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FD&C no.4767

Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study UCSD Warren Residence Halls Rebranding Feasibility Study

prepared by Kevin deFreitas Architects

95% DRAFT COPY Architect

Graphics/ Branding

Landscape

Structural-Seismic

MEP+Lighting

Accessiblity

11.22.2013


Table of Contents Table of Contents Programming Participants

Environmental Graphics + Design Narrative Balance Legacy Place-Making Scale Harlan, Frankfurter, & Stewart Living to Den to Threshold

Architecture Component 01Building Exterior Component 02 Building Entries Component 03 Exterior Stairwells Component 04 Residential Suites Component 05 Common Spaces Component 06 Laundry & Recycling Component 07 Site Pavilions

Landscape Site Analysis Diagrams Conceptual Site Plan Component 08 Warren Plaza Component 09 Oasis/ Lookout Component 10 Field/ Barn Component 11 Canyon Promenade Component 12 Triton Trail

Lighting Component 13 Lighting Concepts

1 2

3 -

37 -

120 -

171 -

MEP Feasibility Report

193

Structural/ Seismic Report

211

Accessibility/ Code Analysis

227

Executive Summary

247

4767 Warren Residence Feasibility Study University of California San Diego

Page | 1


Feasibility Study Participants UCSD Work Group Mark Cunningham, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Housing, Dining, & Hospitality Jana Severson, Chief of Staff with Housing, Dining, & Hospitality Rob Fischer, Maintenance Mechanic with Housing, Dining, & Hospitality

UCSD Facilities Design & Construction Office Joel King, Assoc. VC (Acting)/ Architect Robin Tsuchida, PM/ Principal Architect

Consulting Design Team Members Kevin deFreitas, AIA Principal in Charge with KDA Manish Desai, Associate Architect with KDA Harry Jones II, S.E. Principal Engineer with DCI Engineers Inc. Neil Hadley, Landscape Architect/ Principal in Charge with LandLAB Emily Desai, Environmental Graphics/ Branding with EDCC Robert Fagnant, Associate AIA Senior Designer, Electrical & Lighting with Syska Hennessey Paul Bishop, Architect Certified Accessibility Specialist Michael Teggin, CPE Director Cost Estimation with TBD Consultants

4767 Warrren Residence Feasibility Study University of California San Diego

Page | 1


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Environmental Graphics + Design Narrative

:

01 Balance 02 Legacy 03 Place-Making 04 Scale 05 Harlan, Frankfurter, & Stewart 06 Living to Den to Threshold

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


01

balance

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


balance

a balanced

experience The motto of Warren College, “Toward a Life in Balance,” reflects Justice Earl Warren’s philosophy of cultivating ethically responsible student scholars. But the idea of balance is even more relevant today, as students are focused not only on their academic loads, but also on their daily social interactions and, for many students, adjusting to life very far away from home. In our exploration of the rebranding of the Warren College residence halls, we looked at the various pairings- both physical and intangible- that form the language of this project. Whether it’s the interface of nature vs. man-made structures or the delicate balance between curiousity and the familiar, our goal is to create a space that fosters growth and provides every student at Warren with a truly “balanced” living experience.

HEAVY

WORK

Light

INTIMATE PHYSICAL

REST

LEGACY

day

exploration

FUTURE

W HI M SY P LAY

NATURAL

technological

function

night

ACTIVITY

outdoors

Curiosity

VS.

MANMADE

ex pa ns IVE

fa m il ia r

inDOORS REFLECTION

BALANCE FOUNDATION VISION • SUPPORT • OPPORTUNITY • ENCOURAGEMENT • ABILITY • PLACE-MAKING

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


01

balance

INTIMATE “PRIVATE”

EXPANSIVE

SCALE

“PUBLIC”

Day to day, and even hour to hour, the residents of the Halls experience several different senses of scale. The goal of Balance in this instance is to find the consistent threads throughout the project, moving from large public space, through shared zones and into the quiet (relative) solitude of the residential suites.

SCALE SHARED “FLEXIBLE”

BALANCE As the main generator for the narrative of this project, finding the Balance throughout the overall site and individual spaces is key. This means bringing several “tools” to bear, including harnessing the legacy of the Halls’ namesakes, acknowledging the varying scales and the using placemaking fundamentals to bring it all together.

C R E AT E A BALANCED EXPERIENCE

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


balance ACTIVITY

LINKAGES

& USES

& ACCESSIBILITY

PLACEMAKING

SOCIABILITY

PLACEMAKING When a space is truly succesful, it is usually because it meets several criteria and accomodates many groups of people and various uses with ease. By bringing in the core pricipals of placemaking, we are able to create unique and compelling experiences for many users and uses.

COMFORT & IMAGE

WARREN “SUPERCHIEF”

LEGACY

LEGACY

3 JUSTICES “THE COURT”

When a building or buildings on the UC San Diego campus is named, there is thought and reason that goes into that process. However, somewhere along the way, a disconnect emerges between the original intent and what the everyday users actually know about why the building is special. The Legacy of Earl Warren and the other Justices deserves to be brought back into the space and experience.

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


02

legacy Honoring the history on which Warren College was founded. There is a good reason why Warren College carries this man’s name. Just a brief look at his life gives a sense of what a natural leader and driving force Earl Warren truly was.

the

20TH

the

ATTORNEY GENERAL

30TH

GOVERNOR

OF CALIFORNIA

OF CALIFORNIA

Attorney General of California

3-Term Governor of California

Sacramento, 1938

Sacramento, 1943-1953, Only Governor to serve 3 terms, aside from current Gov. Jerry Brown.

the

14TH

CHIEF JUSTICE

nominated for

OF THE UNITED STATES

Chief Justice Earl Warren Supreme Court 1953-1969

elected as the

grand master OF THE FREEMASONS

Grand Master of the Freemasons California, 1935

vice president OF THE UNITED STATES

• PROGRESS • EQUALITY • COURAGE “Warren was affectionately known by many as the “Superchief”... His strength lay in his public gravitas, his leadership skills and in his firm belief that the Constitution guaranteed natural rights and that the Court had a unique role in protecting those rights.” The Warren College motto, Toward a Life in Balance, is inspired by the philosophy of our namesake, former Chief Justice Earl Warren. The College is dedicated to cultivating ethically responsible citizen scholars who will flourish during their careers at UC San Diego and beyond.

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

US Vice Presidential Nominee Ran with Thomas Dewey in 1948, lost in a stunning upset to Harry Truman and Alben Barkley.


legacy

MEET THE JUSTICES

• PROGRESS • EQUALITY

Chief Justice Earl Warren

• COURAGE

Supreme Court 1953-1969

Justice Felix Frankfurter

Justice John Marshall Harlan II

Justice Potter Stewart

• RESTRAINT • CLARITY

• TOLERANCE • RESPECT

• INTUITION • PRAGMATISM

“Frankfurter believed that the authority of the Supreme Court would be reduced if it went too strongly against public opinion; his influence over other justices was limited by his failure to adapt to new surroundings.

“In general, Harlan adhered more closely to precedent, and was more reluctant to overturn legislation, than many of his colleagues on the Court.”

“Censorship reflects a society’s lack of confidence in itself.” - Justice Stewart

Supreme Court 1939-1962

Supreme Court 1955-1971

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

Supreme Court 1958-1981


03

placemaking What will make students want to be in this place, and feel at home? The task that we have is placemaking at its most basic. More that a library or a lecture hall, the place that we are creating is meant be be home away from home, a gathering spot, a retreat, a sanctuary and a grand park- all rolled into one perfect package.

USES & ACTIVITIES

ACCESSIBILITY & LINKAGES

What are people doing here? How many different things happen here? Are people using the space or is it empty.

How do people get to and through the site? It is easy, enjoyable and universal?

COMFORT & IMAGE

SOCIABILITY

Does the place make a great first impression? Is it inviting, clean, welcoming? Are there places to sit or be active- in and out of the sun?

Do students want to meet their friends here? Do they bring other people along with them? Do people engage, make eye contact, smile and interact?

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


placemaking

“It’s Placemaking, not Placemade. It’s a process. You are never finished.” - Place Governance working group, Detroit, MI

MAKING SPACE INTO PLACE

WALKABLE

CONTINUITY CONNECTED

CONVENIENT

PROXIMITY READABLE

ACCESSIBLE

FUN

SAFE

ACCESSIBILITY & LINKAGES

ACTIVE VITAL

CLEAN “GREEN”

SPECIAL REAL

USES & ACTIVITIES

USEFUL

THE

“THERE” THERE

WALKABLE

COMFORT & IMAGE

SUSTAINABLE

SITTABLE SPIRITUAL CHARMING

CELEBRATORY

ATTRACTIVE

SOCIABILITY

INDIGENOUS

INNOVATIVE DIVERSE STEWARDSHIP

NEIGHBORLY FRIENDLY

COOPERATIVE PRIDE WELCOMING INTERACTIVE

DATA FROM PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES (2003)

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


04

scale How can we help define the experience as residents move from wide expanse to intimate quarters? Whether it is studying alone for an Engineering midterm, or meeting up with friends for a quick game of frisbee- each level of scale that they encounter should be carefully considered.

PUBLIC SPACE “EXPANSIVE”

SHARED SPACE “FLEXIBLE”

PRIVATE SPACE “INTIMATE”

RELATED SPACES:

RELATED SPACES:

RELATED SPACES:

• • • •

• • • •

• RESIDENCE BEDROOMS • RESIDENCE BATHROOMS

CENTRAL QUAD EATERIES AMPHITHEATER WALKWAYS

LOBBY LOUNGE STUDY ROOMS QUAD PAVILIONS LAUNDRY ROOMS

OPTIMAL USES:

OPTIMAL USES:

• • • • • •

• • • •

RECREATION GROUP EVENTS NATURAL EXPERIENCES CENTRAL HUB RELAXATION MEALS & QUICK BITES

STUDY GROUPS SMALL MEETINGS SOCIAL GATHERING SPONTANEOUS INTERACTION • SHARED MEALS

ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS SUPPORT:

ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS SUPPORT:

• GROUP CONNECTIONS • WAYFINDING • ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS • CURIOSITY • ANNOUNCEMENTS

• WAYFINDING • IDENTIFYING SPACES WITH A NAME AND “IDENTITY” • GIVING SENSE OF WHIMSY • TELL STORY OF NAMESAKE, WHERE APPLICABLE • CREATE NEIGHBORHOOD VIBE

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

OPTIMAL USES: • • • • •

STUDY SPACE SLEEPING & RELAXING ROOMATE INTERACTION REJUVENATION IN ROOM MEALS

ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS SUPPORT: • CLEAR ROOM IDENTIFICATION • SENSE OF HOME • USEFULNESS OF COMMON SPACES • ENCOURAGE RESIDENTS ON DAILY BASIS


scale

AN EXPERIENCE IN SCALE

PUBLIC SPACE

SHARED SPACE

PRIVATE SPACE

DAY TO NIGHT SPACE USAGE

MORNING

MIDDAY

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

EVENING


05

Harlan

LEGACY + PLACE + SCALE TOLERANCE

SEMI-INTIMATE: BATHROOMS SHARED: LOUNGE

RESPECT

SHARED: STUDY ROOMS

L E G AC Y SC ALE

H ARLAN H ALL

PRECEDENT TRADITION

INTIMATE: BEDROOMS COMFORT

PL ACE

SAFE

SPECIAL LIKE HOME

USEFUL

COOPERATIVE

DIVERSE

REAL NEIGHBORLY

“Creating a Balanced Experience” JUSTICE FACTOID

ACTIVITY W OR K MANMADE function

PL AY VS.

REST

WH IM SY NATURAL

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

Harlan, a Presbyterian, maintained a New York City apartment, a summer home in Weston, Connecticut and a fishing camp in Murray Bay, Quebec, a lifestyle he described as “awfully tame and correct.”


Harlan

TRADITION + HOME + RESPECT + COMFORT + “OLD SCHOOL”

EDCC // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


ACTIVITY W OR K MANMADE function

PL AY

REST

WH IM SY NATURAL


ACTIVITY W OR K MANMADE function

PL AY

REST

WH IM SY NATURAL


ACTIVITY W OR K MANMADE function

PL AY

REST

WH IM SY NATURAL


SUITE ENTRY


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Architecture: 01 Building Exterior 02 Building Entries 03 Exterior Stairwells 04 Residential Suites 05 Common Spaces 06 Laundry & Recycling 07 Site Pavilions

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


Warren Residence Halls Rebranding Feasibility Study Balance. Curiosity. Experience.

Freshman Residence Halls Harlan, Stewart and Frankfurter are significant buildings within Warren College that serve several diverse functions, including residential, dining and student uses. To create the optimal social and residential environment for students, it is helpful to maintain a consistent architectural language throughout the buildings. This Rebranding Feasibility Study serves to maintain clear direction in the design of the renovated portions of Warren College Residence Halls.


Stewart Hall

Harlan Hall

Frankfurter Hall

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


table of contents project component

01

project component

02

Building Exterior Building Entries project component

03

Exterior Stairwells

project component

04

project component

05

project component

06

project component

07

Residential Suites Common Spaces

Laundry & Recycle Site Pavilions

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


project component

01

Building Exterior

Harlan

Stewart

Frankfurter

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


building exterior existing conditions & challenges

The existing exterior of the three residence halls present a few challenges that should be addressed. The exterior is highly contrasted visually with the window system and ornamental metal work painted out in prominent red tone. The metal work is showing significant fading and discoloration as well. The exterior plaster color in relation to the glazing system is very unappealing and bland. The exterior suite balconies are visually open and under-utilized by student residents. Additionally, there are code deficiencies along with maintenance issues with the existing exposed decks.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 03

as built image 02

as built image 04

as built image 05

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


existing challenges challenge 01 Ornamental metal eyebrows are discolored and add to visual confusion while providing no functional shading.

challenge 02 Window System painted in red tone appear to be fading in certain exposures. They add to the contrasted visual language in a negative way. Existing system glazing is single pane smoked and dark and does not meet new energy-efficiency standards. Frames to be replaced do not accept dualpane glazing.

challenge 03 Existing balconies in many locations in need of surface maintenance. These outdoor spaces are highly visible from adjacent suites and are currently underutilized by students.

challenge 04 Existing balcony ornamental metal work is faded in color/ tone and adds significant visual complexity that dates the building.

challenge 05 Existing balconies guardrails appear to be out of current code compliance. Would need to be replaced.

challenge 06 Existing bands of horizontal reveals coupled with awning elements and metal trellis system accentuate the visual banding of the building.

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


building exterior case studies & proposed solutions

The key design idea for the exterior of the residence halls is enhancement by subtraction. In carrying out this idea the facades would be stripped of the ornamental eyebrows and trellis elements, window system replaced with a natural aluminum tone, and plaster surface re-painted to be in concert with glazing system. The second thought is to rethink the barren suite balconies as usuable square footage. Recapture this series of vertical outdoor decks inside the residence suites themselves. This would provide needed additional common space to the efficiently sized existing suites, especially for the anticipated higher student density called for.

case studies FUNCTION DAY

WHIMSY NIGHT

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 01

case study image 03

case study image 04

case study image 02

case study image 05

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions solution 01 New translucent 1" thick 3-Form Chroma window shade fin. Attach to window frame with clip system.

18"

solution 02 New translucent 1" thick 3-Form Chroma vertical fin for privacy screening.

solution 03 New dual-glazed operable casement aluminum window system in natural anodized aluminum color.

solution 04 Eliminate operable awning portion. Fixed opening with dual-insulated Low-E II glazing.

south exposure

south exposure

solution 05 Translucent shading device orientation can conform to exposure type of the window.

south exposure

east exposure

exterior window KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01 Operable window on both sides of deck enclosure for thru ventilation.

solution 02 New dual glazed window configuration with casement and fixed types. Translucent window fins applied depending on exposure.

solution 03 New strip windows at +48" height. Introduce exterior synthetic wood paneling within bay pop-out such as Parklex or Eco Clad.

solution 04 Roof to wall profile creates a zig zag shape defining bay element

solution 05

west view

Integrated planter element replacing the existing arc shaped cmu block plinthes.

south view

exterior deck enclosure (option A)

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


building exterior more ideas & case studies

2

1

3

6

proposed solutions

4

5

7

8

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


02 Building Entries project component

Harlan

Stewart

Frankfurter

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


building entries existing conditions & challenges

The existing residence hall entries are difficult to find and lack clear understanding. The main facades are broken into small scale type elements with ornamental metal work, balconies, and trellis type features. The various elements serve to add visual complexity and distraction to the main entrance points. The vertical entry point consists of a incongruous mix of elements such as bay windows that add noise to the overall elevation.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 03

as built image 02

as built image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


existing challenges challenge 01 Contrasting architectural elements such as bay windows with prominent vertical column structure add to complexity and lack of clarity.

challenge 02 Exterior balcony space that remain under utilized. Add visual noise with fine scale guardrails.

challenge 03 Exterior entry pergola is not functional being open to elements and adding visually prominent element that does not clearly demarcate main entry.

challenge 04 Entry glazing system tucked back into building and outfitted with dark-tinted glass.

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


building entries case studies & proposed solutions

The key design idea for the main entries is to make them clear, transparent, and unique in character. The entry point should be a welcoming portal, a point of interface that stands in visual contrast to the quieted facades. Key components of the entries are illumination, transparency, materiality, and use of color.

case studies

INDOOR EXPLORATION

OUTDOOR REFLECTION

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 03

case study image 01

case study image 02

case study image 04

case study image 05

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions

solution 01 Recapture outdoor balconies into interior circulation as part of study rooms on upper floors. Unify vertical facade into glazed curtain wall creating an illuminated and transparent wall surface.

solution 02 Transform bay-window facade with simpler planar element. Possible use of foundational material such as pre-cast concrete in suspended manner.

solution 03 Illuminated entry graphic/ signage

solution 02 Open up lower-level common lounge to outdoor courtyard via sliding glass doorway.

solution 04 Create an enclosed entry portal that pulls entry point out from the building. Each portal to be unique to residence hall in form, color, and materiality.

main entry perspective

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01

Transform bay-window facade with simpler planar element. Possible use of foundational material such as pre-cast concrete in suspended manner.

solution 02 Illuminated entry graphic/ signage

solution 03 Open up lower-level common lounge to outdoor courtyard via sliding glass doorway.

solution 04 Create an enclosed entry portal that pulls entry point out from the building. Each portal to be unique to residence hall in form, color, and materiality.

main entry perspective from courtyard

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


building entries more ideas & case studies

proposed solutions

2

1

4

5

3

8 6

7

9

16

10

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


03 Exterior Stairwells project component

Harlan

Stewart

Frankfurter

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


exterior stairwells existing conditions & challenges

The existing exterior stairwells are heavily used by the student residents to exit and enter the residence halls; often because of quick access and close proximity to their suite. The current exit stairs show significant signs of wear and tear and in need of repairs. Elements such as landing guards are out of current code compliance and would need to be addressed. Architecturally this heavily utilized element appears very much enclosed and covered. The stair element presents itself in some locations as a visually prominent vertical element to the buildings. Potential opportunity exists to turn the stairs into an interactive lighter feeling structure, both physically & visually.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

as built image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


existing challenges challenge 01 Decorative trellis element creates a highly ornate & colored element that visually detracts and gives a dated feel to the building.

challenge 02 Very imposing and solid vertical element.

challenge 03 Solid enclosure creates dark stair access.

challenge 04 Exposed sprinkler & plumbing piping located in most visible and open section of stairwell. Relocate to a more inconspicuous location.

challenge 05 Guardrail does not meet open space requirements for code and possibly new height of 42�. Paint finish visibly peeling.

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


exterior stairwells case studies & proposed solutions

The stair element presents itself in some locations as a visually prominent vertical element to the buildings. The potential opportunity exists to transform the stairs into an interactive lighter feeling structure both physically & visually. Introduce a sense of lightness to the overall vertical structure by removing the in-fill wall and placing a patterned, perforated scrim. This screen could become a unique design at each of the major staircases. In addition, reduce the ornate visual language of the stair guardrails, handrails, and ornamental trellis by designing new clean simplified horizontal guards and enclosing the open trellis into a simple roof plane.

case studies

HEAVY

LIGHT

FAMILIAR

CURIOUS

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 01

case study image 02

case study image 03

case study image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions solution 01 Framed in horizonal roof element. Accent color / supergraphic on the underside.

solution 02 New code-compliant horizontal guardrail with galvanized finish.

solution 03 Perforated pattern powdercoated metal screen in undulating orientation.

solution 04 New high-efficiency lighting.

solution 05 Repaint all steel stair stringers and landings dark matte color.

solution 06 New steel frames for exit / entry doorways and sidelites. Paint in pop accent color with graphic level number.

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions

south staircase (Harlan)

view south from staircase KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


exterior stairwells more ideas & case studies

1

2

3

4

6

5

7

8

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


04 Residential Suites project component

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


residential suites existing conditions & challenges

The existing exterior stairwells are heavily used by the student residents to exit and enter the residence halls; often because of quick access and close proximity to their suite. The current exit stairs show significant signs of wear and tear and in need of repairs. Elements such as landing guards are out of current code compliance and would need to be addressed. Architecturally this heavily utilized element appears very much enclosed and covered. The stair element presents itself in some locations as a visually prominent vertical element to the buildings. Potential opportunity exists to turn the stairs into an interactive lighter feeling structure, both physically & visually.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

as built image 04

as built image 05

as built image 06

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


existing floor plan

challenge 01 Entry hallways into suites are dark and poorly lit. Low ceiling heights add to tight feel of the circulation space.

Corridor

Bed F (3)

Bed A (3)

S

Bathroom

challenge 01 Current bathroom not adequate for increased student density. Shower configuration could be looked at with wet and dry areas overlapping.

challenge 01 Furniture in suites take up valuable floor space and is bulky and oversized. Due to limited floor area bunks are placed in front of exterior windows. Opportunity exists to streamline furniture configuration and layout.

challenge 01 Built in closets take up valuable floor space while providing storage capacity for single occupant. Look to remove these built in elements.

challenge 01 Exterior suite deck provides a place to get outside of the suite, but are underutilized by residents. Decks are very open and unprotected affording views to and from adjacent residence halls. Opportunity exists to re-capture this real estate and incorporate into the common living space of the suites.

S

M

Bed B (2)

Bed E (2)

Bed D (1)

Bed C (2)

Living

Deck Space

Suite Area = 1,450 (nsf) Circulation= 225 (nsf)

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions

solution 01

Reconfigure shower stall and cubby area to accommodate 3 showers. Introduce seating bench with hanging wall to open up space. Eliminate “Jack-Jill� bathroom entry and create single entrance.

solution 02 Replace existing vanity & sinks with trough sinks capable of serving 4 students at same time.

Corridor

Entry

Entry

Bed A (3)

S

Bathroom

Bed F (3)

S

M

Bed B (2)

Bed C (2)

Bed E (2)

Bed D (1)

Living

solution 03 Accent color/ material wall surface. Study/Dine

solution 04

Remove built-in closets in each bedroom. Put back precious square footage into room. Replace with multi-function wardrobe + hanging furniture unit.

solution 05

(Area= +65 nsf) Enclose existing balcony space. Create additional square footage to common living room. Possible built-in banquette for shared dining/ study area.

plan one

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions

solution 01 (Area= +65 nsf) Look to close off secondary suite entry/ exit. Based on cursory code review two exits are not required from each suite. Eliminate excessive circulation and transfer floor space into existing Bedroom F. Allow possibility to have an occupancy of 4 students.

Corridor

Entry

Bed A (3)

Bed F (4)

S

Bathroom

M

Bed B (2)

Bed C (2)

Bed E (2)

Living

Bed D (1)

Study/ Dine

plan two

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


suite bathrooms case studies & proposed solutions

The existing exterior stairwells are heavily used by the student residents to exit and enter the residence halls; often because of quick access and close proximity to their suite. The current exit stairs show significant signs of wear and tear and in need of repairs. Elements such as landing guards are out of current code compliance and would need to be addressed. Architecturally this heavily utilized element appears very much enclosed and covered. The stair element presents itself in some locations as a visually prominent vertical element to the buildings. Potential opportunity exists to turn the stairs into an interactive lighter feeling structure, both physically & visually.

case studies

NATURAL INTIMATE

MANMADE EXPANSIVE

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 01

case study image 02

case study image 03

case study image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01

proposed solutions

Replace existing vanity & sinks with trough type sinks capable of serving 4 students at same time.

solution 02 New backlit mirrors

solution 03 Accent wall tile here, textured wall tile material.

solution 04 Change door swing outward. Door type to be white laminated french type.

solution 05

remove part of existing wing walls. Reconfigure shower stall arrangement to create 3 shower stalls with white laminated glazed dividers

solution 06 Close off second entry into bathroom. Move storage cubbies. Fill door opening with backlit plastic panel similiar to 3-Form.

bathroom axon

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01 Replace existing vanity & sinks with trough type sinks capable of serving 4 students at same time.

solution 02 Accent wall tile here, textured wall tile material.

solution 03 Change flooring finish material.

solution 04 Place bench seating against accent tile wall across from shower stalls.

solution 05

Change toilet partitions to brushed stainless steel type.

solution 06 Under vanity mini-storage cubbies for toiletries.

bathroom axon

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


suite bathrooms more ideas & case studies

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proposed solutions

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


suite living space case studies & proposed solutions

The common living space within the residence suites is the central hub space for socializing, interacting, and sharing daily life amongst suite mates. Creating multiple use zones within the living room is needed. With the increase in student residents capturing the exterior deck area into the living space is a key feature. The now expanded common room can be divided into a lounging/seating area and a dining-study area. Providing a mix of seating types that will accommodate the potential of all suite residents is important. Finally, the overall design & furnishing aesthetic should create a clear, comfortable, colorful, and inviting common area that reminds you of your living room back home.

case studies WORK

PLAY WHIMSY

FUNCTION

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 01

case study image 02

case study image 03

case study image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions solution 01 Replace existing vanity & sinks with trough type sinks capable of serving 4 students at same time.

solution 02 New backlit mirrors

solution 03 Accent wall tile here, textured wall tile material.

solution 04 Change door swing outward. Door type to be white laminated french type.

solution 05

remove part of existing wing walls. Reconfigure shower stall arrangement to create 3 shower stalls with white laminated glazed dividers

solution 06 Close off second entry into bathroom. Move storage cubbies. Fill door opening with backlit plastic panel similiar to 3-Form.

living room axon

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


suite furniture case studies & proposed solutions

There is an opportunity to rethink how students will live within the confines of their bedroom suites. Current furniture type assumes the traditional manner of bed for sleeping, closet for storing, and desk for studying. Given the tight floor space of the bedrooms themselves and double occupancy being the minimum standard it is important to look at how the furniture can become streamlined and multi-functional. Thinking of the bedroom area as a cockpit allows the possibility to view every square inch as usable and functional. Following are case studies and designs that begin to illustrate this concept.

case studies TECHNOLOGICAL REST

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

01

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case study image 02

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions solution 01 Double occupancy bunk design. Furniture features pantry type vertical storage, rolling desk, mini-desk attachment, moveable leaning pillows, and under bed cubby storage.

solution 02 New compact storage armoires (ghosted)

solution 03 Quad occupancy bunk design. Furniture features pantry type vertical storage, rolling desk, mini-desk attachment, moveable leaning pillows, and under bed cubby storage.

solution 04

Current wall configuration to be changed expanding triple occupancy room to allow for future quad occupancy. Will require eliminating secondary hallway & entry doorway.

solution 05 Single occupancy bunk design. Furniture features , rolling desk, compact armoire unit, moveable leaning pillows, cubby vertical storage, and under bed cubby storage.

bedroom axon

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions feature 01 10"x 28" back night stand cubby with integrated power & charging station.

feature 02 New 28"x25" compact storage armoire with upper hanging section + 3 pullout drawers

alternate feature 03 moveable leaning pillow-support designed for laptop use in bed.

feature 04

7'-0"

Sliding desk moveable to create workstation configuration in bed.

9'-5"

feature 05

Bed platform designed to fit extended twin matress 39"x80".

39"

feature 06 Under bed open cubby storage for larger items and books.

single bed design

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions feature 01 Integrated upper bunk night stand & study surface.

bunk bed design

feature 02 10"x 18" back night stand cubby with integrated power & charging station.

feature 03 Pull-out pantry side storage system.

feature 04 Sliding desk moveable to create workstation configuration in bed.

feature 05 Integrated ladder access to upper bunk

feature 06 Attachable accessory mini-desk for upper bunk. (chair sold separately)

armoire design KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


05 Common Spaces project component

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


study rooms

existing conditions & challenges

The existing student lounges and study rooms are used by the student residents on a regular basis. The ground level lounges are common use and currently reflect dated themes such as 50's Diner or Industrial Loft, etc. The lounges are fairly small in space and overfilled with a mix of furniture types. These spaces are the primary element that is seen or experienced off the ground level entries. They along with the upper level study rooms need to be freshened up visually and reconfigured to create a stronger physical link from the entry lobbies. The following images and diagrams illustrate the associated challenges and issues currently with these common spaces.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

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as built image 04

as built image 05

as built image 06

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


existing floor plan Electrical

Trash/ Recycle

challenge 01 Laundry room has no connection to exterior, no natural light. Space feels cramped and uninspiring. Does not foster an inviting mood. The number of washer & dryer units provided does not seem adequate to serve increased student density.

Laundry

challenge 02 Student Study Room M

challenge 03

Corridor

Large bay window configuration provides considerable direct daylight that needs to be screened. The bays present themselves as an awkward exterior element on the building elevation. The corners prove to be hard to furnish.

Current study space has no design approach or a clear message. Furnishing is not varied and adequate for student studying needs from short quick to longer periods of studying. Finish materials are very plain and provide no interest.

Living

challenge 04 Main access points into the study space are hard to recognize. Dual entries are redundant. A single clear entry and exit would clearly identify this public space.

Deck Space

Elevator

challenge 05 Corridor

Existing outdoor deck space has no furnishing or tables to allow outside studying. This space is underutilized by the students. Opportunity exists to create additional semi-private study space connected to the study room.

Study Area = 435 (nsf) Deck Area = 128 (nsf)

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


study rooms

case studies & proposed solutions The study rooms are bland and without an identity. Envisioning these rooms to be quiet, comfortable, inviting, and flexible. The big moves would be to first re-locate the entry to the study rooms off of the lobby-circulation. Second, annex the outdoor deck into the indoor study space. Third, deploy varied types of study furniture to create intimate study places as well as group study. Finally, use a palette of materials that work to define an identity that is fresh, sophisticated, bold, and comfortable.

case studies

REFLECTION

EXPLORATION

DAY

NIGHT

Creating a balanced experience.

VISION SUPPORT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGEMENT ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 01

case study image 02

case study image 03

case study image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions

solution 01 Large super graphic relating back to residence hall namesake.

solution 02 Bay window removed extension framed to rectangular shape. Windows relocated facing north and south-providing indirect daylight.

solution 03 Introduce portal window connecting study room and laundry space visually.

solution 04 Place various types of furniture allowing student interaction & studying in different forms. Provide couch type configuration, club chairs, group study table, banquette seating.

solution 05

Open up doorway between study room and existing deck space.

solution 06 Create a seating "Donut", enclosing the outdoor deck into interior study annex. The space provides a more intimate study area directly connected to the main study room.

solution 07 Relocate main access into study room off of elevator lobby rather than suite corridors. Create a glazed visually connected entry point.

study room axon

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


study room perspective KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


study rooms

proposed solutions

more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


student lounges case studies & proposed solutions

The student lounge are designed to reflect outdated themes such as a 50's Diner. These lounges are located on the ground levels of the Halls and serve as the most common use space aside from the entry lobbies themselves. The lounges need to be designed with a strong visual language reflecting a modern and familiar aesthetic. Creating an eclectic mix of lounging and relaxing spaces within the overall room is important. Re-orienting the main entries into these spaces off of the entry lobbies is also key. A stronger engagement with the outdoor courtyard would be nice to extend the space and foster interaction.

case studies

REST

ACTIVITY

FUTURE

LEGACY

Creating a balanced experience. Creating a balanced experience for the VISION students at Warren College is the goal SUPPORT for this project.Creating a balanced exOPPORTUNITY perience for the students at Warren ENCOURAGEMENT College is the goal for this project.

ABILITY PLACE-MAKING

case study image 01

case study image 02

case study image 03

case study image 04

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions solution 01 Textured three-dimensional material on this focal wall such as end cut wood blocks.

solution 02 Replace angled bay window system with solid elevation plane. Perhaps board formed concrete panel element.

solution 03 New glazing system. Able to open completely to exterior courtyard to foster "indoor-outdoor" relationship.

solution 04 Main student lounge to be furnished with a mix of lounge and casual type furniture such as sofa, lounge chairs, stools, bar seating, and platform chaise.

solution 05 Move entry forward of current elevator lobby space. Create a distinct architectural entry portal.

solution 06 Carry entry portal color onto floor surface using an integral color epoxy coating.

solution 07

Create a point of activity within the entry portal element. Suggest student mailboxes or package pick-up.

solution 08 Eliminate existing wall between lounge and lobby space. Put in a glazed wall divider with new entry into lounge off of elevator lobby.

student lounge/ entry axon KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


main entry perspective

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


student lounge more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


lounge perspective (idea A)

lounge perspective (idea B) KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


student lounge more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


06 Laundry + Recycle project component

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


laundry + recycle existing conditions & challenges

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02 challenge 01

Trash/ Recycle room appears dark, dirty, and uninviting to users. Space to be freshened up with new flooring, wall paint, lighting, and graphics.

Laundry room has no connection to exterior, no natural light. Space feels cramped and uninspiring. Does not foster an inviting mood. The number of washer & dryer units provided does not seem adequate to serve increased student density.

Trash/ Recycle

W1 W2 D1 Laundry

Corridor

challenge 02

Electrical

D2

as built image 03 Student Study Room

existing plan KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


proposed solutions solution 01 Extend laundry room into part of the study space to gain access to place 2 additional dryer units.

solution 02 Accent texture or tile wall. Add a splash of color in niche.

solution 03 Countertop work surface for folding or dumping clothes. Solid surface Quartz type counter material.

solution 04 Change door into Laundry Room to French type with 24" sidelite. Allow some visual transparency between corridor & room.

solution 05 Some type of super wall graphic evoking the natural; water & sun.

solution 06 Flooring material to be large-format plank tile.

solution 07 Place a wood bench for seating-waiting while clothes are washing or drying.

solution 08 Stack both end units for vertical washer/ dryer configuration. Space saving allowing additional units to be placed inside the room.

solution 09 or ture . e nt tex Acce lor in nich of co

all.

tile w

sh

spla Add a

r ing o 3 r fold uartz ce fo ion 0 Q solut op work suSrfoalid surface tert es. Coun ing cloth aterial. h dumpcounter m Frenc type m to 4 l ion 0 to LaundryowRosoome visouma. t lu o s or in elite. All rridor & ro id o ge do Chan with 24" s etween c type parency b ing trans evok 5 phic ll gra ion 0 solut pe of super r&wsaun. ty te . Someatural; wa nk tile at pla the n 6 0 e-form n rg la io solut material to be ng Floori iting 7 g-wa ion 0 ench for segaotirndrying. t lu o s od b washin a wo re Place clothes a r/ ashe while 8 ical w allowing 0 n r vert g io solut oth end unnit.sSfopace savin b tio Stack configura dryer

Extend visual space with wall super-graphic evoking natural forest theme.

solution 10 New modular trash and recycling bins

solution 11 Change flooring to monolithic type surface (epoxy coating)

solution 12 Change door into Trash Room to French type to allow some visual transparency/ light between corridor & room.

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01 Replace existing vanity & sinks with trough type sinks capable of serving 4 students at same time.

solution 02 Accent wall tile here, textured wall tile material.

laundry room perspective

(4 washers + 4 dryers)

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


laundry room more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


07 Site Pavilions project component

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site pavilions existing conditions & challenges

The existing site landmarks in and around the Warren Residence Hall area are out moded, insignificant, irrelevant, and under-utilized. The site furnishings are few and far between much of it institutional grade concrete with very little appeal. The terminating pathways do not harness the natural protected scenic view out from the site. The main entry area onto the Warren residence site from Voight is nondescript and does not announce arrival onto or out of the project site. Way-finding kiosks dot the pathway into the heart of the Warren College Residences, but provide very little information delivering it in analog fashion with no interactive element. There are significant opportunities to re-think the landmark elements of the site that begin to position the space in a more forward thinking manner.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

as built image 04

as built image 05

as built image 06

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


existing challenges

challenge 01 28' wide fire lane access required. Creates large area of paved access that feels very much like a roadway without any attention to pedestrian scale.

challenge 02 Secondary pedestrian access path running from quad east terminates into a fixed bench seat. This area has a fantastic scenic view of canyon and beyond. Opportunity to capture this area into a more usable structure.

challenge 03 Outdoor lighting elements are functionally poor and visually uninteresting. Making way finding and access in and out difficult.

challenge 04 Main recreation space in this area is the outdoor basketball court. Concrete court is in need of repair. Large paved surface feels like a unused plaza and adds to the expanse of hard surface area.

challenge 05 Minimal outdoor seating provided and none of it is under cover or shade element.

view of existing site at proposed pavilion one

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01

'

62

Larger study space for students. Tables for seating of 6-8. Room could accommodate approximately 50-60 students.

solution 02 Wide covered slice thru the pavilion. Terminates into scenic overlook deck. Aligns with secondary walkway terminating in cabana pavilion.

solution 03 Smaller space for studying or conference or club organization gathering. Possible small kitchenette to be placed in this room.

' 25

pavilion 01 "study barn"

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site pavilion more ideas & case studies

proposed solutions

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01 Steel trellis with timber infill. Informal group seating outdoors with central firepit.

solution 02 Vertical stacked stone or gabion wall element, housing inset barbeque & outdoor cooking equipment.

solution 03 Protected side walls with covered roof create an enclosed space for reflection, studying, relaxing.

' 17

solution 04 Oversized bench seating out of reclaimed wood. Create a framed viewing area of the protected natural preserve beyond.

' 35

pavilion 02 "the lookout"

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site pavilion

proposed solutions

more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01 Split in cabana to allow passage to and from walkway connecting study barn. Create two cabana areas large and small.

solution 02

Large covered space with picnic style large tables & bench seating. Can accommodate larger group interaction as well as smaller gatherings.

solution 03 boardwalk walking path between cabana and sand area. Large concrete tiles defining the cabana space.

solution 04 Stacked gabion screen wall. Large round cobble fill to be used.

solution 05 Roof top surfaces of cabana could be used for intergrated solar pv panels as well as possible roof top landscape material.

38'

6' 16'

11'

pavilion 03 "the cabana" KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site pavilion

proposed solutions

more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


tandem solo (2)

tandem back to back (2)

tandem facing

double wide facing (6-8)

(4)

triple cluster (4-6)

5'-6"

5'-6"

8'-6"

double wide stagger formation

solution 01

Steel channel frame. Graphic text or quote imbedded into frame.

solution 02

Illuminated ceiling.

solution 03

Back skin to be colored 3 form material with routed pattern. Cavity to be lit with internal lighting.

solution 04

Integrated wood slat seat back. Wood bench optional.

pavilion 04 "the shade spot"

KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site pavilion more ideas & case studies

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KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


solution 01

Painted wall graphic each side to visually extend portal threshold element.

solution 02

Remove existing bridge section at Level 2. Gains about 8'-0" of head clearance.

solution 03

Create steel frame portal element. Bold color to create a highly visible threshold.

solution 04

Add new egress staircase element at Level 2

15'-0"

bridge underpass option A KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site gateway

proposed solutions

more ideas & case studies

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existing condition KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


replacement bridge section

solution 01

Replace guardrail at new bridge section with 42" high laminated glass both sides.

solution 02

Replace bridge section with new steel structure. Gains about 12" of head clearance.

supergraphic quote

here

solution 03

8'-0"

Create steel frame portal element. Bold color to create a highly visible threshold.

solution 04

In ground LED lighting. Cast uplight on portal element; glow at evening/ night.

solution 05

Triton Trail passing thru the portal element

bridge underpass option B KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site gateway more ideas & case studies

proposed solutions

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existing condition KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


21'-0"

solution 01

Integrate graphic quotes from Earl Warren and other Justices. Example: "I feel that the greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more."

11'-0"

48"

solution 02

Triton Trail pathways run thru the gateway pedestrian, bike, and green belt

solution 03

1" Corten Steel plate W gateway. Interior surface to be painted gloss color.

solution 04

Gateway shape formation around bike vs. pedestrian paths.

entry gateway "The W" KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


site gateway more ideas & case studies

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existing condition KEVIN DEFREITAS ARCHITECTS // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Landscape: 08 Warren Plaza 09 Oasis/ Lookout 10 Field/ Barn 11 Canyon Promenade 12 Triton Trail

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


Site Analysis - Existing Conditions


Site Analysis - Issues


Opportunities and Constraints


Conceptual Site Plan


08 Warren Plaza

project component

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Warrenexisting Plaza Site Analysis conditions & challenges Currently the open space component of Warren Housing is comprised of a rolling lawn, two sand volleyball courts and a small cluster of deciduous trees. The space is appropriately scaled for the buildings and dining component but lacks a strong focal point. There is a visual axis that runs east west axis through the space that is undefined and interrupted by light poles and permanent site furnishings. The furnishings a sparse and unfocused, and generally do not promote gathering or interaction. The edges are defined by the fire lane to the north and west and building entries to the east and south. The space is open and flexible which can be an advantage, but it does not inspire or present opportunities for activities for large groups especially after hours.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

as built image 04


existing challenges challenge 01 Entry is uninspiring.

challenge 02 Lack of of focal point or places for gathering and expression. Grading of lawn is utilitarian and is not suited for sports or gathering.

challenge 03 Lack of character, generic and uninviting social space.

challenge 04 Rolling grading does not suggest a heirarchy of spaces. Edges blend together and do not define spaces

challenge 05 Lack of focal point and character.

challenge 06 Outdated furniture is uninviting and is not placed to accomodate a variety of uses.

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


The Beach at Warren Plaza case studies & proposed solutions There are many opportunities to improve Warren plaza. The space should inspire and impress on first visit and become a setting for making new friends and lasting memories. Ideas for tproviding focus to the space include a day and night community pavilion, creating a pool and beach amenity, or exaggerating the topography to emphasize the importance of the space as the heart of Warren Housing. Program enhancements could also include places for food trucks covered eating areas and movie screenings. New designs would refresh and energize the space an amenity for the whole college. Gateway features could be developed to enhance the sense of arrival as well as highlight axis points and views to the natural areas beyond. Sustainable features could include storm water filtration gardens, water harvesting, and solar and wind energy production.

Tr ito n

Tables & Chairs Tr ai l

Amphitheater Warren Info Kiosk

Shade Spots

Ice Cream Bus

Oversize Umbrellas

k ar dw al

The Cabana

Bo

La Fir e

Sand Volleyball

The Beach

ne

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nL ed

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The Waves

Trito n Tra il

concept plan enlargement

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linear water feature landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

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information kiosk


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wave lawn

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volkswagon bus

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

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seating / wave form

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‘the beach’


The Beach at Warren Plaza conceptual renderings

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aerial view south of proposed plaza

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looking south east toward frankfurter hall

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


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looking south east at proposed warren kiosk

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looking north east along beach/boardwalk

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


09 Oasis/Lookout project component

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Oasis/Lookout Site Analysis existing conditions & challenges The current landscape area between Frankfurter, Harlan and Stewart is an underperforming space. The building entries are not supported or defined by hardscape or planting and the central space is programmed and undefined. The vine covered arcade at the eastern edge of the space makes a gesture toward acknowledging and framing the open views of the canyon beyond, but the undifferentiated cul de sac and the wide paved path does not provide a sense of arrival or uniqueness

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

as built image 04


existing challenges challenge 01 Building entries lack lack pedestrian scale and definition. Entry ways are invisible due to uniform landscape treatments.

challenge 02 Monolithic terraces, outdated visual appeal. Common areas lack ample seating and flexibility.

challenge 03 Paving does not differentiate the courtyard space from the rest of the housing complex. .

challenge 04 Lack of character, generic and uninviting planting scheme.

challenge 05 Monochromatic and monocultural tree scheme urrounding building and not ‘LEED’ friendly.

challenge 05 Lack of core identity and narrative, planting is utilitarian and has little connection to the region.

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Oasis/Lookout case studies & proposed solutions The “Freshman Center” can be activated in a variety of ways. Defining the building entries to support the architectural updates will go a long way creating a unique space between the halls. Indoor program can spill out onto the hall “porches” providing spaces for individual and collective expression which will enhance the over character of the court. The central space can be enhanced through creative use of planting, differentiation of paving types and adding program spaces such as bocce, ping pong and outdoor billiards. A lookout or architectural framing could provide a modern updater to the existing colonnade, which would serve as a dramatic and memorable backdrop for the plaza that creates a visual connection the canyon and Eucalyptus groves beyond.

Front Porch

La

ne

The Lookout

Outdoor Living Room

Fi re

Tables andChairs

Triton Trail

Palm Court

Front Porch

Fi re

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Front Porch

Bike Racks

concept plan enlargement

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social gathering space landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

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palm court + living room


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outdoor fireplace

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building entry

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site furniture

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site furniture

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site furniture

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sense of place

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pedestrian scale

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intimate / quiet space landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Oasis/Lookout conceptual renderings

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aerial view south east towards harlan hall and lookout

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aerial section south

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


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looking north east towards harlan hall and lookout

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looking east toward lookout structure

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


10 Field/Barn

project component

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Field/Barn Analysis existing conditions & challenges text

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

as built image 04


existing challenges challenge 01 Edges are undefined and adjacent spaces lack program and regional character.

challenge 02 Access roads dominate the edge. Trails is undefined by signage, is uninviting and lacks visually or physical connections.

challenge 03 Buildings and outdoor areas lack connection to canyon. “Side pockets” are not programmed and lack seating and social programming. Underscaled spaces don’t celebrate relationship with canyon.

challenge 04 Planting lacks relationship to canyon landscape.

challenge 05 Outdated site furniture and unprogrammed spaces and edges along buildings leading to the canyon.

challenge 05 Outdated surfaces, lack character and are uninviting.

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Field/Barn case studies & proposed solutions The opportunities for the design of the “Canyon Edge� are many. The topography and natural setting make it an ideal place to escape the confines of the residence halls and take in spacious views. Framing devices can amplify the scale and create an atmosphere of contemplation and celebration. Ideas to improve the program of the area include a sculptural lookout pavilion, lit and heated study areas, an accessory laundry facility, bbq areas and an energy lab featuring interactive monitoring and renewable energy generation. Paving and lighting designs could enhance the visual connections between the Warren plaza and the canyon edge.

Fi re

La

ne

To The Beach

Bike Racks Bike Racks

Bike Racks

The Field Tables and Chairs rn y Ba d u t S

Fi re

La

ne

Covered Bike Storage

Gabion Wall

conceptual plan enlargement

1

personal study space

2

observation deck

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

Canyon Trail


4

gabion walls / seat walls

3

linear approach

6

playful / innovative

8

alternative transportation landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

5

bicycle storage

7

flexible lawn space


Field/Barn conceptual renderings

1

aerial view east

2

looking east towards field/barn from canyon trail

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


3

looking south toward barn structure

4

looking west toward barn structure

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


11 Canyon Promenade project component

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Canyon existing Promenade Analysis conditions & challenges The “Canyon Edge� has the potential to be one of the most unique places on the UCSD campus, unfortunately its current state is underutilized and under designed. The furthest and most dramatic edge is a corridor for service vehicles and series of trailheads that skirt the Warren Housing mesa which dilute the feeling of being on the edge of a natural preserve. The area has a direct visual connection through the adjacent housing and though Warren Plaza. The picnic table at the far terminus of the space is the beginning of an idea to connect the spaces but lacks the scale and drama necessary to create a meaningful relationship between the main plaza, the user and the landscape. The basketball court is a much needed amenity but may be better suited in another location as it dominates the space and is uninviting when not being used.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

as built image 04


existing challenges challenge 01 Edges are undefined and adjacent spaces lack program and regional character.

challenge 02 Access roads dominate the edge. Trails is undefined by signage, is uninviting and lacks visually or physical connections.

challenge 03 Buildings and outdoor areas lack connection to canyon. “Side pockets” are not programmed and lack seating and social programming. Underscaled spaces don’t celebrate relationship with canyon.

challenge 04 Planting lacks relationship to canyon landscape.

challenge 05 Outdated site furniture and unprogrammed spaces and edges along buildings leading to the canyon.

challenge 05 Outdated surfaces, lack character and are uninviting.

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Canyon Promenade case studies & proposed solutions The opportunities for the design of the “Canyon Edge� are many. The topography and natural setting make it an ideal place to escape the confines of the residence halls and take in spacious views. Framing devices can amplify the scale and create an atmosphere of contemplation and celebration. Ideas to improve the program of the area include a sculptural lookout pavilion, lit and heated study areas, an accessory laundry facility, bbq areas and an energy lab featuring interactive monitoring and renewable energy generation. Paving and lighting designs could enhance the visual connections between the Warren plaza and the canyon edge.

Plaza / Turn Around

Basketball Court

Firelane / Pedestrian / Bicycle Lanes Shade Structures

Basketball Court

Shade Structures

Bicycle Racks

Lookout Gabion Wall

Firelane / Pedestrian / Bicycle Lanes

Gabion Wall

conceptual plan enlargement

2

1

defined pathways

rest and relaxation in nature

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


4

natural setting

3

outdoor study areas

6

pedestrian scale

5

site furniture

7

views to canyon

9

native / natural materials 8

gabion walls / seat walls

10

natural planting palette

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Canyon Promenade conceptual renderings

1

aerial view north east looking at canyon promenade edge

2

aerial view east of canyon promenade edge

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


3

aerial view north looking at canyon promenade edge

4

looking north towards basketball court from proposed promenade

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


12 Triton Trail

project component

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Triton Trail Analysis existing conditions & challenges Triton Trail serves as the primary pedestrian connection and access to Warren Housing. The wide concrete path allows for service and emergency access to travel along Triton Trail but is of a monotonous color and creates an unappealing pedestrian environment.

existing conditions

as built image 01

as built image 02

as built image 03

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY

as built image 04


existing challenges challenge 01 Spaces along pedestrian paths lack definition and character. Monotonous planting palette. Unscreened (exposed) utilities. Pathways terminate in generally uninviting spaces.

challenge 02 Planting and turf areas in poor condition

challenge 03 Wide vehicular/pedestrian pathways lack pedestrian scale. Significant amount of concrete, monotonous color, “concrete jungle�

challenge 04 Sand to Concrete transition is abrupt

challenge 05 Connection to Warren Plaza undefined. Vehicluar/Pedestrian conflict zone

challenge 05 Outdated surfaces, lack character and are uninviting.

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Triton Trail case studies & proposed solutions Opportunities exist in deconstructing the width of the trail using a palette of alternative paving surfaces such as grasscrete, porous concrete, and integral color concrete bands. In addition to proposed signage and visibility improvements, the proposed Triton Trail has potential to engage pedestrians by offering connections to campus amenities such as active and passive outdoor recreation areas, student residence halls, and dining facilities.

conceptual plan enlargement

1

pedestrian scale

2

spatial definition

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


3

meandering trail

4

deconstructed pathways

5

color / texture 6

playful

8 7

pedestrian nodes

seatwalls / benches

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Triton Trail conceptual renderings

1

cross section of trail

2

triton trail at entry to warren plaza

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


3

triton trail at entry to oasis

4

triton trail as it relates to warren plaza

landLAB // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILIT Y STUDY


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Lighting:

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


project component 13

Lighting

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Area Lighting General Illumination

A combination of post top lighting and adjustable fixtures will be used for a higher level of general illumination. The adjustable fixtures will be used to highlight areas of interest and wayfinding while the post tops will provide appropriate light levels. This lighting strategy will meet code mandated egress illumination by keeping at least one footcandle on emergency egress circuit.

Modern LED post top fixtures with 4100K, white light will replace the current sodium “shoebox” area lighting.

T3

Along paths

T4

At junctions of interest

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


As part of a “layered” lighting approach, lighting will be located at multiple levels and integrated into the new landscape including the trees for a more visually appealing nighttime scene.

T5

Lighting from the trees will be used instead of additional poles. Tree ring luminares will be placed on palm trees in the new “Palm Court” and around “The Beach” area.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Triton Trail Pathway Illumination

The primary access to the Warren campus housing area enters from near the bus stop along Voigt Drive and winds through the apartment buildings towards the dining commons and residence halls to the east. This walkway will feature in-ground luminaires, adjustable pole top fixtures, and post top area lighting.

In-ground luminaires will be placed in random groups of 10 in several locations along the trail as an illuminated wayfinding element. -Entrance of Triton Trail at Voigt Drive. -At the turn in the path at Goldberg Hall -Leading up to and underneath the bridge at Douglas Hall -After the information kiosk, by the quad -Just after the amphitheater, heading ng towards residence halls -Leading up to the entrance of each ch

T1

T2

Typical Layout Luminaires will be laid out in a random pattern to one side of the trail. Sections containing luminaires will be approx. 3’ 6” wide by 16’ long. It will consist mostly of white luminaires with 2-3 RGB colored luminaires mixed in.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Proposed In-Ground Path Markers

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Triton Trail Pathway Illumination

`

One of the key transition points along the main pathway into the campus is at the Douglass Hall bridge structure. By using a combination of pathway luminaires and wall-washing techniques we brighten and make the pathway more fun and obvious.

Wall to be illuminated with color changing light.

Linear RGB fixtures will wash both walls leading up to the bridge with colored light. The in-ground linear fixtures will lead up to the bridge and continue underneath for further illumination. T6

T1 & T2

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Information Kiosk proposed solutions

`

The information kiosk provides an important bright spot in the site lighting scheme at the entrance to the quad area.

`

Uplights placed in center of column cluster to create glow.

Recessed LED circular luminaire.

Illuminated sculptural furniture.

K2

K1

T7

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Site Pavilions proposed solutions

A relaxed, low-level illumination scheme is proposed for The Lookout pavilion at The Oasis.

Linear luminaires to be attached to slats in a staggered pattern. Back side of wall will be grazed to highlight texture and create diffuse lighting in enclosed area of “the lookout”

Tape light in cove on fire pit element to graze down sides.

P2

P3

P1

Detail of firepit wall with concealed tapelight integrated into wall.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


The illumination from these sources will provide an interesting pattern on the ceiling while delivering a soft ambient illumination. Low power LED sources may be run on stored energy from rooftop P/V system.

Linear in-ground fixtures will run along each wall to graze with light. Surface mounted luminaires will be arranged on ceiling to create pattern of light.

P4

P5

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Site Pavilions proposed solutions

Strip light to go underneath top railing.

P2

Interior lighting will include linear hanging fixtures that will be dimmable and provide direct and indirect illumination. This will create diffuse light that will be comfortable on the eyes for long periods of studying.

P6

Light art will be created on blank wall with projector light. Customizable images. Path to entrance will be lined with low level ground lighting. The same fixture will be used at entrances to residence halls.

E1

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

E2


The “Shade Spot� pavilions will provide another important layer of the nighttime lighting scheme. The ceiling and back wall of each small pavilion will be internally illuminated to provide light for those using the pavilions and passers by.

Semi-translucent panels will be backlit for glowing ambient light.

Tape light will be used to create a glowing effect on the semitranslucent panels. P2

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Entrances proposed solutions

Custom images will be projected onto prominent wall at entrance.

The glow of this central facade of windows will contribute to exterior illumination and serve to distinguish the entrance from the rest of the building.

E2

Low level sculptural luminaires will provide necessary ground illumination. They will line one side of path to entrance.

Linear luminaires will run horizontally on interior wall.

In-ground linear luminaires will continue into entry and reflect off ceiling.

R3 T1 & T2

E1 SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Lobbies proposed solutions

Illumination inside the entry spaces comes mainly from the floor and walls. At night the reflections from the ceiling create a unique entrance display.

R1

Recessed LED multi-lights to be placed in two spots offset from wood slat wall for grazing. Also placed near signage wall and elevator.

The in-ground linear luminaires from along Triton Trail will lead up to each residence hall entrance and continue into the lobby.

T1 & T2

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Corridors proposed solutions

The Parans sunlight system will bring the sunlight to the interior corridors. The system uses optical fibers to bring the sun’s light into interior spaces.

Linear luminaires will be located at junctions and at doorways. Thery will run perpendicular to the length of the hallway. A few of the luminaires will continue down the wall to throw light back onto the ceiling and thereby minimizing the tunnel feeling. These luminaires will turn on when illumination levels from the Parans sunlight system fall below a certain level.

R2

R3 SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Study Rooms & Lounges proposed solutions

Sustainable lighting practices will be carried into study rooms and lounges and continue the theme of energy savings. Lighting in the study rooms and lounges will consist primarily of LED 2’x2’ fixtures. The diffusers on these fixtures can be varying depths and can be used to create a randomized pattern that will infuse texture, pattern and rhythm with light.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Suite Living Space proposed solutions

Feature wall to be washed with light. This will hightlight the graphics while contributing to ambient lighting in livingroom.

Institutional fluorescent fixtures in bedrooms will be replaced with modern energy efficient LED fixtures. These fixtures will give off a comfortable diffuse light. The shallow projection and smaller size will keep the fixtures further away from the upper bunk beds.

The hallways were previously overlit. The large fluorescent fixtures will be replaced with two smaller fixtures that will create a comfortable level of illumination while using less energy.

Surface mounted circular “dome� luminaire for general lighting.

Task lighting at table.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Suite Bathrooms proposed solutions

Natural light can be incorporated into overall bathroom lighting and save energy costs during the day. All other lighting will be energy efficient LED.

Lighting integrated into mirrors.

Parans sunlight system will bring daylight into bathrooms.

Accent wall will be grazed to highlight texture.

Wet location LED downlight in each stall.

Existing luminaires will be replaced with LED downlights.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY


Laundry Rooms proposed solutions

Linear LED in ceiling for general illumination.

SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP // WARREN HALLS REBRANDING FEASIBILITY STUDY

Adjustable lighting to illuminate wall graphics and provide light for work surface.


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

M.E.P. Report :

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


A member company of SH Group, Inc.

University of California, San Diego San Diego, California

Warren Campus Student Housing MEP Feasibility Report ME Prepared for: UCSD Housing, Dining & Hospitality By: Syska Hennessy Group, Inc. Consulting + Engineering + Technology + Construction

Project No. UCSD2100 November 08, 2013


Executive Summary Syska Hennessy Group has been commissioned by the University of California, San Diego to provide an infrastructure feasibility study to assess the existing MEP systems conditions with recommendations for repair or improvement. The study was conducted on three separate housing buildings, Harlan, Frankfurter and Stewart located on the Warren Campus at UCSD in La Jolla. This report summarizes findings from review of as built drawings, discussions with Campus maintenance personnel and on site observations of the existing conditions. Consideration for the life expectancy of MEP systems over the next 20 years was also applied to the recommendations in this report.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 1 November 05, 2013


Existing H&V Systems Ventilation Systems Currently, the three housing buildings have limited HVAC systems. There are small recirculating fan coil units located inside closets at each floor inside the living suits. These units are thermostatically controlled (one thermostat per suite) and provide heating or ventilation to all of the rooms within a typical housing suite. No cooling is provided from these units. Outside air is dependent on manually operable windows with no control interface to the mechanical ventilation system.

The system works by pulling air from the central living area of a typical suite then distributing supply air through ductwork and diffusers into the various spaces within the suites. With the operable windows open, a sufficient air-change and ventilation of the suite is achieved. If the windows are closed, circulation is dependent on air moving through or under doors and there is no fresh air contribution. This can result in stagnant and unpleasant conditions. Fan coil equipment, ductwork and diffusers are in satisfactory condition.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 2 November 05, 2013


Recommendations Provide at least the code minimum outside air requirement to the interior corridors (of the suites). Exterior rooms have adequate natural ventilation through the operable windows however, the interior corridors fall short. 2013 CMC Section 402.2.1 indicates: “where interior spaces without direct openings to the outdoors are ventilated through adjoining rooms, the opening between rooms shall be permanently unobstructed and have a free area of not less than 8 percent of the area of the interior room, nor less than 25 square feet. This may be achieved through new transfer grills. Provide additional make-up air to the bathrooms. This works with the OA to the interior corridors because the corridor air is transferred to the bathrooms and exhausted. This may be achieved by adding heating-only make-up air units, gravity ventilators or transfer air grills to adjacent exterior spaces. The most feasible and cost effective solution would be the transfer grill addition. At 22-years, the fan coil equipment is approaching expected life. The motors and valves within each of these units should be inspected and replaced as necessary during the upgrades to the buildings. Diffusers would only be replaced where damaged and to accommodate the reconfiguration of the suites.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 3 November 05, 2013


Exhaust Systems Exhaust systems for the three housing buildings are provided for the bathrooms to accommodate the necessary toilet exhaust. Exhaust fans are located on the roofs of the buildings and connected to vertical duct risers. Transfer ducts are located on each floor at the bathrooms to pull air from the space. No dampers or smoke control is evident. The roof mounted fans appear to be in satisfactory condition.

Recommendations Other than maintenance, no changes are recommended for the toilet exhaust systems. For the custodial rooms, we recommend the addition of new exhaust fans to provide the code 1.0 CFM per SF minimum requirement. This may be provided with small, through-wall fan units. We also recommend adding exhaust to the laundry rooms. These spaces are currently nonventilated and can become stagnant and uncomfortable. This is not a code requirement but a recommendation to improve living conditions.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 4 November 05, 2013


Typical Laundry Room We also suggest replacement of the existing ventilation fan located in the main electrical room inside the basement of the Frankfurter Building. The existing fan is in poor condition.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 5 November 05, 2013


Windows The existing windows are single-glazed and contribute a significant heat gain to the interior spaces of the living suites. They also do not meet current code requirements.

Recommendations Replace the existing exterior windows with ASHRAE 90.1 compliant units to meet current energy codes and thermal control. Operable units should be designed and specified to facilitate natural ventilation to the interior spaces. Modeling of the average wind conditions around the buildings will help determine the proper swing and opening direction for the windows so that natural breezes are captured.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 6 November 05, 2013


Enhanced Natural Ventilation Because the existing buildings are located along a canyon with naturally occurring breezes, the possibility of enhanced natural ventilation may be desired and should be considered. The development of a natural ventilation system within the buildings is dependent on the existing architecture, floorplans and building orientation. CFD modeling is required and would help determine the appropriate application of windows, transfer grills, ventilators and possibly solar chimneys. A solar chimney is a technology that can be used to enhance the ventilation of a residential or commercial structure. A solar chimney uses the same principle at use in a fireplace. Due to heat naturally wanting to rise; like the air from a fire will rise through a chimney, creating draft, which takes the smoke with it. This suction is the reason why there is no smoke in a dwelling when a fire is burning in the fireplace. In the case of a solar chimney, the sun’s natural heating ability is being used to cause the air in the chimney to rise, which creates that same type of draft and moves the hot air out of the chimney. In the case of a solar chimney, this heating causes the cooler air from below to be pulled into the chimney for heating as the hot air is released from the top of the chimney. The act of pulling in cooler air creates air movement and ventilation in the structure. One of the most important things to consider when preparing for a solar chimney is placement. The solar chimney must be placed on the roof of a structure in an area that is naturally hit by the sun’s rays. The best scenario is to place the chimney in an area that gets hit when the sun is strongest in the afternoon. It is also important to consider the thermal characteristics of the solar chimney and design the solar chimney with materials that absorb the most heat, which generally includes a black frame, tinted glass and insulated glazing. Size of the solar chimney is another important consideration, as the larger the chimney is, the more effective it is. Further study and modeling of this idea would be mandatory to determine if this strategy would work for the existing housing buildings.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 7 November 05, 2013


Existing Plumbing Systems Observations of plumbing systems for this report are limited to the review of existing plumbing fixtures, drains and visible piping connections. Existing Plumbing Services Each of the three housing buildings receive cold water, hot water supply and return, sanitary waste and gas from the site. Gas service is limited to the laundry equipment. DHWS and DHWR originate from the central Mechanical Room at the dining commons building. The individual buildings do not have separate water heaters. Most of the piping for these services is concealed however no major issues were identified by FM staff. The hot and cold water risers are copper piping. The sanitary waste piping is cast iron. Both of these riser systems are of the original 22-year old construction. Typically, these types of piping materials have 40 to 50 year life expectancy. Recommendations If during the construction of the “rebranding” of the housing buildings the piping is exposed, we recommend an inspection be made on the riser systems. Current municipal water treatment additives have been found to reduce the life of piping systems. Make repairs only as needed. Plumbing Fixtures Lavatories The existing lavatory fixtures within the bathrooms are 4-inch, center set, self-rimming china in good condition. Faucets are single handle, non-low flow type chrome over brass fittings. In many locations the chrome is thinning showing wear.

Existing drain piping and manually operated faucets

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 8 November 05, 2013


Recommendations Replace the lavatories only as indicated in the “rebranding” concepts to accommodate additional capacity and ADA considerations. The faucets must be replaced with new to meet current codes for water flow and use. We recommend products similar to the Kohler “Sculpted, BatteryPowered, Touchless Bathroom Faucet model #K-13462. Additionally, the existing drain piping, grid strainers and traps require replacing. Item New Kohler #K-13462 Faucet

Quantity 15/Flr

Water Closets Existing water closets are floormount, white china, flushometer valve non-low-flow units manufactured by Eljer. Non-ADA types include a trap primer. Recommendations Because the existing fixtures do not meet current code requirements for water use and flow, they will need to be replaced. We recommend replacement in-kind with the current UCSD standard for housing facilities or a product similar to the Kohler “floormount, flushvalve” type similar to “Highline” series. These should include recessed, battery-powered, touchless flush valves. Item New Kohler "Highline" floormount toilet

Quantity 12/Flr

Showers The existing showers are showing their age and similar to the lavatory faucets, the chrome finish is wearing thin. Additionally, the shower heads are not low-flow. The shower mixing valves are

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 9 November 05, 2013


also past their life expectancy at 22-years. The ADA Accessible shower controls and shower heads appear to not meet current California Accessibility Code in regards to location relative to the seat. Recommendations We recommend replacing the existing shower heads with code compliant fixtures matched with new mixing valves. This would most likely occur as part of the “rebranding” changes that will reconfigure the shower layouts. Item New low-flow adjustable shower head New pressure balanced mixing valve assembly

Quantity 15/Flr 15/Flr

Fire Protection Systems Currently each of the three buildings is fully sprinklered with a code compliant wet-pipe system. Risers are located within the exterior stair enclosures then piping enters the building above the corridor ceilings at each floor. The condition of the systems appears to be in good working order and no major issues were identified by FM staff. There are a couple of test valve locations that appear to be leaking but maintenance could resolve that issue easily. Recommendations We do not recommend any changes to the systems as a result of this study. However, heads may need to be relocated depending on the configuration of the suites through the “rebranding” projects and maintenance will be required to resolve the minor leaks.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 10 November 05, 2013


Existing Electrical Systems Observations of electrical systems for this report are limited to the review of the main equipment, distribution and branch circuit panelboards, lighting inverters and wiring devices. Existing Service Equipment The electrical service to the three buildings reviewed originates from a General Electric 1600 amp, 208Y/120 volt distribution board, “LCR” located in Frankfurter Hall. This distribution board serves three separate 400 amp distribution panels, “DPA”, “DPB” and “DPC” located in each of the three housing buildings. Although 22-years old, this equipment is in satisfactory condition and appears to be well maintained. Additionally, replacement parts are still available from GE and aftermarket vendors for this equipment. Currently, load is measured for each of the three distribution feeders to the buildings at the 1600 amp distribution board through analog KWH meters. These existing KWH meters are not “smart” demand type meters and only record current KW/H consumption. The electrical capacity of the service equipment “LCR” and the three distribution panels “DPA”, “DPB” and “DPC” appears to be adequate and is not overloaded. However, to determine exact loading, a 30-day recording of the demand should be performed. Recommendations The existing service equipment is in good condition and unless there is a significant change to the electrical load density we do not recommend replacement or modifications through this assessment. The University may want to consider replacing the existing KWH meters with new, digital power meters. These could be connected to the campus monitoring systems so that information regarding load consumption from each of the buildings can be tracked. Item Square-D PowerLogic PM800 Power Meter

Quantity 3

Branch Circuit Panelboards Branch circuiting within the three housing buildings is similar with typically one 208Y/120 volt panelboard located inside each suite. These panelboards serve the various plug loads as well as the normal lighting, fan coil heating units and laundry equipment. Although 22-years old, this

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 11 November 05, 2013


equipment is in satisfactory condition and appears to be well maintained. Additionally, replacement parts are still available from GE and aftermarket vendors for this equipment. Electrical capacity of the individual panelboards appears to be adequate for the typical housing unit loads. Recommendations The existing branch circuit panelboards are in good condition and unless there is a significant change to the electrical load density we do not recommend replacement or modifications through this assessment. However, future energy code changes (CEC Title 24) that take effect in January of 2014 may require changes or additions to the panels to allow for monitoring of individual load types. Load monitoring, measurement and verification of the various plug loads, lighting and mechanical loads will be required if the University adopts the new codes. After-market branch circuit metering equipment similar to Square-D BCM-42 could be installed at the panelboards to accommodate this requirement. Item Square-D PowerLogic BCM42 Power Meter

Quantity 18

Emergency Lighting Inverters Each of the three housing buildings is furnished with a single, central emergency lighting inverter unit. These supply the code mandated emergency egress or life safety power to selected lighting along the egress paths inside the buildings. Although the equipment appears to be in satisfactory condition, it is past the 20-year life expectancy for this equipment and the internal batteries. Recommendations We recommend replacing the individual inverters at the three housing buildings with new equipment. Because life safety codes have changed since 1991, the new inverter equipment should be sized to accommodate additional lighting loads including: •

Interior egress paths.

Selected lighting inside the individual living suites. (not currently supplied)

Building entrance lighting.

Exit discharge and egress lighting at the stairwells.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 12 November 05, 2013


Exterior egress paths to the “public way”.

The new inverters would replace the existing equipment at the same locations and would connect to the existing branch circuiting. Exterior site lighting circuits would need to be intercepted and extended to the inverters within the electrical rooms. New equipment would have monitored output circuit breakers, 208 volt input, 120/208 volt output and load capacity no less than 4.8kW.

Item Dual-Lite LSN Series 4.8kW inverter

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Quantity 3

Page 13 November 05, 2013


Wiring Devices and Branch Circuiting Existing wiring devices within the three housing buildings are in decent condition. The quantity and locations relate to the original design for the spaces but are a bit too infrequent by today’s standards. The wiring to the devices is in satisfactory condition and no issues were identified by FM staff.

Recommendations To accommodate the “rebranding” and proposed designs for the interior spaces, we recommend replacing the individual wiring devices as necessary to coordinate with the concepts. Additionally, we recommend adding approximately 5% new receptacles to the Study Lounges and Suites to allow for more use of electronic devices and equipment. Our estimation of this would include: •

Two new receptacle branch circuits per floor of each building.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 14 November 05, 2013


New receptacles located in the Study Lounges, Suites, bathrooms and Sleeping Units.

Item New Receptacles and Branch Circuits

Quantity 5%

Fire alarm Systems Each of the three housing buildings currently have a Simplex fire alarm system installed with individual building control panels. The system is manually or automatically actuated through pull stations located near the building exits or smoke detectors located in the corridors and living/sleeping areas. Audio/visual signaling devices are located throughout the buildings for occupant notification. Each of the individual FACP’s are connected through tel/data wiring to the campus central monitoring system. The system appears to be well maintained and in good operating condition meeting the code and UCSD standards for when the buildings were constructed. Recommendations We do not recommend wholesale changes to the system. Any revisions to the system may trigger a requirement to bring the entire system up to current codes and UCSD standards. This would mean new fire alarm control panels, addressable devices and supervised wiring systems. To accommodate the “rebranding” concept designs, minor relocation of existing devices should be the only change to the existing systems.

University of California, San Diego Warren Campus – Student Housing, MEP Feasibility Report

Page 15 November 05, 2013


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Structural/Seismic :

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


Warren Hall Residences Structural/Seismic Study November 15, 2013


Warren Hall Seismic/Structural Study

Page 2 of 7

DCI Engineers has completed a structural/seismic study of the Warren Hall Residence Buildings. This study was done as part of a rebranding study being complete by Kevin DeFreitas Architects. Our study focused on four areas: A. B. C. D.

Seismic Performance of the Warren Hall Residences Impact of proposed architectural changes on existing structures Pedestrian bridges located over the main pathway leading into the Warren Hall complex New Site Pavilions

The study included several site visits and a review of existing structural drawings for Warren Hall and the pedestrian ramp associated with the adjacent residence buildings. A. Summary of Seismic Performance of Warren Hall Residences The following summarizes our findings and recommendations with regard to the seismic evaluation of the existing buildings. Appendix A includes our detailed Tier 1 and 2 analyses. 1. The proposed architectural changes to the building should not trigger code mandated seismic upgrades. Based on UCOP requirements a study is required to confirm that the building meets a minimum life safety performance level. This is defined using ASCE 41 and is S-3 for BSE-R earthquake and S-5 for BSE-2. Also given the increase in occupancy and the importance of housing on the campus it was determined that it would be prudent to complete a seismic review of the buildings. 2. There are a total of three buildings. However they are each divided into three separate structures separated by seismic joints. The buildings range in height from 3 to 5 stories. 3. The lateral system for each building consists of concrete diaphragms spanning between concentric braced frames. The lateral design was based on 1988 UBC. 4. A Tier 1 evaluation was completed first. We then completed a Tier 2 look at the Tier 1 noncompliant items. Based on the age of the building the key part of the evaluation was to confirm that the buildings met the seismic requirements of the 1988 UBC. 5. The Tier 1 evaluation determined the following: a. In general the main components of the lateral system meet the 1988 UBC. b. However there were some locations where the brace connections do not meet code. c.

The seismic joint width was found to be non-compliant. However a Tier 2 look at this item determined that it should be adequate.

6. In addition to the Tier 1 evaluation we also reviewed the brace frame configurations and the seismic performance. The following summarizes our findings: a. The braces are well laid out in the building (see Fig 1). There are multiple braced frames in each direction and they are symmetrically placed in the building.


Warren Hall Seismic/Structural Study

Page 3 of 7

b. The braces are in a chevron configuration. This type of brace configuration has been shown to perform poorly during seismic event. When the compression brace buckles the tension brace loads may fail the beam. This also results in large displacements. 7. Based on our evaluation we have the following seismic renovation recommendations: a. The brace connections that do not meet code should be strengthened. This will require adding additional welds. Appendix B includes requirements for strengthening the connections.

Seismic Joint

Braced frames

Floor Plan Fig 1

b. Columns should be added to the braced frames (see Fig 2). These are typically referred to as “zipper columns�. These would be located where the braces intersect with the beam. These columns will resolve the chevron brace configuration issues discussed above. It will also improve the braced frames performance level and bring them closer to achieving a lateral design that is comparable to current code designed braced frames. There are a number of ways to design these columns. When the retrofit is completed this will need to be looked at more closely. Appendix B shows our preliminary sizing information regarding the columns.


Warren Hall Seismic/Structural Study

Page 4 of 7

Add Columns

Architectural Changes

Braced Frame Elevation Fig 2 B. Proposed architectural changes. There are a number of proposed architectural changes. The ones that would impact the structural systems are discussed below: 1. Infill metal roof trellis over stairs with roof framing: This can be completed by adding 1.5 inch deep by 18 gauge metal roof deck over the existing steel channels and beams. It will be welded down to the beams. The roof beams and columns are able to handle the added vertical loads from the roof. However the current lateral system is based on a cantilevered column system. The cantilevered column system will not work well with this change. One level of lateral x-bracing will need to be added between the new roof and the structure below (see Photo 1 below).

Add 1 inch diameter- Rod Braces

Stair Trellis Photo 1


Warren Hall Seismic/Structural Study

Page 5 of 7

2. Enclose balcony space: This will likely be completed by adding metal studs spanning vertically between balconies. Metal stud box beams and post would be used for any large window openings. At the floors a thin layer of self-leveling grout may be added to the existing decks to eliminate slope/steps. These changes will add some additional dead load and wind load to the building. However the increase will be small enough that it will not impact the lateral design or require strengthening of the gravity system. The balconies are supported on steel columns. These columns should be able to support the added weight from the cladding and roof. C. Pedestrian Bridge There are pedestrian bridges located over the main pathway entrance to the building. The bridge provides very little headroom. We have reviewed the structural construction for these walkways and how the low headroom issue could be improved. 1. Existing construction: The bridges are all concrete framed however the upper level bridges are framed differently than the bottom level bridge (see bridge photo on next page). The bridges are rigidly connected to one building and there is a seismic joint at the opposite side. The bottom bridge appears to some framing for pipe chase. 2. Performance issues: The upper bridges are supported on one side with a sliding connection. This connection allows for some lateral movement. However if there is significant lateral movement of the buildings during a seismic event the bridge connection on the sliding end could lose support and allow the bridge to collapse. This type of failure would represent a significant falling hazard to pedestrian in the area of the bridges. This is mainly a concern at the upper levels where there is typically the most movement (see bridge Photos 2 and 3). It appears that some retrofit work has been completed on the sliding end. There is currently a study being completed by UCSD to determine the extent of this problem.

Added angle Sliding Connection

Bottom Bridge

Pedestrian Bridge Photo 2


Warren Hall Seismic/Structural Study

Page 6 of 7

3. Headroom Improvement: We considered two possible ways to increase the headroom. These are described below. The first option was determined to be the preferred solution. a. The first option is to remove the bridge completely. This option would obviously require a closer review of the circulation issues associated with the bridge to see if it is needed for ADA or fire code issues. b. The second option is to remove the existing bridge and reframe it. This would likely be framed with steel. Appendix C shows a typical cross section of a new steel framed bridge. The beams could be moved up to so that the bottom of the beams is at the same elevations as the bottom of the slab. This would maximize the headroom. It looks like this could increase the headroom by approximately 12 inches.

Upper levels

Pedestrian Bridge Photo 3


Warren Hall Seismic/Structural Study

Page 7 of 7

D. Site Pavilions The project includes the additional of several new site pavilion structures. The study looked at wood and steel options for their construction. The wood version would likely be the least expensive however the steel option would provide more flexibility in the design and more durability. Each of the options is described below: 1. Wood Framed: They roof could be framed with wood trusses spaced at 24 inches on center spanning between perimeter wood framed walls. The roof could also be framed with 2x joist spanning between a post and beam framed ridge beams. The lateral system will consist of plywood roof diaphragms spanning between plywood shearwalls. The foundation will consist of slab on grade with monolithic spread and strip footings. 2. Steel Framed: The roof could be framed with light gauge metal trusses at 24 inches on center spanning between light gauge metal studs. Metal deck would span between the roof trusses. The roof may also be framed with bent steel HSS or wide flange beams spanning the width of the building and supported on steel columns. The lateral system would consist of metal deck roof diaphragm spanning between either flat strap bracing or steel plate shearwalls. The foundation will consist of slab on grade with monolithic spread and strip footings


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Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Accessibility/Code :

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


-

1

2 November 201

3

Kevin deFreitas deFreitas Architects

885 Albion Street San Diego CA 921 06 Accessibility Consulting Services

Re:

Warren Hall Feasibility Study University of California San Diego San Diego, California Dear Mr. deFreitas: Paul L. Bishop, Architect is pleased to submit this Accessibility Review and recommendations to assist the University in complying with the California Building Code (CBC) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) at this location. The attached report indicates those existing elements that do not comply with the 2013 CBC and 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act Standards (ADAS). We have based our report on the assumption that the project will be submitted to the appropriate authorities for approval after January 1,2014, and therefore the 201 3 CBC will be the enforceable version of

the code. The 2010 ADAS has been in effect since March 1 5,2A12 as the enforceable federal standard for accessibility. The previous federal technical requirements, the 1991 Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADMG) were the standards in force up until March 1 4,2012, However, the US Department of Justice (D0J) has indicated that if individual elements were designed and constructed in accordance with the 1991 ADMG, upgrades to comply with the

2010 ADAS are not required. This is considered the "Safe Harbor" exception. Our review did not include a detailed survey of existing site conditions, specifically the cross slope and running slope of the numerous walkways surrounding Frankfurter, Harlan and Stewart Halls. We recommend that a topographic survey be prepared for the project area to determine the extent to which the existing walkrruays must be replaced to comply with state and federal accessibility requirements. Please contact me should you wish to discuss any of my findings. Thank you for the opportunity to be of service.

Paul L, Bishop, Architect c1

1

203

Certified Access Specialist No. 044

P.O. Box IO85 o SouruA BEAcH, CA 92075 o TEL (858) 792-7C26


UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study La Jolla, CA

Item No.

Location

Accessibility Review Report Date: November 12, 2013

Code Reference

Comments

Recommendations

Restripe parking lot to provide a minimum of 1 - 9'-0" wide van accessible parking space with an 8'-0" wide access aisle on the passenger side. 2 accessible parking spaces can share a common access aisle. Provide sign reading "Van Accessible". (Photo Page 1 UL)

PARKING / PASSENGER DROP OFF 1

Justice Lane

11B-208.2.4 208.2.4

There are 6 accessible parking spaces but none are van accessible.

2

Justice Lane

11B-406.5.1 11B-502.4 502.4

The slope at the spaces and/or access Resurface accessible parking spaces and aisle exceeds 2.0% due to the built-up curb access aisles so slope in any direction does ramps. not exceed 2.0%. Remove built up curb ramps and replace per Recommendation to Item No. 4. (Photo Page 1 UL)

3

Justice Lane

11B-502.6.2

There is no signage at each accessible space indicating "Minimum $250 Fine".

Install signs at all accessible parking spaces. (Photo Page 1 UL)

11B-406.5.11 11B-406.5.2

The curb ramp lacks truncated domes.

Replace curb ramps with compliant curb ramps within walkway. Curb ramps shall have 1:12 maximum slope, 36" band of truncated domes at the bottom of the ramp and a 12" grooved border at the top. (Photo Page 1 UL)

Replace approximately 50 - 75% of walk so no sections exceed 2.0% cross slope or 5.0% running slope. (Photo Page 1 UR)

CURB RAMPS 4

Justice Lane

EXTERIOR ROUTE OF TRAVEL 5

Walkways

11B-403.3 403.3

There are several areas where the cross slope exceeds 2.0% and/or the running slope exceeds 5.0%.

6

Walkways

11B-403.4 403.4

There are several areas with elevation Grind concrete smooth or replace walkway changes exceeding 1/4" vertical and/or 1/2" so elevation changes do not exceed 1/4" total with a bevel exceeding 1:2. vertical or 1/2" with a 1:2 beveled slope. (Photo Page 1 LL)

7

2nd Floor Lounge Balconies

11B-404.2.5 404.2.5

The threshold is 3/4" high.

8

Laundry Room

11B-404.2.4.1 There is only 53-1/2" deep clearance on the Relocate / remove some machines to pull side of the door to the washing provide a 60" deep door landing or install an 404.2.4.1 machines. automatic door opener. (Photo Page 2 UR)

DOORS Replace threshold with 1/2" maximum height threshold. (Photo Page 2 UL)

INTERIOR ROUTE OF TRAVEL 9

Dorm Suites

11B-309.3 309.3

The top of the thermostats is 61" AFF. The Lower thermostat in 7 rooms in Frankfurter maximum reach allowed is 48" AFF. and Harlan Halls and 8 rooms in Stewart Hall. (Photo Page 2 LL)

TRANSIENT LODGING GUEST ROOMS 10

Dorm Suites

11B-806.2.3 806.2.3

None of the rooms provide a 36" wide space on both sides of a bed.

Relocate / remove furniture in 7 rooms in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 rooms in Stewart Hall to proved the required clearance. (Photo Page 3 UL)

11

Dorm Suites

11B-806.2.6 806.2.6

None of the rooms provide a 60" turnaround Relocate / remove furniture in 7 rooms in within the room. Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 rooms in Stewart Hall to proved the required clearance. (Photo Page 3 UR)

BATHROOMS 12

Dorm Suites

11B-603.5

The top of the slot of the seat cover dispenser in the accessible toilet compartment is more than 40" AFF (43").

Lower dispenser in 7 bathrooms in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 rooms in Stewart Hall. (Photo Page 3 LL)

13

Dorm Suites

11B-604.4 604.4

The accessible toilet seat height is 20".

Replace accessible toilet in 7 bathrooms in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 rooms in Stewart Hall so toilet seat height is 17" -19" AFF. (Photo Page 3 LL)

Paul L. Bishop, Architect Page 1


UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study La Jolla, CA

Item No.

Location

Accessibility Review Report Date: November 12, 2013

Code Reference

Comments

Recommendations

The accessible toilet compartment accessible toilet paper dispenser is located more than 36" (38") from the rear wall and is more than 9" (10") from the front of the toilet.

Relocate toilet paper dispenser in accessible toilet compartment in 7 suites in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 suites in Stewart Hall so centerline of dispenser is 7" - 9" in front of the toilet. (Photo Page 3 LL)

Dorm Suites

11B-604.8.1.2 The accessible toilet compartment door only has 44-1/2" clearance on the pull side 604.8.1.2 to the lavatory counter. A minimum of 60" clearance is required.

Reconfigure toilet room in 7 suites in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 suites in Stewart Hall so required door clearance is provided. Further design study required. (Photo Page 4 UL)

16

Dorm Suites

11B-604.8.1.2 The accessible toilet compartment door opening is located more than 4" (7") from 604.8.1.2 the side of the compartment.

Replace accessible toilet compartment partition and door in 7 suites in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 suites in Stewart Hall.

17

Dorm Suites

11B-604.8.1.2 The accessible toilet compartment door Is not self-closing. 604.8.1.2

Replace hinges in 7 suites in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 suites in Stewart Hall. (Photo Page 4 UL)

18

Dorm Suites

11B-608.1 608.1

19

Dorm Suites

11B-606.3 606.3

20

Dorm Suites

11B-213.3.7 213.3.7

21

Dorm Suites

907.5.2.3.3 11B-215.1 11B-702.1 215.1 702.1

22

Exit Doors

23

Suite Doors

14

Dorm Suites

11B-604.7 604.7

15

The accessible shower does not comply Replace accessible shower compartment in with either the CBC or ADAS requirements 7 suites in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and for roll-in showers. 8 suites in Stewart Hall. to provide a 30" x 60" roll-in shower. (Photo Page 4 UR) Lower a minimum of 1 lavatory in 7 suites in The lavatory rims are 35-1/2" AFF. A minimum of 1 lavatory must be 34" AFF Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 suites in Stewart Hall. (Photo Page 4 UL) maximum. The shower area coat hooks are all 61" AFF. A minimum of 1 coat hook must be 48" AFF maximum. There are visual alarms in the living rooms and corridors but not the bathrooms.

Lower 1 coat hook in 7 suites in Frankfurter and Harlan Halls and 8 suites in Stewart Hall. (Photo Page 4 LL) No work required unless the fire alarm system is upgraded or replace or a new fire alarm system is installed.

1011.3

There are no Braille/tactile exit signs at required exit doors with illuminated exit signs.

Install Braille/tactile signs at ground floor exit doors that read "EXIT". Install Braille/tactile signs at stairs that read "EXIT STAIR DOWN."

11B-216.2 216.2

There are no Braille/tactile room identification signs.

Install Braille/tactile room identification signs at all suite doors. (Photo Page 5 UL)

Legend

11B-406.2 Italics = California Building Code (CBC) Accessibility Requirements

SIGNAGE

406.2 Non-italics = Americans With Disabilities Act ISA AFF POT

Paul L. Bishop, Architect Page 2

International Symbol of Accessibility Above Finished Floor Path of Travel


There are numerous sections of walkway that have cross slopes exceeding 2.0% and/or running slopes exceeding 5.0%. (Item #5) There are sections of walkway that have vertical elevation changes exceeding 1/4”. (Item #6)

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Paul L. Bishop, Architect / Accessibility Survey Report / P.1

UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study

There are no van accessible parking spaces that serve the residence halls. The slope of the accessible parking spaces and access aisles exceeds 2.0% due to the built up curb ramps and there are no signs indicating “Minimum $250 Fine”. The curb ramps lack truncated domes. (Items #1, 2, 3 & 4)

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There is less than 60” clearance on the pull side of the door to the 2nd Floor Laundry Room. (Item #8) The top of the thermostats in the Suites is 61” AFF. (Item #9)

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Paul L. Bishop, Architect / Accessibility Survey Report / P.2

UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study

The upper floor balcony doors have a threshold exceeding 1/2” in height. (Item #7)

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None of the rooms provide a 60” diameter maneuvering space within the room. (Item #11) The top of the slot of the seat cover dispenser in the accessible toilet compartment is more than 40” AFF. The toilet seat height is more than 19” AFF and the closest toilet paper dispenser is too far in front of the toilet. (Items #12, 13 & 14)

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Paul L. Bishop, Architect / Accessibility Survey Report / P.3

UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study

None of the rooms provide a 36” wide space on both sides of the bed. (Item #10)

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Neither shower compartment complies with the CBC or ADA Standards for roll-in showers. (Item #18) None of the towel/robe hooks are within accessible reach range. (Item #20)

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Paul L. Bishop, Architect / Accessibility Survey Report / P.4

UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study

There is less than 60â&#x20AC;? clear space on the pull side of the accessible toilet compartment door and the door is not self-closing. All of the lavatory rims are too high. (Items #15, 17 & 19)

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There are no Braille / tactile room identification signs. (Item #23)

Paul L. Bishop, Architect / Accessibility Survey Report / P.5

UCSD Warren Hall Feasibility Study

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November 4, 2013

UCSD – Harlan Residence Hall Code Study CODE DATA Building Code: Use type: Occupancy Type: Construction Type: Sprinklered: Fire Alarms: Stories:

California Building Code 2013 (Note: January 1st 2014 new building code will be in effect) “Sleeping unit” (To be determined by Fire Marshall) (CBC 202) R-2 Dormitories (This is a change from original code which had it as R-1) (CBC Section 310) Type II-A Yes No Four (4)

OCCUPANCY INCREASE Occupancy Rate = 50 occupants/s.f. (CBC Table 1004.1.1) Square footage = 680 s.f. for each suite(dorm room pod) (excluding closets, hallways, commons and bathrooms) Total Occupants = 14 max./suite (Currently the occupancy of each pod is 8) Therefore the occupancy is allowed to be increased to a maximum of 14/suite . REQUIRED EXITS To determine the number of exit access stairways required the total occupant load for a story must be determined. The second floor has the greatest number of occupants for any given story totaling 72 occupants (70 for dorms and 2 for RA). Based on the number of occupants exiting each floor (72 for second floor) the required number of exits is two (2) (CBC 1021). Therefore only two exit access stairways are required, provided we meet the travel distance requirements. To determine the required exits from each suite/room or space, CBC Section 1015 exception 1, states that dwelling units with a maximum occupancy of 20 can have one exit. (This interpretation of sleeping units to be allowed in this exception, to be determined by Fire Marshall and/or building official) “1015.1 Exits or exit access doorways from spaces. Two exits or exit access doorways from any space shall be provided where one of the following conditions exists: 1. The occupant load of the space exceeds one of the values in Table 1015.1. Exceptions: 1. In Group R-2 and R-3 occupancies, one means of egress is permitted within and from individual dwelling units with a maximum occupant load of 20 where the dwelling unit is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2.” Therefore only one exit is required from each suite as long as the occupancy is less than 20.


TRAVEL DISTANCE The Maximum Exit Access Travel Distance is 250’ for a fully sprinklered building, for R occupancy type (CBC Table 1016.2) This can be increased due exterior egress balcony (see below). “1016.2.1 Exterior egress balcony increase. Exit access travel distances specified in Table 1016.2 shall be increased up to an additional 100 feet (30,480 mm) provided the last portion of the exit access leading to the exit occurs on an exterior egress balcony constructed in accordance with Section 1019. The length of such balcony shall not be less than the amount of the increase taken. “1016.3 Measurement. Exit access travel distance shall be measured from the most remote point within a story along the natural and unobstructed path of horizontal and vertical egress travel to the entrance to an exit.” All exits do not exceed 250’ therefore they meet current travel distance requirements. EXTERIOR EMERGENCY ESCAPE The exception that did not require us to maintain a secondary “emergency escape and rescue” means of egress out the windows, no longer exist in the new building code (CBC 2013). “1029.1 General. In addition to the means of egress required by this chapter, provisions shall be made for emergency escape and rescue openings in Group R-2 occupancies in accordance with Tables 1021.2(1) and 1021.2(2) and Group R-3 occupancies. Basements and sleeping rooms below the fourth story above grade plane shall have at least one exterior emergency escape and rescue opening in accordance with this section. Where basements contain one or more sleeping rooms, emergency escape and rescue openings shall be required in each sleeping room, but shall not be required in adjoining areas of the basement. Such openings shall open directly into a public way or to a yard or court that opens to a public way.” Therefore all windows in each dorm room will need to meet emergency escape to the exterior requirements.


Hatched area is a dorm room pod or suite

Exterior exit stairway


MEANS OF EGRESS

SECTION 1015 EXIT AND EXIT ACCESS DOORWAYS

1015.1 Exits or exit access doorways from spaces. Two exits or exit access doorways from any space shall be provided where one of the following conditions exists:

.

1. The occupant load of the space exceeds one of the values in Table 1015.1.

II

Exceptions: 1. In Group R-2 and R-3 occupancies, one means of egress is permitted within and from individual dwelling units with a maximum occupant load of 20 where the dwelling unit is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2. 2. Care suites in Group 1-2 occupancies complying with Section 407.4.3. 2. The common path of egress travel exceeds one of the limitations of Section 1014.3. 3. Where required by Section 1015.3, 1015.4, 1015.5, or 1015.6. 4. In detention and correctional facilities and holding cells, such as are found in courthouse buildings, when the occupant load is more than 20 see Section 408.3.11. Where a building contains mixed occupancies, each individual occupancy shall comply with the applicable requirements for that occupancy. Where applicable, cumulative occupant loads from adjacent occupancies shall be considered in accordance with the provisions of Section 1004.1. TABLE 1015.1 SPACES WITH ONE EXIT OR EXIT ACCESS DOORWAY OCCUPANCY

MAXIMUM OCCUPANT LOAD

A,B,E,F,M, U

49

H-l, H-2, H-3

3

~..

H-4, H-5, /-2.1,1-3,1-4, R

10

S

29

L

See Section 443.6.1

a. For holding celis, see Section 408.3.11.

1015.1.1 Three or more exits or exit access doorways. Three exits or exit access doorways shall be provided from any space with an occupant load of 501 to 1,000. Four exits or exit access doorways shall be provided from any space with an occupant load greater than 1,000.

1015.2 Exit or exit access doorway arrangement. Required exits shall be located in a manner that makes their availability obvious. Exits shall be unobstructed at all times. Exit and exit access doorways shall be arranged in accordance with Sections 1015.2.1 and 1015.2.2. Exit access doorways, contributing to the total number of exits or exit access doorways required by Sections 1015.1 and 1015.1.1, shall lead to separate exits. 1015.2.1 Two exits or exit access doorways. Where two exits or exit access doorways are required from any portion of the exit access, the exit doors or exit access door2013 CALIFORNIA BUILDING CODE

ways shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one-half of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between exit doors or exit access doorways. Interlocking or scissor stairs shall be counted as one exit stairway.

Exceptions: 1 Where interior exit stairways are interconnected by a I-hour fire-resistance-rated corridor conforming to the requirements of Section 1018, the required exit separation shall be measured along the shortest direct line of travel within the corridor. 2. Where a building is equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2, the separation distance of the exit doors or exit access doorways shall not be less than one-third of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the area served. 1015.2.2 Three or more exits or exit access doorways. Where access to three or more exits is required, at least two exit doors or exit access doorways shall be arranged in accordance with the provisions of Section 1015.2.1. Additional required exit or exit access doorways shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes, blocked, the others will be available. 1015.3 Boiler, incinerator and furnace rooms. Two exit access doorways are required in boiler, incinerator and furnace rooms where the area is over 500 square feet (46 m2) and any fuel-fired equipment exceeds 400,000 British thermal units (Btu) (422 000 KJ) input capacity. Where two exit access doorways are required, one is permitted to be a fixed ladder or an alternating tread device. Exit access doorways shall be separated by a horizontal distance equal to one-half the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the room. 1015.4 Refrigeration machinery rooms. Machinery rooms larger than 1,000 square feet (93 m2 ) shall have not less than two exits or exit access doorways. Where two exit access doorways are required, one such doorway is permitted to be served by a fixed ladder or an alternating tread device. Exit access doorways shall be separated by a horizontal distance equal to one-half the maximum horizonta1 dimension of room. All portions of machinery rooms shall be within 150 feet (45720 mm) of an exit or exit access doorway. An increase in travel distance is permitted in accordance with Section 1016.1. Doors shall swing in the direction of egress travel, regardless of the occupant load served. Doors shal1 be tight fitting and self-closing. 1015.5 Refrigerated rooms or spaces. Rooms or spaces having a floor area larger than 1,000 square feet (93 m2), containing a refrigerant evaporator and maintained at a temperature below 68째F (20DC), shall have access to not less than two exits or exit access doorways. 395


Warren Residence Halls Re-branding Feasibility Study

Executive Summary : Summary Narrative Project Phasing Diagram Bed Count/Density Diagram TBD Cost Estimate

95% DRAFT COPY 11.22.2013


Written summary narrative here


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Project Phasing Diagram

A1

C1 B1


Warren College Freshman Residence Halls - Bed Count Study (Harlan / Frankfurter / Stewart)

Existing

(no modification to existing floor plan)

Harlan Hall = 15 suites Frankfurter Hall = 15 suites Stewart Hall = 20 suites

50 Total Suites

Original Design Occupancy

8 beds/suite

Design Option A

(modify bathroom + enclose balcony)

Harlan Hall = 15 suites Frankfurter Hall = 15 suites Stewart Hall = 20 suites

47*Total Suites

Option A Design Occupancy

13 beds/suite

2

2

(modify bathroom + enclose balcony + capture partial hallway)

Harlan Hall = 15 suites Frankfurter Hall = 15 suites Stewart Hall = 20 suites

47*Total Suites

Option B Design Occupancy

14 beds/suite

3

3

4

Bathroom

1

Living

Bathroom

2

2

400

Total Bed Capacity

2 Living

1

1

2

Study

Deck

2

Living

2

1

* Total count of suites remains 51 however (1) per building or (3) total suites will remain at the original bed count to meet the 5% Accessibility requirement.

Corridor

3

Bathroom

1

Design Option B

Corridor

Corridor

1

* Total count of suites remains 51 however (1) per building or (3) total suites will remain at the original bed count to meet the 5% Accessibility requirement.

11.20.2013

Study

635

Total Bed Capacity (+235 Increase)

682

Total Bed Capacity (+282 Increase)



4767 warren feasibility study book draft v2