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Agribusiness Publications P.O. Box 669 Sanger, CA 93657 Change Service Requested

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s t e c h n o l o g y september 2008

The Push to Sell More Raisins: CRMB “Wise Choice” Program Promoting the Raisin’s Health Benefits

Dried Plum Growers Battle Fires

The Water Crisis from the Westside

Composting Key to Vineyard Success

The Vine Mealybug Doing Damage

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editor

perspective

September 2008

Water Precious Water

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s I write this perspective, I am looking out a second-story window watching a torrential downpour in Melbourne, Australia. A land ravaged by years of drought, the rain is celebrated by those around me. The irony of their circumstances in relation to those recovering from the recent U.S. Midwest flooding is not lost on me. On this trip I have had the opportunity to speak with farmers, men and women not unlike their counterparts in the United States, whose daily struggles as of late have been the rising cost of fuel, fertilizer shortages, constantly changing environmental regulations and of course, how to keep going. The conversation here, though, turns slightly darker, as one farmer tells of his best mate committing suicide this past year following his seventh consecutive year of insufficient water supplies. Like us, farming and ranching is

all these families have ever known. The total devastation for some by the same issues we face, coupled with the lack of water, has taken many to the breaking point. According to one rancher, suicide incidents in his local farming community have steadily risen as the drought has carried on; for some, there feels like no way out. In speaking with another local, they talk about the government’s efforts to step in. In Queensland to the north, proposals have been made for farmers to permanently remove their crops and install government subsidized solar panels. It offers a steady source of income, courtesy of the taxpayer, and adds power back into the grid. After nearly a decade of inconsistent, and even no revenue, it’s a deal many are cashing in on. The conversations here are a quick reminder that it is not just farming in

America that is struggling with change and battling issues. The global agricultural community is coming to grips with challenges and for some, those obstacles feel so insurmountable that taking their own life is their only perceived option. As farmers in the Westlands Water District come to grips with their own water calamity, I consider our current state of affairs in relation to that of Australia. While our circumstances are not nearly as desperate, it certainly won’t take very long for our farming community to articulate the sentiments found here in Melbourne. The difference is that we still have control of our destiny. While Australians have implemented every water-saving measure possible and reprioritized allocations in favor of the farming community, California is still battling the importance of people versus fish.

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Published monthly for the grape, citrus and deciduous fruit industries in California and sent by controlled mailing to 10,000 addresses monthly.

publisher: John Van Nortwick editor: Amy Wolfe: editor@myagribusiness.com advertising associates: Paul Einerson, Mandy Critchley, Ken Hockersmith & Dan Sturdivant production and design: John Campbell: www.campbellstudio.net web site: www.myfreshfruit.com subscriptions: subscriber@myagribusiness.com Fresh Fruit & Raisin News is published monthly by Agribusiness Publications, 5100 N Sixth Street, Suite 154 Fresno, CA 93710 800-364-4894 • 559-222-7954 Fax: 559-222-5115

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At What Point is Government Involvement in Agriculture Just Too Expensive

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park-Ignited Agricultural IC engines rate at greater than 50 brake horsepower are subject to District Rule 4702. What is District Rule 4702 you ask? Good question. You can read that for yourself at www. valleyair.org/rules/currntrules/r4702. pdf. Here is a list of engines that are affected. Stationary and transportable irrigation pump engines, dairy digester gas-fired engines, and other engines use in agricultural operations that are fired on natural gas, propane/ LPG, biogas, and/or gasoline. OK, that covers everything but the lawn mower. What of getting compliant? To comply with the requirement of Rule 4702, owners/ operators shale submit either an Authority to Construct (ATC) permit application or a PermitExempt Equipment Registration (PEER) application by the upcoming deadline, which by the way was July 1, 2008 for the ATC or October 1, 2008 for the PEER applications respectively. The application should identify the chosen compliance method. Possible compliance methods include: 1. Replace engine with an electric motor, which by the way doesn’t require an ATC or PEER application, and extends your compliance date to January 1, 2010 if you enter into an agreement to electrify wit the district. 2. R etrofit or replace engine with a compliant catalyst system. (exhaust control device). 3. R eplace or retrofit engine to operate in a compliant leanburn configuration. 4. R eplace engine with a new latest-tier certified diesel engine of less emissions. Special note; this may not be an option if you are a permitted source. Check with the District if considering this option. For your personal benefit we have placed the entire copy of the Compliance Bulletin on our website at w w w.mydairyman.com/ publisher’sperspective The projected fiscal impact on the California agricultural industry is in the tens of millions of dollars. The benefit to the state is likely so minute as to be unable to measure it. Headline from California Smog versus Greenhouse Gas Which is Worse? The debate over what to do

with cow manure continues. Using the manure to produce methane gas seems to be a logical alternative and will help reduce demands for fossil fuels. It will also help by cut green house gas emissions, but some are concerned about the smog that may be created in burning the methane gas in a combustion engine being used to create electricity. The San Joaquin Valley Air Board in California is blocking development of methane digesters by demanding near–perfect air quality from engines. The mandated emission standard of 9 parts per million nitrogen oxide has never been demonstrated scientifically. Get that, there isn’t even an engine on the drawing boards, much less in production that can meet that standard and yet sensible progress is stopped because an unattainable standard is set by the board. It is projected that the installation of additional control equipment to meet the Air Board’s standard would cost dairies another $300,000-$400,000. The net fiscal impact on dairies in the state could exceed $5.7 billion assuming one digester was installed at each dairy. Already half dozen projects in the pipeline are stalled because of the Air Board’s stance. Yet the US Department of Agriculture is willing to provide dairyman with a $198,000 dollar grant, the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District will issue the permit to run the generator and the California Energy Commission loves the idea so much they have provided the project with a $500,000 loan. Headline from Texas - The Governor of Texas is Done with Ethanol The Governor of Texas is so fed up with the corn ethanol that he has gone on record stating “at what price will corn be so expensive that the federal government will decide that it is time to stop driving up the price of food? Three years ago Congress imposed a Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) mandate that has forced the gasoline industry to mix massive amounts of corn-based ethanol into the nation’s fuel supply. In 2007, Congress nearly doubled that mandate to require nine bullion gallons of ethanol be blended into gas in 2008 and even more in 2009.” w w w

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What has been the net result of this all-knowing, all-seeing mandate? Feed prices to cattleman, dairies and livestock operations have risen to the highest levels ever. Food prices have risen more than 19 percent over the same period, while the cost of fuel has risen by more than a dollar per gallon. Demand for ethanol has surely risen, and yet profits for ethanol producers are non existent because of the high cost of corn and other raw materials needed to manufacture the ethanol. The net impact on input costs for all of agriculture? Billions and billions of dollars more. One more, because this one puts exact costs on a specific set of producers. Headline from California - New Study Cites Continued Regulatory Cost Explosion. The California Institute for Study of Specialty Crops has published a new study which details the continuing explosion of regulatory costs on California agriculture and specifically citrus. Since a 2006 study by the Institute, an additional $12.4 million in regulatory impacts have been shouldered by the citrus producers throughout California. “Even after giving credit for the reduction in workman’s comp expenses, growers have had a net increase of $46.00 per acre in the past two years,” notes California

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Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen. The vast majority of increases have occurred because of new mandates within education and training, capital investment imposed as a result of environmental edicts and regulations that have changed operational procedures according to the study. We could go on and on, state by state, county by county, even city by city. Don’t think that government regulations are limited to our friends in Washington DC or at your state Capital. They are coming from all sides and at a cost that will likely be the straw that breaks the camel’s back. These costs have bottom line impact. In all cases the monies to comply cannot be offset by an increase in production, improved quality of product or stronger prices for products produced. They are another form of taxation that cannot be economically justified, much less afforded. Someone needs to yell it again from every roof top that the killing of the goose that lays the golden eggs has never been the wisest choice. We all had better wake up here and realize that repeatedly hitting one’s self in the thumb with a hammer is avoidable and that in some cases can be best avoided by not giving some people a hammer and instead putting the hammer into the hands of people who know how to use it. ■


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S EPTEMBER 2 0 0 8

Olives Abound!

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he adage about making lemonade from lemons is certainly applicable for the University of California, Davis. Only in their case it was really about making olive oil. With over 2,000 olive trees on campus, the university was facing a disturbing problem – olives falling on the plethora of bike paths and creating a travel hazard for slipping and falling. Enough incidents occurred that the director of the Grounds Division proposed that the university address the problem by harvesting the trees and making olive oil. The idea was embraced by college officials, and the first UC Davis Olive Oil was produced in 2005. The olive oil proved to be so popular that production expanded by 800 percent over the next two years. Dan Flynn, manager

of the olive oil program, said that academic interest in California’s budding olive oil industry also grew during this period. “The olive oil sector was growing, booming really, and the faculty saw a natural opportunity,” says Flynn. College faculty, staff from the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science and table olive and olive oil producers collaborated on a proposal for the development of a UC Davis Olive Center. The final plan was put to the university leadership who subsequently committed three years of seed money to get the project off the ground. Now the center is moving ahead with fulfilling its mission of enhancing the quality and economic viability of California table olives and olive oil

Flynn, who now is the executive director of the olive center, notes that as the center continues to grow and expand, he and other staff are drawing their inspiration from the grape sector. “We want to help California producers thrive by improving the quality of their product and increasing their efficiency in producing that product.” To achieve that goal the center draws on the myriad of faculty and staff resources available on campus, ranging from farm advisors in the field to food chemists analyzing in the lab. Their services will also expand in the fall of 2008 when the center acquires its own olive oil mill. It will not only be used for the continued production of U.C. Davis olive oil, but also to conduct research. The cen-

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ter is also hoping to pursue additional research in the area of harvesting. Currently, most table and oil olives are hand harvested. Given the state’s labor issues, mechanical harvesting is of great interest. While some success is had on trellis systems with dense growth, Flynn is hoping research and development by the center can increase the use of mechanization. Flynn acknowledges that the greatest growth in the olive segment is with oil. The table olive industry has taken a substantial hit over the last ten years with a 25 percent loss of acreage during that time. He notes the preponderance of that decline is as a result of cheaper imports, which typically equate to lower quality as well. “Most table olives are used in food service with other products,


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such as on pizzas, so the demand for quality hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been there. Because of that, California table olives have suffered as less expensive, inferior olives are brought in.â&#x20AC;? The table olive industry has been pushing for the enforcement of quality standards within trade agreements, but to little avail. At the same time, their olive oil counterparts are also attempting to address standard issues. According to Flynn, there is currently no state or national olive oil grading system. However, that may change. Senate Bill 634 is now making its way through the California legislature and it would create an olive oil grading system with the subsequent criteria. This system is similar in nature to the rules established by the International Olive Council out of Madrid, Spain. Forty counties representing the most productive olive-oil regions in the world comprise the membership; the United States is not one of them. With current consumption trends, this is not surprising. According to Flynn, Americans currently consume roughly one wine bottleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of olive oil on an annual basis, compared to Greece, the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest consumers, where citizens enjoy 35 bottles each per year. The United States is ranked 28th internationally for per capita consumption and 4th in total con-

sumption; a statistic of note only because of the size of our population. In total, the U.S. makes up only 8 percent of the world market. From a production standpoint, with California leading the way, approximately 500,000 gallons of olive oil is produced domestically. Total demand in 2007 was for 70 million gallons and the difference was all imported. The numbers are startling and an indication of just how

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much potential exists for California olive oil. By 2020, Flynn predicts that California should be producing roughly 20 million gallons with unknown potential for increased consumer demand. With so much opportunity for growth on the horizon, the center is working with organizations like the California Olive Oil Council to formalize marketing standards and potentially form an olive oil

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° marketing agreement. For the time being, though, Flynn and his cadre of producers, researchers and staff will continue their existing work to help further this booming industry. They are focusing on consumer research for the table olive, as well as offering seminars on orchard management. From Flynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perspective, by continuing to draw attention to the many efforts of the Olive Center, there is a rising of the entire olive industry. â&#x2013;


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industry

perspective

dried

plums

S EPTEMBER 2 0 0 8

The Rise of the Pomegranate

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wenty years ago, only half of American consumers actually bothered consuming commercially grown pomegranates. According to Tom Tjerandsen, executive director of the Pomegranate Council (PC), many people simply used the beautiful fall fruit for decorative purposes. Something happened about ten years ago, though and people actually began eating their centerpieces. “They discovered that pomegranates really do taste good,” says Tjerandsen, and suddenly there weren’t enough of

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ing inroads into the domestic and international marketplace. Today, with millions of boxes of fresh pomegranates harvested annually, growers are reaping the benefits of a decade of hard work and persistence. Approximately 20 percent of fresh fruit is exported to countries such as the United Kingdom, Japan, Canada and Mexico. Mexico is one of the greatest export opportunities because the fruits grown in California far exceed in size and flavor the pomegranates grown locally. The fruit is an important ingredient in Mexican Independence Day celebration dishes. Tjerandsen adds that any day now, the United States should get approval to export to Korea, where currently supplies are provided by Uzbekistan. Like Mexican pomegranates, the fruit from Uzbekistan is lacking in both size and quality. Fruits from this country are typically the size of golf balls, while California pomegranates grow to be the size of softballs, or larger. Domestic markets have been developed by focusing on demystifying the pomegranate, in particular how to eat and juice it. The PC and individual growers targeted educational campaigns towards the media on the proper techniques, as well as the many known health benefits of the fruit. Its healthfulness is perhaps its greatest strength, as study after study delineates a new health-related reason to consume pomegranates. Tjerandsen notes that while the PC does not directly fund these various studies, the organization does provide input to researchers on the known benefits as well as possible effects to consider in their work. Of the numerous volumes of work on the fruit, it is known to be high in both vitamin C and potassium, an excellent source of fiber, low in calories, and the most antioxidant rich fruit juice availT:9 in

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this decadent red fruit. Growers in California took note of this increased demand. Particularly, Paramount Farms, which launched the subsidiary Pom Wonderful. At the time, the goal was to continue developing the market for fresh pomegranates as well as juice and concentrate. At the time, grenadine was the principal product using pomegranate juice. With an ingenious hour-glass bottle design and a healthfulness-focused campaign, T:6.5 in Pom Wonderful slowly began mak-

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able. Research still be conducted worldwide also points to its benefit in reducing the risk of certain cancers and the potential to immune system strengthening in HIV patients. With so much success over the past ten years there appears to be little to stop this rising star of the fruit industry. The 2008 season seems to offer little sign of concern. “Mother Nature has smiled on the pomegranate crop to date,” says Tjerandsen. The lack of water has been a benefit to the fruit, which can potentially suffer from additional rainfall this season. “The bushes take the water up at a rapid pace and distribute out to the fruit so quickly that the hard outer tusk can not grow fast enough. Ultimately, the fruit cracks and becomes susceptible to pests and diseases.” Given the pomegranate’s hearty nature, this would be the worst possible scenario. The majority of pomegranates are grown in the Southern San Joaquin Valley, prospering where cool evenings help with the development of the deep red skin. The fruit are grown on trellised bushes and require minimal upkeep, relative to other fresh fruit crops. “The plants need very little pre- or post-harvest topical applications,” notes Tjerandsen. They are susceptible to an aphid which is easily controlled through the release of beneficiary insects, such as ladybugs. The bush limbs tend to break because of the weight of the fruit, so thinning is needed. Pomegranates are hand-harvested, but Tjerandsen says there have been few labor issues. “The majority of pomegranates come into season following the larger peach and nectarine crops, so labor is typically still available and willing to work.” The biggest production challenge currently facing pomegranates is the availability of rootstock – there simply isn’t enough. “Growth over the past ten years has continued to exceed predictions and we continually do not have enough rootstock to meet demand,” remarks Tjerandsen. In the grand scheme of things, though, this is a relatively small problem to have. While other fruit producers throughout California battle increased production costs, pomegranate growers continue to enjoy thriving market conditions and an easy-to-grow, low-maintenance crop. ■ w w w

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Organic in the Twenty-First Century

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n 1973, fifteen Santa Cruz-area farmers came together with a mission. Having begun implementing new growing techniques known as organic, they wanted to develop a system that helped ensure the integrity of their process. From this grassroots movement the California Certified Organic Farmers (CCOF) organization was born. In the beginning, the group focused on creating its own standards and systems for inspection. As time progressed and the concept of organic farming grew by leaps and bounds, CCOF helped to ensure a mainstream system continued its tradition of reliability. “When the U.S. Department of Agriculture finally determined that regulations

were needed for the organic segment, they looked to CCOF and our system as a starting place,” says Viella Shipley, the organization’s director of sales and marketing. Since the implementation of the USDA standards, CCOF has become the predominant third-party certification entity in the state of California. “We have a long-standing relationship with the growers,” notes Shipley “and they know they can trust our people as well as our strictest interpretation of the process.” To date, CCOF certifies 80 percent of the organic acres in California, which for the company in 2007 totaled 482,789. In addition, the company certifies in 28 other states spanning the country, as well as in

Mexico, Canada, Costa Rica, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. CCOF’s certification system includes not only growers, but also processors, packers, shippers, distributors, restaurants, and retailers. The process for growers is relatively simple, with inspectors validating that the crop was grown with pests and weeds being managed using earthfriendly methods, such as beneficial insects and mechanical controls. For restaurants, however, certification is much more difficult. “A restaurant has to be able to prove that all items on the menu are 100% organic,” says Shipley. To do so, chefs will submit all recipes, including potential substitutes. Shipley notes

that if an ingredient is not available, the restaurant must have a back-up plan that has been reviewed and also meets the organic standards. Regardless of the type of company certified, the process does involve universal standards. All organic systems must be reviewed on an annual basis. Any changes to a system must be provided to CCOF prior to implementation for approval. Failure to do so could result in the loss of certification. The overall process itself is always fairly similar, with six steps for certification. In an attempt to continue evolving and improving its system, CCOF now has an online application process. The application includes the step-by-step instructions for creating an organic systems plan, the first phase of the process. The plan is then submitted to CCOF for review by trained staff. After reviewing the plan and ensuring that on paper the necessary criteria have been met, a CCOF staff member will schedule an on-site inspection. From that visit a report will be created that evaluates the organic systems plan in its totality. The report is reviewed and with all necessary criteria met, certification will be issued. Shipley says on average the process takes three months. Since its creation and the subsequent growth of the organic market,

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C A L I F O R N I A F RE S H F R U I T CCOF has steadily expanded in direct correlation with consumer demand. In 2007 alone it grew its staff by 34 percent to keep up. The organization has also been segmented into different businesses in compliance with USDA regulations for third-party certification. CCOF is comprised of three business entities. CCOF, Incorporated, is a 501 c (5) non-profit organization and serves as the trade association for organic growers. CCOF, Inc. focuses primarily on advocacy, outreach and education with a specific emphasis on reaching both the media and consumers. In the next three years, its goal is to increase its presence at consumer events with informational materials specifically geared towards this audience. CCOF, LLC is also a 501 c (5) non-profit company and it serves as the certification entity. In the near future, the organization is hoping to grow revenue by 12 percent year over year, which Shipley notes is an ambitious but doable goal, given the growth of the market. In addition, it hopes to double its membership by 2013 and continue to streamline the certification process. The online application is the first of many steps to accomplish this feat. Lastly, there is the CCOF Foundation, which is the 501 c (3)

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non-profit arm of the conglomerate. The Foundation facilitates research and outreach, most recently developing the Going Organic Project with grant funding initially from the Heller Foundation and later from the California State Water Board. The project is designed to accelerate the transition to organic agriculture in California. Going Organic provides a network of support for farmers interested in transitioning to organic

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by addressing systemic, economic, and technical barriers to organic conversion. The broad spectrum of programs and services by all three businesses is certainly a far cry from the early efforts of those determined farmers. As Shipley notes, though, it is really just the evolution of the original idea into an array of opportunities to more fully fulfill their mission. In the twenty-first

century, the organic movement requires so much more to maintain that system integrity. For continued success, this full-scale, multi-dimensional approach is essential. ■ 1. “CCOF Statistics.” California Certified Organic Farmers website. 3 August 2008. http://www.ccof.org/pdf/ CCOFStatistics08.pdf. 2. “Going Organic Project Overview.” California Certified Organic Farmers website. 3 August 2008. http://www. ccof.org/goingorganic.php.

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C A L I F O R N I A F RE S H F R U I T

industry

innovation

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Fish Providing the Organic Fertilizer Advantage

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oday producers are regularly looking for ways to reduce their ever-increasing fertilizer costs and market their crop to maximize profit. A product exists that enables them to do both – Organic Gem Liquid Fish Fertilizer. The product was developed by Mr. Lew Spencer and is produced in Massachusetts by Advance Marine Technologies, Inc. The company has been in business for over 15 years and was once named the Massachusetts Recycler of the Year. This unique fertilizer and biostimulant is produced through cold processing to preserve the enzymes, vitamins, amino acids and other nutrients. The processing plant is FDA inspected because the fish cartilage is used for pharmaceutical products and heavy metals and other toxins must remain low or non-existent. The product is OMRI listed and can be used on certified organic crops. Dennis Piluri distributes Organic Gem to most of the mainland United States through company, Great Western Sales & Distribution, LLC. He sees the product as the perfect win-win for growers looking to maximize their yield with the least amount of nitrogen fertilizer as well as gearing their crop to the organic

market. “In California we have sold to strawberry, almond, grape and other growers who report a reduction of their use of synthetic N of up to 50%” says Piluri. Even growers who have used fish fertilizer report using less Organic Gem because of the superior biostimulating effect which is one of the keys to Organic Gem’s success. This is the result of the unique processing method and the rigid quality controls set in place. According to Piluri, there are two ingredients – 97% fresh raw fish and 3% food grade phosphoric acid. Only one species of fish is used, and Piluri notes that the federal government has increased quotas on this “nuisance” fish which is predatory to the types more desirable for human consumption; thus ensuring the supply of more desirable commercial food grade fish. In addition, their process does not sell off the oils to industry or the meal to pet food processors. Unlike solubles or emulsions, by leaving the raw material - fresh raw fish intact, Organic Gem fertilizer leaves the proteins primarily intact and makes them more bio-available to the plant when needed. While the N-P-K analysis is 3-3-

.3, Piluri says not to let that fool you. University of Massachusetts testing has shown up to 80% of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers either gas off or leach into our ground water. This product does neither; it stays available in the soil for plant consumption when needed. It has outperformed standard 10-10-10 fertilizers. Organic Gem is known to promote the growth of beneficial aerobic bacteria and fungi in the soil. This helps alleviate compaction and promotes better drainage and aeration. It has also been used as a compost enhancer with testing showing a reduction in processing time associated with finished compost. Organic Gem originally targeted the agricultural industry as its main market but has since branched into other areas of the green industry, including golf and residential. Piluri has supplied a nationally recognized Texas golf course with Organic Gem since 2003. The course has won a number of regional and national turf and ground awards. It is mainly organic and continues to use the product in its program. The company has doubled production in each of the past 4 years and is looking to expand its facilities

to other locations. “The greatest challenge today,” says Piluri “is the cost of transportation. We used to be able to get a freight quote and it would be good for 2-3 weeks; now it’s only good for 24 hours.” Even with cost increases, overall business is booming. Piluri expects continued success and greater growth into the future. The company is in the process of developing other products that hopefully will reduce growing costs further. Piluri states “simply put we intend to continue producing and marketing superior environmentally friendly green industry products while taking waste out of the equation.” ■

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S EPTEMBER 2 0 0 8

Farmers May Grow Greener Project near Fresno shows Southeast Asian Fruit Growers how to reduce dust, fuel, and labor by Brian Ziegler Natural Resources Conservation Service

S

outheast Asian fruit growers are learning to farm in a more environmentally friendly way – kicking up less dust and using less fuel and labor – thanks to a trellis demonstration project at a farm south of Fresno, Calif. The demonstration is being funded by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) which wants to show how changes can be made by growers of vining fruit and vegetables that range from bitter melon to sinqua. N RC S District Conservationist Dave Durham says changing trellises on which vines are grown and using drip systems instead of f lood irrigation can cut down on dust that helps contribute to the region’s poor air quality. Durham explained that most growers of crops that include moqua (fuzzy melon), dragon fruit (pitahaya), and loofah use wooden trellises that must be dismantled each year. In the past, growers would disc residue from vines into the ground or burn it. Burning is no longer allowed. The new trellises have a V-shape and are metal. They can

continue to hold the residue as new vines are planted. The residue breaks down over time. The changeover would be less timeconsuming and would mean less of a need to disc the ground, which stirs the dust. “There is a higher initial cost up-front,” Durham says. Metal stakes cost about $4; wooden ones are about $1. Johnnie Siliznoff, NRCS state air quality specialist, says there is little doubt the metal trellising system will reduce dust, but that growers will have to assess whether a changeover merits the economic return. “It’s natural that the grower has to look at the economics,” he says. Chia Lee, along with three other families, farms 15 leased acres at the demonstration site. He says he believes the trellises and drip irrigation will save labor and money. “We used to use f lood irrigation, and we would have to spend a lot of time watching the water – like baby sitting,” Lee explains. NRCS Soil Conservationist Sam Vang and Engineer Jon Chilcote say the drip irrigation system also will be used to deliver fertilizer to plants, further cutting down on tractor trips across the field. The demonstration plot was established through a $25,000 grant from NRCS, which is a part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Other project sponsors include Sierra Resource Conservation District and several Fresno grocery stores. The Center for Irrigation Technology at California State University, Fresno is also helping with the irrigation project, advising on pump efficiency and proper use of chemicals.

Tzexa Lee, president of Cherta Farms Inc. of Del Rey, Calif., says he has used metal trellises in the past. Lee says, “Using those trellises results in better fruit quality because it allows more sunlight

that helps bring better color.” He says the trellising system reduces labor costs and cuts discing trips across a field from seven crossovers to one. ■

PHOTO 1 CAPTION: The trellises used in the Southeast Asian demonstration project are V-shaped, made of galvanized metal, and strung with biodegradable netting. Sharon Nance photo

Natural Resources Conservation Service Engineer Jon Chilcote, left, shows Pao Lee, kneeling, and Vincent Yang a pesticide check valve. Brian Ziegler photo

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Tzexa Lee, president of Cherta Farms Inc. in Del Rey, Calif., says his use of metal trellises results in better fruit quality because it allows more sunlight that helps bring better color. The trellising system reduces labor costs and cuts discing trips, he says. Brian Ziegler photo

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Looking For A “Wow!” Experience? Read On.

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elcome to the new world for fresh-fruit marketing. Growers are contracting with nurseries to limit the release of new varieties so that they – the growers – can control the harvesting and marketing of that variety. By doing so, they can wait until the fruit reaches peak maturity – ensuring a sweet, juicy product for consumers – but still receive premium prices for their fruit. Mike Jackson shows how it works. Four years ago, Jackson and some partners contracted with Dave Wilson Nursery to hold sole rights to the Sauzee King variety, a saucershaped white nectarine developed by Zaiger Genetics, a marketing partner of Dave Wilson. That variety is now in production, and this year’s pick is just hitting the supermarkets now. “I want my customers to have that ‘Wow!’ experience when they

bite into my fruit,” explains Jackson, a Kingsburg grower. “To do that, I can’t pick until the fruit is fully ripe.” And in the old style of marketing, waiting didn’t pay off. “In the past, growers haven’t been as disciplined as they should have been in harvesting their fruit,” says Jackson. “Too many growers would pick it a week or two early. The fruit would look nice and ripe, but the brix level hadn’t reached its peak. There are several reasons to pick early, but by doing so growers were selling a poorer-tasting fruit, and that diminishes demand. By the time I brought my fruit to market, the demand for that variety had crashed.” Now, however, no one else can grow Sauzee King nectarines. Jackson and his partners can wait until it reaches peak maturity, but still get a premium price because they control the marketing all the way from the

Small Operations Can Participate, Too You don’t have to be big to have your own fruit variety. “If a grower with a small operation wants to contract with us for the rights to a specific variety, all he has to do is call us,” says Dennis Tarry, general manager of Dave Wilson Nursery in Hickman. “Then, when a new variety comes up that fits his criteria, we can call him and get the process started. In fact, we’ll probably be working on such a variety right then, and can start the process immediately.”

tree to the supermarket. The new thinking takes a mind for marketing, which a lot of growers would prefer to leave to someone else. Jackson, though, has his own brands – Sugar Tree, Flavor Farmer, and Dinosaur – and he’s going as far as putting individual stands in supermarkets, which he will stock each week with whatever is ripe right then. (Jackson raises colored apricots; peacharines; pluots; interspecific plums; plumcots; white, yellow, and red-flesh peaches and nectarines; among others.) The first marketing stands hit California supermarkets in early July. The system also requires the help of Jackson’s tree suppliers. Dave Wilson Nursery, for example, could have sold a lot more Sauzee King trees if it had sold them to anyone who wanted them. By agreeing to sell only to Jackson, isn’t the nursery hurting its own profitability? “Yeah, but what also hurts us is if growers aren’t making money, and that’s what’s been happening the past few years,” explains Bill Morris, a sales representative in Dave Wilson’s Reedley office. There are several ways growers can get hold of these new releases, says Morris. (See sidebar.) In cases like Jackson’s, a few growers are large enough to control a new variety on their own. In other cases, up to a dozen growers might form a group to buy the rights to a particular variety. Each grower would have to agree to limit the total acreage of the variety and agree to wait until the fruit had reached maturity before picking it. The result should be $20-a-box prices for all, rather than just for the first to market, explains Morris. “Say the demand for a particular variety is 350,000 boxes a week,” says Morris. “In the past, we might w w w

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In some cases, the variety might be available in such a limited release that a small operation could handle its sole rights. If not, “we can put him in touch with other growers with the same interest, or even arrange the details of a marketing club with him and them,” says Tarry. Initially, most of the participating growers have had large operations with sophisticated marketing arms, and the perception is that small growers are being squeezed out of the best varieties. “But that’s not true,” says Tarry. “It’s just that the large growers were the first to express an interest. We’re very interested in hearing from anyone with an interest in a limited-acreage variety.” To contact Dave Wilson Nursery, call 1-800-654-5854, or contact the local Dave Wilson sales representative. have had a million boxes coming in each week, and inventory starts to back up in the coolers. Prices would drop from $20 a box to $6 a box, and the fruit wouldn’t be of high quality. The earliest fruit wouldn’t have reached maturity, and the later fruit would have to sit in cold storage, and a lot of these stone fruits

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don’t do well in cold storage.” It’s a new concept and the details are still being worked out. But if it works as well as Jackson expects, his customers will be saying, “Wow!” when they bite into a piece of fruit, and growers will be saying, “Wow!” when they see the checks coming from their buyers. ■


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political

update

S EPTEMBER 2 0 0 8

Taking the Sustainable Approach

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while back, Vino Farms of Lodi was approached by an employee of East Bay Municipal Utility District about the possibility of restoring 22 acres of its property along the Mokelumne River. The argument for bringing the land back to its original habitat had been a compelling one and started the company down the path of integrating sustainable practices on this 221-acre vineyard. “We realized that making certain changes to how we did business would help sustain our local environment,” says Craig Ledbetter, _________ for Vino Farms. The next step was to install a biodiesel fuel tank and convert all diesel-powered equipment to this cleaner burning fuel. Perhaps the largest undertaking, though, was the installation of a 33-kilowatt solar system. This newest addition, which has been online since April 1, generates enough power for the electric engine used to pump irrigation water to the 221 acres of vineyards and the 22-acre restoration project. Ledbetter says the decision to go solar was not an easy one. After serious consideration of the pros and

cons, the clincher came when fellow growers Brad and Randy Lange shared their positive experience. “The larger upfront costs were certainly a huge factor, but in talking with the Lange twins and hearing of their successful process, we just felt it was the

right decision to make.” In considering what direction to take once they determined that solar power was right for the property, Vino Farms’ staff once again turned to the Lange twins for guidance. “Their advice was to go with

Renewable Technologies without a doubt,” says Ledbetter. Renewable Technologies, Incorporated (RTI), based in Sutter Creek, CA, is considered the preeminent solar design and engineering firm. Established in 1994, it has

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C A L I F O R N I A F RE S H F R U I T been a leader in solar power system design, installation and maintenance. Darryl Conklin, president and CEO, started the business after his experience as an Air Force pilot serving in Desert Shield and Desert Storm. While overseas, seeing the oilfields burn, he became struck by the need for alternative energy sources. “There had to be a different way,” says Conklin. An engineer by trade, Conklin put his professional training, vast experience and desire to make substantive change to good use. Since that time, he has grown RTI into an

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industry-leading, standard-setting corporation. The company continues to focus on renewable energy technologies, which include solar and also wind and hybrid systems. As the Lange twins and Vino Farms have now both attested, RTI takes a holistic approach with maximum customer service. Its turnkey systems include start-to-finish services – design from registered professional engineers, project managers overseeing field installers and licensed technicians to ensure system maintenance. In addition to its exemplary service, the company is

19

unique in that it provides a 10-year warranty from the date of the final building inspection sign-off. “When it was time to move forward with the project, RTI inspected each of our properties and made the decision about the best vineyard to start with,” remarks Ledbetter. Now that this first system is installed, the next phase is being developed. The 221-acre vineyard also includes a shop and employee housing, both of which will be brought online to another solar system. RTI continues to expand its business within the agricultural

community, as well as in other industry segments as well. As renewable energy has become the topic of the moment, the company is striving to help organizations differentiate between fly-by-night operations and its time-tested, quality products. With satisfied customers like Vino Farms, staying busy is not difficult. “RTI has helped us make the transition to sustainable a reality,” says Ledbetter. “We hope our work together will continue as they continue to revolutionize the technology and we strive to maintain our sustainable approach.” ■

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S EPTEMBER 2 0 0 8

More Strawberries, More Antioxidant Absorption

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gricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have assessed the human body’s capacity for absorbing certain antioxidant compounds in strawberries, and have found that the absorption of one key beneficial plant chemical was not “maxed out” as volunteers ate more of this popular fruit. Foods high in antioxidants may

be excellent sources of healthful compounds, and researchers are striving to learn more about their ability to be absorbed and utilized within the human body. The study was conducted at the ARS Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC) in Beltsville, Md., where scientists have pioneered methods for identi-

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fying and measuring various plant compounds in fruits and vegetables. Physiologist Janet Novotny, with the BHNRC’s Food Components and Health Laboratory, led the study, which was published recently in the Journal of Nutrition. Marketed year-round, strawberries are the fifth most consumed fresh fruit in the United

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States, and consumption more than doubled in the past decade, according to experts. Strawberry’s antioxidants come in the form of both long-established vitamins and newly defined plant chemicals. Berries are particularly well endowed with a series of compounds called anthocyanins--the source of the berries’ blue, purple and red pigments. In the study, 12 volunteers consumed three different serving sizes of strawberries during three separate treatment periods. Each twoday meal treatment included either 3.5 ounces, 7 ounces, or 14 ounces of blended strawberries, along with a full diet of carefully controlled foods. Each treatment period was separated by a one-week break. The study showed that the human body is capable of assimilating more anthocyanin pigments as intakes increase. The results will help nutrition scientists evaluate the healthful properties of individual anthocyanins and aid plant breeders in developing varieties with optimal anthocyanin content. ARS is a scientific research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ■

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New Germplasm Could Help Protect Avocados from Root Rot Disease Alfredo Flores ARS Information Staff

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ew germplasm to broaden the genetic diversity of avocados is being collected by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators to help protect this popular fruit from a fungus that damages avocado tree roots. To help combat Phytophthora root rot (PRR), researchers at the ARS National Germplasm Repository in the Subtropical Horticultural Research Station in Miami are screening the germplasm for markers for genes that might confer resistance to PRR. The research is led by plant geneticist Ray Schnell at the ARS Miami lab. Cooperators are molecular biologist James Borrone (now at Oklahoma State University), and colleagues at the University of Florida (UF). The avocado, a staple in the Mexican diet, is also very popular among U.S. householdsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so much so that 43 percent buy avocados. The

avocado tree, native to the area from Mexico to northern South America, produces a fruit that is unique and nutritious. Avocados contain 60 per-

ways to make avocado (Persea americana) more resistant to PRR, which causes the roots of P. americana to rot and, if untreated, to die. Excess

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newsbites

September 2008

NEWSBITES

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C A L I F O R N I A F RE S H F R U I T

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Call today and let us show you the United Valley difference.

3245 W. Figarden Dr. Fresno, CA 93711

• FARM • CROP • WINERIES • COMMERCIAL • UMBRELLA • EQUIPMENT • BONDS • WORKERS’ COMPENSATION • HOME • AUTO • HEALTH • LIFE

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September 2008

Calendar of Events September 9, 2008 California Fig Advisory Board 5th Annual Fig Fest California State University, Fresno. For more information, visit www. californiafigs.com/press/index.html

September 18, 2008 California Avocado Commission Board of Directors Meeting For more information, visit www. avocado.org/industry/commission/ bd-directors

September 10, 2008 Citrus Research Board Board of Directors Meeting Double Tree Hotel, 3100 Camino Del Rio Court, Bakersfield, CA For more information, visit www. citrusresearch.org/frameset.html

September 19-20, 2008 California Rare Fruit Growers 2008 Festival of Fruit California State University, Fullerton. For more information, visit http://festivaloffruit.org/

September 10, 2008 Allied Grape Growers 2008 Annual Membership Meeting Pardini’s Banquet Facility – Fresno, CA. For more information, visit www. alliedgrapegrowers.org/calendar.html

September 25-27, 3008 Produce Marketing Association Foodservice Conference and Exposition Monterey, CA. For more information, visit www.pma.com/foodservice/

September 26-28, 2008 United Fresh Produce Association Training for a Recall, Communicating Under Fire Seminar Clarion Hotel – Yakima, WA. Fore more information, visit www2.unitedfresh.org/forms/MeetingCalendar/ September 27, 2008 California Citrus Mutual Board of Directors Meeting For more information, contact CCM at 559-592-3790 September 28, 2008 Annual Ventura County Strawberry Production Meeting Camarillo, CA. For more information, visit www.calstraw-

berry.com/members/calendar. asp?month=8&year=2008. October 3-4, 2008 U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council East Region Meeting Washington, D.C. For more information, visit www.blueberry.org/ calendar.htm October 24-27, 2008 Produce Marketing Association Fresh Summit International Convention and Exposition Orlando, FL. For more information, visit www.pma.com/freshsummit/

September 10-12, 2008 National Council of Farmer Cooperatives Washington Conference Grand Hyatt Hotel, Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.ncfc.org/events September 10 -12, 2008 United Fresh Produce Association 2008 Washington Public Policy Conference Renaissance Mayflower Hotel – Washington, D.C. For more information, visit www2.unitedfresh.org/ forms/MeetingCalendar/ September 12, 2008 California State University, Fresno Viticulture & Enology Research Center's Annual Grape Day Fresno, CA. For more information, visit www.alliedgrapegrowers.org/ calendar.html September 17-18, 2008 California Association of Winegrape Growers Board of Directors Meeting Embassy Suites Hotel – Sacramento, CA. For more information, visit www.cawg.org/index. php?option=com events&task=view_ detail&agid=35&year=2008&month =07&day=17&Itemid=157

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People & Places

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Order Your Equipment Now for the 2008 Harvest w w w

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hearth

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September 2008

al, farm-raised ... the latest buzz You are not certainly a hot ew vernacular

m “organic” ster the health the people and ble have no roducts. Organic

Choose Organic Food and Enjoy!

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FAMILY FEATURES

Choose Organic Food and Enjoy!

rganic, sustainable, all natural, farm-raised ... Having trouble deciphering the latest buzz ngredients or words in the world of food? You are not alone. Sustainable foods are certainly a hot topic, but deciphering the new vernacular duce such as is a common issue among shoppers. an find organic Federally regulated since 2002, the term “organic” om milk tomeans FAMILY FEATURES food grown using methods that foster the health p potentially and harmonyrganic, of thesustainable, ecosystem,allincluding the people... and natural, farm-raised nd helps pro tect livingHaving animals in it. trouble Naturaldeciphering and sustainable have the latest buzzno federally regulated defini tions of forfood? mostYou products. words in the world are not Organic food is produced alone.with: Sustainable foods are certainly a hot topic, but deciphering the new vernacular � No synthetic pesticides, herbicides, or fumigants is a common issue among shoppers. �Federally No fertilizers made with synthetic regulated since 2002, the termingredients “organic” or means food grown sewage sludgeusing methods that foster the health and harmony of the ecosystem, including the people and ocery store or � No genetically modified organisms (GMOs) bric tote withanimals living in it. Natural and sustainable have no � No irradiation federally regulated definitions for most products. Organic erican usedfood oneis produced with: � No hormones, antibiotics, artificial ingredients or trip, we could� No synthetic pesticides, herbicides, or fumigants trans fats more carbon � No fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or For many, the word organic means produce such as sewage sludge apples, potatoes, and oranges. But you can find organic � No genetically modified organisms varieties of nearly every kind of food.(GMOs) From milk to e is � No irradiation meats, choos ing organic items helps keep potentially ional chemicals out of our bodies, and helps � No hormones, antibiotics, artificial ingredients or protect gned to dangerous trans fats the environment.

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The importance of organic dairy for the environment

without For many, the word organic means produce such as that affect Hints apples, potatoes, and oranges. for Living a But you can find organic to buying varieties of nearly every kind of food. From milk to More Sustainable Lifestyle meats, choosing organic items helps keep potentially milk or dangerous chemi cals you out of bodies, helps pro tect or eople sometimes choose Save a Tree. When hitour your localand grocery store the environment. dairy because they neighborhood market,organic take a reusable fabric tote with vironyou to carry your purchases. If every used one prefer the taste,American but there’s Hints for Living a tote one shopping trip, meets we could beef in reusable shopping more tofor organic dairy than More Sustainable Lifestyle Conserve even more carbon ssil fuel save about 60,000 the trees. eye. These products represent bySave walking the store! a Tree.toWhen you hit your local grocery store or e CO2 a larger ecosystem and process neighborhood market, take a reusable fabric tote with and rice. Buy Foods. Organic agriculture that nurtures the soil andisrespon you Organic to carry your purchases. If every American used one ek — all inherently moresibly sustainable than conventional reusable shopping totecares for onefor shopping trip,that we could animals graze save about 60,000 Conserve evendesigned more carbon farming because is fundamentally to onittrees. the pesticide-free land. Horizon by walking to the store! work in harmony with natural systems,organic without dairy Organic, the leading ing? Morethe use of potentially harmfulagriculture chemicals affect Buy Organic Foods. Organic is that brand, worksjust with more than 450 edients. our ecosystems. Even if you commit to buying inherently more sustainable than conventional farmers across the country and has organic foodititem — like peaches or milk farming because is fundamentally designed to or siness, one adopted its own Standards work in—harmony with natural systems, without of Care it can help! own town. lettuce the use of potentially harmful thatand affect to ensure thechemicals integrity quality anic food, Meatless Meal.ofEven Meat higher to environ our ecosystems. ifcarries you justa commit buyingits products. menu. mental cost for food Producing one organic fooditsitem — value. like peaches or milkbeef or in

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lettuce — it can help! feedlots requires about 16 times more fossil fuel

ucts to energy andMeal. generates about a24higher timesenviron more -CO2 Meatless Meat carries and toxins,than thecost caloric equivalent vegetables and mental for its food value.ofProducing beef in rice. Choose great meatless week — all feedlotsarequires about 16 meal times once more afossil fuel organic, of course — about and enjoy! energy and generates 24 times more CO2 than the caloric equivalent of vegetables and rice.

Night ona the Don’t cooking? Choose greatTown. meatless mealfeel oncelike a week — all More restaurants are cooking with organic ingredients. organic, of course — and enjoy! By rewarding those eateries with your business, Night on the Town. Don’t feel like cooking? More you can make a difference right in your own town. restaurants are cooking with organic ingredients. IfBy your favoritethose restaurant usingbusiness, organic food, rewarding eateries isn’t with your letyou them like right to see on own the menu. can know make ayou’d difference in it your town. If your favorite restaurant isn’t using organic food,

Clean Green. Use natural cleaning promenu. ducts to let them know you’d like to see it on the reduce your exposure to harsh chemicals and toxins, Clean Green. Use natural cleaning and keep the planet healthier, too.products to reduce your exposure to harsh chemicals and toxins, and keep the planet healthier, too.

The importance Chopped Gardenof Salad with organic dairy forCheese Dressing Buttermilk-Blue Serves 6 to 8 environment Thethe importance of

California Waldorf Salad

Serves 4 Dressing 1/3 cup Horizon Organic non-fat plain eople sometimes choose Dressing organicorganic dairy for yogurt or sour cream because they 2 dairy tablespoons minced fresh parsley prefer1 the taste, but there’s 1/3 cup mayonnaise tablespoon snipped fresh chives the more environment to organic dairy than meets 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 clove eople sometimes choosegarlic, minced the eye. These products represent 1 teaspoon grated lime zest organic dairy because they 1/4 cup mayonnaise a larger and process prefer the ecosystem taste, cup but there’s 2 teaspoons curry powder 1/4 crumbled blue cheese that nurtures the soil and respon more to organic dairy than meets 1/2 teaspoon honey or sugar 1/3 cup buttermilk sibly cares for animals that graze the eye. These products represent Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste Garden onecosystem the pesticide-free land. Horizon Salad Salad with a larger and process Chopped California Waldorf Salad that nurtures the the soil leading and respon Organic, organic dairy 1/2Cheese cup Earthbound Farm organic Salad Buttermilk-Blue Dressing Serves 4 celery, sibly cares for animals that graze brand, works with more than 450 thinly sliced 14 ounces Earthbound Farm Organic on thefarmers pesticide-free land. Horizon 6 toSalad 8 Dressing Garden with California Waldorf Salad across the country and has ChoppedServes 1/2 cup Earthbound Farm organic raisins Organic, the leading organic dairy Hearts, Romaine about 1Dressing head Cheese Dressing 1/3 cup Horizon Organic nonButtermilk-Blue adopted its own Standards of Care or Serves 4 brand, works with moreEarthbound than 450 3/4 cup Earthbound Farm organic seedless Farm Serves Organic Iceberg yogurt or sour cream to ensure the integrity and quality 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 6 to 8 Dressing farmers across the country and has grapes, halved Lettuce (washed and dried) 1/3 cupnon-fat mayonnaise ofits itsown products. 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives 1/3 cup Horizon Organic plain adopted Standards of Care Dressing 1 Earthbound Farm organic apple, 2cream tablespoons fresh lime juic 1/2 cup sweet peas yogurt or sour 1 clove minced to ensure the integrity and quality 2 tablespoons mincedgarlic, fresh parsley 1 teaspoon 1/3-inch dice (1 cup)grated lime zest 1/3 into cup mayonnaise 1/4 snipped cup mayonnaise of its products. 1 cup fresh corn 1 tablespoon fresh chives unpeeled, cut tablespoons fresh juice curry powder 2 lime teaspoons 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2blue cupcheese pecans or2 walnuts, toasted 1/4 cup crumbled 1/2 cup diced zucchini and/or yellow 1 teaspoon grated lime zest 1/2 teaspoon honey or sugar 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1/3 cup buttermilk 5 ounces Earthbound Farm organic squash 2 teaspoons curry powder 1/4 cup crumbled blue cheese Salt and freshly ground pepper, toor taste Salad baby spinach mixed baby greens 1/2 cup diced carrots 1/2 teaspoon honey or sugar 1/3 cup buttermilk 1/2 cup Earthbound Farm org cups) 1 cup diced ripe tomato Salt Salad and freshly ground pepper, (about to taste 6Salad thinly sliced 14 ounces Earthbound Farm Organic 1/2 cup Earthbound Farm organic celery, 1/2 cup diced cucumberSalad Place yogurt, mayonnaise, lime juice, zest, curry, Romaine Hearts, or about 1 head thinly sliced1/2 cup Earthbound Farm org 14 ounces Earthbound Farm Organic 1/2 cup diced radish and honey in small bowl, and whisk to combine. 3/4 cup Earthbound Earthbound 1/2 cup Earthbound Farm organic raisinsFarm org Romaine Hearts, or about 1Farm head Organic Iceberg PlaceIceberg celery, raisins, apple, and nuts grapes, halved Combine the dressing ingredients in Earthbound blender and 3/4 grapes, cup Earthbound Farm organic seedless Lettuce (washed and dried) Farm Organic grapes, 1 Earthbound Lettuce and indried) large bowl. Add about half of halved yogurt dressing, Farm organic 1/2(washed cup sweet peas puree. 1 Earthbound Farm organic apple, 1/2 cupchop sweetlettuce unpeeled, cut into 1/3-inc 1peas cup fresh corn and stir to combine. If using a head of iceberg, roughly intocup 1/3-inch diceor (1 cup) 1 cup fresh corn pecans walnuts, toa 1/2 cup diced zucchini and/or yellow unpeeled, cut1/2 Just before serving, into 1/2-inch pieces. Place in large bowl, add 1/2 cup pecans or walnuts, toasted 1/2 cup diced zucchini and/or yellow 5 ounces Earthbound Farm squash add spinach and toss 5 ounces Earthbound baby vegetables, and toss to combine. Farm organic squash spinach or mixed b 1/2carrots cup diced carrots baby greens cup diced to combine. Add more baby spinach or mixed Add 1/2 cup of dressing, toss1/2 to blend, adding (about 6 cups) 1ripe cup diced ripe tomato (about 6 cups) 1 cup diced tomato dressing if needed. more dressing as desired. Serve immediately. 1/2 cup diced cucumber

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1/2 cup diced cucumber Place yogurt, mayonnaise, Place yogurt, mayonnaise, lime juice, zest, curry,lime juic 1/2radish cup diced radish 1/2 cup diced honey in small bowl, and whisk and honey in smalland bowl, and whisk to combine. Place celery, grapes, apple, and nuts Place celery, raisins, grapes, appl Combine theCombine dressing ingredients in blender and in blender the dressing ingredients and raisins, in large bowl. Addin about of yogurt puree. For more recipe ideas visit www.horizonorganic.com and www.ebfarm.com. largehalf bowl. Add dressing, about half of yo puree. and stir to combine. If using a head of iceberg, roughly chop lettuce If using a head of iceberg, roughly chop lettuce and stir to combine. Just before into 1/2-inchinto pieces. Place in large bowl, 1/2-inch pieces. Placeadd in large bowl, add serving,Just before serving, add spinach and toss vegetables, and toss to combine. add spinach and toss vegetables, and toss to combine. to combine. Add more Add 1/2 cup of dressing, toss to blend, adding 1/2 cup of immediately. dressing, toss to blend, adding dressing if needed.to combine. Add more more dressing Add as desired. Serve

Did you know? .

more dressing as desired. Serve immediately.

dressing if needed.

. c o m Recipes can be found visit www.horizonorganic.com and www.ebfarm.com. Government data shows that the conven- For more Therecipe folksideas at Earthbound Farm, in Food to Live By: For more recipe ideas visit www.horizonorganic.com and www.ebfarm.com. tional fruits and vegetables below are most who’ve been farming organically w w w

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Index to Advertisers

California Organic Farmers Association User Friendly Organic Certification Contact: Celia Guilford Grower Representative cofa@xplornet.com 1-866-305-5771

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DuPont™ Altacor® insect control may not be registered for sale or use in all states. Always read and follow all label directions and precautions for use. The DuPont Oval Logo, DuPont™, The miracles of science™, Altacor® and Rynaxypyr® are trademarks or registered trademarks of DuPont or its affiliates. Copyright © 2008 E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. All Rights Reserved. RYNAX010128P336AVB

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