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REPORT CARD 2011

the Powerof


Letter from the Chancellor When we launched The Power of SUNY in April

This Report Card is a product of that promise. Through it, we embrace our public mission to

2010, we committed the resources of SUNY to

“move the dial” in a positive direction regarding critical social issues facing the state, the nation,

a singular goal — to drive New York’s economic

and the world. And we are embracing accountability by laying out our goals — small and big, immediate

revitalization and enhanced quality of life. We

and long-term — and asking New Yorkers to hold us accountable.

promised to build a better SUNY, while staying focused on our three-part mission — To Learn, To Search, To Serve. We also proclaimed

Six Big Ideas:

This document is the culmination of intense discussion and research by more than 300 scholars, experts, and other stakeholders who make up what we call our Innovation Teams — one for each of our Six Big Ideas — and Transformation Teams — seven groups aligned to our objective of internal improvement. Many of New York’s best and brightest in their fields, representing SUNY’s vast institutional diversity, academic breadth, and geographic reach, volunteered for a true team effort.

SUNY and the Entrepreneurial Century These teams continue to serve as a central implementation mechanism for The Power of SUNY. Their

SUNY and the Seamless Education Pipeline

steadfast service and unwavering commitment to the plan are crucial to its success. Development of the Report Card, like that of The Power of SUNY itself, was unprecedented in its inclusivity and

SUNY and a Healthier New York SUNY and an Energy-Smart New York SUNY and the Vibrant Community

aggressive in its approach. True to form, we think you’ll find the metrics used to measure our success to be equally encompassing and ambitious.

No other institution of higher education in the country is taking itself to task in such a comprehensive, explicit, and transparent manner. The level of public accountability provided by this

SUNY and the World

Report Card is truly a first for SUNY, for New York, and for the nation.

Finally, we vowed to use data to carry out the plan

Thank you for taking this journey with us.

in an absolutely transparent and responsible manner.

Nancy L. Zimpher Chancellor, The State University of New York


Letter from the Chancellor When we launched The Power of SUNY in April

This Report Card is a product of that promise. Through it, we embrace our public mission to

2010, we committed the resources of SUNY to

“move the dial” in a positive direction regarding critical social issues facing the state, the nation,

a singular goal — to drive New York’s economic

and the world. And we are embracing accountability by laying out our goals — small and big, immediate

revitalization and enhanced quality of life. We

and long-term — and asking New Yorkers to hold us accountable.

promised to build a better SUNY, while staying focused on our three-part mission — To Learn, To Search, To Serve. We also proclaimed

Six Big Ideas:

This document is the culmination of intense discussion and research by more than 300 scholars, experts, and other stakeholders who make up what we call our Innovation Teams — one for each of our Six Big Ideas — and Transformation Teams — seven groups aligned to our objective of internal improvement. Many of New York’s best and brightest in their fields, representing SUNY’s vast institutional diversity, academic breadth, and geographic reach, volunteered for a true team effort.

SUNY and the Entrepreneurial Century These teams continue to serve as a central implementation mechanism for The Power of SUNY. Their

SUNY and the Seamless Education Pipeline

steadfast service and unwavering commitment to the plan are crucial to its success. Development of the Report Card, like that of The Power of SUNY itself, was unprecedented in its inclusivity and

SUNY and a Healthier New York SUNY and an Energy-Smart New York SUNY and the Vibrant Community

aggressive in its approach. True to form, we think you’ll find the metrics used to measure our success to be equally encompassing and ambitious.

No other institution of higher education in the country is taking itself to task in such a comprehensive, explicit, and transparent manner. The level of public accountability provided by this

SUNY and the World

Report Card is truly a first for SUNY, for New York, and for the nation.

Finally, we vowed to use data to carry out the plan

Thank you for taking this journey with us.

in an absolutely transparent and responsible manner.

Nancy L. Zimpher Chancellor, The State University of New York


Report Card Guide

As our data collection becomes more sophisticated and we experience progress, we anticipate the metrics will be displayed in a more consistent way.

As noted, the purpose of this Report Card is to monitor our progress in implementing The Power of SUNY. While a unique endeavor among systems of higher education, the effort is not intended simply as an exercise in self-promotion, nor should the reader ascribe a punitive quality to the Report Card — we are not scoring our performance for purposes of

Finally, this Report Card represents our commitment to constant improvement toward implementation

assigning failing grades or meting out negative consequences. Instead, given the tremendous effort in developing the strategic plan, our deep commitment to its goals, and our philosophy of

of The Power of SUNY. Metrics that show improvement over time will also demonstrate progress

constant improvement, it only seems fitting that we measure our progress.

toward implementation. The establishment of targets or goals, based upon national standards, will

Moreover, as a self-assessment and progress tool, SUNY’s Report Card has the added benefit of “telling our story” and documenting our contribution to New York State’s health and vitality in a concise and efficient manner. To this end, the Report Card can further our advocacy efforts with policy makers and external stakeholders, thus helping advance our cause of increased state support and regulatory flexibility.

I. FORMAT

Throughout this report, you will also see

We have divided our Report Card into three sections: A Competitive SUNY, which brings to life our Power

The Report Card you see today will most certainly

In such instances, we have identified a metric

of SUNY commitment to building a better university;

evolve over the course of the next several years.

we believe is important to track, but for which

Diversity Counts, which tracks our commitment

In fact, this first edition represents our baseline

we lack data today. Our commitment is to develop

to building upon our rich tradition of providing

year wherein we establish the place from which

the necessary processes or systems to collect

we begin to show progress and improvement.

this data in a timely fashion and to incorporate

a metric defined, but without associated data.

and better preparing students for the myriad of

the results of this work into future editions of the

complex issues they will face as the next generation

We also fully anticipate that over time, new metrics

Report Card.

of state, national, and international leaders; and

will be added and others abandoned. Certainly, core

A Competitive New York, which tracks our progress

metrics, particularly those that track standard and

You will also note that the metrics chosen for

in implementing the strategies associated with our

well-accepted measures will remain constant. In

this Report Card do not measure progress in

Six Big Ideas. In each section, you will find metrics

other areas, however, experience will teach us

exactly the same way. Throughout the document

that represent national best practices and objective

something about gaps in precision, areas for

you will see a mix of hard numbers and percentages,

data designed to hold us accountable to the task

improvement, and measures that do not actually

as well as measures that assess processes instead

of driving New York’s economic recovery. Numbers

track real progress.

of outcomes. In each case, we have tried to choose

throughout this document are rounded for ease of

metrics that best advance the achievement of the

reading. In some places that means totals and sub-

goal in question.

categories do not match exactly.

Denotes: OUTPUT METRIC

Denotes: PROCESS METRIC

Denotes: SUNY WORK IN PROGRESS

Denotes: CONDITION MEASURE

Report Card will include specific targets for improvement, based upon national trends and data.

SUNY’s Report Card represents a work in progress. It will improve with time,

II. THE EVOLUTIONARY NATURE OF THE REPORT CARD

opportunity to traditionally underserved populations

better help us understand the context and pace of our progress. Accordingly, future editions of this

experience, and feedback that you, as the reader, provide.

III. DEFINITIONS & KEY

WORK-IN-PROGRESS METRIC: A metric for which

This document represents data summarized over

data is not readily available.

the entire State University of New York System. In addition, each of the following definitions will

CONDITION MEASURE: Sometimes referred to as

assist you in reading and understanding the

a “top-line metric,” this measure, included in each

significance of our Report Card:

of the Six Big Idea sections, efficiently defines the overall issue or societal condition SUNY seeks to

BASELINE DATA: Assesses SUNY’s status in terms

influence by making progress on the metrics

of data available for the 2008–2009 academic year,

specified in each section. Generally the condition

except where noted.

is not something SUNY can control by itself because improvement requires action from a

OUTPUT METRIC: A metric that tracks progress

multitude of institutions, policy makers, and

toward achieving a particular goal.

individuals. Instead, by moving the dial for the metrics identified in each of the Six Big Idea

PROCESS METRIC: A metric that tracks

sections, SUNY has the ability to positively impact

progress toward implementing a process,

the condition and influence change.

program, or system that is critical to achieving a particular goal.


Report Card Guide

As our data collection becomes more sophisticated and we experience progress, we anticipate the metrics will be displayed in a more consistent way.

As noted, the purpose of this Report Card is to monitor our progress in implementing The Power of SUNY. While a unique endeavor among systems of higher education, the effort is not intended simply as an exercise in self-promotion, nor should the reader ascribe a punitive quality to the Report Card — we are not scoring our performance for purposes of

Finally, this Report Card represents our commitment to constant improvement toward implementation

assigning failing grades or meting out negative consequences. Instead, given the tremendous effort in developing the strategic plan, our deep commitment to its goals, and our philosophy of

of The Power of SUNY. Metrics that show improvement over time will also demonstrate progress

constant improvement, it only seems fitting that we measure our progress.

toward implementation. The establishment of targets or goals, based upon national standards, will

Moreover, as a self-assessment and progress tool, SUNY’s Report Card has the added benefit of “telling our story” and documenting our contribution to New York State’s health and vitality in a concise and efficient manner. To this end, the Report Card can further our advocacy efforts with policy makers and external stakeholders, thus helping advance our cause of increased state support and regulatory flexibility.

I. FORMAT

Throughout this report, you will also see

We have divided our Report Card into three sections: A Competitive SUNY, which brings to life our Power

The Report Card you see today will most certainly

In such instances, we have identified a metric

of SUNY commitment to building a better university;

evolve over the course of the next several years.

we believe is important to track, but for which

Diversity Counts, which tracks our commitment

In fact, this first edition represents our baseline

we lack data today. Our commitment is to develop

to building upon our rich tradition of providing

year wherein we establish the place from which

the necessary processes or systems to collect

we begin to show progress and improvement.

this data in a timely fashion and to incorporate

a metric defined, but without associated data.

and better preparing students for the myriad of

the results of this work into future editions of the

complex issues they will face as the next generation

We also fully anticipate that over time, new metrics

Report Card.

of state, national, and international leaders; and

will be added and others abandoned. Certainly, core

A Competitive New York, which tracks our progress

metrics, particularly those that track standard and

You will also note that the metrics chosen for

in implementing the strategies associated with our

well-accepted measures will remain constant. In

this Report Card do not measure progress in

Six Big Ideas. In each section, you will find metrics

other areas, however, experience will teach us

exactly the same way. Throughout the document

that represent national best practices and objective

something about gaps in precision, areas for

you will see a mix of hard numbers and percentages,

data designed to hold us accountable to the task

improvement, and measures that do not actually

as well as measures that assess processes instead

of driving New York’s economic recovery. Numbers

track real progress.

of outcomes. In each case, we have tried to choose

throughout this document are rounded for ease of

metrics that best advance the achievement of the

reading. In some places that means totals and sub-

goal in question.

categories do not match exactly.

Denotes: OUTPUT METRIC

Denotes: PROCESS METRIC

Denotes: SUNY WORK IN PROGRESS

Denotes: CONDITION MEASURE

Report Card will include specific targets for improvement, based upon national trends and data.

SUNY’s Report Card represents a work in progress. It will improve with time,

II. THE EVOLUTIONARY NATURE OF THE REPORT CARD

opportunity to traditionally underserved populations

better help us understand the context and pace of our progress. Accordingly, future editions of this

experience, and feedback that you, as the reader, provide.

III. DEFINITIONS & KEY

WORK-IN-PROGRESS METRIC: A metric for which

This document represents data summarized over

data is not readily available.

the entire State University of New York System. In addition, each of the following definitions will

CONDITION MEASURE: Sometimes referred to as

assist you in reading and understanding the

a “top-line metric,” this measure, included in each

significance of our Report Card:

of the Six Big Idea sections, efficiently defines the overall issue or societal condition SUNY seeks to

BASELINE DATA: Assesses SUNY’s status in terms

influence by making progress on the metrics

of data available for the 2008–2009 academic year,

specified in each section. Generally the condition

except where noted.

is not something SUNY can control by itself because improvement requires action from a

OUTPUT METRIC: A metric that tracks progress

multitude of institutions, policy makers, and

toward achieving a particular goal.

individuals. Instead, by moving the dial for the metrics identified in each of the Six Big Idea

PROCESS METRIC: A metric that tracks

sections, SUNY has the ability to positively impact

progress toward implementing a process,

the condition and influence change.

program, or system that is critical to achieving a particular goal.


A COMPETITIVE SUNY By building a better SUNY, we not only improve upon the delivery of our core mission, but also better enable implementation of the strategic plan. Accordingly, the metric set forth in A Competitive SUNY tracks our progress in improving the delivery of our core mission — To Learn, To Search, To Serve. In selecting these metrics, we looked to national best practices and existing databases to inform our thinking. In this section you will find the essential measurements that define modern public higher education. SUNY’s strength is rooted in its connectedness as a system, so throughout this document you will find data for the entire University, along with specific aspects for our specialized components.

TO LEARN

STUDENTS AND FACULTY

TO SEARCH

FINANCIAL HEALTH

TO SERVE


A COMPETITIVE SUNY By building a better SUNY, we not only improve upon the delivery of our core mission, but also better enable implementation of the strategic plan. Accordingly, the metric set forth in A Competitive SUNY tracks our progress in improving the delivery of our core mission — To Learn, To Search, To Serve. In selecting these metrics, we looked to national best practices and existing databases to inform our thinking. In this section you will find the essential measurements that define modern public higher education. SUNY’s strength is rooted in its connectedness as a system, so throughout this document you will find data for the entire University, along with specific aspects for our specialized components.

TO LEARN

STUDENTS AND FACULTY

TO SEARCH

FINANCIAL HEALTH

TO SERVE


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

To Learn SUNY SUCCESS

In other words, this item measures; 1) students who

certificate and are successful in a specific amount

Traditional measures of graduation rates do not

stay at one SUNY school; 2) students who transfer

to time — for an associate’s degree that time frame

take into consideration students who elect to make

between two or more four-year schools; or 3)

is three years; for a bachelor’s degree it is six years.

certain transfer decisions. Because transfer is such

students who transfer between two or more two-

an important aspect of SUNY’s system, we developed

year schools.

this measurement to quantify the rates at which

RETENTION RATES In order to graduate, students must first return

our students earn degrees or certificates within the

GRADUATION RATES

for their second year in college. Retention rates

standard time frame regardless of transfer behavior.

Graduation rate is the percentage of students

count the percentage of students entering college

entering college for the first time in a full-time

for the first time in a full-time capacity returning

capacity with the intention of earning a degree or

for year two.

SUNY SUCCESS

GRADUATION RATES

RETENTION RATES

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

88%

62%

83%

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

76%

61%

77%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE

55%

26%

61%

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE

75%

24%

56%


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

To Learn SUNY SUCCESS

In other words, this item measures; 1) students who

certificate and are successful in a specific amount

Traditional measures of graduation rates do not

stay at one SUNY school; 2) students who transfer

to time — for an associate’s degree that time frame

take into consideration students who elect to make

between two or more four-year schools; or 3)

is three years; for a bachelor’s degree it is six years.

certain transfer decisions. Because transfer is such

students who transfer between two or more two-

an important aspect of SUNY’s system, we developed

year schools.

this measurement to quantify the rates at which

RETENTION RATES In order to graduate, students must first return

our students earn degrees or certificates within the

GRADUATION RATES

for their second year in college. Retention rates

standard time frame regardless of transfer behavior.

Graduation rate is the percentage of students

count the percentage of students entering college

entering college for the first time in a full-time

for the first time in a full-time capacity returning

capacity with the intention of earning a degree or

for year two.

SUNY SUCCESS

GRADUATION RATES

RETENTION RATES

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

88%

62%

83%

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

76%

61%

77%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE

55%

26%

61%

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE

75%

24%

56%


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

NUMBER OF CREDITS AT GRADUATION

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIOS The number of students per faculty member,

RECRUITMENT AND ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS FROM HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS

One in three SUNY students is a transfer student,

adjusted to represent a full-time assignment.

Our commitment to, and belief in, the power of diversity is at the very core of SUNY’s mission and

meaning these students attend more than one college in the course of their higher-education

the reason for its creation. We are very focused on creating diversity opportunities. Access to STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES 

15.6:1*

career before completing a degree. Therefore, the ability to seamlessly transfer within SUNY is critical.

attracting students from historically underrepresented populations. In future years we will be adding COMMUNITY COLLEGES

This metric compares the number of credits earned

20.5:1

by transfer students vs. non-transfer students. NON-TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE  TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE NON-TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

133

STUDENTS ENGAGED IN INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUcATION Work experience is an important enrichment

135

activity for our students, and we strongly believe in encouraging internships. We think this is

70

higher education is critical, and so we must hold ourselves accountable for reaching out to AND

important to our students and the future economy

economically disadvantaged populations to this item.

39,000 applications from historically underrepresented populations vs. 143,000 total applications To be comparable to applications, enrollment is for entering students in the fall of 2008.

22,000 students enrolled from historically underrepresented populations vs. 122,000 total new enrollment

of the state. Similarly, co-op education (a paid

71

internship while students earn credit toward their degree) is an important strategy to improve college completion to scale statewide.

COURSES AVAILABLE ONLINE

STEM GRADUATES In the knowledge economy, STEM credentials — a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math — are increasingly valuable to the individual. Some have gone so far as to say that a strong corps of STEM graduates is critical to our nation’s future prosperity and security.

The ability to take courses online is increasingly important: here we intend to track their availability. NOTE: *This figure includes highly labor-intensive clinical and research faculty; for example, academic health science center faculty rations are by necessity considerably lower. In future years, we may consider alternate configurations of this element.

9,940 STEM Graduates


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

NUMBER OF CREDITS AT GRADUATION

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIOS The number of students per faculty member,

RECRUITMENT AND ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS FROM HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS

One in three SUNY students is a transfer student,

adjusted to represent a full-time assignment.

Our commitment to, and belief in, the power of diversity is at the very core of SUNY’s mission and

meaning these students attend more than one college in the course of their higher-education

the reason for its creation. We are very focused on creating diversity opportunities. Access to STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES 

15.6:1*

career before completing a degree. Therefore, the ability to seamlessly transfer within SUNY is critical.

attracting students from historically underrepresented populations. In future years we will be adding COMMUNITY COLLEGES

This metric compares the number of credits earned

20.5:1

by transfer students vs. non-transfer students. NON-TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE  TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE NON-TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

133

STUDENTS ENGAGED IN INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUcATION Work experience is an important enrichment

135

activity for our students, and we strongly believe in encouraging internships. We think this is

70

higher education is critical, and so we must hold ourselves accountable for reaching out to AND

important to our students and the future economy

economically disadvantaged populations to this item.

39,000 applications from historically underrepresented populations vs. 143,000 total applications To be comparable to applications, enrollment is for entering students in the fall of 2008.

22,000 students enrolled from historically underrepresented populations vs. 122,000 total new enrollment

of the state. Similarly, co-op education (a paid

71

internship while students earn credit toward their degree) is an important strategy to improve college completion to scale statewide.

COURSES AVAILABLE ONLINE

STEM GRADUATES In the knowledge economy, STEM credentials — a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math — are increasingly valuable to the individual. Some have gone so far as to say that a strong corps of STEM graduates is critical to our nation’s future prosperity and security.

The ability to take courses online is increasingly important: here we intend to track their availability. NOTE: *This figure includes highly labor-intensive clinical and research faculty; for example, academic health science center faculty rations are by necessity considerably lower. In future years, we may consider alternate configurations of this element.

9,940 STEM Graduates


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

To Search OUR RESEARCH ENTERPRISE

FACULTY/STUDENT RESEARCH AND CREATIVE PRODUCTIVITY

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES*

Publishing or executing original scholarly or creative work is a hallmark of academia. Having other academics cite or reference your work is a badge of honor.

Tracking how much is spent on research activity is the national standard for evaluating the breadth of a research enterprise. Why is this item presented by amount spent versus dollars awarded? For a couple of reasons: First, many research grants are multiyear projects, and using annual expenditures is a nationally accepted way to develop a comparable figure on an annual basis. Second, many colleges and universities contribute operating dollars to their research enterprises and those funds are equally important.

LIBRARY CIRCULATION AND E-RESOURCE DOWNLOADS • 38,300 Publications (2003-2005) • 123,100 Citations (2003-2005)

The depth of a university’s library holdings was once the measure of an active academic enterprise. Today, the availability of online resources is just as important. This item uses data for the calendar year 2008.

• $849,961,000 all SUNY • $720,332,000 Doctoral Campuses only

CIRCULATION (HOLDINGS: BOOKS, JOURNALS, MANUSCRIPTS ) 

E-RESOURCE DOWNLOADS RESEARCH EXPENDITURES PER TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

NUMBER OF LICENSES* EXECUTED

NUMBER OF FACULTY AND STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN SPONSORED GRANTS*

Total dollar figures, especially of this magnitude, can be hard to evaluate. Looking at research expenditures per tenure and tenure-track faculty can be more meaningful.

• $123,000 all SUNY • $255,000 Doctoral Campuses only

In the process of bringing new intellectual property — i.e., discoveries — to the market, executing a license is a milestone. It is at this juncture that a new discovery receives external validation.

• 49 IN 2008–9

Looking at the number of faculty and students involved in sponsored grants is an indicator of how engaged our learning community is in research activity.

• Faculty – 3,920 • Students – 5,290 • Total – 9,210

NOTE: *Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

3,020,000


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

To Search OUR RESEARCH ENTERPRISE

FACULTY/STUDENT RESEARCH AND CREATIVE PRODUCTIVITY

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES*

Publishing or executing original scholarly or creative work is a hallmark of academia. Having other academics cite or reference your work is a badge of honor.

Tracking how much is spent on research activity is the national standard for evaluating the breadth of a research enterprise. Why is this item presented by amount spent versus dollars awarded? For a couple of reasons: First, many research grants are multiyear projects, and using annual expenditures is a nationally accepted way to develop a comparable figure on an annual basis. Second, many colleges and universities contribute operating dollars to their research enterprises and those funds are equally important.

LIBRARY CIRCULATION AND E-RESOURCE DOWNLOADS • 38,300 Publications (2003-2005) • 123,100 Citations (2003-2005)

The depth of a university’s library holdings was once the measure of an active academic enterprise. Today, the availability of online resources is just as important. This item uses data for the calendar year 2008.

• $849,961,000 all SUNY • $720,332,000 Doctoral Campuses only

CIRCULATION (HOLDINGS: BOOKS, JOURNALS, MANUSCRIPTS ) 

E-RESOURCE DOWNLOADS RESEARCH EXPENDITURES PER TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

NUMBER OF LICENSES* EXECUTED

NUMBER OF FACULTY AND STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN SPONSORED GRANTS*

Total dollar figures, especially of this magnitude, can be hard to evaluate. Looking at research expenditures per tenure and tenure-track faculty can be more meaningful.

• $123,000 all SUNY • $255,000 Doctoral Campuses only

In the process of bringing new intellectual property — i.e., discoveries — to the market, executing a license is a milestone. It is at this juncture that a new discovery receives external validation.

• 49 IN 2008–9

Looking at the number of faculty and students involved in sponsored grants is an indicator of how engaged our learning community is in research activity.

• Faculty – 3,920 • Students – 5,290 • Total – 9,210

NOTE: *Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

3,020,000


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

To Serve graduates employed in new york state

Affordability/Comparative debt obligation upon graduation

SYSTEM ENERGY CONSUMPTION

SUNY’s mission is to prepare our students well for

More than 30 percent of SUNY students receive

SUNY can tangibly impact the state’s energy use. It’s

the workforce — so they get good jobs, stay in New

some form of financial assistance; for many, higher

a matter of leadership, but also a matter of economics

York, and become productive citizens.

education would be out of reach without it. For students who benefit from financial assistance, the affordability of a SUNY education (and the value of a

MEDIAN INCOME OF GRADUATES EMPLOYED IN NEW YORK STATE

SUNY degree in the job market) can be measured in

One way to differentiate jobs from good jobs

student debt post graduation.

part by their ability to manage and, eventually, settle

As one of the largest energy consumers in New York,

— using less energy means more money can be put towards our students and our academic mission. We are using a measure of consumption per square foot to be in line with New York’s Executive Order 111.

140,565 BTU/sf

is to look at income. We believe higher education

PURCHASING POWER

has a tangible value in the market place, and we seek to define that value here.

diversity content in the curriculum and course offerings

Graduates in support of NEW YORK STATE workforce needs

In an increasingly diverse world, our students must be

The Department of Labor projects which industries

balance of diversity content in our curriculum, we can

are most in need of qualified workers. SUNY

help students gain these important skills. Tracking

is focused on providing highly skilled graduates

curricular opportunities, we think, will allow us to strike

to fill those needs that require a college degree or certificate.

culturally competent. We think by providing the right

this balance. You will see similar measures focusing on

As one of New York’s largest and most important assets, SUNY contributes directly to the local economy. Beyond providing education and jobs, SUNY is a mass purchaser of goods and services. Other than personal services — all expenditures other than salaries and benefits — is one way to think about the purely monetary impact SUNY makes.

SUNY’s annual purchasing power:

$2,848,451,000

PATIENTS SERVED BY OUR HOSPITALS

Our three teaching hospitals (Upstate Medical University, Downstate Medical Center, and Stony Brook University) are the medical safety net for vast portions of New York.

DOCTOR RETENTION FROM OUR MEDICAL SCHOOLS

Our medical schools are the vehicle through which native New Yorkers become doctors. This is important because these individuals are far more likely to stay in New York and practice medicine.

81% of our medical students are from New York

TOTAL HOSPITAL AND CLINICAL EMPLOYMENT

Our teaching hospitals are a major source of employment.

13,540 employees

different areas in this Report Card.

• Inpatients: 67,000 • Outpatients: 1,077,000


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

To Serve graduates employed in new york state

Affordability/Comparative debt obligation upon graduation

SYSTEM ENERGY CONSUMPTION

SUNY’s mission is to prepare our students well for

More than 30 percent of SUNY students receive

SUNY can tangibly impact the state’s energy use. It’s

the workforce — so they get good jobs, stay in New

some form of financial assistance; for many, higher

a matter of leadership, but also a matter of economics

York, and become productive citizens.

education would be out of reach without it. For students who benefit from financial assistance, the affordability of a SUNY education (and the value of a

MEDIAN INCOME OF GRADUATES EMPLOYED IN NEW YORK STATE

SUNY degree in the job market) can be measured in

One way to differentiate jobs from good jobs

student debt post graduation.

part by their ability to manage and, eventually, settle

As one of the largest energy consumers in New York,

— using less energy means more money can be put towards our students and our academic mission. We are using a measure of consumption per square foot to be in line with New York’s Executive Order 111.

140,565 BTU/sf

is to look at income. We believe higher education

PURCHASING POWER

has a tangible value in the market place, and we seek to define that value here.

diversity content in the curriculum and course offerings

Graduates in support of NEW YORK STATE workforce needs

In an increasingly diverse world, our students must be

The Department of Labor projects which industries

balance of diversity content in our curriculum, we can

are most in need of qualified workers. SUNY

help students gain these important skills. Tracking

is focused on providing highly skilled graduates

curricular opportunities, we think, will allow us to strike

to fill those needs that require a college degree or certificate.

culturally competent. We think by providing the right

this balance. You will see similar measures focusing on

As one of New York’s largest and most important assets, SUNY contributes directly to the local economy. Beyond providing education and jobs, SUNY is a mass purchaser of goods and services. Other than personal services — all expenditures other than salaries and benefits — is one way to think about the purely monetary impact SUNY makes.

SUNY’s annual purchasing power:

$2,848,451,000

PATIENTS SERVED BY OUR HOSPITALS

Our three teaching hospitals (Upstate Medical University, Downstate Medical Center, and Stony Brook University) are the medical safety net for vast portions of New York.

DOCTOR RETENTION FROM OUR MEDICAL SCHOOLS

Our medical schools are the vehicle through which native New Yorkers become doctors. This is important because these individuals are far more likely to stay in New York and practice medicine.

81% of our medical students are from New York

TOTAL HOSPITAL AND CLINICAL EMPLOYMENT

Our teaching hospitals are a major source of employment.

13,540 employees

different areas in this Report Card.

• Inpatients: 67,000 • Outpatients: 1,077,000


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

Students and Faculty STUDENT DIVERSITY

AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

TENURE AND TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

SUNY was founded with the intention to provide fair

The longer it takes for students to complete their

International diversity is important in developing a

Tenure and tenure-track faculty form the basis of campus culture and a college’s scholarly core.

access to higher education, without regard to ethnicity.

degrees, the higher the personal cost of their

globally competent student body — something we talk

They are supported in teaching by talented adjunct faculty.

We use standard federal classifications.

education. While there are many personal factors that

more about in the SUNY and the World section.

The percent of SUNY’s faculty who are tenured or tenure-tracked is:

NUMBER

RACE

PERCENTAGE

can impact the time it takes a given student to earn a college degree, promising college careers can also be

18,200 international students: 4%

STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES: 64%

COMMUNITY COLLEGES: 54%

TOTAL

439,500

100%

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

286,800

65%

ALL MINORITIES

90,600

21%

committed to eliminating obstacles and increasing the

DIVERSITY OF FACULTY AND STAFF

Black Non-Hispanic 

39,200

9%

number of graduates of its two-, four-, and five-year

It’s important to us that the diversity of our students is

will shape every life step that follows. For faculty, it’s a life commitment to excellence.

Hispanic

29,400

7%

programs to complete their course requirements on

reflected in the diversity of our university leadership.

Each group’s assessment of its academic experience at SUNY is critical to the institution’s

time. These figures include full- and part-time students.

We use standard federal classifications.

Asian/Pacific Islander Native American/ Alaskan

19,700

4%

prolonged or derailed indefinitely as a consequence of budget restrictions or flaws in policy. SUNY is

RACE

2,200

1%

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

18,200

4%

UNKNOWN

44,000

10%

FIRST TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE  FIRST TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TOTAL EMPLOYEES

85,800

100%

4.6 years

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

68,600

80%

ALL MINORITIES

13,300

16%

Black Non-Hispanic 

6,900

8%

Hispanic

3,000

3%

Asian/Pacific Islander

3,200

4%

300

<1%

3,900

4%

Our mission is to prepare students to be career ready upon graduation. By tracking how long it takes our students to find jobs we can begin to understand how

Native American/ Alaskan

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

For students, higher education is a pivotal investment of time, money, and ambition that

continued improvement. This year we will focus on student satisfaction as evaluated by the

PERCENTAGE

4.5 years

TIME TO EMPLOYMENT UPON GRADUATION

well we execute that mission.

NUMBER

STUDENT AND FACULTY SATISFACTION

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). In particular, we are interested in the percent of our students satisfied with the instruction and course, campus, facilities, and support services.

SUNY

TOP 50%

TOP 10%

STUDENTS REPORTING RECEIVING AN ENRICHING EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE

40%

47%

54%

STUDENTS REPORTING A SUPPORTIVE CAMPUS ENVIRONMENT

57%

63%

67%

STUDENTS SATISFIED WITH THE LEVEL OF ACADEMIC CHALLENGE

55%

60%

63%

STUDENTS REPORTING AN ACTIVE AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCE

50%

55%

60%

STUDENTS SATISFIED WITH STUDENT-FACULTY INTERACTION

42%

49%

55%


A COMPETITIVE SUNY

Students and Faculty STUDENT DIVERSITY

AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

TENURE AND TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

SUNY was founded with the intention to provide fair

The longer it takes for students to complete their

International diversity is important in developing a

Tenure and tenure-track faculty form the basis of campus culture and a college’s scholarly core.

access to higher education, without regard to ethnicity.

degrees, the higher the personal cost of their

globally competent student body — something we talk

They are supported in teaching by talented adjunct faculty.

We use standard federal classifications.

education. While there are many personal factors that

more about in the SUNY and the World section.

The percent of SUNY’s faculty who are tenured or tenure-tracked is:

NUMBER

RACE

PERCENTAGE

can impact the time it takes a given student to earn a college degree, promising college careers can also be

18,200 international students: 4%

STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES: 64%

COMMUNITY COLLEGES: 54%

TOTAL

439,500

100%

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

286,800

65%

ALL MINORITIES

90,600

21%

committed to eliminating obstacles and increasing the

DIVERSITY OF FACULTY AND STAFF

Black Non-Hispanic 

39,200

9%

number of graduates of its two-, four-, and five-year

It’s important to us that the diversity of our students is

will shape every life step that follows. For faculty, it’s a life commitment to excellence.

Hispanic

29,400

7%

programs to complete their course requirements on

reflected in the diversity of our university leadership.

Each group’s assessment of its academic experience at SUNY is critical to the institution’s

time. These figures include full- and part-time students.

We use standard federal classifications.

Asian/Pacific Islander Native American/ Alaskan

19,700

4%

prolonged or derailed indefinitely as a consequence of budget restrictions or flaws in policy. SUNY is

RACE

2,200

1%

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

18,200

4%

UNKNOWN

44,000

10%

FIRST TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE  FIRST TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TOTAL EMPLOYEES

85,800

100%

4.6 years

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

68,600

80%

ALL MINORITIES

13,300

16%

Black Non-Hispanic 

6,900

8%

Hispanic

3,000

3%

Asian/Pacific Islander

3,200

4%

300

<1%

3,900

4%

Our mission is to prepare students to be career ready upon graduation. By tracking how long it takes our students to find jobs we can begin to understand how

Native American/ Alaskan

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

For students, higher education is a pivotal investment of time, money, and ambition that

continued improvement. This year we will focus on student satisfaction as evaluated by the

PERCENTAGE

4.5 years

TIME TO EMPLOYMENT UPON GRADUATION

well we execute that mission.

NUMBER

STUDENT AND FACULTY SATISFACTION

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). In particular, we are interested in the percent of our students satisfied with the instruction and course, campus, facilities, and support services.

SUNY

TOP 50%

TOP 10%

STUDENTS REPORTING RECEIVING AN ENRICHING EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE

40%

47%

54%

STUDENTS REPORTING A SUPPORTIVE CAMPUS ENVIRONMENT

57%

63%

67%

STUDENTS SATISFIED WITH THE LEVEL OF ACADEMIC CHALLENGE

55%

60%

63%

STUDENTS REPORTING AN ACTIVE AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCE

50%

55%

60%

STUDENTS SATISFIED WITH STUDENT-FACULTY INTERACTION

42%

49%

55%


A COMPETITIVE COMPETITIVE SUNY

Financial Health

CLASSROOM UTILIZATION RATE Classroom utilization rate is an industry standard measurement of how much use a single classroom space gets compared to a predetermined expectation.

FULLY LOADED COST PER STUDENT

STATE SUPPORT PER STUDENT FTE

Knowing the specific cost to educate a student

overall budget.

State support is a critical piece of SUNY’s

is critical to good management, budgeting, and prioritizing. These figures are based on a systemwide formula recently developed and applied to the state-operated campuses.

In 2008-09 our three hospitals contributed significantly to our medical school budgets.

$186,500,000 contributed to

STATE OPERATED** 

$8,290

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

$2,770

medical school budgets from hospital revenues

Diversifying revenue streams and engaging our friends and supporters are two important reasons to increase

TOTAL COST PER STUDENT FTE*†:

$15,940

INSTRUCTIONAL COST PER STUDENT FTE †

$14,470

Direct Instruction:

$7,570

HOSPITAL FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO ACADEMIC HEALTH EDUCATIONAL ENTERPRISE Academic health and hospital ledgers can be complex. Large amounts of money rapidly

Administrative Costs:

Capital Expenditures:

$5,000 $1,900

moving in and out can suggest an organization flush with cash, however the truth is bills and obligations. Potentially more confusing,

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICE COSTS:

$1,470

NOTE: *Excludes Fringe benefits. The fully loaded expenditures include direct costs for each of the missions, plus a distribution of related support costs. Note that the research expenditures do not include expenditures at the Research Foundation. ** The related state funding includes support for the core budget and for debt service/capital expenditures. Funding for university-wide programs, system administration, fringe benefits, and SUNY hospitals are not included. *** CAE: Council for Aid to Education – www.cae.org. † FTE indicates full-time equivalent students or faculty to ensure that comparisons aren’t skewed by part-time students and faculty.

but critical to consideration, is the financial connection between the academic health enterprise (medical school) and the hospital.

our fundraising. We use CAE*** reporting standards.

$232,821,000 Donated to SUNY Campuses

FACILITY MASTER PLAN PROGRESS AND UPDATES The SUNY Construction Fund is executing an extensive facilities master-planning process. We think it is the best of its kind in the country. This item tells you how many campus-facility master plans have been completed:

0 in 2008–9 (the first year of our program) OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS Stewardship of buildings and grounds is critical to our

ALUMNI GIVING RATE Alumni Donors = SUNY graduates who have made one or more gifts in the past year Alumni On Record = living graduates for whom SUNY has a current address Alumni on Record/Alumni Donors = alumni giving rate STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES 

8%

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

1%

educational mission and to diminishing future critical maintenance backlogs. We are working to give you two numbers here: one will represent total dollars spent on maintenance and operation per student. The second will tell you how effective our program is.


A COMPETITIVE COMPETITIVE SUNY

Financial Health

CLASSROOM UTILIZATION RATE Classroom utilization rate is an industry standard measurement of how much use a single classroom space gets compared to a predetermined expectation.

FULLY LOADED COST PER STUDENT

STATE SUPPORT PER STUDENT FTE

Knowing the specific cost to educate a student

overall budget.

State support is a critical piece of SUNY’s

is critical to good management, budgeting, and prioritizing. These figures are based on a systemwide formula recently developed and applied to the state-operated campuses.

In 2008-09 our three hospitals contributed significantly to our medical school budgets.

$186,500,000 contributed to

STATE OPERATED** 

$8,290

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

$2,770

medical school budgets from hospital revenues

Diversifying revenue streams and engaging our friends and supporters are two important reasons to increase

TOTAL COST PER STUDENT FTE*†:

$15,940

INSTRUCTIONAL COST PER STUDENT FTE †

$14,470

Direct Instruction:

$7,570

HOSPITAL FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO ACADEMIC HEALTH EDUCATIONAL ENTERPRISE Academic health and hospital ledgers can be complex. Large amounts of money rapidly

Administrative Costs:

Capital Expenditures:

$5,000 $1,900

moving in and out can suggest an organization flush with cash, however the truth is bills and obligations. Potentially more confusing,

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICE COSTS:

$1,470

NOTE: *Excludes Fringe benefits. The fully loaded expenditures include direct costs for each of the missions, plus a distribution of related support costs. Note that the research expenditures do not include expenditures at the Research Foundation. ** The related state funding includes support for the core budget and for debt service/capital expenditures. Funding for university-wide programs, system administration, fringe benefits, and SUNY hospitals are not included. *** CAE: Council for Aid to Education – www.cae.org. † FTE indicates full-time equivalent students or faculty to ensure that comparisons aren’t skewed by part-time students and faculty.

but critical to consideration, is the financial connection between the academic health enterprise (medical school) and the hospital.

our fundraising. We use CAE*** reporting standards.

$232,821,000 Donated to SUNY Campuses

FACILITY MASTER PLAN PROGRESS AND UPDATES The SUNY Construction Fund is executing an extensive facilities master-planning process. We think it is the best of its kind in the country. This item tells you how many campus-facility master plans have been completed:

0 in 2008–9 (the first year of our program) OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS Stewardship of buildings and grounds is critical to our

ALUMNI GIVING RATE Alumni Donors = SUNY graduates who have made one or more gifts in the past year Alumni On Record = living graduates for whom SUNY has a current address Alumni on Record/Alumni Donors = alumni giving rate STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES 

8%

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

1%

educational mission and to diminishing future critical maintenance backlogs. We are working to give you two numbers here: one will represent total dollars spent on maintenance and operation per student. The second will tell you how effective our program is.


DIVERSITY COUNTS The Power of SUNY made promises to embed SUNY’s commitment to diversity in everything we do. Diversity enriches our lives and the educational experience: it invigorates conversations, awakens curiosity, and widens perspectives. Diversity also ensures our campuses mirror the rapidly changing world, creating an environment that prepares our students to be culturally competent so they can succeed anywhere. • DIVERSITY COUNTS IN A COMPETITIVE SUNY • DIVERSITY COUNTS IN A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK


DIVERSITY COUNTS The Power of SUNY made promises to embed SUNY’s commitment to diversity in everything we do. Diversity enriches our lives and the educational experience: it invigorates conversations, awakens curiosity, and widens perspectives. Diversity also ensures our campuses mirror the rapidly changing world, creating an environment that prepares our students to be culturally competent so they can succeed anywhere. • DIVERSITY COUNTS IN A COMPETITIVE SUNY • DIVERSITY COUNTS IN A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK


Diversity Counts The modern SUNY System was created more

The educational and social benefits of diversity within higher education are clear. The concept is

than fifty years ago through Governor Nelson

vital to American and international business efforts to hire and maintain a diverse workforce. Major

D. Rockefeller’s vision to greatly expand

American businesses, the U.S. military, and other entities have clearly expressed the skills needed

New York’s educated citizenry. His goal was

in today’s increasingly global marketplace, which can only be developed through exposure to widely

to provide opportunities where none existed

diverse people, cultures, ideas, and viewpoints. The U.S. Supreme Court acknowledged this need, and

for the racial and religious groups that were

the supporting social science, in its seminal examination of, and justification for, diversity in higher

targets of discrimination and the economically

education in the case of Grutter v. Bollinger (2003).

disadvantaged who could not afford private colleges. Today, New York is the third most

Beyond being a pathway to culturally competent employment, SUNY campuses are also the

populous state in the nation and one of the

training grounds for many future corporate and community leaders. As the Supreme Court

most culturally diverse. SUNY reflects and

recognized, the path to leadership should be visibly open to talented and qualified individuals of every

values that diversity, which is truly one of

race and ethnicity in order to cultivate a set of leaders with legitimacy in the eyes of the citizenry.

our greatest strengths.

The SUNY student body is sewn from the threads of our nation’s diverse quilt, where the views of all students across the educational spectrum are sought out and given voice.

At SUNY, we recognize our diversity makes us stronger and smarter. We respect,

In sum, SUNY’s diverse educational environments create an intellectual climate that fosters

encourage, and promote all aspects of human

respect for differences, stimulates innovation, encourages collaboration, and prepares students

difference. Diversity enriches lives and the

to live and work productively in a multiracial and multiethnic society.

educational experience. By capitalizing on diversity, our SUNY campuses invigorate conversations, awaken curiosity, foster civic engagement, and widen perspectives.


Diversity Counts The modern SUNY System was created more

The educational and social benefits of diversity within higher education are clear. The concept is

than fifty years ago through Governor Nelson

vital to American and international business efforts to hire and maintain a diverse workforce. Major

D. Rockefeller’s vision to greatly expand

American businesses, the U.S. military, and other entities have clearly expressed the skills needed

New York’s educated citizenry. His goal was

in today’s increasingly global marketplace, which can only be developed through exposure to widely

to provide opportunities where none existed

diverse people, cultures, ideas, and viewpoints. The U.S. Supreme Court acknowledged this need, and

for the racial and religious groups that were

the supporting social science, in its seminal examination of, and justification for, diversity in higher

targets of discrimination and the economically

education in the case of Grutter v. Bollinger (2003).

disadvantaged who could not afford private colleges. Today, New York is the third most

Beyond being a pathway to culturally competent employment, SUNY campuses are also the

populous state in the nation and one of the

training grounds for many future corporate and community leaders. As the Supreme Court

most culturally diverse. SUNY reflects and

recognized, the path to leadership should be visibly open to talented and qualified individuals of every

values that diversity, which is truly one of

race and ethnicity in order to cultivate a set of leaders with legitimacy in the eyes of the citizenry.

our greatest strengths.

The SUNY student body is sewn from the threads of our nation’s diverse quilt, where the views of all students across the educational spectrum are sought out and given voice.

At SUNY, we recognize our diversity makes us stronger and smarter. We respect,

In sum, SUNY’s diverse educational environments create an intellectual climate that fosters

encourage, and promote all aspects of human

respect for differences, stimulates innovation, encourages collaboration, and prepares students

difference. Diversity enriches lives and the

to live and work productively in a multiracial and multiethnic society.

educational experience. By capitalizing on diversity, our SUNY campuses invigorate conversations, awaken curiosity, foster civic engagement, and widen perspectives.


AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE

Diversity Counts in a Competitive SUNY In A Competitive SUNY, we looked at a number of measurements typically associated with responsible 21st-century higher education. In this section, we seek to look at the same elements, but using disaggregated data to highlight opportunities for us to better serve underrepresented populations. For the purposes of data integrity, we have used federal Department of Education classifications.

NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

MALE

FT FT - BA

4.5

4.5

4.9

4.6

4.5

4.9

4.0

4.5

4.6

4.5

FT FT - ASSOC

4.4

4.4

4.7

4.0

3.7

5.1

3.7

4.1

4.1

4.5

TRANSFER - BA

3.2

3.2

3.5

3.2

3.1

3.4

2.5

3.1

3.2

3.2

TRANSFER - ASSOC

3.2

3.3

3.7

3.2

2.5

3.6

2.1

2.5

3.4

FEMALE

3.3

STUDENTS WHO HAVE STUDIED ABROAD RECRUITMENT OF STUDENTS FROM HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED AND/OR ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED POPULATIONS

TOTAL

SUCCESS RATES

NATIVE TWO OR NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT MORE PACIFIC WHITE BLACK MALE UNKNOWN RACES ALIEN NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

FEMALE

APPLICATIONS Historically Underrepresented

142,620 100%

75,150 53%

20,170 14%

18,060 13%

11,810 8%

500 <1%

-

14,310 10%

2,610 2%

61,640 43%

80,980 57%

ENROLLMENT Historically Underrepresented

122,420 100%

79,870 65%

12,190 10%

9,280 8%

5,060 4%

710 <1%

3,650 3%

11,660 10%

-

58,360 48%

64,060 52%

ENROLLMENT Economically Disadvantaged

RETENTION RATES NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN 83%

83%

83%

89%

68%

85%

86%

DIVERSITY CONTENT IN THE CURRICULUM MALE

FEMALE

PROPORTION OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER

FT FT - BA

83%

FT FT - ASSOC

61%

65%

54%

61%

72%

51%

69%

64%

61%

66%

TRANSFER - BA

77%

77%

74%

76%

81%

63%

73%

80%

78%

76%

TOTAL

439,520 100%

286,770 65%

39,220 9%

29,450 7%

19,720 4%

2,240 <1%

18,150 4%

43,990 10%

198,030 45%

241,490 55%

480

50

3,170

TRANSFER - ASSOC

56%

56%

56%

56%

56%

50%

55%

56%

53%

58%

UNDERGRADUATES

398,580 100%

262,310 66%

37,230 9%

28,090 7%

17,530 4%

2,120 <1%

11,020 3%

40,300 10%

181,190 45%

217,390 55%

470

50

3,070

GRADUATES/ PROFESSIONAL

40,940 100%

24,460 60%

1,990 5%

1,360 3%

2,190 5%

130 <1%

7,130 17%

3,690 9%

16,840 41%

24,100 59%

1

83%

85%

GRADUATION RATES NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

MALE

TOTAL

NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN MALE ALIEN NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

62%

63%

55%

56%

69%

47%

45%

67%

58%

66%

FT FT - ASSOC (3 year)

22%

25%

10%

14%

18%

17%

21%

20%

19%

26%

TRANSFER - BA (4 year)

61%

62%

52%

54%

65%

50%

70%

61%

59%

63%

TRANSFER - ASSOC (2 year)

22%

22%

14%

15%

22%

18%

43%

29%

16%

27%

NATIONAL GUARD OR ACT RESERVE

VETERAN

100

-

DIVERSITY OF FACULTY AND STAFF

FEMALE

FT FT - BA (6 year)

ACTIVE MILITARY FEMALE DUTY

NATIVE ASIAN/ AMERICAN/ PACIFIC WHITE BLACK TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

NONRESIDENT MALE ALIEN

FEMALE

TOTAL EMPLOYEES

85,780 100%

68,590 80%

6,860 8%

2,980 3%

3,230 4%

270 <1%

3,850 4%

39,760 46%

46,020 54%

FULL-TIME FACULTY

15,530 100%

12,680 82%

610 4%

380 2%

1,040 7%

50 <1%

780 5%

9,080 58%

6,450 42%

PART-TIME FACULTY

16,570 100%

14,920 90%

570 3%

340 2%

420 3%

50 <1%

270 2%

8,490 51%

8,090 49%

FULL-TIME STAFF

39,100 100%

30,310 78%

4,790 12%

1,710 4%

1,330 3%

140 <1%

810 2%

16,100 41%

23,000 59%

PART-TIME STAFF

14,580 100%

10,680 73%

880 6%

550 4%

440 3%

30 <1%

2,000 14%

6,100 42%

8,480 58%

GRADUATES IN SUPPORT OF NEW YORK STATE WORKFORCE NEEDS


AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE

Diversity Counts in a Competitive SUNY In A Competitive SUNY, we looked at a number of measurements typically associated with responsible 21st-century higher education. In this section, we seek to look at the same elements, but using disaggregated data to highlight opportunities for us to better serve underrepresented populations. For the purposes of data integrity, we have used federal Department of Education classifications.

NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

MALE

FT FT - BA

4.5

4.5

4.9

4.6

4.5

4.9

4.0

4.5

4.6

4.5

FT FT - ASSOC

4.4

4.4

4.7

4.0

3.7

5.1

3.7

4.1

4.1

4.5

TRANSFER - BA

3.2

3.2

3.5

3.2

3.1

3.4

2.5

3.1

3.2

3.2

TRANSFER - ASSOC

3.2

3.3

3.7

3.2

2.5

3.6

2.1

2.5

3.4

FEMALE

3.3

STUDENTS WHO HAVE STUDIED ABROAD RECRUITMENT OF STUDENTS FROM HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED AND/OR ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED POPULATIONS

TOTAL

SUCCESS RATES

NATIVE TWO OR NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT MORE PACIFIC WHITE BLACK MALE UNKNOWN RACES ALIEN NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

FEMALE

APPLICATIONS Historically Underrepresented

142,620 100%

75,150 53%

20,170 14%

18,060 13%

11,810 8%

500 <1%

-

14,310 10%

2,610 2%

61,640 43%

80,980 57%

ENROLLMENT Historically Underrepresented

122,420 100%

79,870 65%

12,190 10%

9,280 8%

5,060 4%

710 <1%

3,650 3%

11,660 10%

-

58,360 48%

64,060 52%

ENROLLMENT Economically Disadvantaged

RETENTION RATES NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN 83%

83%

83%

89%

68%

85%

86%

DIVERSITY CONTENT IN THE CURRICULUM MALE

FEMALE

PROPORTION OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER

FT FT - BA

83%

FT FT - ASSOC

61%

65%

54%

61%

72%

51%

69%

64%

61%

66%

TRANSFER - BA

77%

77%

74%

76%

81%

63%

73%

80%

78%

76%

TOTAL

439,520 100%

286,770 65%

39,220 9%

29,450 7%

19,720 4%

2,240 <1%

18,150 4%

43,990 10%

198,030 45%

241,490 55%

480

50

3,170

TRANSFER - ASSOC

56%

56%

56%

56%

56%

50%

55%

56%

53%

58%

UNDERGRADUATES

398,580 100%

262,310 66%

37,230 9%

28,090 7%

17,530 4%

2,120 <1%

11,020 3%

40,300 10%

181,190 45%

217,390 55%

470

50

3,070

GRADUATES/ PROFESSIONAL

40,940 100%

24,460 60%

1,990 5%

1,360 3%

2,190 5%

130 <1%

7,130 17%

3,690 9%

16,840 41%

24,100 59%

1

83%

85%

GRADUATION RATES NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

MALE

TOTAL

NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN MALE ALIEN NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

62%

63%

55%

56%

69%

47%

45%

67%

58%

66%

FT FT - ASSOC (3 year)

22%

25%

10%

14%

18%

17%

21%

20%

19%

26%

TRANSFER - BA (4 year)

61%

62%

52%

54%

65%

50%

70%

61%

59%

63%

TRANSFER - ASSOC (2 year)

22%

22%

14%

15%

22%

18%

43%

29%

16%

27%

NATIONAL GUARD OR ACT RESERVE

VETERAN

100

-

DIVERSITY OF FACULTY AND STAFF

FEMALE

FT FT - BA (6 year)

ACTIVE MILITARY FEMALE DUTY

NATIVE ASIAN/ AMERICAN/ PACIFIC WHITE BLACK TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

NONRESIDENT MALE ALIEN

FEMALE

TOTAL EMPLOYEES

85,780 100%

68,590 80%

6,860 8%

2,980 3%

3,230 4%

270 <1%

3,850 4%

39,760 46%

46,020 54%

FULL-TIME FACULTY

15,530 100%

12,680 82%

610 4%

380 2%

1,040 7%

50 <1%

780 5%

9,080 58%

6,450 42%

PART-TIME FACULTY

16,570 100%

14,920 90%

570 3%

340 2%

420 3%

50 <1%

270 2%

8,490 51%

8,090 49%

FULL-TIME STAFF

39,100 100%

30,310 78%

4,790 12%

1,710 4%

1,330 3%

140 <1%

810 2%

16,100 41%

23,000 59%

PART-TIME STAFF

14,580 100%

10,680 73%

880 6%

550 4%

440 3%

30 <1%

2,000 14%

6,100 42%

8,480 58%

GRADUATES IN SUPPORT OF NEW YORK STATE WORKFORCE NEEDS


Diversity Counts in a Competitive New York

DIVERSITY COUNTS

SUNY AND A HEALTHIER NEW YORK

SUNY AND THE VIBRANT COMMUNITY

We have looked at graduates in health care fields. Here, we disaggregate that data.

As our campuses design specific service-learning

The Power of SUNY made six clear commitments to diversity opportunities within the Six Big Ideas. In this section, we hold ourselves accountable to those promises.

plans we will measure the development — and

GRADUATES WITH HEALTHCARE CREDENTIALS BY ETHNICITY

then results — of those aimed at serving vulnerable

NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK ALASKAN UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER

MALE

FEMALE

and underserved populations. We will call these “Diversity Counts” service-learning opportunities.

TOTAL

8,830 100%

5,920 67%

850 10%

370 4%

770 9%

40 <1%

160 2%

710 8%

1,870 21%

6,950 79%

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATES

570 100%

400 70%

80 14%

30 5%

20 3%

2 <1%

3 1%

30 6%

130 22%

440 78%

4,090 100%

3,100 76%

330 8%

170 4%

140 3%

30 <1%

14 <1%

310 8%

680 17%

3,410 83%

We have looked at overall SUNY graduates in STEM disciplines. Here, we look

SUNY AND THE SEAMLESS EDUCATION PIPELINE*

ASSOCIATE BACHELORS

2,070 100%

1,110 53%

270 13%

110 5%

280 14%

5 <1%

50 2%

260 13%

420 20%

1,650 80%

Service-learning plans called for by the SUNY and

specifically at underserved populations achieving degrees in STEM fields.

The Strive National Cradle to Career Network

MASTERS

860 100%

550 64%

100 12%

30 4%

60 7%

-

50 6%

70 8%

120 13%

750 87%

the Vibrant Community Innovation Team have not

DOCTORAL

240 100%

170 68%

20 7%

3 1%

20 7%

1 <1%

20 9%

20 8%

80 34%

160 66%

FIRST PROFESSIONAL

920 100%

550 59%

50 5%

20 3%

260 28%

2 <1%

20 2%

20 2%

430 47%

480 53%

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

80 100%

50 68%

9 12%

2 3%

2 3%

1 <1%

6 8%

4 5%

10 12%

70 88%

SUNY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTURY

provides a framework for building community-

GRADUATES IN STEM FIELDS BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

based and data-drive educational solutions. MALE

FEMALE

You can learn more at: www.strivenetwork.org. Our Strive adaptations will employ a number

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATES

180 100%

140 74%

7 4%

20 12%

8 4%

3 2%

1 1%

6 3%

150 80%

40 20%

ASSOCIATE

1,830 100%

1,410 77%

100 6%

100 5%

60 3%

6 <1%

30 1%

130 7%

1,520 83%

300 17%

BACHELORS

5,820 100%

3,520 60%

280 5%

230 4%

640 11%

20 <1%

430 7%

710 12%

3,710 64%

2,110 36%

MASTERS

1,520 100%

570 37%

30 2%

20 2%

80 5%

5 <1%

770 51%

50 3%

960 63%

560 37%

college prepared for college-level work. Here

DOCTORAL

560 100%

190 35%

8 1%

14 3%

30 5%

3 <1%

280 51%

30 5%

350 62%

210 38%

we will first track the implementation of these

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

30 100%

20 68%

2 6%

1 3%

-

-

3 10%

4 13%

20 52%

15 48%

strategies within Strive sites, toward tracking

yet been developed.

of evidence-based intervention strategies aimed at increasing the number of vulnerable students achieving a high-school diploma and entering

their effectiveness. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES DEVELOPED FOR HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS NOTE: *No Strive adaptations have been developed in New York yet.

CERTIFIED DIVERSITY COUNTS SERVICE-LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

SUNY AND AN ENERGY-SMART NEW YORK

SUNY AND THE WORLD

In A Competitive New York, we commit to delivering Energy-Smart education opportunities to the SUNY

Study-abroad opportunities often feel out of reach

community. Here, we focus specifically on those programs offered to low-income families with the ultimate

for many, but as SUNY places increasing value on

goal of reducing the proportion of disposable income those families are spending on energy costs.

them, it must do so for all populations.

MEASURE CAMPUS-BASED PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO EDUCATE LOW-INCOME FAMILIES IN BECOMING ENERGY-SMART

STUDY-ABROAD AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS STUDYING AT SUNY BY ETHNICITY


Diversity Counts in a Competitive New York

DIVERSITY COUNTS

SUNY AND A HEALTHIER NEW YORK

SUNY AND THE VIBRANT COMMUNITY

We have looked at graduates in health care fields. Here, we disaggregate that data.

As our campuses design specific service-learning

The Power of SUNY made six clear commitments to diversity opportunities within the Six Big Ideas. In this section, we hold ourselves accountable to those promises.

plans we will measure the development — and

GRADUATES WITH HEALTHCARE CREDENTIALS BY ETHNICITY

then results — of those aimed at serving vulnerable

NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK ALASKAN UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER

MALE

FEMALE

and underserved populations. We will call these “Diversity Counts” service-learning opportunities.

TOTAL

8,830 100%

5,920 67%

850 10%

370 4%

770 9%

40 <1%

160 2%

710 8%

1,870 21%

6,950 79%

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATES

570 100%

400 70%

80 14%

30 5%

20 3%

2 <1%

3 1%

30 6%

130 22%

440 78%

4,090 100%

3,100 76%

330 8%

170 4%

140 3%

30 <1%

14 <1%

310 8%

680 17%

3,410 83%

We have looked at overall SUNY graduates in STEM disciplines. Here, we look

SUNY AND THE SEAMLESS EDUCATION PIPELINE*

ASSOCIATE BACHELORS

2,070 100%

1,110 53%

270 13%

110 5%

280 14%

5 <1%

50 2%

260 13%

420 20%

1,650 80%

Service-learning plans called for by the SUNY and

specifically at underserved populations achieving degrees in STEM fields.

The Strive National Cradle to Career Network

MASTERS

860 100%

550 64%

100 12%

30 4%

60 7%

-

50 6%

70 8%

120 13%

750 87%

the Vibrant Community Innovation Team have not

DOCTORAL

240 100%

170 68%

20 7%

3 1%

20 7%

1 <1%

20 9%

20 8%

80 34%

160 66%

FIRST PROFESSIONAL

920 100%

550 59%

50 5%

20 3%

260 28%

2 <1%

20 2%

20 2%

430 47%

480 53%

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

80 100%

50 68%

9 12%

2 3%

2 3%

1 <1%

6 8%

4 5%

10 12%

70 88%

SUNY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTURY

provides a framework for building community-

GRADUATES IN STEM FIELDS BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER NATIVE NONASIAN/ AMERICAN/ RESIDENT PACIFIC WHITE BLACK UNKNOWN ALIEN TOTAL NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC HISPANIC ISLANDER ALASKAN

based and data-drive educational solutions. MALE

FEMALE

You can learn more at: www.strivenetwork.org. Our Strive adaptations will employ a number

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATES

180 100%

140 74%

7 4%

20 12%

8 4%

3 2%

1 1%

6 3%

150 80%

40 20%

ASSOCIATE

1,830 100%

1,410 77%

100 6%

100 5%

60 3%

6 <1%

30 1%

130 7%

1,520 83%

300 17%

BACHELORS

5,820 100%

3,520 60%

280 5%

230 4%

640 11%

20 <1%

430 7%

710 12%

3,710 64%

2,110 36%

MASTERS

1,520 100%

570 37%

30 2%

20 2%

80 5%

5 <1%

770 51%

50 3%

960 63%

560 37%

college prepared for college-level work. Here

DOCTORAL

560 100%

190 35%

8 1%

14 3%

30 5%

3 <1%

280 51%

30 5%

350 62%

210 38%

we will first track the implementation of these

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

30 100%

20 68%

2 6%

1 3%

-

-

3 10%

4 13%

20 52%

15 48%

strategies within Strive sites, toward tracking

yet been developed.

of evidence-based intervention strategies aimed at increasing the number of vulnerable students achieving a high-school diploma and entering

their effectiveness. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES DEVELOPED FOR HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS NOTE: *No Strive adaptations have been developed in New York yet.

CERTIFIED DIVERSITY COUNTS SERVICE-LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

SUNY AND AN ENERGY-SMART NEW YORK

SUNY AND THE WORLD

In A Competitive New York, we commit to delivering Energy-Smart education opportunities to the SUNY

Study-abroad opportunities often feel out of reach

community. Here, we focus specifically on those programs offered to low-income families with the ultimate

for many, but as SUNY places increasing value on

goal of reducing the proportion of disposable income those families are spending on energy costs.

them, it must do so for all populations.

MEASURE CAMPUS-BASED PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO EDUCATE LOW-INCOME FAMILIES IN BECOMING ENERGY-SMART

STUDY-ABROAD AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS STUDYING AT SUNY BY ETHNICITY


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK Just over a year ago, SUNY presented Six Big Ideas — areas where SUNY could focus its capacity and expertise to make a difference for the State of New York. We promised to link resources and expertise in targeted and quantifiable ways. In the pages that follow, we have translated these Big Ideas into condition measures, processes, and outcome metrics that we think drive A Competitive New York. • SUNY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTURY

• SUNY AND AN ENERGY-SMART NEW YORK

• SUNY AND THE SEAMLESS EDUCATION PIPELINE

• SUNY AND THE VIBRANT COMMUNITY

• SUNY AND A HEALTHIER NEW YORK

• SUNY AND THE WORLD


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK Just over a year ago, SUNY presented Six Big Ideas — areas where SUNY could focus its capacity and expertise to make a difference for the State of New York. We promised to link resources and expertise in targeted and quantifiable ways. In the pages that follow, we have translated these Big Ideas into condition measures, processes, and outcome metrics that we think drive A Competitive New York. • SUNY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTURY

• SUNY AND AN ENERGY-SMART NEW YORK

• SUNY AND THE SEAMLESS EDUCATION PIPELINE

• SUNY AND THE VIBRANT COMMUNITY

• SUNY AND A HEALTHIER NEW YORK

• SUNY AND THE WORLD


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and The Entrepreneurial Century

THE NUMBER OF INVENTION DISCLOSURES* Successful research can be measured by the knowledge and innovation we produce.

“The future belongs to those who can create, nurture, and commercialize intellectual capital, and the place where that happens is here.”

– Carl T. Hayden,

Chairman, SUNY Board of Trustees

Through regional technology-transfer offices, SUNY is able to leverage strengths across

Entrepreneurship is to the knowledge economy what the assembly line was to industrialism. In higher education, federal research dollars are the fuel, and by increasing our ability to capture funding we are able to create more jobs in New York. More importantly, they’ll be jobs people want, because SUNY has a unique ability to align its breadth and scale with business and industry, taking our solutions and making them viable for real-world applications.

campuses. Measuring invention disclosures is a critical moment in the process of bringing inventions to market.

320* inventions disclosed SUNY’S ENTREPRENEURIAL SUPPORT OF NEW YORK BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

NEW YORK STATE RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

$4,500,000,000 (According to Excell Partners, Inc.).

NEW YORK STATE JOBS CREATED

58,000 (According to New York State Department of Labor).

NEW YORK STATE AVERAGE WAGE VS. NATIONAL AVERAGE SALARY

$60,384 (According to the New York State Department of Labor). vs. $43,460 (According to the New York State Department of Labor Bureau of Statistics).

For SUNY to become a major driver of economic revitalization, we must provide the right kind of support to the business community. This includes qualified and talented graduates, access to our

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES BY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT REGION*

JOBS CREATED THROUGH SPONSORED PROGRAMS

research enterprise, and high-quality training

$5,790,000

STAR METRICS is a federally sponsored effort to

by partnering with businesses and business

LONG ISLAND

$177,513,000

quantify impact of federally funded research.

MID-HUDSON

organizations to create a semi-annual survey.

$7,689,000

Using its methodology we can determine how

REGION

EXPENDITURES*

CAPITAL

$294,137,000

CENTRAL NEW YORK

$53,700,000

FINGER LAKES

expenditures, but in New York, and especially under the leadership of Governor Andrew Cuomo

MOHAWK VALLEY

$5,902,000

NEW YORK CITY

$51,738,000

many jobs are directly supported by SUNY’s

collaboration is critical. Therefore, we plan to build

NORTH COUNTRY

$11,252,000

research enterprise.

research capacity regionally.

SOUTHERN TIER

$39,843,000

WESTERN NEW YORK

$202,398,000

We’ve already looked at SUNY’s total research

and Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy, regional

Jobs supported by SUNY research: 5,360

programs. We will evaluate our effectiveness

NOTE: * Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

ENTREPRENEURIAL CURRICULUM CONTENT AND ACTIVITES To create the next generation of leaders, we must embed entrepreneurial training in our coursework and in extracurricular activities.


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and The Entrepreneurial Century

THE NUMBER OF INVENTION DISCLOSURES* Successful research can be measured by the knowledge and innovation we produce.

“The future belongs to those who can create, nurture, and commercialize intellectual capital, and the place where that happens is here.”

– Carl T. Hayden,

Chairman, SUNY Board of Trustees

Through regional technology-transfer offices, SUNY is able to leverage strengths across

Entrepreneurship is to the knowledge economy what the assembly line was to industrialism. In higher education, federal research dollars are the fuel, and by increasing our ability to capture funding we are able to create more jobs in New York. More importantly, they’ll be jobs people want, because SUNY has a unique ability to align its breadth and scale with business and industry, taking our solutions and making them viable for real-world applications.

campuses. Measuring invention disclosures is a critical moment in the process of bringing inventions to market.

320* inventions disclosed SUNY’S ENTREPRENEURIAL SUPPORT OF NEW YORK BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

NEW YORK STATE RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

$4,500,000,000 (According to Excell Partners, Inc.).

NEW YORK STATE JOBS CREATED

58,000 (According to New York State Department of Labor).

NEW YORK STATE AVERAGE WAGE VS. NATIONAL AVERAGE SALARY

$60,384 (According to the New York State Department of Labor). vs. $43,460 (According to the New York State Department of Labor Bureau of Statistics).

For SUNY to become a major driver of economic revitalization, we must provide the right kind of support to the business community. This includes qualified and talented graduates, access to our

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES BY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT REGION*

JOBS CREATED THROUGH SPONSORED PROGRAMS

research enterprise, and high-quality training

$5,790,000

STAR METRICS is a federally sponsored effort to

by partnering with businesses and business

LONG ISLAND

$177,513,000

quantify impact of federally funded research.

MID-HUDSON

organizations to create a semi-annual survey.

$7,689,000

Using its methodology we can determine how

REGION

EXPENDITURES*

CAPITAL

$294,137,000

CENTRAL NEW YORK

$53,700,000

FINGER LAKES

expenditures, but in New York, and especially under the leadership of Governor Andrew Cuomo

MOHAWK VALLEY

$5,902,000

NEW YORK CITY

$51,738,000

many jobs are directly supported by SUNY’s

collaboration is critical. Therefore, we plan to build

NORTH COUNTRY

$11,252,000

research enterprise.

research capacity regionally.

SOUTHERN TIER

$39,843,000

WESTERN NEW YORK

$202,398,000

We’ve already looked at SUNY’s total research

and Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy, regional

Jobs supported by SUNY research: 5,360

programs. We will evaluate our effectiveness

NOTE: * Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

ENTREPRENEURIAL CURRICULUM CONTENT AND ACTIVITES To create the next generation of leaders, we must embed entrepreneurial training in our coursework and in extracurricular activities.


SUNY and The Seamless Education Pipeline SUNY views education as a pipeline, which encompasses all that we learn from the day we are born through our experiences in the workforce. As New York State and the nation seek to fix the leaks in the education pipeline, SUNY has the capacity and a plan to lead the charge.

A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

“It is a myth that one person or group can fix education by themselves, no matter how visionary or passionate. Only by working together — public and private institutions of higher education, state education departments, school districts, elected officials, civic, philanthropic and corporate leaders — will we see results.” – Nancy L. Zimpher, Chancellor, The State University of New York

SUNY URBAN-RURAL TEACHER CORPS

SUNY is committed to the Strive concept — a

SMART SCHOLARS EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOLS

19 of 100 New York State ninth graders graduate from college in the standard time frame

framework for developing community-based,

Historically underrepresented high-school students

of Teacher Education (NCATE) Blue Ribbon Panel on

(According to the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education)

data-driven partnerships to address learning

are in desperate need of additional opportunities to

Clinical Preparation and Partnerships for Improved Student

outcomes for our most vulnerable populations.

get a head start on college. One way SUNY can

Learning in November 2010, SUNY will transform its

A Strive network engages leaders in Pre-K-

make this possible is through the implementation

undergraduate and graduate teacher education programs

through-12 schools, higher education,

of Smart Scholars Early College High Schools. The

by offering teacher training akin to the clinical training

business and industry, community

network was developed as a collaboration between

that medical professionals receive. Collectively, students

organizations, government leaders, parents,

EdWorks/KnowledgeWorks Foundation, the New York

training in the new and improved programs and program

and other stakeholders. Together we will:

State Education Department, the Bill & Melinda Gates

graduates will be known as the SUNY Urban-Rural Teacher

Increase the number of New York sites

Foundation, colleges and universities, school

Corps (URTC). To develop the URTC, SUNY will:

qualifying for membership in the Strive

districts, and community organizations to allow

Develop clinically rich teacher-education

National Cradle to Career Network and as

students to earn both a high-school diploma and

programs at SUNY campuses toward increasing

a result effectively work toward closing

up to two years of college credit while they are in

the number of SUNY graduates prepared and

high school. With these partners, SUNY will: Increase

teaching in hard-to-serve schools.

Average New York State unemployment rate: 5.3%

(According to the United State Department of Labor Bureau of Statistics)

suny works By partnering with business and industry leaders, economic development organizations, and private foundations, SUNY will create a unique new cooperative-education initiative. SUNY Works will allow students to earn salaries and college credits while simultaneously completing their degree and gaining on-the-job training and experience that will garner job opportunities in high-need 21st-century fields in New York upon graduation. SUNY is committed to: Increasing the number of students enrolled in cooperative-education programs and successfully gaining employment as a result of their co-op experience.

“Education — educating more people and educating them better — appears to be the best single bet that a society can make.”

– David Leonhardt,

Columnist, The New York Times

CRADLE-TO-CAREER NETWORKS

the achievement gap and increasing career entry.

0 sites in 2008–9

the number of historically underrepresented high-school students receiving college-level credits in ECHS, and consequently increase the numbers of those students admitted to college.

As recommended by the National Council for Accreditation

0 programs in 2008–9


SUNY and The Seamless Education Pipeline SUNY views education as a pipeline, which encompasses all that we learn from the day we are born through our experiences in the workforce. As New York State and the nation seek to fix the leaks in the education pipeline, SUNY has the capacity and a plan to lead the charge.

A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

“It is a myth that one person or group can fix education by themselves, no matter how visionary or passionate. Only by working together — public and private institutions of higher education, state education departments, school districts, elected officials, civic, philanthropic and corporate leaders — will we see results.” – Nancy L. Zimpher, Chancellor, The State University of New York

SUNY URBAN-RURAL TEACHER CORPS

SUNY is committed to the Strive concept — a

SMART SCHOLARS EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOLS

19 of 100 New York State ninth graders graduate from college in the standard time frame

framework for developing community-based,

Historically underrepresented high-school students

of Teacher Education (NCATE) Blue Ribbon Panel on

(According to the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education)

data-driven partnerships to address learning

are in desperate need of additional opportunities to

Clinical Preparation and Partnerships for Improved Student

outcomes for our most vulnerable populations.

get a head start on college. One way SUNY can

Learning in November 2010, SUNY will transform its

A Strive network engages leaders in Pre-K-

make this possible is through the implementation

undergraduate and graduate teacher education programs

through-12 schools, higher education,

of Smart Scholars Early College High Schools. The

by offering teacher training akin to the clinical training

business and industry, community

network was developed as a collaboration between

that medical professionals receive. Collectively, students

organizations, government leaders, parents,

EdWorks/KnowledgeWorks Foundation, the New York

training in the new and improved programs and program

and other stakeholders. Together we will:

State Education Department, the Bill & Melinda Gates

graduates will be known as the SUNY Urban-Rural Teacher

Increase the number of New York sites

Foundation, colleges and universities, school

Corps (URTC). To develop the URTC, SUNY will:

qualifying for membership in the Strive

districts, and community organizations to allow

Develop clinically rich teacher-education

National Cradle to Career Network and as

students to earn both a high-school diploma and

programs at SUNY campuses toward increasing

a result effectively work toward closing

up to two years of college credit while they are in

the number of SUNY graduates prepared and

high school. With these partners, SUNY will: Increase

teaching in hard-to-serve schools.

Average New York State unemployment rate: 5.3%

(According to the United State Department of Labor Bureau of Statistics)

suny works By partnering with business and industry leaders, economic development organizations, and private foundations, SUNY will create a unique new cooperative-education initiative. SUNY Works will allow students to earn salaries and college credits while simultaneously completing their degree and gaining on-the-job training and experience that will garner job opportunities in high-need 21st-century fields in New York upon graduation. SUNY is committed to: Increasing the number of students enrolled in cooperative-education programs and successfully gaining employment as a result of their co-op experience.

“Education — educating more people and educating them better — appears to be the best single bet that a society can make.”

– David Leonhardt,

Columnist, The New York Times

CRADLE-TO-CAREER NETWORKS

the achievement gap and increasing career entry.

0 sites in 2008–9

the number of historically underrepresented high-school students receiving college-level credits in ECHS, and consequently increase the numbers of those students admitted to college.

As recommended by the National Council for Accreditation

0 programs in 2008–9


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and A Healthier New York Building a virtual SUNY Institute for Health Policy and Practice (IHPP) will harness and leverage capacity across all 64 SUNY campuses. SUNY will address health issues for our students and faculty in a defined environment — our campuses — and then take “what works” to scale statewide and nationwide. Development of the SUNY Institute for Health Policy and Practice.

THE RIGHT HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN THE RIGHT PLACES The lack of enough well-trained health care professionals is well known and felt nationwide. SUNY is committed to changing this dynamic by: • Producing more well-trained healthcare workers.

THE SUNY WELLNESS NETWORK

To be on the forefront of effective, outcome-based

One in four undergraduate students arrives at

healthcare we need to ramp up our research base

college with one or more significant and chronic

and use “level one” evidence to create the SUNY

health challenges. We know some of the biggest

Scale — a measure of quality healthcare.

risk factors facing our SUNY family; others require

SUNY knows it must:

investigation. Therefore SUNY will:

• Increase funding to strengthen

• Use industry standards to execute a behavioral risk-assessment study.

the IHPP — $4,637,500 in 2008-9. • Increase funding for the four SUNY REACH pillars*.

• Become the largest system to • Analyzing specific needs both geographically and by the type of professional required. NOTE: *SUNY REACH is a program to promote increased research, especially collaborative research in the areas of cancer, infectious disease, disorders of the nervous system, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

become entirely tobacco free. • Develop the SUNY SCALE.

“We all — everyone – have something in common. Each and every one of us will someday be a patient.”

– Dr. David Smith,

President,

SUNY Upstate Medical University


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and A Healthier New York Building a virtual SUNY Institute for Health Policy and Practice (IHPP) will harness and leverage capacity across all 64 SUNY campuses. SUNY will address health issues for our students and faculty in a defined environment — our campuses — and then take “what works” to scale statewide and nationwide. Development of the SUNY Institute for Health Policy and Practice.

THE RIGHT HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN THE RIGHT PLACES The lack of enough well-trained health care professionals is well known and felt nationwide. SUNY is committed to changing this dynamic by: • Producing more well-trained healthcare workers.

THE SUNY WELLNESS NETWORK

To be on the forefront of effective, outcome-based

One in four undergraduate students arrives at

healthcare we need to ramp up our research base

college with one or more significant and chronic

and use “level one” evidence to create the SUNY

health challenges. We know some of the biggest

Scale — a measure of quality healthcare.

risk factors facing our SUNY family; others require

SUNY knows it must:

investigation. Therefore SUNY will:

• Increase funding to strengthen

• Use industry standards to execute a behavioral risk-assessment study.

the IHPP — $4,637,500 in 2008-9. • Increase funding for the four SUNY REACH pillars*.

• Become the largest system to • Analyzing specific needs both geographically and by the type of professional required. NOTE: *SUNY REACH is a program to promote increased research, especially collaborative research in the areas of cancer, infectious disease, disorders of the nervous system, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

become entirely tobacco free. • Develop the SUNY SCALE.

“We all — everyone – have something in common. Each and every one of us will someday be a patient.”

– Dr. David Smith,

President,

SUNY Upstate Medical University


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and An Energy-Smart New York Some believe the green energy economic revolution will be akin to the development and proliferation of the personal computer. By 2030 the U.S. Renewable Energy Market is estimated to be worth $4.5B; similarly, the U.S. Green Collar Workforce is estimated to top 250,000 by 2020. SUNY’s expertise in applied research and its ability to take it to scale will allow us to prepare New York State to capture an outsized share of that market and workforce while leading to a decrease in New York’s energy consumption. SUNY sees the road to realizing this ambition in three parts: Education, Research, and Consumption Practices. New York’s share of the Renewable Energy Market and Green Collar Workforce

ENERGY-SMART EDUCATION Step one is to prepare a generation of Energy-Smart graduates — an educated citizenry that has the skills and drive to take on 21st-century green jobs. At the same time, SUNY needs to take a more active

ENERGY-SMART RESEARCH

INVENTION DISCLOSURES*

As we have committed to tracking research

Similarly, we seek to enhance our technology

expenditures in total and by region, we

transfer process to identify, protect, and

seek to focus on — and significantly grow —

commercialize SUNY’s intellectual property

expenditures in the Energy-Smart disciplines.

portfolio and grow the number of invention

This measurement includes research in

disclosures related to energy disciplines made

the following areas: Smart-Energy Grid

by our faculty and student researchers.

technologies, energy-efficiency technologies, energy storage, alternative and renewable sources, energy for transportation, and energy policy.

Energy-Smart research expenditures: $23,524,400

Finally, controlling consumption is critical. As one of the largest energy consumers in New York, SUNY can lead the way to more responsible usage practices.

A thorough evaluation is in progress to build and assess the impact of a deep, broad, and effective green curriculum.

SYSTEM ENERGY CONSUMPTION

• BTUs/Ft2 – consumption per space (in line with Executive Order 111): 140,565 • MMBTUs/AAFTE – consumption per student: 61.97

SYSTEM CARBON FOOTPRINT (MTCO2E)

• Emissions/Ft2 – per space: .0116 • Emissions/AAFTE – per student: 5.1352

SYSTEM RENEWABLE ENERGY

• Produced: 645,169 kWh • Utilized: 27,395,169 kWh

role in providing continuing community education and energy-management recommendations.

ENERGY-SMART CONSUMPTION

“SUNY has embraced our natural role as a source for research and innovation, and we are leveraging it to break new ground in clean energy technology that will encourage discovery, innovation, demonstration, education, and commercialization of green - and renewable - energy solutions and prepare the workforce that will lead New York’s new economy. We are turning words and ideas into action and jobs — this is the very essence of The Power of SUNY.” – Nancy L. Zimpher, Chancellor, The State University of New York

NOTE: *Represents figures from 4-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and An Energy-Smart New York Some believe the green energy economic revolution will be akin to the development and proliferation of the personal computer. By 2030 the U.S. Renewable Energy Market is estimated to be worth $4.5B; similarly, the U.S. Green Collar Workforce is estimated to top 250,000 by 2020. SUNY’s expertise in applied research and its ability to take it to scale will allow us to prepare New York State to capture an outsized share of that market and workforce while leading to a decrease in New York’s energy consumption. SUNY sees the road to realizing this ambition in three parts: Education, Research, and Consumption Practices. New York’s share of the Renewable Energy Market and Green Collar Workforce

ENERGY-SMART EDUCATION Step one is to prepare a generation of Energy-Smart graduates — an educated citizenry that has the skills and drive to take on 21st-century green jobs. At the same time, SUNY needs to take a more active

ENERGY-SMART RESEARCH

INVENTION DISCLOSURES*

As we have committed to tracking research

Similarly, we seek to enhance our technology

expenditures in total and by region, we

transfer process to identify, protect, and

seek to focus on — and significantly grow —

commercialize SUNY’s intellectual property

expenditures in the Energy-Smart disciplines.

portfolio and grow the number of invention

This measurement includes research in

disclosures related to energy disciplines made

the following areas: Smart-Energy Grid

by our faculty and student researchers.

technologies, energy-efficiency technologies, energy storage, alternative and renewable sources, energy for transportation, and energy policy.

Energy-Smart research expenditures: $23,524,400

Finally, controlling consumption is critical. As one of the largest energy consumers in New York, SUNY can lead the way to more responsible usage practices.

A thorough evaluation is in progress to build and assess the impact of a deep, broad, and effective green curriculum.

SYSTEM ENERGY CONSUMPTION

• BTUs/Ft2 – consumption per space (in line with Executive Order 111): 140,565 • MMBTUs/AAFTE – consumption per student: 61.97

SYSTEM CARBON FOOTPRINT (MTCO2E)

• Emissions/Ft2 – per space: .0116 • Emissions/AAFTE – per student: 5.1352

SYSTEM RENEWABLE ENERGY

• Produced: 645,169 kWh • Utilized: 27,395,169 kWh

role in providing continuing community education and energy-management recommendations.

ENERGY-SMART CONSUMPTION

“SUNY has embraced our natural role as a source for research and innovation, and we are leveraging it to break new ground in clean energy technology that will encourage discovery, innovation, demonstration, education, and commercialization of green - and renewable - energy solutions and prepare the workforce that will lead New York’s new economy. We are turning words and ideas into action and jobs — this is the very essence of The Power of SUNY.” – Nancy L. Zimpher, Chancellor, The State University of New York

NOTE: *Represents figures from 4-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and The Vibrant Community

SUNY PASSPORT With a plethora of arts and culture opportunities at the fingertips of all New Yorkers, we will encourage our students and faculty to take advantage of these opportunities by: Partnering with 250 or more organizations across New York State for reduced or waived cost to cultural or recreational activities.

Strong communities are at the heart of economic revitalization. They foster investment, improve quality of life, and grow stronger citizens. As anchor institutions, our influence is widely felt. Our scholars can quantify our contributions to the well-being of our communities, and our SUNY family can provide significant impact.

system. We’ve identified two ways in which SUNY can better serve its local communities: Establish service-learning plans tailored to the needs and capabilities of each campus that produce evidence-based results to the communities. 2) Require the implementation of a signature engagement project at each campus — a long- term, ever-changing tailored project to meet the community’s needs.

The Carnegie Elective Classification for Community Engagement and the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll are the gold standard in recognizing effective community service. Therefore, SUNY will: Increase the number of SUNY campuses recognized by the Carnegie Elective Classification for Community Engagement and/or the President’s

Well-being Index for New York State Counties

1) Increasing campus-community engagement is central to our mission as a public university

Current Partners: 0

Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.

“Locality matters, as John Dewey wrote in 1927, ‘democracy begins at home and home must be the neighborly community’… No institution can make such significant contributions to the quality of life in their communities and cities as colleges and universities…” – Ira Harkavy, Founding Director and

Associate Vice President, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania

Currently Recognized Campuses: 5

Quantifying the Impact of Volunteerism and Community Service Rendered by SUNY Each year, SUNY students, faculty, and staff perform hundreds of thousands of hours of community service. IndependentSector.org values community service in New York at $28.52 per hour. Using this figure, we can quantify the impact of those volunteer hours — and then double it.


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and The Vibrant Community

SUNY PASSPORT With a plethora of arts and culture opportunities at the fingertips of all New Yorkers, we will encourage our students and faculty to take advantage of these opportunities by: Partnering with 250 or more organizations across New York State for reduced or waived cost to cultural or recreational activities.

Strong communities are at the heart of economic revitalization. They foster investment, improve quality of life, and grow stronger citizens. As anchor institutions, our influence is widely felt. Our scholars can quantify our contributions to the well-being of our communities, and our SUNY family can provide significant impact.

system. We’ve identified two ways in which SUNY can better serve its local communities: Establish service-learning plans tailored to the needs and capabilities of each campus that produce evidence-based results to the communities. 2) Require the implementation of a signature engagement project at each campus — a long- term, ever-changing tailored project to meet the community’s needs.

The Carnegie Elective Classification for Community Engagement and the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll are the gold standard in recognizing effective community service. Therefore, SUNY will: Increase the number of SUNY campuses recognized by the Carnegie Elective Classification for Community Engagement and/or the President’s

Well-being Index for New York State Counties

1) Increasing campus-community engagement is central to our mission as a public university

Current Partners: 0

Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.

“Locality matters, as John Dewey wrote in 1927, ‘democracy begins at home and home must be the neighborly community’… No institution can make such significant contributions to the quality of life in their communities and cities as colleges and universities…” – Ira Harkavy, Founding Director and

Associate Vice President, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania

Currently Recognized Campuses: 5

Quantifying the Impact of Volunteerism and Community Service Rendered by SUNY Each year, SUNY students, faculty, and staff perform hundreds of thousands of hours of community service. IndependentSector.org values community service in New York at $28.52 per hour. Using this figure, we can quantify the impact of those volunteer hours — and then double it.


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and The World

“Globalization is a new reality. So the question is, what do we do to compete? The only way we can keep our edge is to keep educating.” – Vivek Wadhwa, Director of Research,

Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization, and Executive in Residence, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University

Sustained economic prosperity requires a global approach. For New York, comprehensive internationalization will mean more global trade and an increase in personal income and job creation. SUNY can tangibly support this vision for New York by training an army of globally competent graduates with the experience and preparation necessary for their successes to transcend borders and return back home.

EARNING INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGE

Building a Global Faculty Talent Pool

SUNY’s ability to prepare its students for

Faculty excellence and activity is the

participation in the global knowledge economy

only way to ensure comprehensive and

is best exemplified by the recognition of those

sustained internationalization. When

students as successful international scholars.

faculty members are awarded fellowships

An increase in scholarships from organizations

from prestigious international entities, SUNY

such as Fulbright, Gates, and Rhodes helps to

expands its profile and builds new and vital

raise the global profile of all students.

partnerships across the globe.

Number of prestigious international scholarships awarded to SUNY students: 64

Number of international fellowships to faculty and staff: 18

NEW YORK STATE EXPORTS (INTERNATIONAL)*

$39,211,000,000 (According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census).

NEW YORK STATE JOB CREATION

-237,100 (According to New York State Department of Labor).

Harnessing the Impact of International Students

Economic impact of international activity***

NEW YORK STATE AVERAGE WAGE

$57,794 (According to the New York State Department of Labor).

While educating generations of globally

The global activity of our students, faculty, and staff

prepared students is a multi-year process,

not only encourages academic discourse throughout

the impact of SUNY’s efforts will be felt

the world, it brings grants, contracts, and cooperative

immediately. Increasing the number of

agreements back home to benefit New York. SUNY

international students studying at SUNY

expands its reach when it invests abroad and when

not only provides a more rounded experience

investments from abroad are in turn made to SUNY.

Building a Global Student Talent Pool SUNY students will drive New York’s workforce of tomorrow, so they must possess a series of skills and experiences that will enable them to thrive in a competitive global marketplace. It starts here in New York — learning a foreign language or interacting with international students in the classroom and in the dorm. But it also extends beyond: students must be encouraged to study abroad and get real, hands-on experience bridging cultural divides.

Enrollment in Education Abroad: International Students: 18,200

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES TOTAL

44,940

INTRODUCTORY UNDERGRADUATE

39,500

ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE

4,900

POST GRADUATE

540

for others, but also contributes directly to New York’s economy.

Economic impact of international research activities: $42,528,000

Economic impact of international students: $406,802,000** NOTE: All data in this section reflects 2009-10. *May not fully account for exports to Canada ** According to NAFSA: Association of International Educators *** According to the SUNY Research Foundation.


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK

SUNY and The World

“Globalization is a new reality. So the question is, what do we do to compete? The only way we can keep our edge is to keep educating.” – Vivek Wadhwa, Director of Research,

Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization, and Executive in Residence, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University

Sustained economic prosperity requires a global approach. For New York, comprehensive internationalization will mean more global trade and an increase in personal income and job creation. SUNY can tangibly support this vision for New York by training an army of globally competent graduates with the experience and preparation necessary for their successes to transcend borders and return back home.

EARNING INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGE

Building a Global Faculty Talent Pool

SUNY’s ability to prepare its students for

Faculty excellence and activity is the

participation in the global knowledge economy

only way to ensure comprehensive and

is best exemplified by the recognition of those

sustained internationalization. When

students as successful international scholars.

faculty members are awarded fellowships

An increase in scholarships from organizations

from prestigious international entities, SUNY

such as Fulbright, Gates, and Rhodes helps to

expands its profile and builds new and vital

raise the global profile of all students.

partnerships across the globe.

Number of prestigious international scholarships awarded to SUNY students: 64

Number of international fellowships to faculty and staff: 18

NEW YORK STATE EXPORTS (INTERNATIONAL)*

$39,211,000,000 (According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census).

NEW YORK STATE JOB CREATION

-237,100 (According to New York State Department of Labor).

Harnessing the Impact of International Students

Economic impact of international activity***

NEW YORK STATE AVERAGE WAGE

$57,794 (According to the New York State Department of Labor).

While educating generations of globally

The global activity of our students, faculty, and staff

prepared students is a multi-year process,

not only encourages academic discourse throughout

the impact of SUNY’s efforts will be felt

the world, it brings grants, contracts, and cooperative

immediately. Increasing the number of

agreements back home to benefit New York. SUNY

international students studying at SUNY

expands its reach when it invests abroad and when

not only provides a more rounded experience

investments from abroad are in turn made to SUNY.

Building a Global Student Talent Pool SUNY students will drive New York’s workforce of tomorrow, so they must possess a series of skills and experiences that will enable them to thrive in a competitive global marketplace. It starts here in New York — learning a foreign language or interacting with international students in the classroom and in the dorm. But it also extends beyond: students must be encouraged to study abroad and get real, hands-on experience bridging cultural divides.

Enrollment in Education Abroad: International Students: 18,200

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES TOTAL

44,940

INTRODUCTORY UNDERGRADUATE

39,500

ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE

4,900

POST GRADUATE

540

for others, but also contributes directly to New York’s economy.

Economic impact of international research activities: $42,528,000

Economic impact of international students: $406,802,000** NOTE: All data in this section reflects 2009-10. *May not fully account for exports to Canada ** According to NAFSA: Association of International Educators *** According to the SUNY Research Foundation.


Conclusion Today’s SUNY is a system created with

This Report Card gives us a series of baseline metrics using data from the 2008-9 academic year. It

excellence in every dimension. It’s a system

presents a starting point—which we will revisit annually beginning this September.

we take great pride in, but also one that we believe can do even more for students and

As we work toward realizing The Power of SUNY plan by building a stronger SUNY and, in turn, a

families, faculty and staff, alumni, and

stronger New York, we vow to be transparent and urge you to hold us accountable by utilizing this

ultimately all New Yorkers.

initial Report Card and its follow-up companions, which will be published annually. We hope you have found this Report Card helpful and we welcome your feedback and engagement.

In developing our strategic plan — The Power of SUNY — we took ourselves to task and

With these products to guide us, and with your help, SUNY will continue to be a source of immense

challenged the system to reach its full

pride for all of New York.

potential by sustaining its core mission of teaching, research, and service, and also by fulfilling a need in New York State for an

Together, we are

economic-revitalization champion.

the

Powerof


Conclusion Today’s SUNY is a system created with

This Report Card gives us a series of baseline metrics using data from the 2008-9 academic year. It

excellence in every dimension. It’s a system

presents a starting point—which we will revisit annually beginning this September.

we take great pride in, but also one that we believe can do even more for students and

As we work toward realizing The Power of SUNY plan by building a stronger SUNY and, in turn, a

families, faculty and staff, alumni, and

stronger New York, we vow to be transparent and urge you to hold us accountable by utilizing this

ultimately all New Yorkers.

initial Report Card and its follow-up companions, which will be published annually. We hope you have found this Report Card helpful and we welcome your feedback and engagement.

In developing our strategic plan — The Power of SUNY — we took ourselves to task and

With these products to guide us, and with your help, SUNY will continue to be a source of immense

challenged the system to reach its full

pride for all of New York.

potential by sustaining its core mission of teaching, research, and service, and also by fulfilling a need in New York State for an

Together, we are

economic-revitalization champion.

the

Powerof


REPORT CARD 2011

the Powerof

SUNY Spring 2011 Report Card  

Initial SUNY-wide report card for SUNY Spring 2011