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CAMPAIGN PROPOSAL


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Dr. Timothy Brophy; Dr. David Miller; Dean Leonardo Villalón and Dr. Juan-Carlos Molleda: internationalization initiative detailed in the University of Florida’s “Learning without Borders” quality enhancement plan. Several of our team members have traveled and studied abroad, and attest to the positive impact the experience has had on our lives and understanding of the world around us. All of our team members are also active leaders and participants in campus life, and recognize the importance of a deliberate plan for internationalization at the University of Florida. And, as graduating seniors, we’re realizing ourselves just how interconnected, collaborative and competitive our global

Our campaign is called “Project Global.” It’s informed by research and intends to share this developing global competencies, but also to create action and results in order to establish the University of Florida as a leading institution for international education. We appreciate you taking the time to listen to our presentation and read our proposal, and implemented. Project Global will create a global culture at the University of Florida, and productive citizens of the world. Respectfully, Spark Public Relations Mariah Curry Jennifer Garcia Michelle Hughes Kaitlyn Macri Annie Uzar Melanie Wright

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» EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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» RESEARCH

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» SITUATION ANALYSIS

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» GOAL & OBJECTIVES

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» MESSAGE STRATEGY

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» STRATEGIES

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» TACTICS

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» TIMELINE

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» BUDGET

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» EVALUATION

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» STEWARDSHIP

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» APPENDICES

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» TEAM BIOS

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» REFERENCES

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

programs hosted by the UF International Center.

Project Global is a communications campaign aimed at internationalizing the undergraduate experience at the University of Florida. Based on an accreditation effort, UF assembled an internationalization task force who wrote a five-year plan. Using the goals of this quality enhancement plan, we researched the situation through a series of qualitative and quantitative research methods. We interviewed both students and faculty in each of the 13 colleges, gathering insights that assisted us with our campaign planning and strategy.

In order to accomplish these goals, Project Global has devised a message strategy that is informed by research, influenced by the current situation and based on the opportunities that are available for achieving the ultimate goal of a global culture among faculty and students.

Our findings indicated that many faculty were unaware of what the QEP was, but once they became aware of the proposal they became skeptical about the likelihood of the implementation. They also expressed concerned about what the internationalization efforts would do to their already full workload. We also found that many students thought that internationalization efforts were good in theory, but grew concerned with how they would be able to incorporate study abroad programs or internationally focused courses into their already full schedules.

Our core message is, “Gaining a global perspective makes you a more productive world citizen, improving your personal life and relevancy in the job market,” and our campaign slogan is “Go Gators. Go Global.” Through a series of key messages based on the core message, we devised corresponding message strategies that are detailed further later in the campaign proposal.

In order to successfully implement our campaign strategies, we have proposed tactics that speak directly to the messages in each strategy. One tactic aimed at student involvement and participation is an international week to be held each spring semester. The week incorporates five different events to be hosted each night of the week. The week will include a photo contest, international cuisine food-truck rally, international organization fair and study abroad Project Global is a branded and cohesive campaign question-answer session. It will culminate with a that communicates the importance of internationalization. Through our objectives, strategies and tactics, final outdoor festival that will celebrate the diversity of students and cultures at the University of Florida. we have suggested ways to ensure publics receive In order to increase student participation in internasupport and the university succeeds in becoming a tionalization efforts and study abroad programs, we top university for international education. have proposed a program of Project Global Ambassadors be created. Although the University of Florida’s Project Global has written five actionable objectives International Center already recruits and employs a that do more than simply increase awareness. Our team of study abroad peer advisors, we recommend ultimate goal is to change behavior among our pubexpanding this program into a broader “International lics, and the following objectives are aimed at doing Ambassador Program,” comprised of two units: Study so before our campaign deadline of May 2019. For students, our objectives focus on increasing participa- Abroad Ambassadors and Project Global Ambassation in study abroad programs, increasing enrollment dors. These ambassadors will be tasked with promoting Project Global initiatives, including the ambassain internationally focused courses and increasing dor program, international week and the scholarship participation in internationally focused co-curriccompetition. The Project Global scholarship compeular activities. Faculty are also an integral part of tition is aimed to promote student participation with our campaign. For faculty, our objectives focus on study abroad programs. The competition is designed incorporating a global perspective into their courses to create engagement from students and an enhanced and increasing faculty participation in international


determination to study abroad, despite financial and time restrictions. The Project Global Study Abroad Scholarship Competition will grant five students each a $1,000 award to use toward a UF study abroad program. The proposed Project Global programs are designed to be implemented and accomplished by May 2019. Each program has the flexibility and design to be recreated each year of the campaign. To help with implementation, Project Global has created a detailed budget, outlining program allocations and the means necessary to perform each tactic. As a whole, Project Global will require $232,800 to implement over the five-year period. This will include $72,800 for the first year and $40,000 for subsequent years. In order to evaluate the impact of our campaign and document the attitude and behavior changes demonstrated by targeted publics, we will have several measurable plans for preparation, process, and program evaluation. In regards to preparation, we will conduct evaluations prior to the implementation of the campaign. These are intended to pre-test messages and tactics to ensure the achievement of desired outcomes. The preparation evaluation will consist of qualitative methods, including in-depth interviews and focus groups with students, faculty and staff. We will also evaluate progress during the campaign to determine if any future tactics need to be altered. The two methods we will use are post-event surveys and event attendance. Finally, in order to ensure that our campaign meets the goals and objectives set, we will evaluate the success of our programs through program participation and quantitative methods. We will compare this data to the results from past and future annual SERU surveys. An important aspect to the success of Project Global is that we will practice stewardship. Through reciprocity, responsibility, reporting and relationship nurturing we will prepare planned communication and activities to reinforce positive relationships between the client organization and supportive publics.

Project Global recognizes the value and importance in showing appreciation to those who have supported the UFIC and the QEP’s efforts toward internationalization. We will hold a banquet, the International Gator Gala, to award recipients of the International Scholars Program and faculty who have worked to help those students and/or have helped to advance internationalization efforts at the University of Florida. The International Gator Gala will be held in April each year beginning at the end of year one.


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RESEARCH

RESEARCH

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KEY INSIGHTS FROM RESEARCH Current Issues Threatening Success Lack of Funding and Communication: The most prominent challenges facing the University of Florida’s intent to create a campus that is appropriately internationalized and graduates who are cultured and able to participate in the world’s workforce is a disproportionate allocation of resources to this mission. Not only are scholarships and funding for studying abroad – the most tangible aspect of ‘internationalization’ – limited, but also, communication efforts about the importance of a global mindset and the availability of relevant experiences at the University of Florida aren’t targeted. Overall, it seems as if no clear focus or direction exists in terms of involving and activating the university’s stakeholders as informed proponents for the objective the QEP establishes. The UFIC acknowledges that it has encountered “periods of growth and alternating periods of relative stagnation” (University of Florida International Center, 2011) in the goal of internationalizing the campus, but it also, perhaps unfairly, points to changing university budgets as an explanation, and to changes in campus leadership, “whose commitment to the internationalization mission has varied.” If the university is unable to channel more monetary resources to support internationalization efforts, especially study abroad programs, it at least must invest in a targeted, strategic communications campaign to create an awareness among the student body about the opportunities available to them. It’s not surprising that many incoming students are heavy users of social media – this represents both a significant challenge and opportunity. Online communications must contend with a barrage of other messages competing for student attention, but the possibility for high student interaction, such as the Office of Admissions received during its #UF17 campaign last year, proves promising.

Necessity of Appealing to a Larger Undergraduate Population: The University of Florida needs to mobilize and engage more students in international endeavors, experiences and opportunities. Although the UFIC does host several events each semester pertaining to internationalization and study abroad, we propose the incentive for participation in these events simply doesn’t translate to the diverse priorities of students across 14 colleges – these students need to be made aware that there are relevant, discipline-specific experiences they can partake in and that they will benefit from it in their careers or other pursuits. Current advertising for these events is done through the Gator Times, a weekly online and email announcement of upcoming activities on campus, managed by the Division of Student Affairs – this promotion can be better targeted to reach students in a way that will interest them. Our research has also uncovered a decrease in the number of students taking international courses or declaring international-themed concentrations, majors and minors. Only required to complete one general education class that is internationally focused, students may not be taking advantage of the 350-plus international courses.

How the University of Florida Can Succeed in Internationalization Efforts

Although our research indicates internationalism has been a focus for the university during the past decade, and that tenured faculty notice an increased emphasis on internationalization in recent years, a QEP to explicitly address the effort is a tremendous step toward its realization. With the QEP setting the structural groundwork for internationalization across curriculum, student activities and programs, strategic communication to the campus community is crucial if the tactics the QEP calls for are to be carried out. The QEP cannot be successful without the key student and staff publics supporting it and acting on it. Accordingly, messages to students and faculty need


RESEARCH to increase understanding and awareness for what internationalization actually means and how UF is going to foster it. Our in-depth interviews revealed that many, particularly students, are confused about how internationalism and the global economy affects them – so much so that they struggle to define it. And although faculty realize the importance of shaping students into global citizens, they are hesitant to embrace the QEP as a guide because they see it as another regulation and policy they must comply with, with already limited resources.

Without communications and, essentially, social marketing to sell the idea of the importance and accessibility of internationalization to students, faculty and staff, the QEP will not truly be successful. As it is now, it would remain an internal document and vision for the university that only a limited group of people appreciate.

That being said, however, the university does actually have more resources at its disposal than other institutions, with the benefits of an international center, a diverse collection of student groups, an expansive set of study abroad programs, and students and faculty who are among the brightest in the nation, as academic and admissions standards indicate. In communications about the QEP, we’ll focus on leveraging the advantages UF has, and incorporating the new elements, such as the International Scholars Program, as additional benefits.

The University of Florida, a member of the Association of American Universities and the largest and oldest university in the state, was established as a public land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant research campus in 1853 (“University of Florida Academic Life,” 2014). Since the first academic semester began in 1906, enrollment and admissions standards have steadily increased. Now, 49,785 total and 6,000 international students attend the university, according to the University of Florida Division of Enrollment Management, (“Facts and Rankings,” 2013) and it ranks among Forbes’ and U.S. News’ list of top colleges in America (“America’s Top Colleges,” 2014).

Our research did find that some people are immensely invested in developing themselves or the campus internationally, and that they’ve realized, as Friedman did years ago, the flatness of the world and their place in it. Students who’ve studied abroad did genuinely seem positively impacted by their experiences, but we realize not everyone can consider a trip as a possibility. They can, however, interact within their own campus community and participate in classes and the International Scholars Program events to gain a similar perspective – this is what we’ll communicate to our publics.

Mission Statement

The university’s mission and direction is threefold: teaching, research and scholarship, and service. Incorporated into the official mission statement is the internationalization-focused assertion that “together with its undergraduate and graduate students, UF faculty participate in an educational process that links the history of Western Europe with the traditions and cultures of all societies,” (“University of Florida Mission Statement,” 2014) and that the university nurtures these constituents to enable them to contribute and address “the needs of the world’s societies.” In fact, the university recognizes that a diverse, multi-cultural environment is necessary to create graduates who are citizens of the world and cognizant of the shrinking boundaries between nations across the globe. Accordingly, the focus of the recently proposed QEP, internationalization of the university, is pragmatic and a natural extension of this mission.

RESEARCH

Ultimately, messaging to publics must highlight the ‘bright spots,’ a term that Chip and Dan Heath discuss in their book, Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard. The stories of success that already exist at UF regarding internationalism, despite the challenges students and faculty face, will set the stage for discussing how the university can make it easier for students to contribute and compete on a global level.

RESEARCH ON THE CLIENT ORGANIZATION


International Center

The University of Florida’s International Center was established in 1991, presumably to advance the interests enumerated in the mission statement, and to create an environment of multicultural inclusivity. The center assists students, faculty, staff, administrators and external stakeholders and employs about 40 people across five major departments: exchange visitor services; international student services; study abroad services; program development; and administrative and fiscal services. The mission of the UFIC is to essentially integrate a “global dimension” into the educational and curricular experience of the university, and most importantly, to establish an administrative structure that supports the campus community in this goal (“About Us,” 2011). To advance this cause, in addition to the UFIC’s events, international awareness campaigns and other daily functions, the center awards 12 scholarships that fund international study (“UFIC Scholarships & Awards,” 2011).

STRENGTHS, WEAKNESS, OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS Originally drawn from marketing, SWOT is a traditional method of research that analyzes the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization (Smith, 2009). Typically, SWOT analysis is evaluated using internal and external perspectives, considering both internal and external factors. When applying SWOT to the organization, UF, as related to the goals of the Quality Enhancement Plan, we observed many strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

Strengths

UF is competitive on a national and global level and has significant internal strengths that can work to advance the overall perception of the institution. The communications campaign we propose for the Quality Enhancement Plan will leverage these advantages:

prestige, financial support for students, population of students, study abroad students, student-to-faculty ratio, international center, international course offerings, study abroad programs, alumni association network and International Gator Day. Below, each of the strengths is explained in detail. » Prestige: The university is considered a prestigious university both locally and nationally. Its one of only six universities in the country with colleges of law, medicine, agriculture and veterinary medicine on one central campus, as well as undergraduate and graduate degrees available via distance and online learning (“Land Grant,” n.d.). In addition, it is also one of only 17 universities in the country to share the distinction of land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant status. As Florida’s flagship university, UF attracts distinguished professors (“Land Grant,” n.d.). UF has more than 4,000 faculty members with notable records in teaching, research and service. Professors include 37 Eminent Scholar chairs and 40 faculty elections to the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, the Institute of Medicine or the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. (“University of Florida - Admissions” n.d.). UF professors have received accolades including the Fields Medal, two Pulitzer Prizes, NASA’s top award for research and Smithsonian Institution’s conservation award. Forbes ranks the University of Florida 74th out of 650 American universities, 41st of all American research universities, and 11th out of all southern American universities (Forbes, 2014). Each year, thousands of high school seniors apply for admittance, but fewer than half are admitted. Of the 27,243 applicants last year, only 12,443, 45.7 percent, were admitted to the freshman class (Harris, 2014). And, of the 29,319 applicants this year, only 12,923, 44.1 percent, were admitted. In addition to the sheer volume of total applicants, the quality of these applicants is above the national average for graduating seniors, another indicator of UF’s prestige. Of those admitted to the freshman class


RESEARCH in February 2013, 85.4 percent had a GPA of 4.0 or above, and the middle 50 percent had an SAT score between 1780 and 220, and an ACT score between 26 and 31 (Harris, 2014). Those admitted to the freshman class in February 2014 had an average GPA of 4.4, an average SAT score of 1960 and average ACT score of 30.

» Population of Students: As of January 2014, students enrolled numbered 49,785. Of those enrolled, 32,008 are undergraduate students (“University of Florida - Admissions,” n.d.). In comparison, Florida State University’s population is 40,838 total and 30,996 undergraduate students, (“About Florida State University,” n.d.) and the University of Georgia’s population is 34,538 total and 26,278 undergraduate students (“UGA by the Numbers, n.d.). With the higher volumes of graduates each year compared to FSU and UGA, two similar southern universities, UF has a significantly greater influence and presence, with more people who are connected to the institution throughout the country. » Study Abroad Students: The Institute of International Education ranks UF 15th out of all American universities for the highest numbers of students who studied abroad during the 2011-2012 academic year (“Open Doors Data U.S. Study Abroad,” 2013). UF sent 1,991 total students – 1,428 undergraduates – abroad. Of those students 10 were classified as freshman, 113 were sophomores, 421 were juniors and 874 were seniors

» Student-to-Faculty Ratio: The student-to-faculty ratio at UF is 21:1 (“University of Florida Academic Life,” 2014). Compared to Florida State University’s ratio of 26:1 and the University of Central Florida’s ratio of 32:1, UF provides a more individualized educational experience. Presumably, students at UF receive more attention and are able to develop relationships with these faculty members. » International Center: UF’s International Center was established in 1991, and is responsible for facilitating the internationalization of the campus by providing assistance and support to students, faculty and staff members (“About Us,” 2011). The UFIC has a staff of more than 40 individuals and is organized administratively into five major units: Exchange Visitor Services; International Student Services; Study Abroad Services; Program Development; and Administrative and Fiscal Services. Each has a role in the internationalization process at the university, providing resources and supporting the overall mission of the UFIC. The presence of the UFIC and its reach is beneficial to the mission of achieving an internalized campus – the center works with more than 5,000 international students from more than 130 countries, nearly 2,000 international scholars and faculty and more than 2,000 study abroad students in more than 50 countries. » International Course Offerings: The university offers more than 350 internationally focused courses during the spring semesters alone – of these, about half are being taught this semester (“Spring Gen Ed Courses,” n.d.). In order for a course to be considered a general-education international course, it must provide instruction in the “values, attitudes and norms that constitute the culture of countries outside of the United States” (“General Education Program,” 2013).

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» Financial Support for Students: During the 2011-2012 academic year, the university provided about $547 million in financial aid to its students. Scholarship money, not required by students to be repaid, accounted for about $189 million of that total (“Publications: Annual Report 2011 2012,” 2012). Compared to years past, the university has remained consistent with providing aid to students. In 2010, UF dispersed in total, $541,647,517 to more than 47,000 students (“Publications: Annual Report 2010-2011,” 2011). In comparison, UF awarded nearly 6 million more to students in the 2001-2012 academic year than the 2010-2011 year.

(“Study Abroad Open Doors Report,” 2011). Of the students who participated 667 of them were males and 1314 were females, who were apart of 13 different major field of study (“Study Abroad Open Doors Report,” 2011).


The courses are intended to provide an opportunity for students to study how geographic location and socioeconomic factors can affect a culture, and are offered in more than 50 subject areas of study, such as: African American studies, building construction, music, languages and more (“University of Florida Office of the Registrar,” 2014). » Study Abroad Programs: The university has study abroad programs in place that provide students experiences at more than 1,090 universities in more than 90 countries throughout the world (“About Us: University of Florida International Center,” 2011). The range of programs available include subject areas such as language study, pharmacy and archeology (“Programs,” 2011). In addition to study abroad programs, the Warrington College of Business offers dual study abroad and internship experience programs in cities such as London (“Programs,” 2011). Study abroad and internship programs are also available in Salzburg, Sydney, Paris, Madrid, Florence and Dublin through various departments on campus (“Programs,” 2011), and colleges such as the College of Journalism and Communications offer their own self-contained trips. » Alumni Association Network: Nearly 55,000 alumni are members of the official University of Florida Alumni Association, making it the largest dues-paying association in the Southeastern Conference and, according to the association’s website, one of the top 15 in the United States (“About: University of Florida Alumni Association,” 2012). Gator Clubs® raise millions in academic and athletic scholarships, supporting more than 200 students every year. The total alumni on record, about 350,000, reside in every state and in more than 130 foreign countries. » International Gator Day: Yearly, Gator Clubs® across the globe participate in service projects during this day, which happens in the spring, meant to empower graduates and impact their local communities (“International Gator Day,” 2013).

Weaknesses

Internal weaknesses at UF may detract from the ability of a communications campaign to effectively mobilize awareness, understanding and action regarding the QEP’s internalization focus. Weaknesses we observed included; scarcity of financial support for study abroad, lack of funding for international students, low percentage of study abroad students, possible declining trend in study abroad numbers, disparity among colleges in number of students studying abroad, outdated internationally focused communications methods, decreasing enrollment in international courses and international programs. Below, each of the weaknesses is described in detail. » Disparity Among Colleges in Number of Study Abroad Students: During the 2011 – 2012 academic year, 632 students majoring in social sciences and 584 students majoring in business and management studied abroad – but, compared to most other disciplines, these numbers are high (“Study Abroad Open Doors Report,” 2012). As an extreme example, only 10 students majoring in mathematics or computer sciences and only 27 students majoring in education studied abroad this same year. Nationally, a disproportionate number of students in areas of concentration outside the STEM – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – fields study abroad. In the 2011 – 2012 academic year, a total of 283,332 students studied abroad. Of those, 63,427 students, 22.4 percent, were studying social sciences, 58,091 students, 20.5 percent, business and only 4,861 students, 1.7 percent, math or computer sciences (“Fast Facts Open Doors,” 2013).


RESEARCH 2011 saw an increase; from the year 2010 – 2010 to 2011 – 2012 another decrease was observed. In general, the trend appears to be a decline in the number of students choosing to study abroad at UF. The gap between the 2010 – 2011 and 2011 – 2012 numbers is fairly significant, 2,075 compared to 1,991. In fact, the Institute for Education ranked UF number 6 in 2004 for the amount of students it had study abroad compared to other American universities; the ranking has gradually fallen since then to No. 15 (“Open Doors Data U.S. Study Abroad,” 2013).

» Percentage of Study Abroad Students Compared to Total Population: Although the Institute of International Education ranked UF as one of the top in the nation for highest number of students who study abroad, only about 4% of students, 1,991, studied abroad during the 2011 – 2012 academic year, despite the extensive program options (“Open Doors: Institute of International Education,” 2013). There has been a small but steady increase in students who participate in study abroad since the 2008-2009 academic year. However, between the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic year there was nearly a 100-student drop, from 2075 to 1991, in students who participated in study abroad. (“Study Abroad Open Doors Report,” 2011) » Possible Declining Trend in Study Abroad Numbers: Numbers of students studying abroad decreased between the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 years, and between the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 years (“Study Abroad Open Doors Report,” 2012). Although the next two academic years, 2009 – 2010 and 2010 –

» Low Number of International Students: According to U.S. News, UF doesn’t rank as a university with a large percentage of international students when compared to other universities throughout the United States (“Most International Students,” 2014). Among the top 20 are three Florida schools. Ranking No. 2, the Florida Institute of Technology is at 28 percent international, Lynn University ranks fourth at 22 percent and University of Miami ranks 19th with 12 percent. This speaks to the ability of UF to become more internationalized, as three Florida schools rank among the top 20 universities with most international students. » Lack of Funding for International Students: International students attending the University of Florida receive even less funding than study abroad students – the investment totals only about $25,000 per year for about 15 students (“UFIC Scholarships and Awards,” 2011). According to the National Association of Foreign Student Advisers, minimal scholarship aid is available to international students, and generally of the aid that is reserved most goes toward graduate study. NASFA also noted that generally, U.S. institutions offer very little, if any, discount on tuition (“Financial Aid for Undergraduate International Students,” 2014).

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» Scarcity of Financial Support for Study Abroad: Although many opportunities to receive scholarships exist at the university, there is only one scholarship offered to students studying abroad, the Daniel Sinclair Bredahl Scholarship. The total disbursed for this scholarship is about $100,000 – allocated toward just 75 students (“UFIC Scholarships & Awards,” 2011). This is only about 0.053% of the total scholarship money the university awards each year.

Nationally, however, total study abroad numbers from the 2011 – 2012 to 2010 – 2011 academic years increased by 3.4 percent.


» Internationally Focused Communications Methods Outdated: The International Center’s newsletters are outdated – the last was from September 2012, and there is limited campus outreach pertaining to the center and its activities. The only current event for students interested in internationalization available on UFIC’s webpage is the study abroad fair on Jan. 9th. » Enrollment in International Courses is Decreasing: According to the 2011 SERU student attitude survey, (“Student Experience in the Research University Report,” 2011) the percentage of freshman enrolled in courses with an international focus was 58%, the percentage of sophomores and juniors, 40% and the percentage of seniors, 45%. These rates have declined since 2009 – in 2009, the percentages of sophomores, juniors and seniors were 70%, 62% and 68%, respectively. Additionally, the numbers of students taking international courses differed substantially among colleges – for example, the in the College of Journalism and Communications, 54% of students were enrolled in these courses, but 30% in the College of Public Health and Heath Professions were enrolled, and these percentages have also each decreased by about 30% since 2009. This data speaks to the trend in the majors of students who are studying abroad. Through research we see that a much higher percentage of students in the humanities and communications fields, rather than the sciences, study abroad. » Enrollment in International Programs: According to the most recent SERU survey data, only 10 percent of UF respondents indicated that they were working toward a certificate, minor or major in an area with an international or global focus (“Student Experience in the Research University,” 2011). Of this 10 percent, five percent of freshman, six percent of sophomores, seven percent of juniors and 13 percent of graduating seniors obtained or worked toward a certificate, minor or major with an international or global them. Although when compared to 2011, these numbers have risen, freshman fell at 3 percent, sophomores at 5 percent, juniors at 7 percent and seniors at 11 percent. Other universities that par-

ticipated in the SERU study reported higher percentages; however, these percentages were not specifically noted in the report.

Opportunities

As a large institution, the University of Florida has many opportunities that the Quality Enhancement Plan can benefit from. Our communications plan and campaign will utilize these following opportunities, which include: student organizations, 2013 legislative preeminence bill and online degree programs. » Student Organizations: More than 975 student organizations exist at UF. Of these, 70* are self-identified as “international” (“Student Organizations,” 2011). Organizations that self-identify as “international,” typically have an international element. For example, the International Student Speakers’ Bureau is self-identifies as international organization because it is comprised of international students studying at the University of Florida. In order to participate in a student organization at the University of Florida you must be a current undergraduate or graduate student. Students unsatisfied with existing organizations are encouraged by the University of Florida Department of Student Activities and Involvement to create their own through a registration process, which opens in April. *See complete list of international student organizations in the Appendix. » 2013 Legislative Preeminence Bill: Governor Rick Scott has designated UF as a ‘Preeminent University,’ in accordance with the Preeminence Bill in 2013 (“2013 Legislative Summary,” 2013). This has provided the university with $15 million per year for five years. The legislation also covers the start-up cost of $10 million for the Institute of Online Learning and another $5 million for operational expenses. The Preeminence Bill is designed to advance UF’s academic and research programs. There are also roughly 16 legislative items approved or waiting to be approved by Governor Rick Scott, which are designed to help support UF and its goal of higher education, according to the 2013 Legislative Summary.


RESEARCH » UF Online Degrees: The University of Florida offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees online. The process still requires formal admission to UF, and students must be seeking a degree from a discipline within the Distance Learning Program (“Online Degree Programs,” 2014). This is designed to be flexible and convenient, to allow students to take classes from virtually anywhere. Four international programs also exist: Master of International Construction Management; Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences – Clinical Pharmacy; Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences – Forensic Science; and Audiology.

Threats

» Tuition Increase: Although UF’s tuition expense is less than the average net cost of tuition at an American university, according to the CollegeCalc website, it has increased from $3,206 to $5,657 during a five-year period (“CollegeCalc: University of Florida,” 2013). This is an annual increase of 15.3%. On average, national universities increase tuition by only 5% each year. The negative ramifications of this could potentially impact students in deciding whether or not to attend UF or to study abroad. Additionally, the legislative board seeks to authorize a 3% increase in tuition fees from $5,657 to $5,827 (“2013 Legislative Summary,” 2013). » Scholarships Among Competitors: The University of Florida International Center offers about 30 scholarships and awards to students seeking to study abroad. Other, similar institutions in the southeast offer more: The University of Georgia offers about 78, (“University of Georgia Office of International Education,” n.d.) Florida State University offers about 73 (“Money Matters,” n.d.) and the University of Central Florida offers about 49 international-study

» Economic Risk: The latest recession is having an adverse effect on universities and colleges. Students graduating are having a harder time finding jobs, according to a Bloomberg report (Shilling, 2012). Nationally, only 49 percent of graduates from the classes of 2009 to 2011 found jobs within their first year out of school, compared with 73 percent of those who graduated just three years earlier in 2006. The increased sense of economic risk is causing more young adults to reconsider pursuing a degree or an advanced degree, and impacting the enrollment rates at institutions nationally.

PUBLIC RELATIONS AUDIT

Internal Environment

The internal environment section of the public relations audit consists of any inside factors contributing to the success or failure of UF and its international center. The internal environment has a significant role in the operating efficiency of the UFIC and the end results of the QEP. » Niche: The University of Florida is one of the most comprehensive public land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant research universities in the United States (“University of Florida Mission Statement,” 2014). It is the largest and oldest of the 11 universities in the state of Florida and belongs to the Association of American Universities. UF is also ranked 74 out of 650 American universities, 41 out of all of the American research universities and 11 out of all of the southern American universities (“University of Florida,” 2014). » Performance: According to U.S. News & World Report, the University of Florida retains 95.8 percent of incoming freshman, and the graduation rate within four years is 64% (“Facts and Rankings,” 2013). Out of all the universities in the United States, UF ranked 15 for the number of students who studied abroad during the 2011 – 2012 school year, with 1,991 students (“U.S. Study Abroad,” 2013). Although the ranking has

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As a large institution, the University of Florida has few threats that would stand in the way of the successful implementation of the Quality Enhancement Plan. However, we have identified the following as threats: tuition increase, scholarships among competitors and the economic crisis. Below, each of the threats is outlined in detail.

specific scholarships (“University of Central Florida Study Abroad,” n.d.).


fluctuated over the past few years, UF has consistently been on the Institute of International Education’s top 25 list. U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 rankings placed the University of Florida at No. 14 in the nation’s best public universities, which is three spots up from the 2012 rank (“Facts and Ranking,” 2013). According to the report, UF improved its performance in multiple areas such as graduation and retention rank, expected graduation rate, selectivity, and alumni giving rank, faculty resources and percentage of classes with fewer than 20 students. UF also ranked fourth nationally among universities that are launching startup companies with the university’s technologies. U.S. News & World Report also ranks UF No. 17 in “Top Public Universities,” (“Facts and Ranking,” 2013) Kiplinger’s ranks UF No. 3 in “Best Values in Public Colleges,” the Fiske Guide to Colleges list of Best Buys Among Publics ranks it No. 3 and Forbes ranks UF No. 15 on the list of best public universities. UF was ranked ninth by job recruiters on the list of places where corporations want to recruit new employees. It also ranked No. 21 in the category of National Universities in the 2012 Washington Monthly magazine College Rankings. According to the Wall Street Journal’s SmartMoney Magazine, UF offers students and their families the second-highest return on investment of American universities (“UF Climbs,” 2013). UF also had the nation’s best career services in 2010 and 2012 according to the Princeton Review. The Career Resource Center is currently ranked No. 5 in the nation. According to Forbes, UF ranks No. 74 overall in America’s Top Colleges, No. 41 in America’s Research Universities and No. 11 in America’s Colleges in the South. Forbes partnered with the Washington, D.C.based Center for College Affordability and Productivity (CCAP) to produce the rankings (“Ranking America’s Top Colleges 2013,” 2013). The rankings focus more on what students are getting out of attending the colleges, rather than what it takes to get into the colleges.

» Structure: General The University of Florida’s strongest governing body is the Board of Trustees. The Board is the university’s legal owner, final authority and policy creator. The board is responsible for ensuring UF’s resources are used efficiently and effectively. The Governor appoints six members of the board, and the Board of Governors appoints the other five members. The Student Body President and the Chair of the Faculty Senate are also voting members. The Board of Trustees is responsible for appointing the president of the university, who serves as the chief executive officer and is responsible for the administration of all university activities. The Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs is the second ranking officer of UF, serving as the chief academic officer and acting for the President when he is not able to. The Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources, who manages the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the Senior Vice President for Health Affairs, who supervises the Health Science Center, both assume responsibility for the budgeting and administration of their separate budgetary units within the university. The Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer manages six departments and has six vice presidents who report directly to the Senior Vice President. These departments are the Division of Business Affairs, the Office of Human Resource Services, the Office of Research, the Division of Information Technology, the Chief Audit Executive and the Office of Technology Licensing. The Senior VP also presides as the President of the University of Florida Research Foundation. Besides these six departments, there are also vice presidents for Development and Alumni Affairs, Enrollment Management, Finance, General Counsel, Students Affairs, the University Athletic Association and University Relations. The vice presidents of these departments report to either the Senior VP or the President directly. The faculty senate is the group of faculty members who represent the faculty as a whole. The members have mutual authority and responsibility, and they


RESEARCH strive to enhance UF’s academic reputation and increase the quality of education the university provides.

» Structure: Communications Inside UF is a section of the University of Florida’s website that is dedicated to providing students with news releases from all areas of the University. The University of Florida News Center prepares the releases, and Steve Orlando, the senior director of media relations, manages the site. Other key members of the media relations department are: Chris Moran, director of communications; Ron Wayne, news center editor; and Kay Howell, executive secretary and web content coordinator. The Gator Times is a student-focused news site that reaches all students at UF. A weekly email is sent to every student registered at UF via his or her Gatorlink email address. The newsletter provides information about campus events, academic opportunities, community opportunities, academic announcements and administrative announcements. Additional articles and news can be found on the site, which is edited by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

» Internal Impediments: According to numbers from the UFIC, the amount of scholarship money given to students to pursue international studies is only 0.053 percent of the total scholarship money UF distributes to students (“UFIC Scholarships & Awards,” 2011). Our primary research indicates that students perceive the expense of studying abroad to be a considerable limitation, and occasionally the ultimate deciding factor that prevents them from pursuing the experience. Our primary research indicated that many students don’t study abroad because it is not affordable or does not fit into their class schedules. Students might be more involved in internationalization efforts without these impediments. As a student in the College of Design, Construction and Planning said, “We live in a global world, that’s self-evident. I think that the university is doing all the efforts to create the options… the step that’s needed are funds for students to do these things.” Another impediment is that the student body and faculty believe the UFIC does not have enough campus outreach initiatives to keep the campus community updated about international activities and opportunities. Outdated pages and newsletters on the center’s website substantialize this and indicate our interviewees were accurate in their observations. The general education course requirements also only mandate undergraduates take one three-credit international course, which is one of the lowest categorical requirements, presenting an obstacle in internationalizing the university.

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The University of Florida International Center “serves as an internal and external liaison for the University, providing a source of assistance to faculty, administrators and students and enhancing their ability to pursue and develop international activities and initiatives” (“About Us: UFIC”). The four main departments of the center are Exchange Visitor Services, International Student Services, Study Abroad Services and Program Development. The Executive Director of the UFIC is responsible for the day-to-day internal operations. The Dean of the university is responsible for the external operations of the center and connecting the center to external campus organizations and organizations around the world. Currently, the UFIC has 38 staff members, which consist of 34 full-time positions and four part-time and student-worker positions.

Bruce Floyd is the Social Media Specialist in the University Relations Department. He is in charge of the content on UF’s Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. UF has more than 534,000 likes on Facebook, 61,320 followers on Twitter, 18,175 followers on Instagram and 2,070 people subscribed to their YouTube channel. The university actively updates each of these social media platforms, except YouTube, multiple times each day and responds to student engagement on these mediums (“Social Media,” 2014).


International students considering enrolling at UF may be misinformed about programs or pricing, based on existing communications. They may read outdated information that discourages them from attending UF, such as not meeting certain requirements or the program they are looking for not existing. UF continues to raise tuition prices so that its rates are equal to or more than the national average rates. Because UF is a top ranking university, the UF Board of Trustees feels the tuition rates need to be at least equivalent to other universities’ rates with similar rankings (“Publications,” 2014). This is an impediment because it makes it financially challenging for international students to attend UF. There are other universities in the country, and even the state, which have lower tuition rates than UF. It will be difficult to encourage international students to pay higher tuition to attend UF, when they can attend a cheaper university in the same state. The lack of faculty support for the QEP is also an internal impediment. Based on interviews conducted with UF faculty members, the faculty is concerned about having enough resources to implement this plan. According to a professor in the Department of Criminology, “The question becomes one of resources and where are the monetary resources coming from. Will there be new additional funds available just for this or are they taking it from somewhere else? Will there be more faculty to add the new courses? There is always a struggle for resources.” UF faculty members also expressed their concern with the plan actually being carried out due to the lack of structure and accountability. According to a professor in the Department of Political Science, “I’m always skeptical of “accreditation” planning, in part because the planning and the implementation seem to have disjointed motivations. Often it seems like all you have to do is show them what you’re going to do and not necessarily implement the plan. Although I don’t think it’s purely a negative motivation, I do think it’s often more complicated socially, politically and economically than a lot of people acknowledge. Always the problem with something like this is that there’s a structure, but not an agent. There’s no one

directly responsible for it.” The faculty members are the ones ultimately responsible for ensuring international education is worked into the curriculum, so the doubt and resistance from faculty members will be one of the largest internal struggles for implementing the QEP. Another impediment is that faculty members who work primarily with graduate students feel that the QEP won’t affect them or their departments, because it is aimed toward internationalizing the undergraduate population. A professor in the College of Pharmacy said, “It’s mostly geared to the undergraduates, and we’re a professional school, so we’re not part of the undergraduate, and there are certain things that are done in the programs for undergraduate, and we don’t follow all those rules.” A professor in the College of Public Health and Health Professions said, “I was in on some of the preliminary discussions, so I know that it’s related to undergraduate students mostly, where I work mostly with graduate students.”

External Environment

The external environment portion of the public relations audit consists of any outside factors contributing to the success or failure of UF and its international center. The external environment plays a significant role in the operating efficiency of the UFIC and the end results of the QEP. » External Impediments: External Impediments are social, political or economic factors that influence the situation UF’s campaign for internationalization faces. The 2012-2013 state budget governor Rick Scott signed cut the total amount of university funding by $300 million, specifically cutting UF’s funding by $38 million (DiSalvo, 2012). Funding cuts such as these are detrimental to UF’s international center, because it already receives minimal funding to send students abroad and to advertise its services. Since 2006, UF’s funding has been reduced 30 percent, or by $240 million (Moyer, 2012). The financial budget for 2013-2014 was almost the complete opposite. Governor Rick Scott restored


RESEARCH the $300 million back to Florida universities. This university budget gave UF $15 million for the next five years to become one of the top ten universities in the nation. The budget also gave UF money to make much-needed renovations, increase employees’ salaries and raise tuition (“2013 Legislative Summary,” 2013). Although this is an extraordinary accomplishment for UF and other Florida universities, the budgets for the upcoming years, which will be still determined by the governor, are still unpredictable and can result in even more funding cuts than before. There was also no mention of internationalizing the campus more or funding more international programs.

» Opponents: An opponent to UF’s internationalization plan would be any individual, company, group or organization actively against the university’s efforts. Our research didn’t lead to the discovery of any realistic opponents working against the internationalization of UF, although it revealed many competitors.

Competitors

Eight institutions, in addition to UF, have already developed strategic internationalization plans (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 21). Four institutions in Florida alone have written QEPs themed specifically around internationalization: University of Central Florida, Florida International University, University of Tampa and Rollins College. Other institutions across the U.S. – Duke University, the University of Tennessee, Wake Forest University and Kennesaw State University –

» Florida International University: Similar to UF’s proposed QEP, Florida International University’s focus in its 2010 QEP was on curriculum, co-curricular activities and faculty development. The plan set a process that would “enable every undergraduate to develop global awareness, a global perspective and an attitude of global engagement,” (Rosenberg, Wartzok, 2010, p. 9) and allocated a budget of $4.11 million for the effort. Distinguishing FIU from UF, however, is the fact that 83% of its student body – about 40,000 total – are from minority groups, whereas only 30% of UF’s population – about 49,000 – are from minority groups. » University of Tampa: The University of Tampa’s QEP also had a three-fold approach, centered around creating an environment to promote international competency, increasing international experiences and opportunities and “maximizing learning outcomes through repeated exposures” (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 22). Of particular relevance to UF concerning this university as a competitor is its Certificate of International Studies program.

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Another external impediment is the economic downturn, which has had a major impact on universities, according to a “Bloomberg” article (Shilling, 2012). Only 54 percent of 18 to 24 year olds are employed, which is the lowest number since data collection began in 1948. Also, the average debt for new graduates from 24 percent between 2000 and 2010, and one third of graduates who are employed take jobs that don’t require a four-year degree. As more students graduate college owing debt and without job security, current students are inevitably disinclined to spend on expenditures such as study abroad programs.

have also focused QEPs on internationalization. » University of Central Florida: Goals of the University of Central Florida’s 2009 – 2012 QEP included enhancing its reputation worldwide, graduating students who are competitive in the global market and creating “an international campus climate” (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 21). By increasing on-campus opportunities and activities and collaborating with institutions abroad, UCF aimed to engage students in internationalization efforts. Interestingly, in contrast to UF’s, its plan didn’t call for increased promotion of study abroad programs. UCF’s domestic focus has the potential to create a comparative advantage for the university if it is successful, and generates action from one of the largest undergraduate populations of any U.S. university – nearly 60,000 students (Smith-Barrow, 2013). UCF also offers 49 international-study specific scholarships – 19 more than UF offers (“University of Central Florida Office of International Studies,” 2014).


» Rollins College: The QEP Rollins College created in 2005 had five initiatives: leadership and citizenship, student recruitment and retention, academic and social integrity, internationalization and diversity (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 22). The institution has expected to see “measurable evidence of increased personal responsibility for campus culture,” and “student learning gains in relation to citizenship, leadership, diversity and involvement in local and global communities” (Carrier, 2005, p. 10). Goals of Rollins’ also included several related to increasing academic achievement and graduation rates, much unlike UF’s. Despite its concern about improving in these areas, however, Rollins College is a significant competitor to UF as an alternative to the public university. It was No. 1 in the 2014 edition of U.S. News’ Southern Regional University rankings (“Best Colleges,” 2014). » Duke University: The QEP proposed by Duke University in 2009 differed from similar plans at other universities in that its primary components were more specific, tactical elements: the Winter Forum, a two and a half-day on-campus program; a “Global Semester Abroad,” a program that compares an issue in two countries; and the global advising program, a resource for all students (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 21). » University of Tennessee: Similar to UF, the University of Tennessee’s QEP in 2005 was meant to move “intercultural and international studies from the periphery to the center of the institution” (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 21). Its proposal was a 16-point action plan that incorporated participation from across the university – including reviews of general education requirements and curriculum. » Wake Forest University: At the time Wake Forest University initiated its QEP, 50% of students were already involved with academic study abroad (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 21). The two initiatives of the plan were “to enhance the quality of student international experiences” and to increase participation in these experiences.

» Kennesaw State University: Kennesaw State University also seeks to improve its position as a global university, and in 2009 proposed a QEP similar to Wake Forest’s, that aimed to bring “focus, structure, coordination, integration, assessment and substance to the internationalization process” (Kennesaw State University Office of the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs,” 2009).

Supporters

Any individual, organization, company or group of people interested in UF’s initiatives to become a more internationalized campus, and engaged in these efforts, is a supporter. » Alumni: The University of Florida has more than 365,000 alumni located in all states and more than 135 countries (“About: University of Florida Alumni Association,” 2012). The alumni provide financial support to the university and help increase recognition of UF throughout the world. The University of Florida Alumni Association has almost 350,000 members. The association coordinates nearly 100 Gator Clubs in Florida, throughout the country and internationally. The clubs are groups of UF alumni who represent and promote UF in their communities. They organize programs and events to support the university and help recruit qualified and promising students to attend UF. The alumni association also hosts outreach programs that send faculty and administration members on the road to promote the university and spread UF’s mission and goals. They also provide networking and employment opportunities for students and recent alumni members. The clubs provide financial assistance programs, such as scholarships, to UF students. » Students: The University of Florida 49,785 students enrolled – of those, 32,008 are undergraduates and 6,000 are international students (“Stats and Facts and Facts for Prospective Students,” n.d.). More than 96 percent of incoming freshman at UF score higher than the national average on standardized college entrance ex-


RESEARCH ams, which helps to give UF the prestigious ranking it has achieved. The freshman class that entered the university for the fall 2013 semester had an average GPA of 4.3 and an average SAT score of 1967. In the fall of 2011, UF admitted 1,375 International Baccalaureate students, which is more than any other U.S. university. The university ranks second out of all the public institutions in the U.S., and fifth out of all public institutions internationally, for the number of National Merit Scholars enrolled. The abilities of these students and their academic achievements give the university these rankings. Without the abilities and achievements of its students, the university wouldn’t receive the high level of funding that it does, because it wouldn’t have the academic prestige.

» Faculty Members: UF has more than 5,000 faculty members, which gives it a student-faculty ratio of 21:1 (“Faculty and Staff,” 2014). In the 2010-2011 academic year, the faculty attracted more than $600 million in research and training grants to the university. More than two dozen UF faculty are members of the National Academies of Science and/or Engineering, the Institute of Medicine or a counterpart in another nation. The University of Florida has more than 50 Eminent

While conducting our primary research, it was clear that faculty members showed an interest in increasing internationalization efforts on campus. One faculty member from the Department of Tourism said, “To me it makes a lot of sense because our students are not just going to work here, in the state of Florida or even in the United States, they’re going to work around the world and the more they are familiar, the more they’re going to be prepared”. Another faculty member from the College of Pharmacy stated, “And I think when they went back to the deans to ask what they would want for accreditation, and what they wanted to focus on, and it was unanimous that internationalization for a university of this type – research, public university, large, aspiring to be a top ten university that internationalization was important - and so it was reconfirmed that this would be the subject of the QEP.” A faculty member in the Department of Political Science said, “I think internationalization is crucially important. If we want to be a great school, it really needs to matter.” Faculty recognize internationalization as “the way of the world.” A faculty member in the Department of Tourism said, “And if you’re not moving forward, you’re probably moving backward, because someone else is moving forward. If the university would like to be considered a top tier university, it’s that important, because other universities are moving forward through technology, travel opportunities and the Internet.” In their opinion, helping the university to become more internationalized will help it reach the top ten ranking it’s trying to acquire.

Public Perception

» Visibility The University of Florida is a prestigious university well known throughout the world. There are more than 49,000 students, 5,000 faculty members and 365,000 alumni members. These individuals come from more than 135 countries all over the world

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According to our primary research, students believe UF becoming internationalized is important and want to embrace the opportunity to learn more about other nations. A student in the College of Nursing said, “I definitely think that it would be beneficial for us to work with other people. One quote that I love is, “Every single person you’re going to meet in your life knows something that you don’t know,” and whether it’s someone from another country or someone from another city, or state or whatever, I think we can all learn things from each other.” A student from the College of Design, Construction and Planning said, “I think it’s important that different people get a lot of different perspectives. I know a lot of the international students come here because they don’t have the same opportunities back home. I think not only does it help them but it also helps us as a school to have the diversity in the program.”

Scholar Chairs, which are positions funded at more than $1 million each to attract nationally and internationally recognized scholar.


and each of the 50 states in the US. UF is mentioned as one of the top universities in the nation from many credible sources such as US News, Forbes and Kiplinger. It is also a well-known research university, being one of only 17 public, land-grant universities in the nation and belongs to the Association of American Universities (“Kiplinger’s Best Value in Public Colleges,” 2013). The University of Florida’s Facebook page has more than 530,000 ‘likes’ and more than 1,5000 people talking about it. The UFIC’s Facebook page has more than 1,400 ‘likes’ and 13 people talking about it. Most of the news coverage about the University of Florida right now is focused on the push to become a top 10 public university in the U.S., the “UF Rising” campaign. UF recently announced its intended to recruit top minds in personalized medicine, unmanned vehicles, online learning and seven other fields as part of this initiative. The university committed to use the more than $13.3 million from the state earmarked for “UF Rising” to bring in a maximum of 100 researchers with national stature (“UF to Expand its Brain Gain Push,” 2014). » Reputation According to primary research we conducted, the majority of faculty members believe that UF is becoming more internationalized. A faculty member in the Department of Psychology said, “UF is definitely more international today than it was when I arrived. They offer more opportunities and have expanded a lot.” A professor in the Department of Criminology said, ““Yes, there have been different ways in which we have been encouraged to internationalize curriculum, and I believe it’s an evolution of the larger society with globalization. It has been imperative to build some of those components into the social sciences and humanities as well.” The majority of students also consider UF an internationally focused university. A student from the Department of Psychology said, ““I believe that UF is extremely focused on the international community and its workings. I say that because I have seen the number of student organizations that are dedicated to international groups, and many events that UF spon-

sors revolves around the celebration of many different types of cultures.” A student from the College of Fine Arts said, “I think the University of Florida really gets its name out there and students from other countries know about us and want to. When they come to the United States they want to come to our university. And I found just even from looking around campus that the University of Florida really does have an international scope. There are a lot of programs that we offer to benefit our international students and that’s not only from the outside going in, it’s also from the inside going out.

RESEARCH ON THE SITUATION The Quality Enhancement Plan and Process of Issue Identification The University of Florida is focusing resources on becoming more internationalized, and its leadership, along with an internationalization task force, has proposed a five-year quality enhancement plan, QEP, supporting this effort – this document is intended not only to guide the university in a new direction, but also to serve as a key component of the ongoing accreditation process dictated by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, SACS. According to the QEP, it was a 2003 self-study and report that “served as the springboard for the development of internationalization as an area of strategic importance for the institution (Miller, Villalón, & Brophy, 2014, p. 5). Additionally, two other initiatives were influential in laying the groundwork for the QEP: President Machen’s 2007 strategic work plan and Provost Joseph Glover’s 2011 campus-wide initiative for “enhancing the quality of academic programs,” which both had internationalization as central themes. Analysis of data from the biennial census study of the university climate, the Student Experience in the Research University, SERU, survey, exposed additional concerns regarding internationalization to the task force. Essentially, the survey revealed that there is a discrepancy in the percentage of students at all


RESEARCH academic levels who actually study abroad, and the percentage of students who wanted to; the survey also revealed “substantial decreases” in enrollment numbers for courses in every college with international focuses from 2009 to 20011 and 2013 (Miller, et al., 2014, pg. 11). These findings undoubtedly highlighted to the task force the importance of explicitly addressing internationalization within the university, and attempting to realign campus trends with the institution’s mission to “prepare graduates for success in a global society” (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 5). After determining internationalization as the subject of the QEP, the task force arranged itself into five “working groups,” including literature review and research, communications, campus initiatives, evaluation and writing, (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 7) in order to gain insights into the situation, leverage existing research and establish a model for internationalization at UF.

certification as an incentive for students to engage in international learning, expand current co-curricular activities, such as the annual Global Gator Initiative conference for creating social change, and allocate resources to support these efforts (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 27-30).

Out of this process came the identification of two international “competencies” the university seeks to “develop and measure in students:” global awareness and intercultural competence (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 7). Additionally, the task force identified three learning outcomes to measure these competencies, based on content, critical thinking and communication:

The American Council on Education’s report by the Center for International and Global Engagement, Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses, however, describes internationalization as “incorporating global perspectives into teaching, learning and research; building competence among students faculty and staff; and establishing relationships and collaborations with people and intuitions abroad” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 3).

And finally, to advance the overall goal of the QEP of enhanced internationalism in the undergraduate learning experience, the task force identified the following campus initiatives as areas to improve: study abroad, curriculum, campus life, international resources and the international scholars program. In these areas, the task force has intentions to: increase participation in study abroad, review curriculum and add new international studies classes, create an ‘International Scholars Program’ medallion

As the QEP task force’s literature review revealed, definitions of ‘internationalization’ regarding higher education that have been established during the past 30 years have varied remarkably, but “more recently, internationalization of higher education has been defined as ‘the process of integrating an international, intercultural or global dimension into the purpose, functions or delivery of post-secondary education,’” (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 17) a conceptualization the QEP’s authors endorse in the document.

According the ACE’s Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement, CIGE, “the circumstances and demands of the current era require a deeper commitment on the part of institutions, and a far-reaching scope of action,” concerning internationalization on America’s campuses American Council on Education, 2012, p. 3). It’s not enough to continue the rhetoric on the subject that’s been ongoing for decades and employ outdated models – institutions must engage in “comprehensive internationalization.” Comprehensive internationalization is a strategic and coordinated process. It “seeks to align and integrate international policies, programs and initiatives, and positions colleges and universities as more globally oriented and internationally connected” American

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» SLO 1: Students identify, describe and explain global and intercultural conditions and interde pendencies. » SLO 2: Students analyze and interpret global and intercultural issues. » SLO 3: Students communicate effectively with members of other cultures.

Internationalism: Defining an Abstract Concept


Council on Education, 2012, p. 4). For this to be successful, an institution’s leaders must be involved, and its curriculum and various stakeholders must be impacted. However, according to a report, Academic Internationalism: U.S. Universities in Transition, based on consultations from the Social Science Research Council, SSRC, in 2008, despite a general consensus that our institutions “are undergoing a process of globalization,” (Stevens & Miller-Idriss, 2009, p. 1) there is a lack of agreement about “what globalization means, what propels it, or what intellectual, political and ethical consequences it will bring for American higher education.” Limited systematic and empirical research on globalization or internationalization exists, and “there is no clear social science research agenda or intellectual framework” for assessing it, according to the SSRC. “Consequently, scholarly discussions on the topic are often anecdotal, conjectural and highly polemical.”

Contextualizing Internationalism – Motivations Behind the QEP

The SSRC’s research, funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Education and International Research and Studies Program, attempts to place internationalism into historical and intuitional context, in an effort to compensate for the confusion that appears to exist regarding the definition of internationalization and its effects in a world of disappearing global boundaries. The council identified two major “epochs” for universities, based on the driving forces behind ever-increasing emphasis on internationalization. After World War II, the United States “built the largest and most widely emulated national higher education system in world history,” (Stevens & Miller-Idriss, 2009, p. 3) with internationalization efforts revolving around the study of foreign language to advance national security interests under Title VI of the National Defense Education Act of 1958, enacted in response to pressure mounting from the Cold War with Russia and the launch of Sputnik. “During the decades since the inception of the legislation and

with the continued encouragement of leading philanthropic institutions, funds awarded to universities under Title VI seeded the development of administrative units devoted to the study of particular world regions” (Stevens & Miller-Idriss, 2009, p. 4). After the Cold War, a period “in which American universities ambitiously seek clients, resources and prestige internationally,” (Stevens & Miller-Idriss, 2009, p. 4) ensued. “Intellectual developments in the humanities, especially, called into question the notion that cultures, nations or world regions could appropriately be conceived as coherent units.” The “area studies” mentality of the Cold War conceded to new approaches to internationalization that spoke to the significance of a more diverse, global perspective – from this, according to the SSRC, fields of study and academic majors such as international relations, global public health and others emerged. The SSRC’s most significant assumption, however, is that the changing trends in internationalization are due to “reorganization of relationships” between universities, governments and students, and that higher education in the U.S. is “undergoing a fundamental transition: from an era of growth through national subsidy to one of survival through entrepreneurial activity; and from a long tradition of service to region and nation to one of service to the globe – an entity that is easy to define geographically but exquisitely difficult to apprehend as a political, intellectual or moral whole” (Stevens & Miller-Idriss, 2009, p. 23). The ACE reinforces this concept: that internationalization isn’t as much of a trend as it is a necessity for academic institutions, whose fundamental duty it is to “prepare students for productive and responsible citizenship (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 3).” In the 21st century, the report says, “this means preparing students to live and work in a society that increasingly operates across international borders. Graduates must possess intercultural skills and competencies to be successful in this globalized world, and higher education institutions must commit to helping students achieve these outcomes.”


RESEARCH Accordingly, the pressure against UF to expand the international competency of its students and increase its accessibility for international students is significant, particularly as a research university attempting to earn recognition as one of the nation’s best, as enumerated in the billion-dollar ‘UF Rising’ campaign (“UF Rising,” 2013). Foreign affairs columnist and three-time Pulitzer prize winner Thomas L. Friedman famously refers to this situation – the phenomena of the ‘shrinking’ world and intense competition – in his book, The World is Flat. He calls it “Globalization 3.0” (Friedman, 2007). As the researchers at the SSRC argue, Friedman also traces its origin to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the revolution of information and interaction it encouraged.

Now, in ‘Globalization 3.0,’ collaboration and competition in real time is possible, among individuals anywhere – these individuals are “on a more equal footing than at any previous time in the history of the world,” (Friedman, 2007, p. 8) with access to the network of information online. “No one anticipated this convergence,” Friedman writes, “It just happened – right around the year 2000. And when it did, people all over the world started waking up and realizing that they had more power than ever to go global as individuals competing against other individuals all over the planet, and they had more opportunities to work with those other individuals, not just compete with them. As a result, every person now must ask, ‘Where do I as an individual fit into the global competition and opportunities of the day, and how can I, on my own,

Another factor important in considering the motivations behind the QEP and the push for internationalization in U.S. institutions is the declining prestige of the American academic system, albeit most relevant to secondary education institutions, and not necessarily post-secondary. Because studies routinely show American students fall behind students in other industrialized countries on international education tests, UF inevitably must distinguish itself if it is to attract these individuals from abroad to the university. In fact, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Program for International Student Assessment, the PISA test, has been reporting that the U.S. is “average” (Friedman, 2012) in the academic performance of students almost entering college. Compared to 69 other countries, it “does not stand out.” Accordingly, American young adults are not as prepared for the rigor of higher education, and could benefit from an influx of international students.

The State of Internationalization on Campuses

The Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses report from the ACE labels itself as the “only comprehensive source of data on internationalization in U.S. higher education institutions,” (“2012 Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses,” 2014) and used survey data collected from 3,357 accredited, degree-granting institutions in 2001, 2006 and 2011. The survey assessed many aspects of campus internationalization, including: » Articulated institutional commitment » Administrative structure and staffing » Curriculum, co-curriculum and learning out comes » Faculty policies and practices » Student mobility » Collaboration and partnerships The ACE’s extensive research offers insights into the state of internationalization at U.S. institutions, concerning the above six key areas of interest.

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Entire countries developed a sense of ‘globalization,’ and, subsequently, companies became ‘globalized,’ until technological advancements – the invention of the personal computer, the rise of the Internet and ultimately the ability for users to create digital content – catalyzed the ‘flattening’ process. According to Friedman, “it is impossible to exaggerate how important this was to the flattening of the world” (Friedman, 2007, p. 56).

collaborate with others globally?’” (Friedman, 2007, p. 10-11).


» Articulated Institutional Commitment: According the ACE, institutions generally perceive the level of internationalization activities on their campuses positively, and also perceive their progress in internationalization positively – “overall, survey respondents perceive that internationalization has accelerated on their campuses in recent years. This was the case for 93% of doctoral institutions, 84% of master’s institutions and 78% of baccalaureate institutions” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 7). Additionally, 2011 saw an increase in the ratio of institutions, 1:2, that refer to internationalism in their mission statements, and significant percentage, 52%, of institutions that report “international education or some aspect of internationalization is among the top five priorities in their current strategic plans” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 7). The percentage of institutions that had an officially recognized, campus-wide plan for internationalization, or a task force or committee exclusively dedicated to the topic, also increased by three percent, from 23% to 26% between 2006 and 2011. Similarly, the percentage of institutions that formally assessed “the impact or progress of their internationalization efforts” between 2006 and 2011 increased, after declining slightly between 2001 and 2006. “It is perhaps unsurprising that formal assessments of internationalization efforts are on the rise,” the ACE reports, because “U.S. higher education in general has become more focused on assessment in recent years” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 8). » Administrative Structure and Staffing: Assigning offices and staff exclusively dedicated to advancing internationalization efforts and implementing and coordinating programs and initiatives, the ACE identified, establishes a “framework” for success in accomplishing university-wide internationalization goals. “Having these offices and staff report to top-level administrators encourages institutional leaders to stay engaged and informed throughout the process…and sends a message about the high priority the institution places on its internationalization agenda” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 9).

According to the ACE’s data, the percentage of institutions with offices or staffs that lead internationalization – such as the UFIC – “increased slightly between 2006 and 2011,” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 9) and “overall, 40% of institutions have a full-time professional staff or faculty member who oversees or coordinates multiple internationalization activities or programs.” Interestingly, the ACE’s data show that the president of an institution is the most influential “catalyst for spurring internationalization” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 10). As mentioned in the QEP, President Machen’s strategic work plan for the university emphasizes internationalism and its importance to the mission and direction of UF. » Curriculum, Co-Curriculum and Learning Outcomes: The ACE’s 2011 survey indicated that a majority, 55%, of institutions have initiatives already in place “to internationalize the undergraduate curriculum,” and reported that 2011 “saw an increase across all sectors nationally in the percentage of institutions that require undergraduates to take courses that feature global trends and issues” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 20). The UF requirement for general education is three credits, out of 36 total general education credits, of international studies – the university has designated 384 courses as international studies courses. According to the QEP, curriculum enhancement at UF has been planned in “two processes:” existing curriculum will be evaluated to determine if all courses meet the three student learning objectives set by the internationalization task force, and new curriculum will be added through the form of courses that “specifically address the student learning outcomes and qualify for the International Scholars Program” (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 28). Although the ACE found that institutions increased their requirements for students to enroll in classes concerning global trends and issues, it discovered that the percentage of institutions that require undergraduates to take courses that “primarily feature perspectives, issues, or events from countries outside


RESEARCH the United States” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 11) decreased. These classes are important because, as the ACE explains, they provide “background and cultural knowledge to contextualize the broader content covered in global issues courses,” and provide deeper understanding rather than breadth of subject matter (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 12).

In terms of co-curricular programs and activities, those held on campuses that are supplemental to academic studies, the ACE found that the most commonly offered were international festivals or events. Having a residence hall designed to “facilitate integration of U.S. and international students” (American Council on Education, p. 12) was also common – more than half, 57%, of institutions in UF’s category had this program in place. UF participates in International Education Week, and also offers experiences through the Division of Student Affairs, such as the Common Reading Program for incoming freshman, living and learning communities through the Housing and Residence Education department, UF Performing Arts, the Samuel P. Harn Museum’s courses, exhibits and lectures, and student organizations – 63 of which are internationally oriented (Miller, et al., p. 26-27). Also observed by the ACE in the 2011 survey data was a “substantial increase in the percentage of institutions that have developed internationally focused student learning objectives” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 13). Arguably, UF has fallen behind other institutions regarding this subject

» Faculty Policies and Practices: Notably, the ACE’s 2011 survey data revealed an increase in the percentage of institutions, from 32% to 68%, that “consider international background, experience and interests when hiring faculty in fields that are not explicitly international” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 14), suggesting that universities are searching for instructors, across all colleges, who can contribute to the diversity of the campus and serve as proponents for internationalization. And because faculty typically want to earn tenure, and may hold their positions for long periods of time, it’s beneficial that institutions select for this trait in hiring. Unfortunately, funding for faculty to “travel to meetings and conferences abroad, and to study or conduct research abroad” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 15) declined from 2006 to 2011 – less than half of the institutions surveyed, 48%, funded international travel, and only 31% funded research abroad. Conversely, however, 2011 saw “substantial gains,” an increase of 10%, in the institutions that fund faculty accompanying and leading students on study abroad programs. At UF, only 18.9% of faculty members surveyed by the UFIC who went abroad listed the reason for leaving the country as accompanying undergraduate or graduate students on a study abroad program (University of Florida International Center, 2013, p. 14). » Student Mobility: In 2011, the ACE found that more institutions were providing scholarships for study abroad, but “despite the promising funding data, 42% of institutions reported no study abroad activity among their 2011 graduates, and 36% reported that less than 5% studied abroad” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 17). These numbers reflect the general decreasing trend in study abroad numbers observed by UF in recent years – in fact, only about 4% of the student body studies abroad during their undergraduate edu-

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International studies classes at UF, however, are described in the undergraduate catalogue as providing “instruction in the values, attitudes and norms that constitute the culture of countries outside the United States,” (“Spring Gen Ed Courses,” n.d.) so the university appears to be ahead of the majority in this respect. Also beneficial for the university is its undergraduate foreign language requirement, which is a requirement the ACE says has “steadily declined over time across all sectors” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 11).

because it wasn’t until the development of the QEP that student learning outcomes explicitly concerning internationalization were created.


cation at the university (“Study Abroad Open Doors Report,” 2012). Also in 2011, more than 60% of institutions surveyed by the ACE provided scholarships or other financial aid for international undergraduate students, and about half had a “strategic international student recruitment plan” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 18). UF is at an advantage compared to the majority of institutions surveyed, however, because of its international alumni networks. The percentage of institutions with these chapters and resources “declined from 13% in 2006 to 9% in 2011” (American Council on Education, 2014, p. 19). » Collaboration and Partnerships: “Though global engagement has been occurring spontaneously for many years in the form of such activities as faculty and student exchanges, faculty-to-faculty research partnerships, and formal or informal cooperation agreements,” the ACE reports, “institutions have begun to think more strategically about these collaborations and the roles they can play in overall institutional internationalization,” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 23). Forty percent of institutions the ACE surveyed that reported an “accelerated focus on internationalization” had implemented campus-wide “policies or guidelines for developing and approving partnerships or assessing existing partnerships” (American Council on Education, 2012, p. 22). These collaborations mostly took the form of joint-degree or certificate programs with overseas institutions or branch campuses.

Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) Findings:

The SERU, designed by the University of California Berkeley Center for Studies in Higher Education, is intended to be a means of gathering information about attitudes, values and beliefs of undergraduate students to improve campuses (“University of Florida Office of Institutional Planning and Research,” 2014). Other universities, in the Association of American

Universities, that distributed the survey included: Indiana University, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of Iowa, the University of Minnesota, Rutgers University, the University of Michigan, the University of Oregon, the University of Texas, the University of Virginia, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Pittsburgh. The survey was administered in 2009, 2011 and 2013. The last distribution produced a 58% response rate among UF students, which was a significantly higher completion rate than other participating universities earned – 17,798 students took the survey (“Student Experience in the Research University,” 2013). Returns were 70% in 2009, 63% in 2011, indicating UF response rates have been decreasing. SERU data revealed that student-reported enrollment in courses with an international focus has substantially decreased, and that the number of participants in study abroad programs has base lined during the last five years (Miller, et al., 2014, p. 38). Questions and responses from the 2013 survey pertaining to internationalization: » Was whether or not a major complemented study abroad important to you when deciding? Students at UF, compared to national results, reported that their majors were generally affected by their desires to study abroad. First year students were more likely to indicate that choosing a major based on if it complemented study abroad was important, with about 55% indicating it was, compared to 50% nationally. Second year students didn’t report that choosing a major based on its possibility for study abroad was as important, with only 48% indicating it was, compared to 44% nationally. Overall, an equal percentage of UF freshman and sophomores indicated this was an important factor as indicated it was not, so these results aren’t incredibly suggestive. It’s worth noting, however, that in general, UF underclassmen were more likely to consider a major’s compatibility with study abroad important to them than students at other universities.


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# of participants % No % Yes

1st year- UF

960

45

55

1st year- Other

7, 500

50

50

2nd year- UF

3, 618

52

48

2nd year- Other 8, 794

56

44

Total- UF

4, 578

50

50

Total- Other

16, 294

53

47

Level

# of participants % No % Yes

1st year- UF

957

37

63

1st year- Other

7,500

41

59

2nd year- UF

3, 607

40

60

2nd year- Other 8, 796

46

54

Total- UF

4, 564

40

60

Total- Other

16, 296

44

56

Level

# of participants

% No

% Yes

1st year- UF

973

78

22

1st year- Other

10,663

81

19

2nd year- UF

3,668

75

25

2nd year- Other

15,155

75

25

3rd year- UF

5,354

65

35

3rd year- Other

17, 429

68

32

4th year- UF

7,803

66

34

4th year- Other

27, 401

70

30

Total- UF

17, 798

68

32

Total- Other

70, 648

72

28

» Have you completed or are you participating in UF study abroad activities? Only 13% of UF students who responded to the survey indicated that they had participated or are participating in study abroad activities with the university – this number seems low, but ultimately is reflective of the slight decline and base-lining of UF study abroad students. Level

# of participants % No % Yes

Total- UF

3,134

Total- Other 11, 237

87

13

84

16

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» Was whether or not a major provides international opportunity important to you? Interestingly, students at UF were also more likely to consider a major’s provision of an international opportunity important to them than students at other universities – and these results were more pronounced than those concerning study abroad. Overwhelmingly, both first and second year UF students reported that this was a factor to their decision of a major, with 63% and 60% indicating it was important. Similar to the previous results, it was less important to sophomores than freshman.

» In the past year have you decided against study abroad to meet expenses? Overwhelmingly, students across all universities responded indicating that in the past year they had not decided against studying abroad for financial reasons, specifically to meet budgeted expenses. This is unexpected, because as our primary and additional secondary research indicated, students generally consider the cost of studying abroad to be a significant, limiting factor in their ability to pursue it. It’s worth noting, however, that UF students across all class years were more likely to have in fact decided against studying abroad for financial reasons than students at other universities. And, nationally, it appears that students are more likely to have decided within the past year against study abroad to meet expenses as they progress academically.


» Have you traveled abroad for service learning, volunteer work experience? Out of the 3,134 respondents to this question from UF, who had traveled abroad, only 11% reported traveling abroad for service learning or volunteer work experience, and a similar result was observed with other students, although it was marginally higher. Level

# of participants % No % Yes

Total- UF

3,134

Total- Other 11,211

89

11

88

12

» Have you traveled abroad for cross-cultural experience or informal education? More students from UF who had traveled abroad reported going for cross-cultural experience or informal education than service work or volunteerism, but it was still a small percentage, at %14, and was the same nationally. Level

# of participants % No % Yes

Total- UF

3, 123

Total- Other 11, 205

86

14

86

14

» Have you traveled for recreation? As expected, more students from UF and other institutions reported that they’d traveled for recreation than for study abroad, service work, volunteer or informal education experience. Thirty-two percent of UF students who’d traveled indicated it was recreational, compared to 29% nationally. Although this percentage is higher than the national, it’s still considerably low for an institution in UF’s position. However, the sample size of respondents for this question and the aforementioned was small. Level

# of participants % No % Yes

Total- UF

3, 131

Total- Other 11, 212

68

32

71

29


RESEARCH Force Field Analysis

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RESEARCH ON PUBLICS

students, and this must be taken into account.

Students

» Juniors & Seniors The upperclassmen, an opinion-leader group, are also an important public because they are most likely to have experienced the initiatives the UFIC and larger university community have implemented to encourage internationalization. They are also more likely to be involved on campus and have influence over their younger peers.

» Freshman & Sophomores The underclassmen at UF are the largest target public our campaign will address – they are an active-aware public, meaning they are generally informed about the idea of internationalization. But, as our research indicates, these publics are limited in engagement and experience with UF’s international opportunities. The incoming students at UF are required to go through an orientation program called Preview. By informing students at Preview of the internationalization efforts at UF, they reach a base level of awareness that is an important first step in transforming them into an active public, meaning they will become invested in the internationalization effort. Students are relatively impressionable at Preview, because it is their first interaction with advisors and peer leaders at UF, and they are looking for guidance in forming their class schedule and selecting activities and organizations to participate in. The Almanac of Higher Education 2013 provides great insight into the opinions of first-year students around the nation (“Almanac of Higher Education 2013,” n.d.). The survey used to obtain the statistics for the almanac, “were obtained from nearly 200,000 first-time full-time students entering 283 four-year colleges in 2012, and were statistically weighted to represent the entire group of entering freshmen. Three categories in the “qualities in which student evaluates self as ‘highest 10 percent’ or ‘above average’” section of the almanac show average and below average percentages in the following categories: openness to having my own views challenged (54%), ability to discuss and negotiate controversial issues (63.2%), and ability to work cooperatively with diverse people. There were 5,741 freshman students who came to UF in 2010 as Florida residents (“Where Does Your Freshman Class Come From,” 2011). This is down by 4.6% in 2006.This decline indicates that more students are coming from out of state. Tuition for out-of-state students is higher than that of in-state

Upperclassmen tend to be more career-oriented than freshman and sophomores. Seniors in particular begin to be more conscious of what will help them land a job after graduation. A senior political science major felt as though he would be motivated to study abroad or participate in an internationalization event upon, “knowing there’s something on the other side after it.” He went on to discuss that incentives such as the possibility of gaining an internship or job with an organization such as the UN or the World bank would motivate students like him to increase involvement in international programs. With graduation on the mind, many seniors like a design, construction and planning student interviewed may think internationalization is “just an extra thing that if you do it’s great, and it’s amazing. But it’s not completely necessary.” On the other hand, one accelerated nursing student noted the benefits of a level of understanding about other cultures. “I definitely think that it would be beneficial for us to work with other people… One quote that I love is that, ‘every single person you’re going to meet in your life knows something that you don’t know.’ And whether it’s someone from another country or someone from another city, or state, or whatever, I think we can all learn things from each other...So I think just whether it’s different countries, or different races or anything where you’re bringing different people together, you’re going to get more knowledge working towards what you’re going for.” The 2011 and 2013 SERU results indicated that 42% of students have had or were currently experiencing


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An extra component to graduating with a degree means more work and possibly more money, or less time being able to attribute to other activities or a job to make said money. There are also students who feel internationalization efforts such as participating in an International Scholars Program should be secondary to earning an undergraduate degree. One senior design, construction and planning student said the program would be a good incentive for students to do, and would be “amazing” for them to experience, but that it isn’t completely necessary. It seems as though this trend of internationalization not having to be a priority is felts among upperclassmen. One senior said, “I believe that UF is extremely focused on the international community and its workings. I say that because I have seen the number of student organizations that are dedicated to international groups, and many events that UF sponsors revolve around the celebration of many different types of cultures. I think it is extremely important for UF to focus on international groups, but at the same time I also think that UF needs to make it a secondary focus rather than a primary one that it seems to be right now.”

This recognition of student organizations and internationalization is positive for our efforts, but this student not seeing this partnership as a priority is a hindrance for the University of Florida. The notion of internationalization being secondary to obtaining a degree also stems from course availability. As noted by a chemistry major, financial cost and course availability restrain students from studying abroad. This student said, “I know they offer scholarships for the language courses, but they don’t offer any help or don’t tell us how to take science and math courses abroad. I’m not sure how I would be able to take courses for my major while abroad.” » Student Organizations Student organizations are another active-aware public this campaign must address. They have the ability to champion internationalization and create a presence on campus to raise awareness and interest from other students about international opportunities. As previously stated, UF houses 70 international student organizations (“Organizations directory,” n.d.). Currently, there are 987 total registered student organizations on campus. These organizations consist of students all across campus of different ages and majors. According to the Student Activities and Involvement Annual Report for 2013, 574 advisors are involved with these organizations (“Student activities and involvement,” 2013). Not only do the organizations involve students from all over campus, but these advisors represent 14 of the 17 academic departments/ colleges and the Division of Student Affairs (The student activities and involvement annual report, 2013). The togetherness that student organizations bring about on campus to unite the community is irreplaceable. The support that the department of Student Activities and Involvement provides for cultural organizations greatly contributes to the presence of those cultures and students’ abilities to celebrate them on campus. According to the report, “SAI provides support and advisement to the following cultural organizations and their heritage month activities: Asian American Student Association, Black Student Union, Hispanic Student Association, Jewish Student Union,

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a course with an international or global focus (“Student Experience in the Research University Report,” 2011). These students are now upperclassmen and are looked up to by younger undergraduate students. Less than half of the students who participated in the survey seemed to be driving their educations with an international focus, based on their course load. However, with the 70 student organizations on campus with an international focus consisting of a mix of under and upperclassmen, there is a decent presence of internationalization (“Organizations Directory,” n.d.). As with the freshman and sophomore publics, juniors and seniors are concerned about finances. One junior biology major said a key motivator to participate in an International Scholars Program would be money and any kind of scholarship. Some students are simply unaware of the existence of scholarships to study abroad. “They never seem to have scholarships or grants for those sorts of things,” according to a senior astronomy and physics double major.


Pride Student Union, Women’s Student Association, Volunteers for International Student Affairs (VISA) and Islam on Campus” (The student activities and involvement annual report, 2013). The demographic information for the fall 2013 semester student enrollment is provided below. The information was retrieved from the UF Office of Institutional Planning and Research.

Enrollment by Level, Gender and Ethnicity Fall 2013 Female

Male

Not Reported

Total

Undergraduate Enrollment White 10,677 Hispanic/Latino 3,633 Black/African American 1,624 Asian 1,295 Non-Resident Alien 314 Not Reported 510 Two or More Races 570 American Indian or Alaska Native 45 Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 159 Total 18,827

Total Enrollment White Hispanic/Latino Black/African American Asian Non-Resident Alien Not Reported Two or More Races American Indian or Alaska Native Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Total

White Hispanic/Latino Black/African American Asian Non-Resident Alien Not Reported Two or More Races American Indian or Alaska Native Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Total

White Hispanic/Latino Black/African American Asian Non-Resident Alien Not Reported Two or More Races American Indian or Alaska Native Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Total

Non-Resident Alien White Hispanic/Latino Asian Not Reported Total White Hispanic Black Asian Non-Resident Alien Not Reported Two or More Races American Indian or Alaska Native Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Total

9,184 2,752 885 1,229 322 451 379 44 80 15,326 1 6 4 1 1 13 19,867 6,389 2,509 2,525 637 962 949 89 239 34,166

Source: Final Student Data Course File Source as of Fall 2013 is the SUDS Student Information File (SIF) Prepared by the UF Office of Institutional Planning and Research

Non-Resident Alien White Hispanic/Latino Asian Not Reported Total White Hispanic Black Asian Non-Resident Alien Not Reported Two or More Races American Indian or Alaska Native Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Total

15,015 4,446 2,125 1,799 1,849 810 653 77 174 26,948 12,911 3,400 1,197 1,649 2,573 794 447 71 90 23,132 1 6 4 2 2 15 27,932 7,850 3,322 3,450 4,423 1,606 1,100 148 264 50,095

Faculty & Alumni » Professors Instructors who teach international studies have global experiences to share with students and have a significant stake in the internationalization of the university. They have the ability to personally influence and guide students in the right direction. These professors are already doing their best to respond to the opportunity of bettering the University of Florida for their own reasons, and we want them to learn more about the international efforts of the QEP and help them align their teachings with these efforts. Only 18.9% of faculty members surveyed listed a reason for leaving the country as accompanying undergraduate or graduate students on a study abroad program (University of Florida international center, 2013). This indicates that many of the faculty members surveyed went abroad for reasons that do not directly increase the internationalization of students. These members may share their experiences with their students, but if there is not a sufficient outlet to do so, they may not be able to pass on what they have learned abroad. One professor even noted when interviewed that there is a great deal for faculty to offer, but they just do not understand how to translate it. Citing that communication is key, there needs to be more done on an administrative side to “help meet the expectations of the QEP.” In addition, professors like one in the Department of Health Education & Behavior do agree that internationalization is a benefit to students once they enter the “global arena,” and “students will benefit tremendously by knowing what’s going on and what are the issues around the globe.” Professors understand that there needs to be some level of give and take when it comes to internationalization. Some faculty discussed that a lack of funds deters them from facilitating study abroad trips. One professor said many trip facilitators are paid minimally. This is not feasible for those with families that they will be leaving behind at home. A senior


RESEARCH lecturer in the Department of Statistics said the right stipulations such as financial support and a desirable location would incentivize facilitating a study abroad trip. As important as the destination is to the students taking courses abroad, facilitators also want to be able to make the most of the experience. As educated, progressive individuals, professors do support the idea of internationalization. According to the survey conducted by the University of Florida International Center, 59.8% of those surveyed strongly agreed “it is important to maintain professional ties with foreign faculty, researchers, staff and/or students” (University of Florida international center, 2013, p. 22).

In reference to the importance to the University of Florida as a whole to incorporate internationalization, this lecturer added, “and if you’re not moving forward, you’re probably moving backward, because someone else is moving forward. If the university would like to be considered a top tier university, it’s that important, because other universities are moving forward through technology, travel opportunities and the Internet.” » Advisors These active-aware publics are the first faculty members many students interact with and have the ability to set a dialogue about internationalization and its importance in education and business. Because they are some of the first members UF students meet, we should focus on informing advisors of our goals and get them on board. To ensure a timely graduation and to develop a relationship with their adviser, students are encouraged to take charge of their own education. Steps to do so include meeting

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Following suit, one senior lecturer in the Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management thinks, “it [internationalization] makes a lot of sense because our students are not just going to work here, in the state of Florida or even in the United States, they are going to work around the world and the more they are familiar, the more they’re going to be prepared.”

with their adviser once per term, regularly reviewing their degree audit on ISIS, being aware of university and college policies and procedures by reading the UF Undergraduate Catalog and consulting with their adviser, seeking the assistance of an adviser early on if they are experiencing personal or academic difficulties, and routinely checking their GatorLink e-mail account for important messages from the university and their adviser (“Advising,” 2012).


project GLOBAL


SITUATOIN ANALYSIS

SITUATION ANALYSIS

37


SITUATION ANALYSIS The University of Florida’s recently proposed five-year quality enhancement plan, QEP, outlines an initiative for internationalization of the campus community. The document and the task force assembled for its development sends the indication that the university is dedicated to this goal. Although internationalization – “the process of incorporating global perspectives into teaching, learning and research; building competence among students, faculty and staff; and establishing relationships and collaborations abroad” (American Council on Education, 2012) – has been an element incorporated into UF’s mission and focus for decades, the 2014 QEP revitalizes the efforts already in place to reflect the situation of the current era. It is now more important than ever before for the university to embrace a global society and to educate and empower students with the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to be informed, productive citizens of the world. The distance between countries is metaphorically shrinking – it is becoming easier for people across the globe to communicate and compete, and the job market for recent graduates is accordingly expanding. Also putting pressure on the university is the fact that similar institutions have already published internationally focused QEPs and are more decidedly promoting their efforts and earning recognition. And unfortunately, our research indicates student participation in international classes and study abroad is declining or has essentially baselined during the past several years. The internationalization task force and the personnel implementing the campaign face obstacles regarding the target publics’ perception of the expense and commitment involved in actively pursuing an international education, and a general confusion about what internationalization actually means. However, the university has significant advantages as a prestigious public land-grant institution and its already-established International Center is an invaluable resource for an internationalization campaign.

Primary and secondary research also revealed that strong advocates for internationalization already exist among students, faculty and staff. Leveraging these success stories and communicating how others can replicate their experiences should be a powerful means of influencing those apathetic to the issue. In order for a campaign for internationalization to be successful, more students, faculty and staff must be moved to action and the messages must resonate with their self-interests – this campaign is informed by research about what motivates these publics and their current understanding of and engagement with internationalization. An initiative for internationalization that is not accompanied by a strong, strategic communications campaign cannot be effective and will not create a sense of urgency in the larger campus community. The concept of internationalization is abstract to many students, staff and faculty, and the QEP appears to come across as essentially an empty promise with faculty. A branded, cohesive campaign that communicates the importance of internationalization should ensure publics receive support and the university succeeds and is on track to become a top university for international education.


SITUATION ANALYSIS

SITUATOIN ANALYSIS


project GLOBAL


GOAL & OBJECTIVES

GOALS & OBJECTIVES

41


GOAL AND OBJECTIVES Campaign Goal: To create a global culture among students, faculty and staff. A public relations campaign goal is a direct assertion of anticipated accomplishments. The goal of our communications campaign concerning internationalization at the University of Florida is a reputation management goal, intended to expand and enhance the institution’s identity and perception by both publics and non-publics. Our goal is to improve the University of Florida’s prestige as a diverse, internationalized campus by creating a global culture among students, faculty and staff.

Impact Objectives Our campaign objectives are all actionable because simply increasing awareness isn’t our ultimate measure of success. These statements are impact-oriented, clear and measurable and advance the goal for the campaign. The deadline for all of the objectives is the spring 2019 semester, after the campaign has been completed, and a margin of time we believe will realistically be sufficient to move our target publics from awareness to behavior.

» »

To increase all undergraduate student enroll ment in internationally focused classes, those identified by the registrar as general educa tion code “N” classes, by 10% by May 2019. To increase undergraduate student partici pation in study abroad programs from the 2013 – 2014 academic year total by 5% by May 2019.

» » »

To increase undergraduate student partici pation and engagement in internationally focused co-curricular activities and programs, such as international events, international student organizations and other elements of the International Scholars Program excluding study abroad, by 10% by May 2019. To create action from faculty in support of internationalization efforts through increased incorporation of global perspectives in ma jor-specific coursework and general educa tion coursework, so that 25% of introductory topic courses consider international issues by May 2019. To increase participation by faculty in the opportunities provided by the UF Internation al Center, such as the Intercultural Communi cations Institute, the International Speakers Program and International Working Groups, by 5% by May 2019.


project GLOBAL


MESSAGE STRATEGY

MESSAGE STRATEGY

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MESSAGE STRATEGY

Messages for Undergraduate Students

Overview of Message Strategy

» Core Message:

Our message strategy is informed by research into the target public’s beliefs and values, the situation on the University of Florida’s campus and the opportunity the institution has for achieving its ultimate goal of creating a global culture among faculty and students. We have also considered behavioral framework principles of communication to ensure our messages raise a need, concern or interest from the target public, that they provide guidance and credibility for the desired behavior, and that they motivate the target public to take action through mental rehearsal and identification of the benefits of action and consequences of inaction. Although our core and key messages differ slightly for our two target public groups – students and faculty – the desired behavior we seek to instill in them is similar. In students and faculty, our campaign attempts to create an appreciation for developing personal global competence through engaging in actions such as studying abroad, attending international events and taking or teaching international classes. » Slogan:

Go Gators. Go Global.

Gaining a global perspective makes you a more productive world citizen, improving your personal life and relevancy in the job market. » Key Message 1: In an increasingly competitive, global environment, you can become a marketable professional if you are a citizen of the world – if you are culturally competent, and can not only communicate and interact with others, but also understand the diverse perspectives of your future colleagues. Studying abroad and learning about other cultures can help you realize this competency, and presents possibilities for better jobs and careers abroad. Justification: This message raises interest in our target public, because it is personally relevant to them. Students can understand how internationalization affects them on an individual level in a more impacting way if it is tied to their interests. With this message, we’ll share stories of success from real-life students who have made an effort to get an international education, and who are benefiting from it. » Key Message 2: Successful students agree with researchers on the subject, such as the American Council on Education and the Institute for International Education, that you benefit from taking advantage of opportunities for developing cultural awareness and global competency during your undergraduate career. Students who engage in internationally focused events, programs or activities experience personal growth, enhance their critical thinking skills and stand out to employers. In the largest survey of study abroad alumni, conducted by the Institute for International Education, 98% of respondents indicated it had enabled them to see their own cultural values and biases, and 82% indicated it had caused them to see the world in a more sophisticated way.


Justification: This message brings credibility to our core message that developing a global perspective is of interest to students. It presents the desired behavior – taking advantage of opportunities for internationalization at UF – as a solution for students to overcome competition and better educate themselves. » Key Message 3: The world is becoming more connected and internationalization enables you to compete, collaborate and work with others across the world, but you need to be prepared for this global market. Companies hire students who have experience engaging with people of all backgrounds, heritages and ethnicities – if you don’t broaden your perspectives, you may be turned away from job opportunities and earn a lower salary. However, if you can empathize with and understand people from different cultures, you see the world differently and are empowered by this knowledge.

cause ‘internationalization’ is abstract, we’ve defined it for them in terms of specific things they can do on campus.

Messages for Faculty and Staff » Core Message: Nurturing an international culture in the classroom translates to a higher quality of education for your students and higher levels of discussion in your classes. » Key Message 1: Your influence as educators is reflected in the success of your students – you can help them thrive in a global environment by assigning classwork and curriculum that incorporates global perspectives and issues, and through discussions in the classroom. Students depend on you to prepare them for life after graduation.

Justification:

Justification:

This message creates the intention to act, and calls for our publics to form an attitude about the behavior we’re asking them to engage in. By clearly presenting the benefits of action and consequences of inaction, we reach the public by showing them what’s in it for them.

This message raises an opportunity for our target public by reinforcing their importance. Faculty members have a responsibility to ensure students are receiving the best education possible and to help them become successful in their future careers. They can become trustworthy mentors and advisors, and are on the front-lines for student experience in terms of international education.

» Key Message 4: Have you explored international opportunities while at UF? Attend internationally focused events, join one of the 63 internationally focused student organizations, register for any of the 384 international general education classes – those identified by the registrar with code “N” – and study abroad to take control of your education. Visit the Department of Student Activities and Involvement on the third floor of the Reitz Union or the International Center in the HUB to get started today, or check out www.ufic.ufl.edu.

» Key Message 2: Research from the American Council on Education indicates that support from faculty is instrumental in internationalizing a campus and ultimately contributing to the prestige of the institution. Faculty members encourage internationalization through incorporating global perspectives into their coursework, participating in programs abroad and attending internationally focused events.

Justification:

Justification:

This message helps our target public mentally rehearse the behavior we want them to engage in. Be-

This message presents the desired behavior, nurturing and encouraging internationalization on campus, as


credible and as a solution to improve the campus. According to the American Council on Education, “the circumstances and demands of the current era require a deeper commitment on the part of institutions, and a far-reaching scope of action…institutions must engage in “comprehensive internationalization.” » Key Message 3: By encouraging students to get engaged in internationalization on campus, you benefit in the form of awards, recognition, the opportunity for tenure and promotions. Conversely, you not actively advocating for student internationalization threatens UF development and you will be unable to adapt to the globalized society around us. Justification: This message attempts to get faculty to understand the benefits and consequences of their engagement in internationalization at UF. It motivates them to action because it appeals to their personal interests through an emotional appeal. » Key Message 4: How can contribute to internationalization at UF? Incorporate global perspectives into your existing curriculum, lead a study abroad trip and use UF resources like the international center to participate in internationally focused programs and activities, such as the Intercultural Communications Institute, the International Speakers Program and International Working Groups. Visit www.ufic.ufl.edu to get started today. Justification: This message helps our target public mentally rehearse what we want them to do, and points them in the right direction to begin taking action in support of internationalization.


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STRATEGIES

STRATEGIES

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CAMPAIGN STRATEGY

Audience Engagement – Interest

Overview of Strategy

By utilizing the strategy initiative of audience engagement, our intention is to take advantage of strong, two-way communication tactics to get students invested in the idea of internationalization on campus. Communication will emphasize the students’ own interests and the salience of the information – “the degree to which information is perceived as being applicable or useful to the audience,” (Smith, Strategic Planning for Public Relations, 115) – must be high, and reflect ‘what’s in it for them.’ Our message to students is that in an increasingly competitive, global environment, they are marketable if they are citizens of the world, which can start in the classroom and that these classes can help them earn the reward of being named an International Scholar at graduation.

Project Global aims to position the University of Florida as a leading institution for international education, and differentiate it from its competitors by emphasizing the opportunities available for students, faculty and staff both domestic and abroad.

» Objective 2:

Our recommendation to approach this communications campaign is to take initiative through proactive strategy, that incorporates both action and communication – taking control and initiating this campaign on the University of Florida’s timeline is in the institution’s best interest, and coincides with the implementation of the quality enhancement plan. The university has dedicated itself to creating a global campus culture, and it’s important to earn recognition for this as it is relevant and happening – not after it has become common knowledge, especially because the success or failure of this endeavor depends so highly upon the students, faculty and staff.

Strategy by Objectives » Objective 1: To increase all undergraduate student enrollment in internationally focused classes, those identified by the registrar as general education code “N” classes, by 10% by May 2019. Primary and secondary research indicates students generally only enroll in internationally focused classes to meet the general education requirement of three credit hours. Taking these classes is a more accessible option for students to increase their global competency than studying abroad, and so enrollment in these classes should increase as students realize the importance of widening their perspectives and developing an international mindset.

To increase all undergraduate student participation in study abroad programs from the 2013 – 2014 academic year total by 5% by May 2019. Students turn down the opportunity to study abroad for a variety of reasons, but most commonly because they perceive they can’t afford it or fit it into their academic schedules and graduate on time. Our campaign not only attempts to eliminate these barriers and make studying abroad feel more accessible to undergraduate students, but also to create the perception that students can’t afford not to study abroad, considering the global economy and collaborative, competitive workforce. Opinion Leaders & Audience Engagement – Participation To bring credibility to our message and the call to action of studying abroad, we recommend involving formal opinion leaders, such as the American Council on Education and the Institute for International Education, and also informal opinion leaders, such as students. The formal opinion leaders we’ve identified will enable us to incorporate solid data and statistics, with messages that echo our campaign’s messages.


And, also communicating through informal opinion leaders, in this case students who’ve studied abroad or international students and faculty brings an increased accountability and sense of endorsement to our campaign. Our campaign will use these individuals as bright spots, and share their success stories. Students are more likely to trust the opinions of those in their own peer group, but will value the opinions of the organizations or authorities that legitimize these opinions.

form of an International Ambassadors Program, designed to make activity by the University of Florida in regards to internationalization observable and to increase knowledge on campus for its efforts and the reasoning behind them. Special events in the form of an expanded awareness week will generate audience participation and shrink confusion by students about internationalization.

Additionally, we’ll utilize the strategy initiative of audience engagement through participation by creating a channel for students to share their own messages. This will be in the form of an interactive competition for a small stipend or scholarship to study abroad, designed to get students to participate in a creative or video project for the campaign. The winners of this scholarship competition will become built-in ambassadors and personalize Project Global.

To create action from faculty in support of internationalization efforts through increased incorporation of global perspectives into major-specific coursework and general education coursework, so that 25% of introductory topic courses consider international issues by May 2019.

» Objective 3: To increase undergraduate student participation and engagement in internationally focused co-curricular activities and programs, such as international events, international student organizations and other elements of the International Scholars Program excluding study abroad, by 10% by May 2019. Students have immense opportunity to become involved on campus in an activity, organization or program that enhances their global competencies. But as our research indicated, undergraduates generally can’t even define “internationalization” and the array of activities, organizations or programs that fall into this category is so expansive that it’s overwhelming and confusing. Transparent Communication & Special Events Reaching undergraduates on campus through grassroots initiatives and through tactics that are convenient for them is another strategy for communication our campaign will implement. This will take the

» Objective 4:

As specified in the quality enhancement plan, a component of the upcoming internationalization effort involves commitment from staff and faculty to help advance this cause on campus and foster an educational environment that is conducive to creating students with global competencies. Triggering Event & Audience Feedback Although we recognize any process that requires a revision of curriculum as difficult to implement, we recommend that it be strongly encouraged, and make it an easy and accessible series of actions for instructors. Incorporating a triggering event in the form of a targeted piece of communication and a subsequent seminar will stimulates action from our public. By empowering instructors and faculty with knowledge about the support they’ll have and the specific direction of the campaign, we’ll dissuade them from adopting the perception that internationalization is a ‘vague’ concept at the university and that it’s too much of a task for them to be involved. Additionally, we suggest regularly engaging with instructorsand faculty in order to solicit their feedback. This would take the form of online surveys, question-and-answer sessions, and dialogues between Project Global advisors and liaisons – people who are regularly available to instructors and faculty.


» Objective 5: To increase participation by faculty in the opportu nities provided by the University of Florida International Center, such as the Intercultural Communities Institute, the International Speakers Program and International Working Groups, by 5% by May 2019. It’s not enough to convince instructors and faculty to incorporate a global perspective into their classes and interactions with students – the ultimate ideal is to get them more invested in internationalization efforts. Again, we understand that it requires extra action from them and is a challenge, but our messages and tactics attempt to frame this behavioral objective in a way that appeals to the best interest of these individuals. Audience Interest & Special Event In order to communicate the personal benefits instructors and faculty will experience if they help in the effort of internationalization, and to communicate the consequences of inaction, our messages emphasize the recognition these individuals can earn from being a part of Project Global. As previously mentioned, we’ll call attention to the fact that instructors are high-influence people to students, and that they can improve the quality of education at the university and themselves by continuing to adapt their teaching styles. To fit with this message, we recommend instituting an annual invitation-only banquet that will recognize the staff and faculty who have contributed to Project Global, and recognize the recipients of the already-in-place International Educator Awards from the University of Florida’s International Center.


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TACTICS

TACTICS

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TACTICS International Ambassador Program Project Global requires student ambassadors to champion internationalization on campus. The University of Florida’s International Center already recruits and employs a team of Study Abroad Peer Advisors – we recommend expanding this program into a broader “International Ambassador Program,” comprised of two units: Study Abroad Ambassadors and Project Global Ambassadors. Project Global Ambassadors will serve as general liaisons and our campaign representatives among students, faculty and staff regarding everything the International Scholars Program covers. This includes study abroad, on-campus co-curricular activities and programs and the additional tactics proposed in this plan. Recruitment for the International Ambassador Program, and specifically for Project Global Ambassadors, will begin in the early weeks of the fall semester, and will include training sessions, so the students are educated on the details of the Quality Enhancement Plan, Project Global and their responsibilities. Ideally, these students will be juniors or seniors who have strong academic records, have studied abroad and/ or have earned six or more credits of international studies and will represent all 16 colleges. To attract students, Project Global representatives can initiate several tactics, including posting fliers on campus, using promoted social media posts, listing and including the opportunity on UF’s websites and weekly student emails and generating interest from existing Study Abroad Peer Advisors. To ensure the message is targeted to students with an investment in internationalization, we recommend sending an email to advisors of the student organizations we’ve identified as international – see Appendix – and also emailing students who have studied abroad. To qualify, students must submit a resume and cover letter explaining what internationalization means

to them and why they are seeking admittance into the program. Students who progress past this initial screening will be asked to interview with UFIC staff and prepare a presentation with an idea on how to engage students in internationalization – this further screens the candidates for fit and personality, and also provides Project Global with some additional creative ideas. After a team of about 20 – 30 ambassadors is chosen, they will begin training sessions regarding Project Global, and the larger initiative of the quality enhancement plan. UFIC staff and members of the internationalization task force will present these training sessions and communicate to the students their responsibilities and the expectations they are held to as ambassadors. Although we suggest training take place over the course of about two weeks, we recommend it absolutely be completed and all students on board to serve as ambassadors by the end of the fall semester, so that ambassadors can create the sense of urgency with students to study abroad during the summer and start their international careers at the events we propose, to follow. Tasks: » Determine which faculty or staff members of the UFIC will supervise the new expanded ambassador program. » Notify the existing Study Abroad Peer Advisors of the changes to the program and the upcoming Project Global Initiative via usual means of com munication. » Compile a list of Study Abroad Peer Advisors interested in remaining in the expanded program as a Study Abroad Ambassador, and a list of those interested in having a greater role as a Project Glob al Ambassador. » Create a new email account to receive applications for the new International Ambassador Program. » Determine what is involved in the application – write a directional prompt for the cover letter and questions. » Begin the recruitment process to attract students to the International Ambassador Program, particu larly highlighting the Project Global Ambassador


branch – this includes producing print materials such as brochures and fliers, creating social media content and drafting copy for emails to students and for web. » Look over the applications with a committee of Project Global and UFIC representatives, and de termine who will conduct interviews. » Select about 50 applicants to come into the UFIC for in-person interviews, and email the applicants to arrange the interviews. » After the interviews, select the final roster of 20 – 30 students for Project Global Ambassadors and 20 – 30 students for Study Abroad Ambassadors. » Notify the new ambassadors of their status and create a Doodle Poll or use another scheduling application to arrange a training session with sever al options for attendance. » Plan the curriculum for the training session with the ambassadors and decide who will present it. » Execute the training session(s) with the ambas sadors so they are completely debriefed about the initiative and campaign. » Arrange a rotating schedule so that each ambas sador has the opportunity to be in a leadership role and working in the UFIC office, if interested, as well as a tabling schedule for the ambassadors to con duct grassroots marketing on campus.

Scholarship Competition Project Global includes a competition designed to create engagement from students and an enhanced determination to study abroad, despite financial and time restrictions. The Project Global Study Abroad Scholarship Competition will grant five students each a $1,000 award to use toward a UF study abroad program. It should be announced at the beginning of the fall semester through fliers on campus, promoted social media posts, press releases and articles on UF’s websites and weekly student emails and through the UFIC and existing Study Abroad Peer Advisors. The contest will ask students to create a video, social media post, image or other creative composition that showcases why they want to study abroad and why they think it will be important to them in their

futures. They’ll post the submissions to the Project Global Facebook or Twitter pages using the hashtag #GlobalGatorCash, and also follow up with an email version to the Project Global Ambassadors to ensure entries aren’t overlooked, as the contest runs the full 15-week fall semester. Project Global representatives and the internationalization task force have three options concerning how to handle results and name five winners of the scholarship competition: (1) a student-driven results; (2) internal decision; or (3) random selection. 1. Student-Driven Results: The five submissions with the most “likes,” “shares,” “favorites,” “retweets,” or similar are the winners. This option encourages students to tell their friends about their entry and means the applicants will essentially help to drive the competition by publicizing and promoting it for Project Global representatives and the task force. 2. Internal Decision: The five submissions Project Global representatives and the task force judge to be the best, based on creativity, quality of work/ thought and overall message are the winners. This option allows Project Global representatives and the task force greater control over the results and the general outcome of the tactic because applicants can be selected holistically and for factors like career promise, area of desired study and class standing. 3. Random Selection: The five submissions that are randomly selected with a number generator are the winners – Project Global representatives and the task force will assign each entrant a number based on the order they apply in, and then use a random number generating program, such as one of the free web-versions, to select five of these numbers. This option gives Project Global representatives and the task force the least amount of control over the results and the general outcome of the tactic, but ensures students perceive the contest as fair. We recommend either of the first two options. The ideal selection process, however, would be a combination of these two methods, but we realize this makes the process more complicated.


Mobilizing students to get them talking about and sharing the contest online and by word-of-mouth is crucial to obtaining the desired secondary result of earning positive favor from the campaign’s target publics, and creating a dialogue about internationalization on campus. We also believe it’s important for Project Global representatives to be able to have a certain amount of say in the winners. Our suggestion is to implement a point system. Students would be awarded points based on how many “likes,” “shares,” “favorites” and “retweets” their submission earns. For example: 25 shares equals 25 points, 50 shares equals 50 points, 100 shares equals 100 points, and so on, until a maximum level of 400 or 500 shares, after which the student’s points would cap off. Then, essentially grade the submissions with the highest scores based on a rubric that considers creativity, quality of work/thought and overall message, and choose the five winners based on this combined score. The intention for the contest is to excite students about the idea of internationalization and to motivate them to go abroad – even if a student does not win the contest, simply reflecting about the idea and putting into words or thoughts why they want to study abroad has the potential to instill an even deeper desire to follow through with this intent. Our research also reveals that lack of financial support is a significant limiting factor for students and often the main reason why they don’t pursue studying abroad. This competition will generate positive attention from media, students and faculty, and reinforce a message of support for internationalization from the university. Tasks: » Determine which Project Global representatives will oversee the competition, and assemble a co mmittee to judge or select the winners, based on the method decided upon. » Create a new email account to receive the submis sions. » Determine the guidelines for the contest submis sions, based on our above suggestions, and write the copy for this and for the contest rules.

» Begin promoting and advertising for the competi tion – includes producing print materials such as post cards and fliers, creating social media content and drafting copy for emails to students and for web. » Open the contest for submissions. » Look over and track the submissions throughout the fall semester, with assistance from Project Glob al Ambassadors. » Regularly remind students about the competition through communication online and through print material. » Close the contest for submissions at the end of the fall semester. » Based on the method decided upon for selection of winners, determine five recipients – this may in clude either judging the submissions based on their popularity online or the quality of the submission or choosing randomly. » Notify the winners via email to check their eligibili ty and continued interest in the award the Monday of International Week. » Invite the winners to attend Friday’s Global Fest during International Week via a Project-Global branded » Officially and publicly announce the names of the winners at Global Fest and award them an oversized check. » Send to their home addresses a congratulatory letter to their parents or guardians, with instructions on how to receive the funds. » Arrange a video interview with the five winners for the creation of a video spot about their internation al stories, their study abroad plans and their career ambitions.

International Week The University of Florida already has an international awareness week, but we believe it’s not effective as it is, and suggest expanding its scale and improving its appeal to a wider range of undergraduate students by rebranding it and presenting it in the spring. Moving the International Week is also beneficial because many students elect to study abroad in the summer.


During the week, which would be in February – fall semester is football season and too busy on campus – each day would feature a different international-themed activity or event, and dining halls will provide multicultural food options. A check-in station should be incorporated at each of the events to swipe students’ Gator 1 Card number/UF ID numbers into a spread sheet on a computer in order to track attendance and reward students for participating at the end of the week. Each event will be heavily advertised on campus starting in early January, and by utilizing social media outlets such as the Facebook pages, Twitter handles and Instagram pages of Project Global, student organizations, the UFIC and UF colleges or departments, the Alligator and local radio stations. Ambassadors will also flier and generate word-of-mouth discussion within the most populated areas of campus such as Turlington, Plaza of the Americas, The Hub and Reitz Union. Project Global Ambassadors will send emails to international student organization leaders and their faculty advisors asking for their support and participation during the five days of the event, as their presence at most events is vital. This email will provide an overview of Project Global, the larger initiative of internationalization and invite the organizations to join the cause by appealing to the clubs’ interests in gaining new members. To ensure participation is easy for student organizations, each group wanting to be a part of International Week will be assigned a Project Global Ambassador, who will serve as the key point-person for assistance in planning and logistics. Depending on how many organizations are interested, each Project Global Ambassador may be handling between one to three organizations. Monday ‘Global Moments,’ a photo-sharing initiative, will be promoted during the weeks leading up to International Week via social media outlets and list serves. Students will submit photos from study abroad trips or from their experiences in international

clubs or programs, and the best photos will be enlarged, printed and mounted on poles around campus, including on the Plaza of the Americas, Turlington and the Reitz Union area. As an incentive to participate, the students who share photos will be entered into a drawing and could win prizes on Friday of Project Global International Week. Project Global and International Ambassadors will act as representatives and be on-site to tell students about the schedule of events for the rest of the week and answer questions regarding international organizations on campus, future study abroad opportunities, popular international courses and more. This tactic aims to not only inform students of the international opportunities available on campus, but also intrigue them and create a fun environment. Tasks: » Starting in January, ask for students to submit pho tos from study abroad or other international expe riences to the Project Global social media pages, via email or to the Project Global Ambassadors. » Have Project Global Ambassadors collect and orga nize the photos via a DropBox or other method until the week prior to International Week. » Set a schedule for Project Global Ambassadors to be on-site at displays during the day. » Select the 20 best photos for to be enlarged and printed on a plaque-like plastic, then mounted on a metal, plastic or wood pole. » Place the winning photos throughout campus, in the Plaza of Americas, Turlington and the Reitz Union area. » Create an album of photos on Project Global’s Face book page and post all of the submissions, inviting followers to check out the winners at the displays. » Announce the 20 winners and post their submis sions to a separate album. » Execute the display event – have Project Global Ambassadors on-site and prepared with materials and talking points about Project Global.


Tuesday ‘Global Bites,’ a food truck rally, will take place on the Plaza of the Americas or another similarly crowded campus location, featuring cuisine that represents different cultural groups. We suggest reaching out to local city food trucks, as well those affiliated with the University of Florida. Student organizations can also use the day as an opportunity to table and fundraise by selling their own foods. This is an excellent way for student organizations to spread the word about their international efforts and why students should get involved. The food trucks will attract the students, but the student organizations will be able to showcase their initiatives and truly make an impression that should be memorable with students, and ideally encourage them to join an international organization. Tasks: » Reserve the Plaza of Americas at least two months in advance for the event. » Contact local food trucks and UF-affiliated food trucks, and student organizations, at least two months in advance – have prepared an explanation about International Week and the Global Bites event. » Contact each food truck and organization commit ted to attendance regarding the menu and logis tics for the day – reiterate to them the purpose of the event and confirm they are serving food from a specific culture. » Designate about 10 ambassadors to lead the event, instruct them of their tasks. » Begin promoting and advertising for the competi tion – includes producing print materials such as post cards and fliers, creating social media content and drafting copy for emails to students and for web. » During and after the event, post pictures of students enjoying a variety of ethnic foods on social media.

Wednesday Global Talk,’ a study abroad panel featuring students, faculty and staff and Project Global/International Ambassadors will take place in a Retiz Union ballroom and create a dialogue about the benefits and importance of studying abroad, how to overcome obstacles in order to do so and provide a forum for students to ask questions about their options. Project Global ambassadors and Study Abroad Ambassadors who’ve studied abroad will make up the student panel of five, and they’ll be prepared with an overview of their experience and answers to frequently asked questions about studying abroad, such as: Why did you decide to study abroad? Did it delay your academic progress? Did you family support your decision? How did you finance your trip? Why would you recommend studying abroad? How did you overcome anxiety about living in another country? University of Florida International Center staff and Project Global representatives or internationalization task force members will make up the faculty and staff panel of three, and they’ll be prepared with a similar overview of their experience teaching or living abroad and their perspective as educators and professionals. Tasks: » Finalize which ambassadors and involved faculty members will be speaking at the panel. » Reserve a Reitz Union ballroom and microphones for the eight panel members. » Create a dialogue, which will be a list of discussion topics and some major highlights to touch on for each section, and print one for each panel member. Also include an FAQ section within the document. » Rehearse the questions with the panel members a few days before the date so they are familiar with the questions. » Have food and water ready at the event for the par ticipating panel members. » Share photos and students’ comments via social


media outlets and websites. » Thank each panel participant with personalized Project Global stationery. Thursday ‘Global Games,’ a day for international-themed student organizations to showcase their organizations and the activities, hobbies and crafts of their cultures, will take place in Turlington Plaza. Project Global Ambassadors, in the email communication to these organizations in January, will suggest ideas about what to bring, how to represent their organizations at the fair and attract students to their displays, and the individuals assigned to each organization work with them to assist in the planning and logistics of the event. Tasks: » Finalize a group of participating student interna tional organizations. » Contact each of the participating organizations again with a detailed description of the event and ideas of what they can bring. » Have about 5 to 10 (depending on how many or ganizations RSVP) International and Project Global Ambassadors prepared and on-site at the event. Friday ‘Global Festival,’ an outdoor event to end International Week and celebrate the diversity of students and cultures at the University of Florida, will take place on Flavet Field in the evening, and feature ethnic food from food trucks, internationally themed movies projected on a large screen and additional entertainment by music groups and student organizations. As with the previously outlined events, Project Global Ambassadors will host it and assist student organizations in participating. This is the largest event of the week, and advertisement and promotion will accordingly focus most prominently on this event.

Outline for Global Festival » 6 p.m…………..………… Project Global Ambassadors Opening Address » 6:15 p.m. ……………..…. Student Group/Local Entertainment » 6:30 p.m. ………………... Movie Screening » 8:35 p.m. ………………... Student Group/Local Entertainment » 9:05 p.m. …………..…..... Movie Screening » 11:10 a.m. …….…….........Winners of Prize Packs and Scholarship Competition Announced » 11:25 p.m. ………….…… Student Group/Local Entertainment » 12 a.m. ………………...... Project Global Am bassadors Closing Address Tasks: » Reserve Flavet Field in the beginning of January. » Secure security and an EMT to be on-site during the entire event. » Rent a movie screen and a stage, either through UF or a local renter, for the entire six hours. » Contact local bands, comedians, or entertainers informing them of the event and inviting them. » Personally invite scholarship winners, as they will be publicly announced at the end of the event and will be invited on stage. » Create prize packs, filling them with cameras, inter national phone cards, outlet converters, translation dictionaries, etc. » Have every ambassador on board and prepared


before the event. Host a mandatory meeting for ambassadors and international organization leaders prior to the event to go over the schedule and their responsibilities. » Designate an opening speaker, an in-between speaker, and a speaker to announce the scholarship winners at the end of the night, preferably faculty members that have been heavily involved in Project Global. » Contact the same food trucks as we will have for the Global Bites event and see if they are also will ing to attend the festival with similar menu options that relate to their culture. » Execute the event and update social media sites during the event with photos, videos, comments, etc. » Thank everyone who participated in the festival the week after with personalized Project Global statio nery.

Preview

and even seniors. To go about this, Project Global representatives must create a relationship with the Dean of Students Office (DSO) and New Student and Family Programs (NSFP). Historically, only study abroad is presented at Preview, but we suggest expanding the program presentations by helping the DSO and NSFP understand Project Global initiatives and goals. Because Project Global Ambassadors won’t be in place until the end of the fall 2014 semester, we suggest simply utilizing existing Study Abroad Peer Advisors if Project Global representatives want to execute a smaller-scale event for Preview in the summer of 2014. For the remaining summers of the campaign, however, Project Global Ambassadors will be able to handle the event, and will have a tabling display with promotional and information items, and will make the presentation mentioned above.

Project Global Ambassadors will have a presence at the Preview event for incoming freshman and transfer students. In addition to the existing study abroad informational session, the ambassadors will attend the resource fair portion of this event to table and interact with students and parents. During Preview, one of the first experiences University of Florida students have, students are at their most impressionable and are eager to become engaged in the Gator Nation. Having a presence at Preview will allow for their exposure to Project Global initiatives. Additionally advantageous to Project Global is the fact that students register for their first semester of classes at Preview. The opportunity for ambassadors to talk to and influence students about the benefits of taking international credits before they set even their first schedule of classes is significant, and has the potential to increase enrollment in these courses among freshman. The ideal is to get freshman invested in internationalization early on, and make them more likely to enroll in international credits as sophomores, juniors

Tasks: » Contact Dean of Students Office and New Student and Family Programs personally by scheduling meetings to present Project Global’s ideas to them. » Follow up with both departments on whether they will allow us to be a part of the preview process. » If we are able to have a presence at preview, prepare/ host a meeting for all of the ambassadors on how to act with new students and parents, along with what types of conversations to bring up and how to an swer questions they might not be used to hearing.


Social Media

Tasks:

Interactivity is crucial to the success of this campaign, and so Project Global will have its own Facebook, Twitter and Instagram profiles and pages to share testimonial videos, infographics and other engaging, relevant information relating to study abroad, on-campus curricular activities and the International Scholars Program.

» Create Project Global Facebook, Twitter and Insta gram profiles, dedicating a few individuals as admin members, who will have the access to edit the pro files. » Reach out to the UFIC and international student organizations so they can share and retweet Project Global’s posts, tweets, videos and photos. » Create an internship position or utilize Project Global ambassadors to update the social media sites daily and to think of creative ways to entice students to become international. » It is vital to utilize these sites daily to reach un dergraduate students. Repost student organiza tions’ posts, share students’ comments about studying abroad and live tweet from internationally themed events on campus, etc. » Sustain relationships with the international orga nizations and UFIC so they continue to share and retweet Project Global’s information.

The manager of the UFIC’s social media pages will help Project Global’s posts and pages to receive views by retweeting and sharing the content, and inviting its followers to check out Project Global. In order to get retweets and shares from other UF accounts, we recommend creating content that is targeted at niche publics and subjects, such as a post about how the College of Journalism and Communications might engage in internationalization, or about the invention of the first printing press by a man named Gutenberg in Germany. Other content on the profiles will highlight the ambassador program and International Week, and emphasize interesting and helpful facts and pieces of information. To ensure a two-way flow of information from Project Global representatives and students, faculty and staff, posts can also ask for feedback about what they expect from Project Global and the internationalization efforts throughout the campaign. In keeping with this interactive model for communication, comments and content from students, faculty and staff directed to Project Global or posted on its profiles must be acknowledged or responded to in a timely manner. For this reason, we recommend Project Global Ambassadors take shifts in the UFIC offices to manage social media during the weekdays.

Micro Website We envision Project Global’s website as an engaging online resource and tool for our publics – both student and faculty and staff groups. Included on the website will be general information about Project Global and internationalization, a blog curated by the Project Global Ambassadors, a calendar of events, resources from the UFIC and details on the International Scholars Program. The website will serve as the central landing page for the initiative of internationalization at the University of Florida, similar to the webpage for the ‘UF Rising’ campaign. A proto-type of the website has already been created using Weebly.


is evident in today’s shrinking world. It’s now more important than ever for the University of Florida to adapt to a global society.

Tasks: » Expand the Weebly website already created or cre ate an entirely new one with the same idea, to at tract students, faculty and staff. » Update the website regularly with updates on the international events on campus and blog posts of study abroad success stories. » Utilize international student organizations and UF IC’s social media outlets to share information from the website and engage more students in the online platforms

Girl 1: To me, it’s expanding my mind set.

Guy 1: It’s taking a step back from the normal and what you’re used to and getting to know others a little bit better.

Guy 2: It’s preparing me for my future, and my career.

With over 60 international student organizations, more than 300 international education courses and study abroad programs in over a thousand universities in over 90 countries, the University of Florida is breaking down barriers and internationalizing the undergraduate student experience.

Girl 1: It’s a big world out there.

Digital Content – Video Spots Guy 1: Because the Gator Nation is everywhere.

An element of the webpage and tactic that can be presented also on social media and across other promotional outlets is a series of scripted video spots featuring diverse groups of students reflecting on what internationalization means to them and about Project Global, highlighting the key points in our message strategy section. These spots can be aired on UF’s PBS-affiliated WUFT Channel 5, and on WRUF Channel 6, as well during the news broadcast on ABC-affiliated WCJB-TV 20.

Link to “Go Gators. Go Global” Spot: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKh8FtsOdQU

Storyboard of Project Global “Go Gators. Go Global” Spot

Tasks:

Project Global :60 Television Spot | “Go Gators. Go Global.”

is evident in today’s shrinking world. It’s now more important than ever for the University of Florida to adapt to a global society.

Girl 1: To me, it’s expanding my mind set.

Guy 1: It’s taking a step back from the normal and what you’re used to and getting to know others a little bit better.

Guy 2: It’s preparing me for my future, and my career.

With over 60 international student organizations, more than 300 international education courses and study abroad programs in over a thousand universities in over 90 countries, the University of Florida is breaking down barriers and internationalizing the undergraduate student experience.

Girl 1: It’s a big world out there.

people just like us across the globe.

Girls 3 & 4: Go Gators. Go Global.

» Use the already-made video as an introductory tool for Project Global’s website and social media out lets. » To create another video, first come up with an idea behind the video and what the dialogue will be. » Then, find actors that will suit the needs of the vid eo and have each actor sign a talent release form. » Find talented students or a local/UF affiliated pro duction company to film the video. Having students make the video is another great way to incorporate internships in the Project Global program. » Update Project Global’s website with the recent vid eos, ask international student organizations to share the video on their social media profiles, and ask UFIC to have them on the front page every-so-of ten.


Print Materials

Press Releases and Media Alerts

Print materials will be utilized throughout the campaign to advertise anything we will be implementing to internationalize the campus. Project Global will benefit from producing postcards, brochures and flyers, and will use these print materials as advertisements and to increase awareness for the ambassador recruitment, International Week events, the International Scholars Program and the Scholarship Competition.

Press releases and media alerts are key tools in any public relations campaign to reach media outlets. Project Global communications staff will produce ready-to-use materials to send out to the media early in the campaign and consult editorial calendars of local publications to see if any outlet is running articles or issues that relate to internationalization. This will ensure we are reaching all of our audiences, because there are various types of newspapers and magazines the student, faculty and staff population uses. The main idea behind these press releases and media alerts is Project Global’s initiatives and the events during International Week.

For your reference, we’ve produced samples of these print tactics and have included them in the Appendix section of this book. You’ll find the following: ‘Thank You’ stationery, a Project Global general brochure, a ‘Save the Date’ card for the International Gator Gala described in the Stewardship section, an International Week postcard and a Project Global Ambassador recruitment flier. Tasks: » Create an informational brochure about Project Global’s mission to hand out all of the time. » Create a flier to advertise the International Ambas sador Program. Pass out this flier in the beginning of the fall semesters. » Create a postcard that will list each event, time and date for International Week events. A postcard is easy to keep in a purse or notebook, so students can have it on campus with them the week of Interna tional Week. » Create the ‘Save the Date’ brochure for the Interna tional Gator Gala. Deliver these to invited individ uals via mail. This will also be easy for faculty, staff and students to keep in a spot that they will be able to refer to it at any time. » Create branded stationery to use throughout the campaign, such as thank you and note cards with Project Global’s logo and slogan on them. » Use the style guide we created to ensure the colors are consistent with each print material. » To produce the print material in high quality color, utilize on-campus color printers or local print ven dors.

An example press release for International Week is in the Appendix of this book. A press release generally features a newsworthy idea, quotes from relevant people and a “boilerplate,” an explanation at the end that provides supplemental information on the organization. A media alert is similar, but is written for journalists interested in the visual elements of an event – it provides an overview of the ‘who,’ ‘what,’ ‘where,’ ‘when,’ ‘why,’ and ‘how,’ and gives an idea of what camera-worthy things are happening at the event. For example, during the Global Festival of International Week, a media alert might include information about the food trucks that are coming, the performers and entertainers, and other notable people who will be in attendance. News items and Story Angles for Releases/Alerts: » Launch of Project Global » Announcement of expanded ambassador pro gram of the UFIC » Project Global Scholarship Competition » Announcement of Project Global International Week » Winners of Project Global Study Abroad Scholar ship Competition » Announcement of Project Global International Gator Gala


Feature items and Story Angles for Releases/Alerts: » Impact of studying abroad on personal education of a UF student » Perspective from a Project Global Ambassador about internationalization » Testimony from leading employer about the impor tance of international education » Profile on winners from Project Global Study Abroad Scholarship » International athlete profile Tasks: » Use and expand on the International Week press re lease located in the Appendix of the campaign book. The key points for this release are to touch on each event, what the overall purpose is for the event and quotes from students and faculty regarding the excitement or success. This can be published be fore or after the events. You can add the scholarship winners to this release or alert, or write a new one explaining the scholarship and its winners. » Use the same format as the International Week re lease to create press releases for other major parts of the campaign, as listed above and create established relationships with local news sources such as The Alligator and The Gainesville Sun so they will know there will be quite a few releases and pitches coming their way the first year Project Global id launched. » Create a release or alert about the launch of Project Global in the very beginning of fall, 2014. » Create a release or alert about the International Ambassador program once the team is selected. This will be written to inform UF stakeholders of what the ambassadors will be doing throughout the school year, to reiterate why the International Ambassador program was expanded and more about Project Global’s goals for the five years. » Create a release or alert discussing the impact studying abroad has on students. Publish this mid-spring semester, as students are thinking about studying abroad over summer. » Another idea for the spring semester is to create a release or alert in which a Project Global ambassa dor shares his or her opinions on internationaliza

tion, and how Project Global is having an impact. » A release or alert about a well-established employer should be written and published in the fall semester, as students are about to choose their spring class es. Expand on the fact that international courses are not only the perfect elective to a hard schedule, but imperative in today’s shrinking world.

Promotional Items College students are attracted to free, promotional items, especially if the items are useful. We recommend purchasing and customizing a range of items to pass out throughout the campaign, including: tumblers, T-shirs, pens, pencils, stress-ball globes, paper fans and koozies. Name and logo representation around campus through these items will create awareness for Project Global. Tasks: » Find an online or local source to create most of the promotional items through. In the end, this will save money because the one source will discount everything based on how many items are bought. CustomInk is the online source we used, but there are many options online and in Gainesville. » Have an idea ready for CustomInk, or another source, to put on the promotional items or actually have the items made beforehand. This could be a job for the ambassadors, a semester internship posi tion or a job for Project Global staff. » Hand out these promotional items at every event during International Week and every tabling/adver tising opportunity on campus. These items can also be handed out in the classrooms during the begin ning of the semesters.


Paid Placements

Letter to Staff and Faculty

We suggest Project Global advertise through a variety of different channels and mediums, including radio, television, print and non-traditional.

Project Global launches in the Fall 2014, and it’s crucial to inform staff and faculty about the campaign and about the larger initiative of internationalization. Our research indicated that many faculty members aren’t familiar with the quality enhancement plan and are skeptical about the effectiveness of its implementation and about the amount of work it will impose upon them.

Radio Advertise in the form of :15 and :30 second spots to run on WRUF-FM Country 103.7 the Gator, WRUFAM ESPN, KISS 105.3, running for a few weeks on each station. Television Advertising in the form of :30 and :60 second spots to run on UF’s PBS-affiliated WUFT Channel 5 and WRUF Channel 6, as well as WCJB-TV20’s ABC-affiliated channel. Print Advertise heavily with placements in The Independent Florida Alligator, a paper with a high readership rate among students, faculty and staff. See the Appendix. Non-Traditional Light post banners and bus wraps will reach a large amount of students, faculty and staff, as many utilize Regional Transit System buses to get to campus and on campus, and inevitably walk by light posts in heavily trafficked areas. Tasks: » Contact the radio stations, television channels and newspapers we want to advertise with. » Once that is finalized, create ad schedules with the news sources and work out the pricing. » Radio and print should be used throughout the entire campaign not only to advertise Project Glob al’s events, but also the mission. This will spread the word about Project Global. » Television and non-traditional advertisements should just be used for major events, such as Inter national Week festivities.

Our suggestion is to utilize communication methods and channels already in place to communicate to faculty and staff – an email at the beginning of the semester signed from the university’s president and key members of the internationalization task force is a tactic we recommend. This effectively launches the campaign for faculty and staff, and will highlight the main components of Project Global and the ramifications internationalization has for the campus community. The email also will direct staff and faculty to the Project Global webpage and to resources from the UFIC. Tasks: » Draft a professional email highlighting the main components of the Quality Enhancement Plan, the tactics UF chose to implement, an explanation why we need faculty and staff to help, and reassurance that we will help them along the way in finding ways to internationalize the campus in and outside of the classroom. » Make sure to also have specific instructions on how to access the faculty and staff section, and the UFIC resources section, on Project Global’s microsite. » Have the email revised for accuracy and grammati cal errors. » Locate the listserv for all UF faculty and staff mem bers because we want everyone informed of the QEP, and send the email in the very beginning of the fall semester. » Track how many faculty and staff members opened the email, and how many responded so that we can see if they are starting to become interested in the concept of internationalizing the campus.


Meeting with College Deans & Faculty Workshops Key members of the internationalization task force and representatives from the Project Global will meet with the deans and lead faculty from each college at large to further detail and explain Project Global and the quality enhancement plan, and to ask for their colleges’ support in the initiative. This meeting is intended to be informal in nature, and a way for Project Global’s proponents to offer suggestions and resources for the college deans regarding how they can incorporate Project Global into their own programs and curriculums. It will be arranged through email, after the initial email letter goes out. It’s imperative for this meeting to occur early in the fall 2014 semester and launch of Project Global, to ensure staff and faculty understanding and support. At this meeting, representatives from the UFIC will serve as advisors to the deans and present examples of potential projects or assignments instructors can include in their classes for science, technology and math fields, and for social sciences and liberal arts and business fields. After this initial meeting, individual meetings with the separate colleges can be arranged, if necessary, and a schedule of faculty and staff workshops on internationalization for all to attend will be announced. See the Appendix for a meeting agenda and suggestion of workshop subjects. Information presented at these workshops must be succinct, so it’s timely and memorable, but also explanatory enough to ensure understanding and that it’s helpful. Tasks: » Draft a professional email highlighting the main components of the Quality Enhancement Plan, the tactics UF chose to implement, an explanation why we need faculty and staff to help, and reassurance that we will help them along the way in finding ways to internationalize the campus in and outside of the classroom. » Make sure to also have specific instructions on how

to access the faculty and staff section, and the UFIC resources section, on Project Global’s microsite. » Have the email revised for accuracy and grammati cal errors. » Locate the listserv for all UF faculty and staff mem bers because we want everyone informed of the QEP, and send the email in the very beginning of the fall semester. » Track how many faculty and staff members opened the email, and how many responded so that we can see if they are starting to become interested in the concept of internationalizing the campus. International Gator Gala Banquet Favorability with the target public must be maintained if the five-year campaign is to be effective for its duration – people enjoy feeling appreciated. This means recognizing everyone who participates in Project Global and the internationalization of the campus and rewarding them for their efforts. Doing this will motivate supporters to achieve even more for the campaign and continue to be proponents of the campaign. An invitation-only banquet can accomplish this, and will be held at the end of the spring semester each year. It will consist of a dinner and presentation from Project Global representatives, who will award certificates to students who have completed the International Scholars Program, the Project Global Ambassadors, and staff and faculty who have been particularly dedicated to the cause of internationalization. During the banquet, we recommend also presenting the winners of the existing International Educator Awards, instead of the reception that usually occurs in the fall’s International Education Week. As with the International Educator Awards, all colleges will be invited to submit nominations for invitations to the banquet for student, faculty and staff. Planning for this banquet should begin in the fall and it should be publicized and promoted online, in order to motivate students, faculty and staff to qualify for an invitation. We suggest the Project Global Ambassadors and the UFIC organize the details of the


banquet, which can be held in the Reitz Union and feature catering from UF’s company. Tasks: » Draft a professional email highlighting the main components of the Quality Enhancement Plan, the tactics UF chose to implement, an explanation why we need faculty and staff to help, and reassurance that we will help them along the way in finding ways to internationalize the campus in and outside of the classroom. » Make sure to also have specific instructions on how to access the faculty and staff section, and the UFIC resources section, on Project Global’s microsite. » Have the email revised for accuracy and grammati cal errors. » Locate the listserv for all UF faculty and staff mem bers because we want everyone informed of the QEP, and send the email in the very beginning of the fall semester. » Track how many faculty and staff members opened the email, and how many responded so that we can see if they are starting to become interested in the concept of internationalizing the campus.


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TIMELINE TIMELINE

73


2014-2015 August Task Name Start Date End Date Wk Wk Wk Print Material-Project 8/11/2014 on going Press Release 8/11/2014 9/5/2014 Task 1: Create Press Release 8/11/2014 8/15/2014 Task 2: Distribute Press 8/18/2014 9/5/2014 Brochures 8/11/2014 on going Task 1: Design Brochure 8/11/2014 8/15/2014 Task 2: Distribute Brochures 8/18/2014 on going Fliers 8/11/2014 on going Task 1: Design Flier 8/11/2014 8/15/2014 Task 2: Distribute Flier 8/18/2014 on going Radio Ads 8/11/2014 9/26/2014 Task 1: Create Radio Ad 8/11/2014 8/13/2014 Task 2: Send Radio Ads out 8/14/2014 8/18/2014 KISS 105.3 (run radio ad) 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 103.7 The Gator (run radio ad) 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 ESPN 850 (run radio ad) 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 Social Media Ads 8/18/2014 on going Facebook (Post daily) 8/18/2014 on going Twitter (Post daily) 8/18/2014 on going Instagram (Post daily) 8/18/2014 on going Print Ads 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 Task 1: Distribute Press 8/18/2014 8/22/2014 Task 2: Distribute Flier of 8/18/2014 ########## The Independent Florida 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 Fine Print (run Press Release 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 HerCampus (run Press 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 Website (update daily) 8/25/2014 on going Project Global 8/18/2014 on going Task 1: Find advisor and 8/18/2014 8/22/2014 Press Release 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 Task 1: Create Press Release 8/18/2014 8/22/2014 Task 2: Distribute Press 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 Brochure 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 Task 1: Design Brochure 8/18/2014 8/22/2014 Task 2: Distribute Brochure 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 Fliers 8/18/2014 9/26/2014 Task 1: Design Flier 8/18/2014 8/22/2014 Task 2: Distribute Flier 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 Recruitment (Table and 8/25/2014 9/26/2014 Task 1: Interview interested 9/29/2014 10/3/2014 Task 2: Choose candidates 10/3/2014 10/8/2014 Training 10/13/2014 10/31/2014 Scholarship Competition 11/3/2014 2/6/2015 Fliers 10/272014 2/6/2015 Task 1: Design Flier 10/27/2014 10/31/2014 Task 2: Distribute Flier 11/3/2014 2/6/2015 Announce Winner 2/6/2015 2/6/2015 International Week 2/2/2015 2/9/2015 Task 1: Establish location 1/5/2015 1/9/2015 Task 2: Distribute promo 2/2/2015 2/9/2015 Task 3: Distribute Surveys 2/12/2015 2/16/2015 Press Release 12/29/2014 2/9/2015 Task 1: Create Press Release 12/29/2014 1/2/2015 Task 2: Distribute Press 1/5/2015 2/9/2015 Fliers 12/29/2014 2/9/2015 Task 1: Design Flier 12/29/2014 1/2/2015 Task 2: Distribute Flier 1/5/2015 2/9/2015 Bus Ads 1/5/2015 1/26/2015 Light post banner 1/5/2015 1/26/2015 Gator Gala Banquet 3/3/2015 4/11/2015 Task 1: Create Invitations 3/3/2015 3/7/2015 Task 2: Send Invitations 3/10/2015 3/14/2015 Task 3: Host event 4/11/2015 4/11/2015 Preview 5/25/2015 8/14/2015 Task 1: Order Promotional items 5/12/2015 5/16/2015 Task 2: Table and distribute brochure, fliers and promo items Faculty Workshops 9/2/2014 12/9/2014 Task 1: Create Workshops 9/2/2014 9/6/2014 Task 2: Implement workshops Faculty & Staff letter Task 1: Create letter Task 2: Email/Send letter

9/10/2014 12/6/2014 12/6/2014 12/13/2014

12/9/2014 12/17/2014 12/10/2014 12/17/2014

Wk

September Wk Wk Wk

Wk

October Wk Wk 3 Wk

Wk

November Wk Wk Wk

Wk

Wk

December Wk Wk 3 Wk

January Wk 1 Wk Wk Wk

Wk


TIMELINE Wk

January Wk 1 Wk Wk Wk

Wk

February Wk 2 Wk Wk

Wk 1 Wk

March Wk Wk

Wk

Wk

April Wk Wk

Wk

Wk

May Wk Wk

Wk

Wk

June Wk Wk Wk

Wk

Wk Wk

July Wk

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August Wk Wk

TIMELINE


project GLOBAL


BUDGET

BUDGET

77


BUDGET CATEGORIES Objective 1: To increase all undergraduate student enrollment in internationally focused classes, those identified by the registrar as general education code “N” classes, by 10% by December 2016. Personnel Material Printing TOTAL

Objective 2: To increase all undergraduate student participation in study abroad programs from the 2013 – 2014 academic year total by 5% by December 2016. Material Printing TOTAL

Objective 3: To increase undergraduate student participation and engagement in internationally focused co-curricular activities and programs, such as international events, international student organizations and other elements of the International Scholars Program excluding study abroad, by 10% by December 2016. Personnel Material Media Costs Equipment and Facilities Printing Postage TOTAL

$6,660 $4,000 $2,000 $12,660

$5,000 $2,000 $7,000

$10,000 $1,000 $8,000 $4,500 $2,000 $17,640 $43,140

Objective 4: To create action from faculty in support of internationalization efforts through increased incorporation of global perspectives into majorspecific coursework and general education coursework, so that 25% of introductory topic courses consider international issues by December 2016. Printing Administrative Items TOTAL

$2,000 $500 $2,500

Objective 5: To increase participation by faculty in the opportunities provided by the University of Florida International Center, such as the Intercultural Communities Institute, the International Speakers Program and International Working Groups, by 5% by December 2016. Media Costs Equipment & Facilities Printing Refreshments TOTAL

$2,000 $500 $2,000 $2,000 $6,500


FIVE-YEAR TOTAL BUDGET Year 1 Total Budget Year 2 Total Budget Year 3 Total Budget $72,800 $40,000 PERSONNEL

$16,660

$10,600

MATERIAL

$10,000

$10,000

MEDIA COSTS

$10,000

$5,000

EQUIPMENT & FACILITIES

$5,000

$1,000

$500

$500

PRINTING

$10,000

$6,000

POSTAGE

$17,640

$4,900

$2,000

$1,000

EVALUATION RESEARCH

$500

$500

CONTINGENCY

$500

$500

ADMINISTRATIVE ITEMS

REFRESHMENTS

$40,000

Year 3 Total Budget Year 4 Total Budget Year 5 Total Budget $40,000 $40,000 $40,000

$10,600

$10,600

$10,600

$10,600

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$500

$500

$500

$500

$6,000

$6,000

$6,000

$6,000

$4,900

$4,900

$4,900

$4,900

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500


project GLOBAL


EVALUATION

EVALUATION

81


EVALUATION

International Week if they checked in at any of the events with their Gator1 ID cards. It will help ensure the achievement of the campaign objective to Preparation increase undergraduate student participation and engagement in internationally focused co-curricular Preparation evaluation is conducted prior to the implementation of the campaign, and is intended to pre- activities and programs, such as international events, test messages and tactics to ensure the achievement of international student organizations and other eledesired outcomes. The preparation evaluation should ments of the International Scholars Program excluding study abroad, by 10% by May 2019. The survey consist of qualitative methods, including in-depth will help determine the planning of International interviews and focus groups with students, faculty and staff. The feedback gathered from these in-depth Week for the coming years. Questions on the survey will include information regarding student attitudes interviews and focus groups will help determine if the tactics proposed in this plan will be beneficial and toward the time, location, activity and event selection and how students found out about the event. This influential on the target public groups. information will help improve how to go about planning for the event in the future. We recommend during the summer seeking a group of about ten faculty, ten staff and ten students to sit Surveys to faculty who attend faculty workshops in these focus groups and in-depth interviews. The should be sent out the Monday following each workfocus groups should consist of five people each and shop. The questions should be aimed to determine the in-depth interviews should consist of five people each. During these sessions, Project Global represen- faculty attitude toward each specific workshop and the intended learning outcomes for them, in addition tatives should ask open-ended questions that deterto opinion on university support and any ideas they mine public’s knowledge about internationalization have for improvement. These surveys will help enand attitudes toward the slogans, programming and sure the accomplishment of two objectives aiming to promotional channels. It’s imperative to ensure the create action from faulty in support of internationalpublics will be reactive and positively impacted by ization efforts and to increase participation by faculty our campaign. Questions asked should also gear toin the opportunities provided by the UF International ward the participants’ views on our proposed tactics like International Week, the International Gator Gala, Center and Project Global by 2019. the scholarship competition and the faculty workAttendance at all events held relating to internationshops. alization at the University of Florida will also play a role in evaluation of the campaign objectives. The Process number of faculty and students attending events put on by Project Global is a reflection on the advertiseThe campaign will be evaluated throughout the years ment and promotion of each event. Attendance could as tactics are implemented. Evaluating progress also determine if events should be held at a different during the campaign will determine if any future time of day, week or year. tactics need to be altered. It will also help achieve objectives and keep the campaign on track according Program to the timeline. Two methods of evaluation are postevent surveys and event attendance. Program evaluation, after the campaign has been The post-event surveys should be distributed after the completed, will determine whether or not the campaign successfully accomplished each objective. The end of the International Week and after each faculty program evaluation will consist of measuring aspects workshop. Students will receive the post-Internaof the campaign tactics such as attendance at events, tional Week surveys via email the Monday following


enrollment in international organizations and international classes and surveys. The first objective Project Global set out to accomplish is to increase student enrollment in internationally focused classes, those identified by the registrar as general education code “N� classes, by 5% by May 2019. This objective will be evaluated through pulling reports of student enrollment in all courses with an international focus over the five-year period. The enrollment numbers for these courses for the years leading up to the beginning of the campaign should also be pulled to see the improvement over time. These years should be 2010-2014. The enrollment numbers should then be compared to determine if a 5% increase in these courses by May 2019. The second objective is designed to increase undergraduate student participation in study abroad programs from the 2013-2014 academic year total by 5% by May 2019. The evaluation of this objective will consist of collecting reports at the end of each academic year for the next five years. The reports collected between 2014-2019 will then be compared to the 2013-2014 academic year reports. This will evaluate the amount of students that enrolled in study abroad programs. The enrollment of students in study abroad programs should show an increase of student involvement by 5% by May 2019. The third objective aims to increase undergraduate student participation and engagement in internationally focused co-curricular activities and programs, such as international events, international student organizations and other elements of the International Scholars Program excluding study abroad, by 10% by May 2019. Event attendance is one of the key units of measure to help determine the success of this objective. Attendance at internationally focused events during the duration of the campaign should be compared to attendance at such events in the five years prior to the beginning of the campaign. Student organization membership should also be measured. Membership for such organizations should be pulled from GatorConnect at the end of each school year during the campaign. Membership numbers for the

previous five years before the campaign began can be obtained from the Department of Student Activities and Involvement. These numbers should all be compared in order to determine if the 10% increase has been met. The fourth objective aims to create action from faculty in support of internationalization efforts through increased incorporation of global perspectives in major-specific coursework and general education coursework, so that 25% of introductory topic courses consider international issues by May 2019. The campaign will evaluate this objective by distributing surveys to faculty member at the end of their course. The survey will determine whether the faculty member incorporated internationalization in their coursework and if so, how they incorporated it. By May 2019 the responses gathered from the faculty surveys should show a 25% positive result on the incorporation of internationalization in the coursework. The final objective intends to increase participation by faculty in the opportunities provided by the UF International Center, such as the Intercultural Communications Institute, the International Speakers Program and International Working Groups, by 5% by May 2019. Participation in faculty events and programs should be measured throughout the fiveyear period as the events and programs happen. They should then be compared to participation in the same events from the previous five years before the start of the campaign. The numbers for each year will be totaled and compared to see if there is an overall increase of 5% more faculty participating in such events and programs.


project GLOBAL


STEWARSHIP

STEWARDSHIP

85


STEWARDSHIP Reciprocity Project Global includes a yearly banquet, the International Gator Gala, at the end of the spring semester for awarding the publics and stakeholders who championed internationalization efforts at the University of Florida. This includes the Project Global Ambassadors, the International Scholars Program participants and the faculty and staff who advised these students and contributed to internationalization in their own capacities. The International Gator Gala will be held in April each year beginning at the end of year one. Because it is anticipated that the International Scholars Program could be a four-year endeavor for students to achieve, students will not be awarded for completing the program until April of year four. For the first three banquets, the students who are working towards completing the International Scholars Program will be invited, along with faculty members who are helping to advance internationalization efforts and the ambassadors. This will encourage these students to continue pursuing the program.

In order to qualify for an invitation, the amount of involvement in internationalization will need to vary from year to year. For example, invitations would be emailed out to all teachers and students involved in international courses, as well as student leaders in international student organizations. However, as more programs are developed, it will be more difficult to qualify for an invitation. By year two in the campaign, it will be required to be enrolled in at least one international course and be a member of at least one international student organization. For faculty members, they will have to teach at least one international course, or be advisors to international student organizations.

Reporting An annual report on the progress of Project Global, the QEP and the internationalization efforts of the University of Florida will be prepared to maintain visibility and transparency with publics and stakeholders, and will highlight the initiative’s successes. It will be published on the university websites beginning at the end of the first year and available to all.

It is important to report our efforts to show the public what is being done towards the internationalization Each year, voting will take place among a committee of the University of Florida. In order to effectively comprised of staff and student employees of the International Center to recognize a top faculty member communicate all that is being done, there will be an annual report on international events put on at the and student who have demonstrated a passion for University of Florida both by the International Center enhancing internationalization at the University of and student organizations, and it will also highlight Florida. These two individuals will be recognized at study abroad work like photographs and stories of the International Gator Gala with certificates. Holdselect students. The report will also track Internationing a banquet will provide opportunity for media al Scholar Program students’ work to show that there coverage by and for students like in the Independent are strides being made in the program before the first Florida Alligator. group of students is able to be awarded. This report will be released at the end of the fiscal year of year Inviting media to cover the event will expose internationalization efforts and opportunity for reward to one and will continue through the next four years of the QEP. It will be accessible to the public on the Unistudents and faculty. The banquet as a whole could make invitees not only feel honored to attend, but will versity of Florida International Center website. Pubalso give them the opportunity to network with peers lishing it online will also cut down on costs and those and possible mentors who have the same passion and who are interested in keeping up with the changes made year to year will be able to conveniently. desire for internationalization.


Responsibility An advisory board or task committee will regulate and oversee the International Scholars Program and its students, providing direction for the program and implementing improvements during the next five years. It is important for the University of Florida and by extension, the University of Florida International Center and those who commit to executing the QEP to maintain promises to the public. In order to ensure the QEP remains on track, an advisory board will be created. Due to the large amount of programs and activities in mind to execute the QEP, there should be different facets or committees to make up the advisory board. This will allow a few members of the University of Florida community to oversee the implementation of relevant international coursework, study abroad information and recruitment sessions, faculty training and International Scholar Program events. The advisory board should be comprised of students and faculty who apply to be members, but who do not have major ties to any one program or effort in order to alleviate any concerns of favoritism. They should meet bi-monthly as a whole board and have open communication with the facets they oversee.

Relationship Nurturing It is important to keep in contact with supporters of the internationalization of the University of Florida through regular communication and interaction. These supporters are students who enroll in international coursework, pursue the International Scholars Program or attend international events on campus like those during International Week. Faculty and staff who aid in internationalization efforts through teaching courses, attending events or advising international student organizations are also supporters who should be reached out to regularly. These supporters should be communicated with

regularly, possibly via email with a monthly newsletter inviting them to upcoming events and informing them of current programs and initiatives. In order to engage with supporters before events happen, questions for themes to incorporate into future events and voting on the top suggestions would help supporters feel as though they are included in the planning process, and that their voices are heard. These questions will be created on an online polling system like Qualtrics and a link should be incorporated into the newsletter. To further show appreciation to supporters, we recommend individually thank them for their time and efforts. This will be done through mailing thank you cards after events to those who helped put it together and attended. These cards will also be sent to faculty and staff at the end of each school year for their support through advising or teaching students with an international focus. Those who attend the faculty and staff workshops throughout the year will also receive thank you cards.


project GLOBAL


APPENDICES

APPENDICES

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APPENDIX I Project Global Style Guide Logo Full Color

Gray Scale

Color Logo White Font

Black and White

project GLOBAL

project GLOBAL project GLOBAL

Color Palette Full Color

CMYK: C= 0 M= 70 Y= 100 K= 0 RGB: R = 255 G= 74 B= 0

CMYK: C= 100 M= 60 Y= 0 K= 20 CMYK: C= 79 M= 57 Y= 18 K= 2 RGB: R = 71 G= 108 B= 155 RGB: R = 0 G= 33 B= 165

CMYK: C= 0 M= 55 Y= 80 K= 0 RGB: R = 246 G= 140 B= 71

CMYK: C= 40 M= 30 Y= 0 K= 0 RGB: R = 152 G= 165 B= 212


APPENDIX I- CONT’D Gray Scale

Pantone: CMYK: C= 0 M= 0 Y= 0 K= 80 RGB: R = 88 G= 89 B= 91

Pantone: CMYK: C= 0 M= 0 Y= 0 K= 70 RGB: R = 109 G= 110 B= 113

CMYK: C= 0 M= 0 Y= 0 K= 60 RGB: R = 128 G= 130 B= 133

CMYK: C= 0 M= 0 Y= 0 K= 50 RGB: R = 147 G= 149 B= 152

Additional Colors

Pantone: Black CMYK: C= 0 M= 0 Y= 0 K= 100 RGB: R = 0 G= 0 B= 0

Pantone: White CMYK: C= 0 M= 0 Y= 0 K= 0 RGB: R = 255 G= 255 B= 255

Typography Logo

Project:

Gautami Regular

GLOBAL: Gautami Bold

Print Materials

Web Materials

Myriad Pro

Minion Pro

Minion Pro

Myriad Pro


APPENDIX II Complete List of International Organizations Ability Service Training Responsibility Achievement (ASTRA) Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity - Beta Beta Chapter (AO) Academically Oriented Dental Fraternity American Society of Interior Designers/International Interior Design Association (ASID/IIDA) Amnesty International (Amnesty) Arabic Cultural Association (ACA) Audio Engineering Society (AES) Bangladeshi Students Association (BSA) Best Buddies, Brazilian-Portuguese Club (Bate Papo) Catholic Gators Coalition (Catholic Gators) Christian Pharmacist Fellowship International Jacksonville (CPFI Jax) Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI – Orlando), Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI - Gainesville) Circle K International (CKI) Dancin’ Gators, Delta Sigma Theta Digital Assembly (DA) Engineers Without Borders (EWB-UF) European Union Club (EU Club) Florida Global Medical Brigades Florida International Society of Pharmaco-Epidemiology (ISPE) Florida Quidditch Florida Water Environment Association (FWEA) View Gator Beach Volleyball (GBV) Gator Beach Volleyball (GBV) Gators for Doctors Without Borders (GDWB) Gators For Rwanda (GFR) Gators Growth International Volunteer Excursions (Gators G.I.V.E) Global Medical Training (GMT) Golden Key International Honor Society (GK) Greek American Student Association (GASA) Heal The World (HTW), View Health Outreach Assembly (HOA) Health Outreach Assembly (HOA) Hope Global Mission (Hope) Humanitarian Interaction on Campus (HIC) Indian Graduate Students Association (IGSA) Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences (INFORMS) Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) International Business Society (IBS) International Friendship (IF)


APPENDIX II- CONT’D View International Law Society (ILS) International Law Society (ILS) International Medical Outreach (IMO) View International Studies Club, International Studies Club Kappa Delta Pi (KDPi), Mayors’ Council (MC) Model United Nations (MUN) Navigators International (Navigators) No Southern Accent (NSA) Nourish International- Florida (Nourish) Operation Smile (OS) Phi Alpha Delta Legal Fraternity Fletcher Chapter Levin College of Law (PAD Fletcher Chapter)


APPENDIX III Interview Guide: Student Name of Interviewer: Date: Subject’s Age: Subject’s Gender: Subject’s Year in School: Subject’s Major: Subject’s Race/Ethnicity: Subject’s Country/State of Origin: INTRODUCTION: Introduce yourself. Explain: This interview is being conducted by a group of students in the Public Relations Campaigns course. We are developing a campaign to promote internationalization at the University of Florida. Your participation in this interview will allow us to put together the best campaign possible. With your consent, I would like to make an audio recording our conversation. Although I will be taking notes while we are speaking, I would like to listen to the conversation again at a later date for data analysis purposes. I will destroy the audio file when I am finished with this project. --INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 1. Have you ever spent time abroad? If yes ask: what was the reason? What countries have you visited? How long were you there? What did you learn from your experience? If no ask: do you have a desire to spend time abroad? Why or why not? What would you hope to get out of the experience? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer). 2. When someone says “internationalization,” “globalization” or a “global economy,” what do you think of? How do you feel internationalization affects you personally? How do you think internationalization will affect your future career? 3. Do you think of the University of Florida as an internationally focused university? Why or why not? How important do think it is for UF to have an international focus? Please explain. 4. Regardless of major, all students must take three credits that fulfill the international requirement. (The classes have an “N” in the course catalog). What class did you take to fulfill that requirement? How was your experience in that class? Are you interested in taking more classes with an international focus? Why or why not? 5. Are you interested in studying abroad during your time at UF? Why or Why not? What are the major factors influencing your decision about studying abroad? If the person has already completed a study abroad, ask: how was the experience beneficial to you academically? Professionally? Personally? 6. What internationally focused events have you attended at UF? Why did you attend these events? How would you describe your experience? If the person has not attended an international event, ask: Why haven’t you attend these types of events? What types of events would you be interested in? 7. Do you belong to any international student organizations? If so, how many and which ones? Why do you belong to these organizations? Why don’t you belong to any? 8. UF is planning to start an International Scholars Program, an award program that recognizes international achievement among students by completing approved international scholar courses and going beyond a students’ college required foreign language requirements. What would motivate you to participate in the International Scholars Program?


APPENDIX IV Interview Guide: Faculty Name of Interviewer: Date: Subject’s Age: Subject’s Gender: Subject’s Position: Subject’s College: Subject’s Race/Ethnicity: INTRODUCTION: Introduce yourself. Explain: This interview is being conducted by a group of students in the Public Relations Campaigns course. We are developing a campaign to promote internationalization at the University of Florida. Your participation in this interview will allow us to put together the best campaign possible. With your consent, I would like to make an audio recording our conversation. Although I will be taking notes while we are speaking, I would like to listen to the conversation again at a later date for data analysis purposes. I will destroy the audio file when I am finished with this project. --INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 1. When did you start working at UF? Is UF more international today than it was when you started teaching and/or doing research here? If yes ask: in what ways? Can you please give some examples or anecdotes? If no ask: what would it take to make the university have a more international focus? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer).

UF is currently undergoing reaffirmation for accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools - Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). A primary component of this process is implementation of the university’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), a five-year campaign focused on further internationalizing undergraduate offerings. 2. What do you know about the QEP? (Note to interviewer: if the faculty member does not know about the QEP, give them a brief explanation).What do you think about the QEP? Do you think the QEP can help the university accomplish its goal of internationalization? Why or why not? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer). 3. One of the initiatives of the QEP is to have new internationally focused courses. Do you already teach a course with an international focus? If yes ask: What course(s) were they? How was your experience teaching the class? If no ask: Have you ever thought about creating and teaching a new international course? Why or why not? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer). 4. Have you ever been on a study abroad trip as faculty at UF? If yes ask: where and when did you go? Tell me about your experience? Would you consider participating in another study abroad program? Why or why not? If no ask: would you be interested in participating in a study abroad program in the future. Why or why not? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer). 5. Do you think of the University of Florida as an internationally focused university? Why or why not? Do you believe that the school offers enough programs, courses and supports organizations that are internationally focused? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer). 6. In your opinion, how important is it for the University of Florida to become more internationalized? Should a research-1 university make internationalization a priority? Why or why not? (Note to interviewer: please make sure that this is more than just a “yes” or “no” answer).


APPENDIX V Project Global Branding: Ambassadors Logo

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Project Global Branding: Recruitment Tags

I AM I AM

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Apply to be a Project Global Ambassador,

go Apply to www.projectglobaluf.com today! to be a Project Global Ambassador,

go to www.projectglobaluf.com today!


APPENDIX VI Project Global International Week Flyer

Front

Back


APPENDIX VII Project Global International Week Press Release Media Contact: Alberta Gator 352-123-4567 alberta@ufl.edu FOR RELEASE JANUARY 1, 2015 Action-Packed Project Global International Week Brings Excitement to Campus Awareness Week Encourages Students to Develop Global Perspectives GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Ambassadors from the University of Florida International Center announce the first annual “Project Global International Week,” a series of events from Feb. 2-6 that intends to help students realize the importance of attaining an international education and to make studying abroad more accessible. A highlight of the week is the announcement of the five $1,000 winners from a scholarship competition for undergraduate students – launched in the fall, the competition invites students to get creative and produce a video, image, social media post or other composition that showcases why they want to study abroad, and how they think it will impact their futures. “Recent data from the Student Experience in the Research University survey indicates and rankings from the Institute for International Education indicate that the number of students who study abroad at UF has been gradually declining during the past decade,” said Leonardo Villaón, dean of the UF International Center. “The scholarship competition is designed to enhance determination to study abroad, despite financial restrictions.” The week concludes with a high -profile festival that celebrates cultural diversity on campus and the lifestyles, music and movies of countries across the globe. Other events include: Monday: “Global Moments,” a photo-sharing initiative that displays student photography from study abroad trips or other international clubs and programs around campus. Tuesday: “Global Bites,” a food truck rally on the Plaza of Americas featuring ethnic cuisine. Wednesday: “Global Talk,” a study abroad panel featuring students, faculty and staff and ambassadors and creates a dialogue about the benefits of studying abroad, and how to overcome obstacles in order to do so. Thu rsday: “Global Games,” an international student organization festival that allows the opportunity for these groups to teach the activities, hobbies and crafts of their cultures. Friday: “Global Festival,” an outdoor celebration featuring food, movies, local entertainment and prizes. *** What is Internationalization? The American Council on Education defines internationalization as incorporating global perspectives into teaching, learning and research; building competence among students, faculty and staff; and establishing relationships and collaborations abroad. About Project Global: Project Global is a five-year initiative, inspired by the 2014 Quality Enhancement Plan, to establish the University of Florida as a top university for international education. The goal of this campaign is to create a global culture among students, faculty and staff, and to empower students with the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to compete in an increasingly expanding, interconnected job market. About the Project Global Ambassadors: Project Global Ambassadors are a part of the UFIC’s ambassador program, and are champions for internationalization on campus. They work closely with the UFIC and help advise students on study abroad, campus opportunities and the International Scholars Program. ###


APPENDIX VIII Project Global Informational Brochure Ambassador Program What is ... Internationalization? » Internationalization is incorporating global

perspectives into teaching, learning and research; building competence among students,

and collaborations abroad. (American Council on Education) It’s more important now than ever before for students to learn to be successful in a society that operates across geographic borders.

Project Global Ambassadors are champions for internationalization on campus, and are actively seeking an education from the University of Florida that will prepare them for careers abroad or at home.

What is ... Project Global? »

establish the University of Florida as a top university for international education.

empower students with the knowledge, skills and expanding, interconnected job market.

Go Go Global. Global. Go Gators. Go

Internationalizing the Gator Nation

Participating in the Project Global Ambassador program is one of the best experiences I’ve had at UF. It’s awesome to be a part of something that connects students to the bigger world around them. – ALBERTA GATOR

Ambassadors work closely with the International Center and help advise students on study abroad, campus opportunities and the International Scholars Program.

— Join the Ambassadors —

m

project GLOBAL

ProjectGlobal@ufl.edu


APPENDIX VIIII Project Global Ambassador Informational Flyer

AMBASSADOR PROGRAM project GLOBAL

» Passionate about travel? » Excited to learn about cultures & people? » The UF International Center wants you!

Apply online today! | www.projectglobal.ufl.edu @ProjectGlobalUF | #GoGlobal

G

ProjectGlobalUF


APPENDIX X Project Global Faculty Workshop Flyer

!! !

Faculty Workshops

What is the Project Global Campaign? | 9/10 Incorporating International Concepts in the Classroom | 9/23 Start Your Own Study Abroad Trip | 10/2 Incorporating International Concepts in STEM | 10/13 Incorporating International Concepts in Business | 10/29 Incorporating International Concepts in Liberal Arts | 11/6 Incorporating International Concepts in Communications | 11/19 Incorporating International Concepts in Agriculture | 12/3 Be Rewarded For Your International E orts | 12/9

Go Gators. Go Global.


APPENDIX XI Project Global Faculty College Meeting Agenda

AGENDA & ACTION ITEMS COLLEGE LEAD MEETINGS DATE: TIME: LOCATION: DURATION: COLLEGE/ATTENDEES: I.

What is Project Global?

II.

Importance of Internationalization in Education a. Preparing Students for Careers b. Improving Standing and Prestige of University

III.

How to Incorporate Global Perspectives into the Classroom a. Projects b. Assignments c. Tasks & Discussions

IV.

Taking Advantage of the UFIC Resources and Project Global Ambassadors a. Online Tools b. Faculty and Staff Programs c. Request the Project Global Ambassadors to Speak in Class

V.

Upcoming Project Global Events a. Scholarship Competition b. International Week

VI.

Comments, Questions, Concerns


APPENDIX XII

Project Global :60 Television Spot | “Go Gators. Go Global.”

is evident in today’s shrinking world. It’s now more important than ever for the University of Florida to adapt to a global society.

Girl 1: To me, it’s expanding my mind set.

Guy 1: It’s taking a step back from the normal and what you’re used to and getting to know others a little bit better.

Guy 2: It’s preparing me for my future, and my career.

With over 60 international student organizations, more than 300 international education courses and study abroad programs in over a thousand universities in over 90 countries, the University of Florida is breaking down barriers and internationalizing the undergraduate student experience.

Girl 1: It’s a big world out there.


APPENDIX XII- CONT’D


APPENDIX XIII Project Global Talent Consent Forms


APPENDIX XIII- CONT’D Project Global Talent Consent Forms


APPENDIX XIII- CONT’D Project Global Talent Consent Forms


APPENDIX XIII- CONT’D Project Global Talent Consent Forms


APPENDIX XIII- CONT’D Project Global Talent Consent Forms


APPENDIX XIII- CONT’D Project Global Talent Consent Forms


APPENDIX XIV Project Global Stewardship Tactics

Project Global Stationary


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TEAM BIOS TEAM BIOS

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Mariah Curry Creative Director Mariah Curry is a senior at the University of Florida and will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in public relations this May. Curry has devoted herself not only to her studies, but also to the university. She started working at the Dean of Students Office as a Student Assistant where she focused on publications for new student programs for the incoming classes at UF. After two years, she was promoted to marketing and public relations Intern and was given greater responsibilities for the DSO. Additionally, Curry served as a Public Relations Captain for Dance Marathon securing a $50,000 company sponsorship to support Children’s Miracle Network and UF Health Shands Hospitals. Curry also previously interned at Chappell Roberts, an advertising agency in Tampa, Fla. In the summer of 2012 Curry had the incredible opportunity to work as a public relations intern in London, England at Action Against Hunger, an organization that strives to eradicate hunger for the people of Africa. She spent the summer abroad in the non-profit organization’s public relations office utilizing her communication, design, and critical-thinking skills. After graduation Curry would like to work on a public relations campaign for a non-profit organization similar to that of Action Against Hunger. Here, she hopes to gain entry-level experience and enhance her professional development skills. In the future she would like to eventually pursue a career in corporate communications where she will utilize the experiences she gained thus far and strive in a more competitive environment.

Jennifer Garcia Research Director Jennifer Garcia is senior at the University of Florida. She will graduate May 2014 with a Bachelors of Science in public relations and a minor in History and Education. She originally entered UF pursuing a degree in Engineering; however with positive feedback and extensive research, she knew that her passion was in the field of public relations. Jennifer seeks to have a career managing the relationship and communication between a client and its customers. During her time at UF, Jennifer has had the opportunity to work in various internships which have helped mold her into the public relations practitioner she hopes to become. Whether it was working with non-profit companies such as LifeSouth Community Blood Center, Inc. and the Early Learning Coalition of Alachua Country or being a part of a student run public relations agency, Alpha PRoduction, she has had a diverse range of experience, which will help her succeed in her future endeavors. After graduation, Jennifer will pursue a career as a public relations practitioner. She also plans to return to school and obtain her Masters in Marketing. To end her career, she will enter the teaching world where she hopes to teach 10th grade history. The world is ever changing, but she has high aspects of achieving anything she puts her heart into.


Michelle Hughes Media Director Michelle Hughes is a senior public relations major from Palm Valley, Fla., who graduates in May 2014 with a Bachelor of Science in public relations and a minor in business administration. She is currently the communications coordinator for MacNificent Solutions, a marketing management company in Gainesville, Fla. Michelle has experience designing and implementing strategic marketing plans for a range of clients, such as Gainesville Harley-Davidson, United Way of North Central Florida, Five Points of Life, Body by Boris, a local personal training facility, and Start Up Quest, a career training program with eight regions throughout Florida. Michelle also gained experience while working as an account associate for Alpha PRoductions, a marketing and promotions intern at WRUF-AM & WRUF-FM, a marketing and communications intern at United Way of North Central Florida and an advertising intern, clerk and dummier at The Independent Florida Alligator. After graduation, Michelle will become a full-time employee at MacNificent Solutions and remain in her position as communications coordinator. Her long-term goal is to become a partner at MacNificent Solutions and bring in her own clients. Eventually, Michelle would like to start her own marketing management company in Gainesville after making valuable connections throughout the years and building a professional reputation with MacNificent Solutions.

Kaitlyn Macri Research Director Kaitlyn Macri is soon-to-be a graduate from The University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science in public relations and a minor in leadership. She attended her first two years at The University of South Florida while studying mass communications. Kaitlyn heard about the field of public relations through a few of her friends and quickly realized she could make a career as a relationship builder with companies and their customers. This is not only a successful route, but also something she enjoys. She has had many experiences during her college career. Whether she was interning with Advocates for World Heath, Inc. in Tampa, Fla, which is a start-up not-for-profit organization, or with Collier Companies, the multi-million dollar management company in Gainesville, Fla., she has always broadened her knowledge of public relations and marketing through as many experience as she could. She has also interned with WUFTFM and WUFT-TV and with Partnership for Strong Families in Gainesville, Fla. After graduation, she plans on starting to work her way up within the company she currently works for. She will be working with a local apartment community on sustaining relationships with its residents, and think-


ing of ways to bring in more prospects. The company is headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., which is where she sees herself working in the next few months. She wishes to become part of the marketing or human resources department. Further down the road, Kaitlyn aspires to work for a not-for-profit organization such as Make-A-Wish or Invisible Children. She has always had a passion for helping the less fortunate and making the world a better place than it is. Hopefully, she will be able to fulfill this dream in the upcoming years.

Annie Uzar Account Executive Annie Uzar is a senior public relations major from Palm City, Fla. She graduates this spring with a Bachelor of Science in public relations and a minor in leadership. Uzar currently serves as a Public Relations and Marketing Intern for the University of Florida Career Resource Center. Her past experience includes interning at the American Cancer Society Martin/Okeechobee Unit and Cotton & Company, an international luxury real estate firm located in South Florida. While working with the American Cancer Society, Uzar started a new marketing tradition of lighting up a local bridge for breast cancer awareness in October. These experiences gave her insight into the field and how to incorporate her coursework into real life situations. After graduation, Uzar will begin an assistantship with the Nova Southeastern University Office of Career Development while pursuing a Master of Science in College Student Affairs. She plans to utilize the communication skills she has learned at the University of Florida to promote career opportunities to students she will interact with in this position. Long-term, Uzar aspires to become a student affairs professional working at a university in South Florida while contributing to the field as a leader in professional organizations like the NASPA - Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education.

Melanie Wright Chief Copy Writer and Editor Melanie Wright is a third-generation Florida Gator and graduates this spring with honors and a Bachelor of Science in public relations and minor in leadership. Wright has experience interning for IMG College Sports Marketing and the marketing and promotions department of the University of Florida Athletic Association. She has also this semester worked on a national integrated communications and advertising campaign as a participant in FOX Sports University, a program that challenges students to create real-world solutions that are actually implemented across FOX’s media channels. She is an ambassador for the College of Journalism and Communications and the vice president of Country Music Association EDU. Additionally, Melanie has previously served as an account executive for Alpha PRoductions, a student-run public relations firm, as an intern for WRUF-FM Country 103.7 the Gator/WRUF-AM ESPN Radio, and as an intern for Balance 180 Gymnastics Academy, a Gainesville-based nonprofit.


Melanie wants to work in the sports and entertainment sector of the public relations agency, and has an interest in branding, publicity and marketing. She has a passion for ice hockey and played competitively for six years, is a diehard Gator fan, and studied abroad for a summer in Sydney and Cairns, Australia. After graduation, Melanie is accepting a job as the program director for PRO Martial Arts, a new fitness kickboxing and karate franchise located in Gainesville, Fla., that emphasizes leadership, character development skills and bullying prevention for children and teens.

spark Spark Public Relations

Public Relations

spark Spark Public Relations

Public Relations


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REFERENCES

REFERENCES

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REFERENCES Almanac of Higher Education 2013. (n.d.). The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved February 10, 2014, from http://chronicle.com/article/A-Profile-of-Freshmen-at/140387/ American Council on Education (2012). Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses: 2012 Edition. Retrieved from American Council on Education - Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement website: http://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Documents/MappingInternationalizationonUSCampus es2012-full.pdf American Council on Education (2014). 2012 Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses. Retrieved February 2014, from http://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Pages/2012-Mapping-Internationaliza tion-on-U-S--Campuses.aspx Annual Report 2010-2011. (n.d.). UF Office for Student Financial Affairs RSS. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://www.sfa.ufl.edu/publications/#annualreports Brodhead, Richard H., Ruderman, Judith. (2009). Global Duke: Enhancing Students’ Capacity for World Citizenship. Duke University. Carrier, Shannon M. (2005). Education for Citizenship and Leadership In Local Global Communities. Rollins College. CollegeCalc. (2013). University of Florida. Retrieved January 2014, from CollegeCalc: http://www.college calc.org/colleges/florida/university-of-florida/#.Uur4qXnSzGB DiSalvo, D. (2012, April 23). How Governor Rick Scott is Sabotaging Florida’s Universities. Retrieved January 2014, from Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2012/04/23/how-gover nor-rick-scott-is-sabotaging-floridas-universities/ Florida State University. (n.d.). About Florida State University. Retrieved January 2014, from Florida State University: http://www.fsu.edu/about/students.html Florida State University. (n.d.). Money Matters. Retrieved January 2014, from Florida State University: http://international.fsu.edu/Students/Prospective/Money%20Matters.aspx Forbes. (2014). America’s Top Colleges. Retrieved January 2014, from Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/col leges/university-of-florida/ Institute of International Education. (2013). Open Doors Data U.S. Study Abroad: Leading Institu tions by Study Abroad Total. Retrieved January 2014, from Institute of International Education: http://www.iie.org/Research-and-Publications/Open-Doors/Data/US-Study-Abroad/Leading-Institu tions-by-Study-Abroad-Total/2011-12


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project GLOBAL


Project Global Campaigns Book  

This is an excerpt of the campaign book that I contributed to as creative director for public relations campaigns, a class taken by all publ...

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