-HOUSING

Project Number

4

3NF

Drawn By

1

InteriorOpening_Dining 1 : 10

Scale

A504

1 : 10

12/16/2013 11:33:58 PM

3NF

161


Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

1

Gum Pole Detail 1:5

2

No.

Roof Detail 1:5

Description

Date

CO-HOUSING

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Wall Sections

Details

Drawn By

Bathroom Wall Section 1 : 10

Scale

A505

1 : 10

507-3.1 12/16/13 TF NL

Project Number Date 12/16/2013 11:34:02 PM

507-3.1 12/16/13 NL

Date

162

Date

CO-HOUSING

Project Number

1

3NF

Drawn By

3

Roof Detail @ Column 1:5

4

Window Detail 1:5

Scale

A600

1:5

12/16/2013 11:34:07 PM

3NF

163


3NF Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

Date

No.

Date

Foundation Detail 1:5

1

Outdoor Porch

2

Room Schedule

CO-HOUSING

Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 11 12 13 14 15

Malamulo Hospital Details Date Drawn By

Scale

A601

1:5

Name KHONDE KITCHEN LIVING DINING LAUNDRY POWDER HALLWAY BED1 BED2 BED3 BR1 BR2 BR3

Grand total: 13

12/16/2013 11:34:10 PM

507-3.1 12/16/13 TF

Project Number

164

Description

Area 37 m² 13 m² 9 m² 13 m² 4 m² 3 m² 4 m² 23 m² 23 m² 23 m² 5 m² 5 m² 5 m² 167 m²

Perime ter 24 14 12 15 8 7 9 27 27 27 10 10 10 200

Roof Schedule Volume 108.77 m³ 36.46 m³ 27.02 m³ 30.89 m³ 9.53 m³ 6.64 m³ 8.62 m³ 70.34 m³ 69.35 m³ 69.25 m³ 15.98 m³ 12.68 m³ 12.61 m³ 478.13 m³

Type

Window Schedule

Area

Volume

metaldeckin 1139 SF g metaldeckin 2004 SF g Grand total: 3143 SF 2

142.35 CF 250.54 CF 392.89 CF

C o u nt

Type

1 579 x 8 1195 9 579 x 1195 1 579 x 2 1465 3 579 x 1465 9 1114 x 579 5 1

Sill Heig Heig Widt ht h Area ht 1195 579 12 1.27 m² 1195 579 6 m² 1.27 1465 579 10 1.00 m² 1465 579 3 m² 1.00 471

579 2 m² 34 m²

Final5_BedroomInterior

Door Schedule Coun t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Type 36" x 80" 30" x 80" 48" x 84" 36" x 84" 36" x 80" 36" x 84" 2 1.042 3'4.25" x 7'-0" 3'4.25" x 7'-0" 88.58268" x 2.47m 2 36" x 84" 2 1.042 36" x 84" 36" x 84" 30" x 80" 36" x 80"

Width

CO-HOUSING

Height

0.91 0.76 1.22 0.91 0.91 0.00

2.03 2.03 2.13 2.13 2.03 0.00

1.02

2.13

1.02

2.13

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.91 0.91 0.76 0.91

2.13 2.13 2.03 2.03

Malamulo Hospital Schedules 507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date Drawn By

Scale

A700

12/16/2013 11:34:15 PM

1

3NF

165


MALAMULO HOSPITAL MEDICAL STUDENT HOUSING

3NF

3NF 5.77

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

GFI

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

GFI

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Date

Description

Date

8.30

3

0.90

GFI

P

3.79

6.84

3

3

3

GFI

GFI

GFI

CO-HOUSING

CO-HOUSING

A301 A302 A303 A400

Sheet Name COVER SHEET SitePlan Foundation Plan Phasing Communal Unit Bedroom Unit Communal Unit Elevations Bedroom Unit Elevations Interior Elevations Communal Interior Elevations Private Sections

A500 A501 A502 A503 A504 A505 A600 A601 A700 E200 S200 S201

Sheet Name Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Wall Sections Details Details Schedules Electrical Plan Structure Pergola

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital Electrical Plan

COVER SHEET Project Number Date Drawn By

Scale

166

N

0-G000

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date Drawn By

1

ELECTRICAL PLAN 1 : 50

Scale

E200

1 : 50

12/16/2013 11:34:20 PM

0-G000 A100 A200 A201 A202 A203 A300

Sheet List Sheet Number

12/16/2013 11:27:37 PM

Sheet List Sheet Number

167


124

125

3NF

126

3NF

Concrete Sill

7.26

2.86

59

142

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

2.69

2 Wythe Brick Wall

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

127 mm dia Gum pole Columns 16.80

57 61

58

No.

Description

Date

2.75

Date

2.24

Description

2.50

No.

3.60

50 mm dia Bamboo Covering

14.40

127 mm dia Gum pole Rafters Spaced @ 90 mm

1.87

2.10

25 62

1.05

203mm dia Gum Pole Beam Staggered

23

3.25

Concrete Sill

8.30

203mm dia Gum Pole Beam

32

3.37

Dimensional Lumber Purlins Spaced @ 45 mm

0.45

CO-HOUSING

CO-HOUSING

1 127 mm dia Gum pole Columns

1.80

Malamulo Hospital

Date Drawn By

Roof Structure 1 : 50

Scale

Pergola 507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number

168

Malamulo Hospital

Structure

22.80

1

N

S200

1 : 50

507-3.1 12/16/13 NB

Project Number Date Drawn By

1

Pergola 1 : 50

Scale

S201

1 : 50

12/16/2013 11:34:33 PM

2.70

12/16/2013 11:34:25 PM

0.90 3.60

169


Final Construction Documents Doctors’ Housing

A103 A506 A507 A601 S201 A604 A101 A602 A603 A402

N

Temporary Schedule Sheet Cover Page Room Schedule Roof Plan Floor Plan Floor Plan-Unit 1 Foundation Plan Elevations Sections Wall Types Wall Schedule Door Schedule Beam and Floor Schedule Plumbing Schedule Window Schedule Wall Types Wall Types Wall Types Wall Types Electircal plan Septic / Waste Management Site Plan Stormwater Management Site Plan Wall Types Wall Types Foundation and Wall Assembly Structural Framing Plan Tank Stand Site Plan Door and Window Assmebly Load and Non-Load Bearing Roof Assembly Rainwater / Stormwater Management Systems

NORTH ARROW REFERENCE - CALLED NORTH - TRUE NORTH

SECTION REFERENCE - DETAIL NUMBER - DWG ON WHICH DETAIL APPEARS

1 A101

REVISION REFERENCE

XXX EL. 000.00'

1

A101

ELEVATION LEVEL REFERENCE

ELEVATION REFERENCE - DETAIL NUMBER - DWG ON WHICH DETAIL APPEARS

1i

101

LARGE SCALE REFERENCE - DETAIL NUMBER - DWG ON WHICH DETAIL APPEARS

- ALUMINUM

- ACOUSTICAL CMU

- FINISH LUMBER

JTR MFS

- CMIU

- DIMENSIONAL LUMBER

- CONCRETE

- SHIM

- GYP BD / GROUT

- PLYWOOD

- BATT INSULATION

- ACOUSTICAL PANEL

- RIGID INSULATION

- TILE

- COARSE AGGREGATE / BALLAST

- EARTH

CENTER LINE

X/A-XXX 1

- STEEL

- CMU

COLUMN REFERENCE

1

A101

- FIRE RATED (SEE WALL TYPES)

SPOT ELEVATION REFERENCE

XXX EL. 000.00'

0

1 1

1

X/A-XXX

MATCH LINE

WALL TYPE REFERENCE

DOOR NUMBER REFERENCE

Room name 101

1t

Symbols Legend 1:1

ROOM NUMBER REFERENCE

WINDOW NUMBER REFERENCE

Materials Legend 1:1

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Description

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Cover Page

Doctor Housing Site Plan

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Date Drafting View Cover Page

Scale

170

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Project Number

1

JTR MFS

G001

1:1

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 1

Site Plan 1 : 100

Date

Scale

A101

1 : 100

12/16/2013 9:45:55 PM

000 G001 A203 A205 A202 A204 A201 A301 A401 A501 A701 A702 S202 E202 A703 A502 A503 A504 A505 E201 A102

NOT ALL MATERIALS DEPICTED ON THIS LEGEND ARE USED IN THE ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS.

NOT ALL SYMBOLS DEPICTED ON THIS LEGEND ARE USED IN THE ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS.

Sheet Name

12/16/2013 9:47:02 PM

Sheet List Sheet Number

171


Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Description

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Septic / Waste Management Site Plan

Doctor Housing Stormwater Management Site Plan

Septic / Wastewater Management Site Plan 1 : 100 Scale

A102

1 : 100

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:45:58 PM

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Date

172

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Project Number

1

JTR MFS

Date

1

Stormwater / Rainwater Site Plan 1 : 100

Scale

A103

1 : 100

12/16/2013 9:46:01 PM

JTR MFS

173


JTR MFS

35.50

4.08

0.61

6.70

0.85

1.84

0.61

4.90

0.61

1.23

0.61

0.85

6.70

0.61

4.08

0.61

0.75

0.24

0.61

JTR MFS

0.70

0.61

Consultant Address Address Address Phone 2.15

3.00

7.00

0.80

2.20

2.48

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

0.61

10.56

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

13.00

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

3.00

0.26

0.91

8.00

1.00

1.30

0.61

4.00

2.00

2.39

No.

0.70

1.00

Drafting Foundation Plan 1 1 : 50

1.00

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Foundation Plan

Date

Scale

174

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number

A201

1 : 50

Doctor Housing Floor Plan

Drafting Plan 1 1 : 50

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:02 PM

Foundation on the east side is identical to foundation to the west wide but mirrored and moved .85 meters south.

5.00

Date

Scale

A202

1 : 50

12/16/2013 9:46:07 PM

Malamulo Hospital

5.00

175


JTR MFS

JTR MFS Consultant Address Address Address Phone

concrete pad

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

trench location

Consultant Address Address Address Phone 0.35

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

8.60 15.64 28.40 17.55 19.30 7.50

REF. 0.81

0.60

2 2 2 2 2 2

0.42

0.58

175

1.21

Window type 1

Window type 1

0.70

2.36

1.00

1.00

Window type 2

1.00

0.58

0.42

0.58

1.21

Malamulo Hospital

1.00

Scale

A203

1 : 100

0.42

0.58

0.42

0.58

0.42

0.58 0.21

Drafting Plan of Unit 1 : 50

Doctor Housing Floor Plan-Unit 1

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:11 PM

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Date

0.58

Malamulo Hospital 1

Doctor Housing Room Schedule

Project Number

183

184

1.36

176

1.05

1.00 0.36 0.58

1.00

Drafting Room Schedule 1 : 100

1.05

1.19

177

gum poles at 1 meter spacing

1

1.05

2.00

0.89

1.30

2 Master Bath 2 Spare Bed 2 Living Room 2 office kitchen 2 Master Bed 2 Spare Bath

2.00 176

Date

Scale

A204

1 : 50

12/16/2013 9:46:12 PM

DN

2

179 2.50

0.91

2

180 0.65 178

0.09

2 Living Room

Date

0.91

5

Description

0.78

1

2 Spare Bed

Number 1 1 1 1 1 1

No.

2.00

DN

1 Living Room

Perimeter 8.60 28.20 17.55 7.50 15.64 19.50

1.00

1 Spare Bed

Name 1 Master Bed 1 Spare Bed 1 Office/Kitchen 1 Spare Bath 1 Spare Bed 1 Master Bed

1.00

2

4 m² 28 m² 14 m² 3 m² 13 m² 14 m² 77 m² 4 m² 13 m² 28 m² 14 m² 14 m² 3 m² 77 m²

1.21

2 Spare Bath 2 Master Bath 2 2 2 Master Bed

0.58

2

1.21

REF.

2 office kitchen

0.81 0.11 0.58 0.09 0.58

1

1.65

182

0.20

Area

1 Office/Kitchen

1

1

REF.

1

0.87

1.30

Date

Room Schedule

1 Master Bed 1 Master Bed 1 Spare Bath

0.75

0.70

Description

1.68

No.

DN

0.06

1.14

181

177


JTR MFS

JTR MFS

End of roof height 4.37

1.47 0.91

0.93

3.81

3.26

0.91

2.47

2.90

3.34

3.99

0.57

South Wall start height 3.00 North Wall start height 2.50

Ground Level 0.00

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

4

West 1 : 50

1

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

East 1 : 50

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

DN

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

DN

REF.

DN

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

REF.

No.

DN DN 2

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Roof Plan

Doctor Housing Elevations

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

A205

1 : 50

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:15 PM

Drafting Site Plan 1 1 : 50

178

North 1 : 50

Date 3

South 1 : 50

Scale

A301

1 : 50

12/16/2013 9:46:18 PM

DN

179


JTR MFS Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Section 4 1 : 50

1

2

No.

Description

Date

Section 1 1 : 50

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Sections

Doctor Housing Rainwater / Stormwater Management Systems

Section 2 1 : 50

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

180

Date

A401

1 : 50

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date 1

Rainwater Catchment Section 1 : 25

Scale

A402

1 : 25

12/16/2013 9:46:21 PM

4

Section 3 1 : 50

Description

12/16/2013 9:46:20 PM

3

JTR MFS

181


Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Structural Brick Pier Load Bearing 1 : 25

Description

No.

Description

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Wall Types

Doctor Housing Wall Types

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

182

Date

A501

1 : 25

1

12/16/2013 9:46:23 PM

1

JTR MFS

Two Wythe Brick Wall with Vent Non-Load Bearing 1 : 25

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

A502

1 : 25

12/16/2013 9:46:24 PM

JTR MFS

183


JTR MFS

JTR MFS

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Description

Date

No.

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Wall Types

Doctor Housing Wall Types

1

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Date

Scale

184

A503

1 : 25

Floor to Ceiling Brick 1 : 25

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:26 PM

Window type 1 with Vent 1 : 25

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Project Number 1

Description

Date

Scale

A504

1 : 25

12/16/2013 9:46:27 PM

No.

185


JTR MFS Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

Date

No.

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Wall Types

Doctor Housing Wall Types

Public Window with Vent 1 : 25 1

Date

Scale

A505

1 : 25

Kitchen Wall Section 1 : 25

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:28 PM

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number

186

Description

Date

Scale

A506

1 : 25

12/16/2013 9:46:31 PM

1

JTR MFS

187


JTR MFS Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

No.

Description

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Wall Types

Doctor Housing Foundation and Wall Assembly

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Date

Scale

A507

1 : 25

1

Two Wythe Wall Assembly 1:5

2

Typical Foundation Detail 1:5

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

A601

1:5

12/16/2013 9:46:36 PM

French Door Wall Section 1 : 25 Project Number

188

Date

12/16/2013 9:46:34 PM

1

JTR MFS

189


JTR MFS

JTR MFS Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Description

Date

No. 1

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Door and Window Assmebly

Doctor Housing Load and Non-Load Bearing Roof Assembly

2

Typical Window Assembly 1:5 Scale

190

A602

1:5

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:39 PM

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Date

Typical Hardware Assembly 1:5

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Project Number

1

Description

Load Bearing Wall Assembly 1:5

2

Non-Load Bearing Wall Assembly 1:5

Date

Scale

A603

1:5

12/16/2013 9:46:41 PM

No.

191


qs-Wall Quantities by Assembly

B2010 B2010 B2010 B2010

Grand total: 153

Length Center To Center 0.30

Width

brick piers

518.46

506.35

Generic 8" Brick Generic 8" Brick 1 wythe Generic 8" Brick regular Storefront

1524.08

996.36

0.66

853.28

279.71

0.33

1940.80

1268.50

0.66

74.07 4910.68

0.00 3050.92

Wall Type

JTR MFS

Description Comments

0.98

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Tank Stand

Doctor Housing Wall Schedule

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

192

Exterior Walls

Calculated To Butt-End Dimensions Area Volume

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

A604

1 : 20

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:44 PM

Tank Stand 1 : 20

Exterior Walls Exterior Walls Exterior Walls

Wall Assembly

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

1

Assembly Description

Date

Scale

A701

12/16/2013 9:46:46 PM

JTR MFS

Assembly Code

193


qa-Door Quantities Assembly Code C1020 C1020 C1020

Assembly Description Interior Doors Interior Doors Interior Doors

Count

Door Description

Type 32" x 84"

Width

12

Single-Flush

0.81

4

Single-Flush

30" x 80"

0.76

6

french doors

68" x 80"

1.73

Height 2.13

Thickness

Fire Rating Description

Constructio Manufactur n Type er

Model

URL

Door Type

0.05

10

2.03

0.05

12

2.03

0.05

33

Grand total

B2020100 B2020100

Assembly Description Windows Windows

Count

Window Description

Type

10

Fixed Fixed Bay_Lovvre_WIndow_fo r_vents_4491 Bay_Lovvre_WIndow_fo r_vents_4491 Bay_Lovvre_WIndow2

22

Fixed

1465x579 925x579 Bay_Lovvre_WIndow _for_vents_4491 Bay_Lovvre_WIndow _2 Bay_Lovvre_WIndow _2 16" x 24" 2

18 14 6 2

B2020100 Windows Grand total

Width

Height

Description

Constructio Manufactur n Type er

Model

URL

Window Type

0.58 0.58 2.40

1.47 0.93 1.50

19 20 21

2.40

1.50

22

2.40

1.50

24

0.58

0.30

25

JTR MFS

Comments

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

0.08

0.08

0.76

0.08

No.

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

0.08

0.91

Assembly Code

0.91

1.07

0.08

qa-Window Quantities

JTR MFS

Comments

0.58

0.45

0.06

0.06

0.06

0.58

0.45

0.06

0.30

0.09

0.06

0.06

0.17

0.06

0.93

0.80

2.11

2.03

2.11

2.03

0.06

Malamulo Hospital Doctor Housing Door Schedule 2

2

Drafting Window 2 1 : 10

Doctor Housing Window Schedule

Door Type 1 1 : 10

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

194

Drafting Window 1 1 : 10

A702

1 : 10

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number Date

Scale

A703

1 : 10

12/16/2013 9:46:52 PM

French Doors 1 : 10

1

12/16/2013 9:46:49 PM

1

Malamulo Hospital

0.70

195


qp-Plumbing Fixture Quantities

JTR MFS

Assembly Code

Assembly Description

Count

D2010410

Sinks Kitchen

2

D2010400

Sinks

4

D2010110

Water Closets Single Bathtubs

4

Sink Kitchen-Isla nd Sink Vanity-Squ are Shower Stall Rectangular Toilet-Dom estic-3D

2

D2010500

Double light fixture

Unit Description

2

Type

CW HW Waste Vent Manufactur er Description Connection Connection Connection Connection

Model

URL

JTR MFS

Comments

18" x 18" 20" x 18"

Sink vanity

34"x32" Private

Shower stall

Toilet-Dom Toilet estic-3D

Tub-Rectan Tub-Rectan gular-3D gular-3D

Grand total

Single light fixture

1.01

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

0.84

No.

1

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Electircal plan

Doctor Housing Plumbing Schedule

Drafting Plan_Electircal 1 : 50

2

Date

Scale

196

E201

1 : 50

1

Drafting Bathroom Plan 1 : 20

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:46:55 PM

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number

Bathroom Section 1 : 20

Date

Scale

E202

1 : 20

12/16/2013 9:46:58 PM

Double light fixture

197


qs-Structural Beams & Bracing Quantities

2x3 B10

Assembly Description

Superstructure

Gum Pole B10

Model

Level

Length

JTR MFS

Comments

1156.26

Superstructure

HSS-Round Gum Pole Structural Tubing

Gum Pole: 69

Superstructure

392.21 392.21

Concrete-R sill ectangular Beam

15.40 15.40 1563.87

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

Date

No.

Description

Date

Malamulo Hospital

Malamulo Hospital

Doctor Housing Structural Framing Plan

Doctor Housing Beam and Floor Schedule

Date

Scale

S201

1 : 50

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number 12/16/2013 9:47:05 PM

507-3.2 12/16/2013

Project Number

198

Type

2x3

1156.26

sill: 20 Grand total: 185

Drafting Framing Plan 1 : 50

Dimension Lumber

2x3: 96

sill B10

1

Structural Members

Date

Scale

S202

12/16/2013 9:47:08 PM

JTR MFS

Assembly Code

199


200


DdesignIX