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T A B L E | O F | C O N T E N T S

ON|FIGURE|GROUND A P P R O A C H I N G | S PA C E STUDY|OF|A|DANCER HOUSE|FOR|ADANCER HOUSING|FOR|HAITIANS HOTEL|IN|CONDADO


CITY|FIELD|CONDITIONS SANTURCE|MASTERPLAN ENGINEERING|SCHOOL D R A W I N G S P H O T O G R A P H Y

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F I G U R E | G R O U N D p r o f e s s o r

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m a y r a

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The power of images is something that cannot be underestimated in any vertient of design. Our capacity to represent and communicate a certain message is what characterizes a designers work. This initial excersice attempts not only to familiarize the student with the particular vocabulary and general concepts of the field, but also to acquire a sense of composition, and more importantly, develop the capacity to represent these concepts through imagery. Each 10� x 10� composition represents a particular concept of design, looking to maintain a visual and formal continuity throughout the five pieces.

j i m ĂŠ n e z

f a l l . s e m e s t e r | 2 0 0 9

|TRANSFORMATION| | N E T W O R K | | C O M P R E S S I O N | Make a dramatic change in the form, An arrangement of intersecting hori- To be squeezed or pressed together or appearance, or character of. zontal and vertical lines. into a smaller space


| A B R U P T | | A X I S | A sudden and unexpected change, An imaginary line that divides somesteep; precipitous thing into equal halves.

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A P P R O A C H I N G | S P A C E p r o f e s s o r

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m a y r a

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Though the design process is a changing phenomenon for each individual, it is common to begin the process of generation of three-dimensional objects and space with an initial two-dimensional image. This exercise is anchored on the previous graphic compositions, being the seed that engendered different ideas and distinct ways of representing them in three dimensions. The transformation of the ideas, also transform the object in question. This spatial experience is composed of fragmented elements that transform at each step, with a variation in spacing between each element. Though the compositional origin based on the images presented before, is not obvious, it can be perceived when viewing the object in certain angles. The irregularity of the piece makes it an enticing experience to the eye.

j i m ĂŠ n e z

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longitudinal

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S T U D Y | O F | A | D A N C E R p r o f e s s o r

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e s t e b a n

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s p r i n g

s e n n y e y

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The field of design is and should remain to be ‘open-minded’. Said field looks for the integration of professions, observing all efforts being made, and often finding the means for new design. This exercise seeks the development of a design concept to be applied in the next project, through the observation of choreography, which in a sense is the design of movement. This study of movement is based on ‘the rite of spring’, choreographed by Pina Bausch. The observation of frames, instants and synthesis of the images leads to a certain three dimensional diagram that accounts for form, color, flexibility or rigidity. The rather intuitive and experimental exercise has allowed the development of rough spatial concepts that can be refined to generate an actual constructible design.

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S T U D I O | F O R | A | D A N C E R p r o f e s s o r

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e s t e b a n

From the previous study of Pina Bausch’s choreography, the developed piece served as compositional organizer for this house, designed for the dancer herself. The result is the division of the program into two sections: a rigid volume resulting of the constant ‘wall’ of people observed in the back of the choreography, and a flowing volume that results from the main dancer’s movements throughout the choreography. Living areas will be concealed within the rigid volume, while the main space, the dance room, within the flowing flexible red volume. The flexibility of this space does not necessarily respond to its from rather than its function. This dancing space may be connected directly to the concrete volume, or not, depending if it is preferred for it to be closed or open. Also, the dance space is flexible because it can transform to be an open air space, with the mechanic removal of the cloth roof.

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t o p

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second | floorplan r e s t i n g | a r e a

first|floorplan main|entrance d a n c e | a r e a

r e s t r o o m

r e s t r o l i v i n g | s p k i t c h b a l c o

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g u e s t

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outdoor|terrace


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transversal

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longitudinal|section

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H O U S I N G | F O R | H A I T I A N S * p r o f e s s o r

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j u a n

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f a l l

p e n a b a d

The concept of the “house-machine” first enunciated by Le Corbusier and followed by many more, is of significant relevance to the development of this project. The challenge presented is to produce a housing unit for communities affected by tuberculosis in Haiti. Although the typical unit will be the most common, the kit of parts used in it might be re-arranged in order to produce variations of the house to allow different kinds of families and individuals to reside in such a community. The house, while maintaining low construction costs attends directly the most basic needs of the residents. Throughout the design process, the most important element considered was to achieve constant access to fresh air and water. Cross ventilation and rain water harvesting are major features in this design, looking to generate a healthy interior environment. The incorporation of gathering spaces for community interaction has been attended as well, having provided open-air terraces, both in the main entrance and rooftop. d o r m i

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b a c k

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f r o n t

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transversal | section

c o m m o n

t o r i e s

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a r e a

f a ç a d e

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l o n g i t u d i n a l

* In collaboration with Cristina Valentín, Alexandra López, and Alejandra Fuentes.

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s e c t i o n

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p o s s i b l e

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c i r c u l at i o n | s e r v i c e s

living|public.space

d o r m i t o r i e s

kitchen

single|unit

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f u l l

three.unit

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Due to the particular irregularities of this site, each house sits over a structure of “pilotis�, raising them over the terrain. This makes the units suitable for the entire site without the need of terrain work. Also, the arrangement of the units responds to the communal needs, generating diverse and ample gathering areas for the entire community.

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HOTEL|RENOVATION|IN|CONDADO p r o f e s s o r

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Design to some may be defined as the intentional arrangement of parts to accomplish a harmonious whole. This was the drive or intention of this project. From a simple line diagram, volumes emerged overlapping, intersecting and fitting together in order to reach the architectural object: the tectonics of each part become protagonist. The requirements of this project were to develop an annex containing entertainment and public areas for an old existing hotel. The original 11-story building was asked to be preserved as is and only intervene on the rest of the site. This is the first project presented that shows an effort to understand scale through the surroundings or context. The scale of the generated volumes attempts to reconcile the taller hotel tower with the rest of the smaller scale buildings around it. The result is a harmonious relationship with context.

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a d m i n i s t r at i v e | o f f i c e s restrooms

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open | air | terrace f l o o r p l a n

mezzanine|bar restaurant

s e c o n d

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mezzanine | activity . f l o o r p l a n

main

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k i t c h e n restaurant

f i r s t

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main | ball . room f l o o r p l a n

|2010


m a i n

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O N | F I E L D | C O N D I T I O N S p r o f e s s o r

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j u l i á n

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m a n r i q u e s

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+ This exersice diverts from the design process applied in the rest of the selection of works. The projet derives from Stan Allen’s “Field Conditions” , essay that marks a transition from the traditional architectural forms to the consideration of networks and systems. “Field “ reffers to an array of objects that accumulate and become a system. Through the representation of this system, we look to describe spatial qualities withouth the building apparatus. This fiel condition is constructed out of approximately 2,500 sewing bobbins. After several experiments of how these bobbins should interact with eachother, it was found that the logic to be followed was a radial arrangement. The hexagons resulting from the tying of the bobbins make up the field condition.

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(67) + PAPER VEIL

In the process, a paper veil was thrown upon the piece as observed in the image, to avoid distracting the observer with the piece’s beauty, and observe more closely the behaviour of the piece when interacting with light.


S1|magnitudes S2|proyection S 3 |

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S 5 | p e r f o r a t i o n S6| e l i p s e | n e t w o r k S 7 | h a l o | n e t w o r k

S8|combined

two material representations of the process were developed. First, a cast plaster tile that was sculpted in a CNC milling machine, and second, a piece of lycra thrown over and tied down the first with a hardening chemical, producing a textured fabric.

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This axonometric presents each layer of systems or networks developed from the bobbin field condition. From this layering , a series of material representations were achieved. |

S 9 | n e t w o r k | 1 & 2 S10|network|1,2&3

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CITY|FIELD|CONDITIONS p r o f e s s o r

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The systems and networks found in the bobbin field condition, now serve as logics to follow on the city field condition of Villa Palmeras, Puerto Rico. Though the conditions are different, applying similar rules to the analysis of the area develop its own set of diagrams. By classifying each building on site by use, we encounter different conditions that overlap. By developing a set of networks that overlap according to use, we discover a distinct way to approach the architectural intention. From the overlapping of the diagrams developed several objects that describe the architectural intention and its variants of scale. The objects result not only from the overlapping of the networks using a surface, but by extracting the “figure” from the ground and converting it into openings.

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S|4 Wireframe sketch S|1 Initial hills and S|2 First overlapping

valleys treatment for surface. m i x e d

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of two distinct surfaces.

S|3 Development of connection between surfaces.

of the two surfaces and connectors beS|6 Same surface treattween them. Concep- S|5 Establishing con- ment on inside walls tualization of paper nectors or bridges be- of courtyards, and models. addition of conectors tween Courtyards. inside.

commercial+commercial|sideI commercial+commercial|sideII housingl + commercial | side I

m i x e d + h o u s i n g | s i d e II

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housing + commercial | side I

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housing+commercial|sideII

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housingl+commercial|sideII

mixed + commercial | side I

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S|7 Further exploration of the architectural object; indroduction of protruding volumes from ‘Courtyard’ openings.

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mixed + commercial| side II

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MASTER|PLAN|FOR|SANTURCE*spring.semester|2012 p r o f e s s o r

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This collaborative effort takes place in a rather deteriorated area of the Puerto Rican urban landscape. The project consists of taking a卢n entire block in the urban network of Santurce and generating a strategic proposal to activate the area, incorporating multi-use establishments as well as housing. The drive in this project is the renovation of an otherwise dead area. Though the block is surrounded by theaters, giving the area great potential for urban life, the current lack of multiple uses kept it from being a healthy urban environment. Through this master plan and its subtle gestures we seek to liven the area. Though the master plan itself was a collaborative effort, each member of the team individually designs each building within it, though some interaction and communication between designers did continue.

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* In collaboration with Alfredo L贸pez and Yohary Betancourt.

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t y p i c a l | a pa r t m e n t | p l a n

a pa r t m e n t | v a r i a t i o n | p l a n

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SCHOOL|OF|ENGINEERING* p r o f

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r e n a t e

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f r u c h t e r

stanford university

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cafe|second.income a u d i t o r i u m

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c l a s s r o o m s s t u d e n t

|lounge

instructional|labs

DN

UP DN

UP

This project, part of the PBL lab at Stanford University is a fully collaborative effort. The process, perhaps even more complex than the project itself, begins with the interaction of allocated team members, most of them in different countries and time zones. Each member not only of a different country and culture (USA, Puerto Rico, Germany, Sweden, China), but of a different discipline; this detail makes this project very close to the reality of AEC interactions in the field. The collaboration does not only apply to the team’s members, but to industry professionals that engaged in counseling or mentoring throughout this semester long project.

fa c u lt y

s e m i n a r

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r o o m s

Instructional|labs DN

* In collaboration with Rob Best, Wenhao Chen, Christopher Lee, Gustav Westphal and Sabrina Lingemann

|lounge

a d m i n i s t r at i o n


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architectural.model.iso

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f l e x i b i l i t y

Designed to not only solve the practical problem of heat transfer into the building, it prodives an aesthetically pleasing and rich visual texture to the surface. It is an automated system that allows the user to control the incidence of light. It also may serve as a shield, protecting the building from events such as hurricanes.

B

BIM |

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As part of the PBL(AEC) experience the collaboration between disciplines was crucial. BIM coordination is one of the major aspects to the completion of the project and its success in the program. s e l e c t e d w o r k s

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| D R A W I N G S |

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| P H O T O G R A P H Y |

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t r a v e l i n g

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s e l e c t e d w o r k s

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Maria Isabel Carrion | Portfolio 2009-2012