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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Basic Assessment Report in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998), as amended, and the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006 (Version 1)

Kindly note that: 1.

This basic assessment report is a standard report required by Eastern Cape Department of Economic Affairs, Environment and Tourism (ECDEAET) in terms of the EIA Regulations, 2006 and must be submitted together with the application form.

2.

This form is current as of 3 July 2006. It is the responsibility of the EAP to ascertain whether subsequent versions of the form have published or produced by the competent authority.

3.

The report must be typed within the spaces provided in the form. The size of the spaces provided are not necessarily indicative of the amount of information to be provided. The report is in the form of a table that can extend itself as each space is filled with typing.

4.

Selected boxes must be indicated by a cross and, when the form is completed electronically, must also be highlighted

5.

An incomplete report may be returned to the applicant for revision.

6.

The use of “not applicable” in the report must be done with circumspection because if it is used in respect of material information that is required by the competent authority for assessing the application, it may result in the rejection of the application as provided for in the regulations.

7.

This report must be handed in at offices of the relevant competent authority as detailed below.

8.

No faxed or e-mailed reports will be accepted. Only hand delivered or posted reports will be accepted.

9.

The report must be compiled by an independent environmental assessment practitioner.

10. Unless protected by law, all information in the report will become public information on receipt by the competent authority. Any interested and affected party should be provided with the information contained in this report on request, during any stage of the application process.

DEPARTMENTAL CONTACT DETAILS Head Office –Bhisho (General Enquiries) Director: Environmental Impact Management Department of Economic Affairs, Environment & Tourism Private Bag X0054 Bhisho 5605

Alfred Nzo Region Regional Manager: Environmental Affairs Dept of Economic Affairs, Environment & Tourism P/b x3513 Kokstad, 4700

Amathole Region Regional Manager: Environmental Affairs Dept of Economic Affairs, Environment & Tourism Private Bag X9060 East London, 5200

Bhisho Business Village Block C No. 5 Siwane Street Bhisho Tel: [040] 609 4712/4704 Fax: [040] 609 4700 Cacadu/Nelson Mandela Metro Region Regional Manager: Environmental Affairs Dept of Economic Affairs, Environment & Tourism Private Bag X5001 Greenacres, 6057

170 Hope Street Kokstad Tel: [039] 727 3257 Fax: [039] 727 3282

Medical Centre, cnr Oxford & St James Streets, East London Tel: [043] 742 0360 Fax: [043] 742 0323

Chris Hani/Ukhahlamba Region Regional Manager: Environmental Affairs Dept of Economic Affairs, Environment & Tourism PO Box 9636, Queenstown, 5320

OR Tambo Region Regional Manager: Environmental Affairs Dept of Economic Affairs, Environment & Tourism Private Bag X5029 Mthatha, 5100

Collegiate House, cnr Belmont Terrace & Castle Hill Central Port Elizabeth Tel: [041] 508 5800 Fax: [041] 585 1958

Old Royal Hotel, 104 Cathcart Road Queenstown Tel: [045] 808 4000 Fax: [045] 838 3981

Old Radio Transkei Building, Cnr Victoria & York Roads Mthatha Tel: [047] 531 1191 Fax: [047] 531 2887

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

(For official use only) File Reference Number: Responsible Officer: Date Received:

SECTION A: APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION The relevant parts of this section must be completed if the environmental assessment practitioner (EAP) on behalf of the applicant whishes to apply for exemption from completing or complying with certain parts of this basic assessment report.

1.

APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM ASSESSING ALTERNATIVES:

At least two alternatives (site or activity) should be assessed. If that is not possible, the applicant should apply for exemption from having to assess alternatives. Such exemption will, however, not apply to the no-go alternative that must be assessed in all cases. Provide a detailed motivation for not considering alternatives including an explanation of the reason for the application for exemption (supporting documents, if any, should be attached to this report): I declare that the above motivation is accurate and, hereby apply for exemption in terms of regulation 51 of the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006, from having to assess alternatives in this application as required in section 24(4)(b) in the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998) Signature of the EAP:

2.

Date:

APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM COMPLETING OR COMPLYING WITH PART(S) OF THIS BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT:

Application for exemption form completing or complying with certain parts of this basic assessment report may be made by completing the relevant sections below. Applications for exemptions from completing or complying with any other part of the basic assessment report must be made in the normal manner. Indicate the numbers of the sections of this report for which exemption is applied for: Section B: 7(a) 7(b) 7(c) 7(d) 8 9 10(c) 10(e) 10(f) 10(g) 10(h) 10(j) 10(k) 12 Section C: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Section D: 1(a) 1(b) 1(c) 1(d) 1(f) 1(g) 3 Provide a detailed motivation including an explanation of the reason for the application for exemption (supporting documents, if any, should be attached to this report): I declare that the above motivation is accurate and, hereby apply for exemption in terms of regulation 51 of the EIA Regulations, 2006, from having to complete the indicated sections of the Basic Assessment Report. Signature of the EAP:

Date:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

SECTION B: ACTIVITY INFORMATION 1.

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION

Describe the activity, which is being applied for in detail (A1): In recent times, moving dunes at Sardinia Bay, Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM), have progressively inundated infrastructure. Access to the lower car park is now seriously compromised. The ablution block opposite the upper car park is about to be overrun by the dunes. As the dunes continue moving east-north-eastward at approximately 2 - 5 metres per year, the dunes will soon block the road completely. In ¹50 years from now the dune is likely to have overrun the lower car park and the clubhouses (Sardinia Bay Ski-boat Club, Sardinia Bay Lifesavers Club) and eventually move up the slope to the east of the lower car park. Temporary measures implemented in 2007 and 2008 to halt the sand inundation by clearing with a front end loader have proved expensive and fruitless in the long term. They are also not in line with recent legislation (Integrated Coastal Management Act) to maintain the natural attributes of coastal landscapes and not to interfere with natural sand movement. This is particularly important in a nature reserve. Predicted climate change and sea level rise further demand to relocate structures that were built too close to the sea. The problem with sea level rise is its interaction with changing storm intensities and wind field conditions that overwhelm existing infrastructure. Already the sea is washing at the foundations and stilts of the clubhouses during storm tides. It is only a matter of time that the houses will be toppled by the sea. In the medium term (a few years at most), the clubhouses would have to be given up. Similar incidents are bound to happen over large stretches of coast as South Africa comes face to face with the impacts of a changing coastline as a result of climate change. In alignment with key coastal legislation and policy papers (e.g. National Environmental Management: Integrated Coastal Management Act, Coastal Management Programme for Nelson Mandela Bay), NMBM is striving to create a more environmentally friendly, healthy and sustainable city with substantial socio-economic, health, recreation and tourism benefits. The key objective is to preserve the natural character of the metro beachfront as far as is possible and to rehabilitate degraded coastal areas through harmonious landscaping following principles of international best practice. Various alternatives were explored by the applicant in a 2007 feasibility study jointly conducted by Werner Illenberger and Arcus Gibb (Pty) Ltd on behalf of Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality. The alternative applied for here presents the preferred option by the client informed by the outcomes of the feasibility study and by submissions received from Interested & Affected Parties during the public participation process of this Basic Assessment. The proposed development activities were formulated to reach an integrated solution to the problem of moving dunes obstructing public access to Sardinia Bay beach that is future proof for many years to come. The proposed activities are also a proactive response to the threats to life and property arising from sea level rise. The preferred solution to this is the creation of a new car park and toilet block on the top at the edge of the escarpment overlooking the beach, more or less directly above the existing clubhouses. From there, boardwalk stairs would lead down the escarpment to the beach. The existing footprint of the jeep track will allow a road upgrade. The old infrastructure can be taken away in its entirety and the mobile dune will never be a factor. The vista from the top of the hill will be a duplication of what is at Schoenmakerskop and ensure visitors will be circulating and crime will be deterred. The toilets will be closer and more regularly used. The walk to the beach will be short, ensuring the popularity of the beach is maintained. Specific activities of this alternative consist of: 1. Upgrade to gravel road standards of the jeep track from Green Gate to a position above the existing clubhouses at the edge of the calcrete escarpment over a length of 460 metres. Running in parallel, a bridle path for horse riders would be allowed for. Vehicle access by the general public to other parts of the Sardinia Bay Nature Reserve would be restricted by suitable means, e.g. gates and bollards. 2. Construction of a new car park at the end of the upgraded jeep track near the edge of the escarpment. 3. Construction of stairs at the proposed new car park leading down the escarpment to the beach. 4. Construction of a ramp for emergency purposes from the edge of the escarpment to the beach. 5. Closure of the lower portion of the road leading to the lower car park for the general public, including the lessees of the clubhouses. 6. Closure and demolition of the public toilets and replacement by toilet facilities located on the newly created car park. These will be unaffected by sand inundation. 7. Closure of the horse track descending from the escarpment to the beach to the east of the clubhouses (Borelli’s path), and creation of an alternate means of access for riders. Activities would be implemented as follows: 1. The turnoff at Green Gate from the DR01901D would be widened and controlled by a boom. Placement of a gatehouse for access control at the turnoff would be optional. Upgrade of the jeep track to gravel road standards and a width of six metres will require only minor earthworks. 2. Beach access for the public would be provided from the new car park at the end of the upgraded jeep track by means of stairs leading down the escarpment to the beach. The design width of the stairs would be 1.8 m and its length would be approximately 120 m depending of how many turns are required to overcome the height difference. The construction material of the stairs is recycled plastic-wood, also known as Polywood.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

3.

4. 5.

6.

7. 8.

The staircase would be raised at variable distances (10 – 100 cm) above ground to accommodate the natural topography of the ground. The stairs would have handrails on either side (rail height 850 mm). Only manual labour will be used for the construction and no heavy machinery is necessary. The new car park would have similar characteristics as the upper car park, i.e. consist of naturally occurring compacted calcrete. Assuming similar dimensions than the upper car park, approximately 3000 m2 of fynbos would be destroyed to make way for this. This would be sufficient for 200 cars and a house for lifesavers, law enforcement and ablutions with a 200 m2 footprint. The closure of the lower portion of the road leading to the lower car park would be effected by means of bollards anchored into the ground. The closed portion of road and car park would be ripped to reinstate ground infiltration by rainwater. Road base layers would be left as is. Vehicle beach access for emergency services and law enforcement (4x4 quad bikes only) would be provided by means of a 2.4 m wide Polywood ramp from the top of the escarpment to the bottom end of the lower car park. This ramp would have a length of ±120 m and achieve a gradient of 1:10. The ramp would be raised at variable distances (10 – 60 cm) above ground to accommodate the natural topography of the ground. The ramp would have low guide rails on either side. Only manual labour will be used for the construction and no heavy machinery is necessary. Public toilets would be demolished by conventional means and all rubble would be transported away for disposal at a registered landfill site. A new toilet block equipped with a conservancy tank for servicing periodically would be constructed at the new car park. Water for the toilet block would be sourced from the NMBM main water supply pipeline nearby. Borelli’s path would be blocked by means of timber. The existing bridle path from Red Gate via The Tunnel to Platbank is envisaged as an alternate access for rider to the beach. Rider coming from the east making use of the bridle path running in parallel to the upgraded jeep track as appropriate. No changes are envisaged to the ski-boat and lifesavers clubhouses at present.

In the medium term, the lifesavers clubhouse would have to be demolished. A new lifesavers house would be built on higher ground at the edge of the escarpment (supported by its own application for environmental authorisation). This new lifesavers house would be under the control of NMBM – the present one is not. Access from the DR01901 to the new lifesavers house would be achieved via Green Gate along the upgraded jeep track, which would also serve as the evacuation route for medical emergencies. Persons in distress would be transported on stretcher from the beach up the boardwalk (a distance of approximately 250 m) and from there on by car into town. As in the past, the rescue helicopter would be landing and taking off on the beach. When the boat house has become unsafe for occupation because of sea level rise it would also have to be demolished. Presently, the Sardinia Bay Ski-boat Club has a valid license for the launching of boats at Sardinia Bay beach, but a driving on the beach permit was declined by DEDEA (then DEAET) in 2003 effectively stopping all boating by the club at that location. It is patently obvious that it makes no sense to rebuild the boat house on higher ground if there is no license to tow boats into and out of the water. Legal aspects pertaining to the premature termination of lease agreements between NMBM and the Sardinia Bay Ski-boat Club and the Sardinia Bay Lifesavers Club, respectively, are beyond the scope of this environmental investigation. Alternatives A1 (and S1, see below) were developed from a suggestion submitted from registered I&APs. They were developed in order to overcome various disadvantages of A2 and S2 relating to the walking distances involved. The upper vehicle car park is way too far (approx. 600 m) from the beach for practical purposes in terms of carrying picnic goods and the same large distance applies for the toilet facilities for a parent to take a child. That means relieving yourself on the beach, in a rock pool, or behind a dune will become common place. Most car break-ins in the past have occurred at the upper car park where it is just so easy for criminals if there is nobody in attendance. The reduction in the length of the boardwalk will be an aid in offsetting costs.

2.

ALTERNATIVES

Describe alternatives that are considered in this application. Alternatives should include a consideration of all possible means by which the purpose and need of the proposed activity could be accomplished in the specific instance taking account of the interest of the applicant in the activity. The no-go alternative must in all cases be included in the assessment phase as the baseline against which the impacts of the other alternatives are assessed. The determination of whether site or activity (including different processes etc.) or both is appropriate needs to be informed by the specific circumstances of the activity and its environment. After receipt of this report the competent authority may also request the applicant to assess additional alternatives that could possibly accomplish the purpose and need of the proposed activity if it is clear that realistic alternatives have not been considered to a reasonable extent. 2(a) Site alternatives: Describe site alternative 1 (S1), for the activity described above, or for any other activity alternative: Sardinia Bay is situated southwest from the Port Elizabeth city centre at 34o02’S, 25o30’E, to where it is linked with a tarred access road (DR01901) via the New Seaview Road. Save for two clubhouses (Life Savers, Ski-boat), public toilets and car parks, the area is undeveloped otherwise. The main attractions of Sardinia Bay are its Marine Reserve with miles of unspoilt coastline and crystal clear water excellent for diving, horse riding and scenic walks as well its Sacramento Hiking Trail. The shoreline to the east towards Schoenmakerskop consists of rocky outcrops of highly folded and jointed quartzitic sandstone. At the back of the rocky shore the land rises steeply by 10 – 15 m forming an escarpment. Soils at the top are rich in calcrete, with Schoenmakerskop Rocky Shelf Fynbos and Driftsands Dune

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Fynbos as the vegetation types. To the west, sandy beaches occur backed by high (30 m), mobile dunes. A marine protected area of 55 ha was proclaimed at Sardinia Bay in 1974 and, to provide landward protection for this reserve, two adjacent areas (Sylvic Reserve: 78 ha, Sardinia Bay Reserve: 320 ha) were consolidated in 1980 to form the Sardinia Bay Nature Reserve. Being fynbos and arguably promoted by visitor carelessness, fires are fairly common at Sardinia Bay Nature Reserve. In recent times, major veld fires were recorded in June 1996 and in January 2009. The Driftsands dunefield that bypasses the headland of Cape Recife was artificially vegetated some 100 years ago in order to stop the discharge of sand onto the Algoa Bay beaches, as this sand was perceived to be causing the sanding-up of the jetties at Baakens River. As part of this stabilisation, an artificial littoral dune was constructed along the sandy coast in the Sardinia Bay-Gulchways area. Stabilisation at Sardinia Bay was achieved by constructing drift fences and by planting various alien species (marram grass Ammophila sp., rooikrans Acacia cycolps). During the 20th century the artificial stabilisation at Sardinia Bay was successful in that large quantities of sand were retained and the movement of dune sand towards the east was retarded. As a series of historical aerial photos shows (see 2007 feasibility study by Illenberger & Arcus Gibb), by approximately 1980 the artificial littoral dune was starting to destabilize into mobile parabolic dunes along much of the artificial littoral dune, eventually resulting in the situation that presents itself today. The re-activation of the dunes in the Sardinia Bay-Gulchways area is largely due to the inherent dynamics of coastal dune fields. As the amount of sand that is being artificially retained gets larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep the dunes fixed. Once a parabolic dune is initiated it is very difficult to stop, because wind flow is channelled through the dune, increasing wind-blown sand movement, and because the rapidly moving sand swamps vegetation. Because the dune sand is piled up, gravity helps the movement of the dune, speeding it up even more, as is happening with the dune along the access road to the lower car park. Hence the management option of continuing to artificially vegetate and fix these dunes becomes increasingly expensive and unviable. It is very likely that the effects of global climate change have also assisted in the re-activation of the dunes in the Sardinia Bay-Gulchways area. Increasing temperatures result in sea level rise by the thermal expansion of water and through the addition of water to the oceans from the melting of continental ice sheets. An important consequence of global warming on the South African coast is that average wind velocity is beginning to increase in all seasons. If due to climate change, winds become only 10% stronger, then wave height increases by 26%, and coastal sediment transport rates potentially increase by 40% to 100%, thus setting coastal dunes on the march. Another effect of global warming is that along the South African shores storm activity and severity are beginning to increase. Higher sea levels will require smaller storm events to overtop existing storm protection measures. The clubhouses situated at what is now the extreme high water mark will become more and more often swamped by the sea. In the interest of public safety and environmental sustainability it is therefore expedient for NMBM to retreat to higher ground and not to try to fight the natural processes operating in the highly malleable and dynamic coastal dune environment. Site alternative S1 involves the use the jeep track to create a new road to the proposed point of the footpath leading down to the beach, as well as the creation of a new car park and toilet block overlooking the beach at the top of the escarpment. Please see A1 for a description for the proposed locations and activities. Describe site alternative 2 (S2), if any, for the activity described above, or for any other activity alternative: Site alternative 2 is located in the same general area as S1. It involves retaining the existing upper car park and the construction of a raised boardwalk to the top of the calcrete escarpment along the edge to a position more or less above the clubhouses. From there, boardwalk stairs would lead down the escarpment to the beach. Please see A2 below for a description. Describe site alternative 3 (S3), if any, for the activity described above, or for any other activity alternative: No 3rd site alternative, other than the no-go option, was identified.

(2)(b) Activity alternatives: Describe activity alternative 2 (A2), if any, for any or all of the site alternatives as appropriate: Specific activities consist of: 1. Construction of a raised boardwalk leading from the upper car park along the edge of the calcrete escarpment to a position above the existing clubhouses over a length of approximately 500 m. It follows part of the Sacramento Trail. 2. Connecting to the end of the raised boardwalk, the construction of stairs leading down the escarpment to the beach. 3. Closure of the lower portion of the road leading to the lower car park for the general public, including the lessees of the clubhouses. 4. Closure and demolition of the public toilets and replacement by toilet facilities located on the upper car park that are not prone to sand inundation. 5. Closure of the horse track descending from the escarpment to the beach to the east of the clubhouses (Borelli’s path), and creation of an alternate means of access for riders. Activities would be implemented as follows:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

1.

2. 3.

4. 5.

The design width of the boardwalk would be 1.8 m. The construction material is recycled plastic-wood, also known as Polywood. The walkway would be raised at variable distances (10 – 100 cm) above ground to accommodate the natural topography of the ground. The walkways would have handrails on either side (rail height 850 mm). Only manual labour will be used for the construction and no heavy machinery is necessary. Beach access off the boardwalk would be provided at its end above the clubhouses by means of stairs leading down the escarpment to the beach. Construction material and construction methods would be the same as for the boardwalk. The closure of the lower portion of the road leading to the lower car park would be effected by means of bollards anchored into the ground. The closed portion of road and car park would be ripped to reinstate ground infiltration by rainwater. Road base layers would be left as is. Public toilets would be demolished by conventional means and all rubble would be transported away for disposal at a registered landfill site. Borelli’s path would be blocked by means of timber. The existing bridle path from Red Gate via The Tunnel to Platbank is envisaged as an alternate access for rider to the beach.

Provisions regarding the future fate of the clubhouses would be the same as described in A1, Describe activity alternative 3 (A3), if any, for any or all of the site alternatives as appropriate: Several emails received from I&APs have called for a 3rd activity alternative that consists of keeping the lower car park open by bulldozing the active dune out of the way and into the sea. This option is in violation of section 15 of the Integrated Coastal Management Act, 24 of 2008. This was confirmed by Neil Malan, Marine & Coastal Management, Cape Town. This option was therefore not assessed. Integrated Coastal Management Act, 24 of 2008 Section 15 - Measures affecting erosion and accretion (1) No person, owner or occupier of land adjacent to the seashore or other coastal public property capable of erosion or accretion may require any organ of state or any other person to take measures to prevent the erosion or accretion of the seashore or such other coastal public property, or of land adjacent to coastal public property, unless the erosion is caused by an intentional act or omission of that organ of state or other person. (2) No person may construct, maintain or extent any structure, or take other measures, on coastal public property to prevent or promote erosion or accretion of the seashore except as provided for in this Act.

4.

ACTIVITY POSITION

Indicate the position of the activity using the latitude and longitude of the centre point of the site for each alternative site. The co-ordinates should be in degrees and decimal minutes. The minutes should have at least three decimals to ensure adequate accuracy. The projection that must be used in all cases is the WGS84 spheroid in a national or local projection. Alternative: Latitude (S): Longitude (E): Alternative S11 (preferred or only site alternative) 34o 02‘ 25o 30‘ Alternative S2 (if any) 34o 02‘ 25o 30‘ o o Alternative S3 (if any) ‘ ‘ In the case of linear activities: Alternative: Latitude (S): Longitude (E): Alternative S1 (gravel road) o 34 01‘52” 25o 29‘55” • Starting point of the activity o 34 01‘56” 25o 30‘02” • Middle point of the activity 34o 01‘59” 25o 30‘09” • End point of the activity Alternative S2 (boardwalk) 34o 02‘ 25o 29‘54” • Starting point of the activity 34o 02‘ 25o 30‘01” • Middle point of the activity 34o 02‘ 25o 30‘09” • End point of the activity Alternative S3 (if any) o o ‘ ‘ • Starting point of the activity o o ‘ ‘ • Middle point of the activity o o ‘ ‘ • End point of the activity For route alternatives that are longer than 500m, please provide an addendum with co-ordinates taken every 250 meters along the route for each alternative alignment.

5.

PHYSICAL SIZE OF THE ACTIVITY

Indicate the physical size of the preferred activity/technology as well as alternative activities/technologies (footprints): Alternative: Size of the activity: Alternative A12 (preferred activity alternative) 5380 m2 Alternative A2 (if any) 6138 m2 1 2

“Alternative S..” refer to site alternatives. “Alternative A..” refer to activity, process, technology or other alternatives.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

m2

Alternative A3 (if any) or, for linear activities: Alternative: Alternative A1 (preferred activity alternative) Alternative A2 (if any) Alternative A3 (if any)

Length of the activity: 460 m 550 m m

Indicate the size of the alternative sites or servitudes (within which the above footprints will occur): Alternative: Size of the site/servitude: Alternative A1 (preferred activity alternative) 2768238 m2 Alternative A2 (if any) 2768238 m2 Alternative A3 (if any) m2

6.

SITE ACCESS

Does ready access to the site exist, or is access directly from an existing road? If NO, what is the distance over which a new access road will be built Describe the type of access road planned:

YES x

NO m

Include the position of the access road on the site plan.

7.

WASTE, EFFLUENT, EMISSION AND NOISE MANAGEMENT

7(a) Solid waste management Will the activity produce solid construction waste during the construction/initiation phase? YES x If yes, what estimated quantity will be produced per month? How will the construction solid waste be disposed of (describe)? Polywood offcuts will be recycled by manufacturer. Excess metal ware will be disposed off as solid waste Where will the construction solid waste be disposed of (describe)? Registered landfill site. Will the activity produce solid waste during its operational phase? YES If yes, what estimated quantity will be produced per month? How will the solid waste be disposed of (describe)?

NO 3 m3

NO x m3

Where will the solid waste be disposed if it does not feed into a municipal waste stream (describe)? If the solid waste (construction or operational phases) will not be disposed of in a registered landfill site or be taken up in a municipal waste stream, the application should consult with the competent authority to determine whether it is necessary to change to an application for scoping and EIA. Can any part of the solid waste be classified as hazardous in terms of the relevant legislation? YES NO x If yes, inform the competent authority and request a change to an application for scoping and EIA. Is the activity that is being applied for a solid waste handling or treatment facility? YES NO x If yes, the applicant should consult with the competent authority to determine whether it is necessary to change to an application for scoping and EIA. Describe the measures, if any, that will be taken to ensure the optimal reuse or recycling of materials: Polywood offcuts will be recycled by manufacturer. Has a specialist been consulted to assist with the completion of this section? YES NO x If YES, please complete: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO x If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

Date:

7(b) Liquid effluent Will the activity produce effluent, other than normal sewage, that will be disposed of in a YES NO x municipal sewage system? If yes, what estimated quantity will be produced per month? m3 Will the activity produce any effluent that will be treated and/or disposed of on site? Yes NO If yes, the applicant should consult with the competent authority to determine whether it is necessary to change to an application for scoping and EIA. Will the activity produce effluent that will be treated and/or disposed of at another facility? YES NO x If yes, provide the particulars of the facility: Facility name: Contact person:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Describe the measures that will be taken to ensure the optimal reuse or recycling of waste water, if any: Has a specialist been consulted to assist with the completion of this section? If YES, please complete: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: E-mail: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? Signature of specialist:

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

Cell: Fax:

Date:

7(c) Emissions into the atmosphere Will the activity release emissions into the atmosphere? If yes, is it controlled by any legislation of any sphere of government? If yes, the applicant should consult with the competent authority to determine whether it is necessary to change to an application for scoping and EIA. If no, describe the emissions in terms of type and concentration: Has a specialist been consulted to assist with the completion of this section? If YES, please complete: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: E-mail: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? Signature of specialist:

YES

YES YES

NO x NO

YES

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

Cell: Fax:

Date:

7(d) Generation of noise Will the activity generate noise? YES x NO If yes, is it controlled by any legislation of any sphere of government? YES NO If yes, the applicant should consult with the competent authority to determine whether it is necessary to change to an application for scoping and EIA. If no, describe the noise in terms of type and level: During construction, low level noise will be generated by electrical hand tools, such as power drills and cutoff saws Has a specialist been consulted to assist with the completion of this section? YES NO x If YES, please complete: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO x If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

8.

Date:

WATER USE

Please indicate the source(s) of water that will be used for the activity by ticking the appropriate box(es) municipal water board groundwater river, stream, dam or other the activity will not use lake water x If water is to be extracted from groundwater, river, stream, dam, lake or any other natural feature, please indicate the volume that will be extracted per month: liters

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Does the activity require a water use permit from the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry? YES NO x If yes, please submit the necessary application to the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry and attach proof thereof to this application if it has been submitted.

9.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Describe the design measures, if any, that have been taken to ensure that the activity is energy efficient: The boardwalk does not consume energy when operational Describe how alternative energy sources have been taken into account or been built into the design of the activity, if any: The boardwalk will be built from polywood which is made from recycled plastic.

10.

SITE OR ROUTE PLAN

A detailed site or route plan(s) must be prepared for each alternative site or alternative activity. It must be attached as Appendix A to this document. The site or route plans must indicate the following: 10(a) The scale of the plan which must be at least a scale of 1:500; 10(b) the property boundaries and numbers of all the properties within 50m of the site; 10(c) the current land use as well as the land use zoning of each of the properties adjoining the site or sites; 10(d) the exact position of each element of the application as well as any other structures on the site; 10(e) the position of services, including electricity supply cables (indicate above or underground), water supply pipelines, boreholes, street lights, sewage pipelines, storm water infrastructure and telecommunication infrastructure; 10(f) all trees and shrubs taller than 1.8m; 10(g) walls and fencing including details of the height and construction material; 10(h) servitudes indicating the purpose of the servitude; 10(i) sensitive environmental elements within 100m of the site or sites including (but not limited thereto):  rivers;  the 1:100 year flood line (where available or where it is required by DWAF);  ridges;  cultural and historical features;  areas with indigenous vegetation (even if it is degraded or invested with alien species); 10(j) for gentle slopes the 1m contour intervals must be indicated on the plan and whenever the slope of the site exceeds 1:10, the 500mm contours must be indicated on the plan; and 10(k) the positions from where photographs of the site were taken.

11.

SITE PHOTGRAPHS

Colour photographs from the center of the site must be taken in at least the eight major compass directions with a description of each photograph. Photographs must be attached under Appendix B to this form. It should be supplemented with additional photographs of relevant features on the site, if applicable.

12.

FACILITY ILLUSTRATION

A detailed illustration of the activity must be provided at a scale of 1:200 as Appendix C for activities that include structures. The illustrations must be to scale and must represent a realistic image of the planned activity. The illustration must give a representative view of the activity.

13.

ACTIVITY MOTIVATION

13(a) Socio-economic value of the activity What is the expected capital value of the activity on completion? What is the expected yearly income that will be generated by or as a result of the activity? Will the activity contribute to service infrastructure or is it a public amenity? How many new employment opportunities will be created in the development phase of the activity? What is the expected value of the employment opportunities during the development phase? What percentage of this will accrue to previously disadvantaged individuals? How many permanent new employment opportunities will be created during the operational phase of the activity? What is the expected current value of the employment opportunities during the first 10 years? What percentage of this will accrue to previously disadvantaged individuals?

R 2,000,000 R0 YES NO x

0 R unknown Unknown % 0 R unknown Unknown %

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

13(b)

Need and desirability of the activity

Motivate and explain the need and desirability of the activity (including demand for the activity): The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM) has recently launched an urban beachfront redevelopment initiative under the auspices of the Environmental Services Directorate. The aim of these beachfront development projects is to create a more environmentally friendly, healthy and sustainable city with substantial socio-economic, health, recreation and tourism benefits. The key objective is to preserve the natural character of the metro beachfront as far as is possible and to rehabilitate degraded coastal areas through harmonious landscaping following principles of international best practice. Sardinia Bay beach is a highly favoured recreational destination for Port Elizabethans. It also has its fair share of out of town visitors owing to its scenic qualities. The problems with the mobile dunes have for too long already prevented to reach the full potential of this beach. A general principle of coastal zone management is that no fixed structures should be built in the littoral active zone and that all human travel on foot or in vehicles should be carefully managed. The suite of proposed activities aims to redevelop Sardinia Bay as a recreational node while observing proven principles of coastal zone management. In this context, boardwalks play an important part in improving recreational access to the seashore. Raised boardwalks also serve as important instruments in the management of coastal dunes in that they direct human traffic away from these sensitive environments. In respect of the need for vehicle (quad bike) beach access for emergency services and law enforcement, it should be noted that the next beach access point to the west is situated 5.7 km away at Bushy Park, and the next beach access point to the east is at Schoenmakerskop 3.3 km away. Indicate any benefits that the activity will have for society in general: Improved and convenient access to the coast in the face of an advancing dune swamping the previous means of access. Indicate any benefits that the activity will have for the local communities where the activity will be located: Both the edge of the new car park and/or the boardwalk are a convenient look-out point for dolphin spotting and general sea-watching and provide improved access to the beach.

14. APPLICABLE LEGISLATION, POLICIES AND/OR GUIDELINES List all legislation, policies and/or guidelines of any sphere of government that are applicable to the application as contemplated in the EIA regulations, if applicable: Title of legislation, policy or guideline: Administering authority: Date: National Environmental Management Act, (Act No. 107 of 1998) Department of Environmental 1998 Affairs & Tourism National Environmental Management: Integrated Coastal Department of Environmental 2008 Management Act (Act No. 24 of 2008) Affairs & Tourism Coastal Management Programme for Nelson Mandela Bay Nelson Mandela Bay 2007 Municipality

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

SECTION C: SITE/AREA DESCRIPTION Important note: For linear activities (pipelines etc) as well as activities that cover very large sites, it may be necessary to complete Section C for each part of the site that has a significantly different environment. In such cases please complete copies of Section C and indicate the area, which is covered by each copy No. on the Site Plan. Section C Copy No. (e.g. A): (complete only when appropriate)

1.

GRADIENT OF THE SITE

Indicate the general gradient of the sites. Alternative S1: Flat 1:50 – 1:20 1:20 – 1:15x Alternative S2: 1:20 – 1:15 Flat 1:50 – 1:20 x Alternative S3: Flat 1:50 – 1:20 1:20 – 1:15

2.

1:15 – 1:10

1:10 – 1:7,5

1:7,5 – 1:5

Steeper than 1:5

1:15 – 1:10

1:10 – 1:7,5

1:7,5 – 1:5

Steeper than 1:5

1:15 – 1:10

1:10 – 1:7,5

1:7,5 – 1:5

Steeper than 1:5

LOCATION IN LANDSCAPE

Indicate the landform(s) that best describes the site. Alternative S1: Ridgeline Plateau Side slope of Closed hill/mountain valley Alternative S2: Ridgeline Plateau Side slope of Closed hill/mountain valley Alternative S3: Ridgeline Plateau Side slope of Closed hill/mountain valley

3.

Open valley

Plain x

Undulating plain/low hills

Dune x

Sea-front x

Open valley

Plain x

Undulating plain/low hills

Dune x

Seafront x

Open valley

Plain

Undulating plain/low hills

Dune

Sea-front

GROUNDWATER, SOIL AND GEOLOGICAL STABILITY OF THE SITE

Is the site(s) located on any of the following (tick the appropriate boxes)? Alternative S1: Alternative S2: Shallow water table (less than 1.5m YES NO x YES NO x deep) Dolomite, sinkhole or doline areas YES NO x YES NO x Seasonally wet soils (often close to water bodies) Unstable rocky slopes or steep slopes with loose soil Dispersive soils (soils that dissolve in water) Soils with high clay content (clay fraction more than 40%) Any other unstable soil or geological feature An area sensitive to erosion

Alternative S3: YES NO YES

NO

YES

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

YES

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

YES

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

YES

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

YES

NO x

YES

NO x

YES

NO

YES x

NO

YES x

NO

YES

NO

If you are unsure about any of the above or if you are concerned that any of the above aspects may be an issue of concern in the application, an appropriate specialist should be appointed to assist in the completion of this section. (Information in respect of the above will often be available as part of the project information or at the planning sections of local authorities. Where it exists, the 1:50 000 scale Regional Geotechnical Maps prepared by the Council for Geo Science may also be consulted). Has a specialist been consulted to assist with the completion of this section? YES NO x If YES, please complete: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO x If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Signature of specialist:

4.

Date:

GROUNDCOVER

Tick the types of groundcover present on the site. Alternative S1: Natural veld - good Natural veld with Natural veld with conditionE x scattered aliensE heavy alien infestationE Sport field

Cultivated land

Paved surface x

Veld dominated by alien speciesE Building or other structure x

Gardens Bare soil x

If any of the boxes marked with an “E “is ticked, please consult an appropriate specialist to assist in the completion of this section if the environmental assessment practitioner doesn’t have the necessary expertise. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO x If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Are there any rare or endangered flora or fauna species (including red data species) YES NO x present on any of the alternative sites? If YES, specify and explain: Are their any special or sensitive habitats or other natural features present on any of the YES x NO alternative sites? If YES, specify The access road leading to the lower car park that is earmarked for closure is located in an active and explain: dune field. The entire activity applied for for authorisation is located in a nature reserve. Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached?

YES

NO x

YES

NO

Signature of specialist: Date: The location of all identified rare or endangered species or other elements should be accurately indicated on the site plan(s). Alternative S2: Natural veld - good conditionE x Sport field

Natural veld with scattered aliensE

Natural veld with heavy alien infestationE

Cultivated land

Paved surface x

Veld dominated by alien speciesE Building or other structure x

Gardens Bare soil x

If any of the boxes marked with an “E “is ticked, please consult an appropriate specialist to assist in the completion of this section if the environmental assessment practitioner doesn’t have the necessary expertise. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO x If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Are there any rare or endangered flora or fauna species (including red data species) YES NO x present on any of the alternative sites? If YES, specify and explain: Are their any special or sensitive habitats or other natural features present on any of the YES x NO alternative sites? If YES, specify The access road leading to the lower car park that is earmarked for closure is located in an active and explain: dune field. The entire activity applied for for authorisation is located in a nature reserve. Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO x If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist: Date: The location of all identified rare or endangered species or other elements should be accurately indicated on the site plan(s). Alternative S3:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Natural veld - good conditionE

Natural veld with scattered aliensE

Natural veld with heavy alien infestationE

Sport field

Cultivated land

Paved surface

Veld dominated by alien speciesE Building or other structure

Gardens Bare soil

If any of the boxes marked with an “E “is ticked, please consult an appropriate specialist to assist in the completion of this section if the environmental assessment practitioner doesn’t have the necessary expertise. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Are there any rare or endangered flora or fauna species (including red data species) YES NO present on any of the alternative sites? If YES, specify and explain: Are their any special or sensitive habitats or other natural features present on any of the YES NO alternative sites? If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist: Date: The location of all identified rare or endangered species or other elements should be accurately indicated on the site plan(s).

5.

LAND USE CHARACTER OF SURROUNDING AREA

Black out land uses and/or prominent features that does not currently occur within a 500m radius of the site Alternative S1: Low density Medium density High density Informal Natural area x residential residential residential residentialA Commercial & Heavy AN Retail Light industrial Medium industrial warehousing industrialAN Office/consulting Military or police Casino/entertainment Power stationA Hospitality facility room base/station/compound complex Spoil heap or slimes Quarry, sand or Open cast mine Underground mine Dam or reservoir damA borrow pit Hospital/medical Tertiary education School Church Old age home center facility Sewage treatment Train station or Major road (4 lanes N Railway line AirportN A N N plant shunting yard or more) Harbour H Sport facilities Golf course Polo fields Filling station Landfill or waste treatment siteA Mountain, koppie or ridge Other land uses (describe):

Plantation

Agriculture

River, stream or wetland

Nature conservation area x

Museum

Historical building

Graveyard

Archeological site

If any of the boxes marked with an “N “are ticked, please consult an appropriate noise specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the ambient noise level have a negative impact on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist or studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

If YES, is such a report(s) attached?

YES

Signature of specialist:

NO

Date: A

If any of the boxes marked with an “ “ are ticked, please consult an appropriate air quality specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the ambient air pollution level have a negative impact on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

Date:

If any of the boxes marked with an “H“ are ticked, please consult an appropriate health assessment specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the surrounding land use pose any unacceptable health risk on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? Signature of specialist:

Date:

Alternative S2: Natural area x Retail Power stationA Open cast mine Hospital/medical center Sewage treatment plantA Harbour Landfill or waste treatment siteA Mountain, koppie or ridge Other land uses (describe):

Low density residential Commercial & warehousing Office/consulting room Underground mine School

Medium density residential

High density residential

Light industrial

Medium industrialAN

Military or police base/station/compound Spoil heap or slimes damA Tertiary education facility

Casino/entertainment complex Quarry, sand or borrow pit

Informal residentialA Heavy industrialAN Hospitality facility Dam or reservoir

Church

Old age home

Railway line

Major road (4 lanes or more)N

AirportN

Sport facilities

Golf course

Polo fields

Filling stationH

Plantation

Agriculture

River, stream or wetland

Nature conservation area x

Museum

Historical building

Graveyard

Archeological site

Train station or shunting yardN

N

N

If any of the boxes marked with an “ “are ticked, please consult an appropriate noise specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Postal code: Telephone: E-mail: Will the ambient noise level have a negative impact on the proposed activity? If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? Signature of specialist:

Cell: Fax: YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

Date:

If any of the boxes marked with an “A“ are ticked, please consult an appropriate air quality specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the ambient air pollution level have a negative impact on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

Date:

If any of the boxes marked with an “H“ are ticked, please consult an appropriate health assessment specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the surrounding land use pose any unacceptable health risk on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

Date:

Alternative S3: Natural area Retail Power stationA Open cast mine Hospital/medical center Sewage treatment plantA Harbour Landfill or waste treatment siteA Mountain, koppie or ridge Other land uses (describe):

Low density residential Commercial & warehousing Office/consulting room

Medium density residential

High density residential

Light industrial

Medium industrialAN

Military or police base/station/compound Spoil heap or slimes damA Tertiary education facility

Casino/entertainment complex Quarry, sand or borrow pit Church

Old age home

Train station or shunting yardN

Railway lineN

Major road (4 lanes or more)N

AirportN

Sport facilities

Golf course

Polo fields

Filling station

Plantation

Agriculture

River, stream or wetland

Nature conservation area

Museum

Historical building

Graveyard

Archeological site

Underground mine School

Informal residentialA Heavy industrialAN Hospitality facility Dam or reservoir

H

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

If any of the boxes marked with an “N “are ticked, please consult an appropriate noise specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the ambient noise level have a negative impact on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

Date:

If any of the boxes marked with an “A“ are ticked, please consult an appropriate air quality specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the ambient air pollution level have a negative impact on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? YES NO Signature of specialist:

Date:

If any of the boxes marked with an “H“ are ticked, please consult an appropriate health assessment specialist to assist in the completion of this section. Has a specialist been consulted? YES NO If YES, please complete the following: Name of the specialist: Qualification(s) of the specialist: Postal address: Postal code: Telephone: Cell: E-mail: Fax: Will the surrounding land use pose any unacceptable health risk on the proposed activity? YES NO If YES, specify and explain: Are any further specialist studies recommended by the specialist? YES NO If YES, specify: If YES, is such a report(s) attached? Signature of specialist:

6.

Date:

CULTURAL/HISTORICAL FEATURES

Alternative S1 Are there any signs of culturally or historically significant elements, as defined in section 2 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999, (Act No. 25 of 1999), including archaeological or palaeontological sites, on or close (within 20m) to the site? If YES, explain:

YES

NO x

Uncertain

If uncertain, conduct a specialist investigation by a recognised specialist in the field to establish whether there is such a feature(s) present on or close to the site. Briefly explain the findings of the specialist: Will any building or structure older than 60 years be affected in any way? YES NO x

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Is it necessary to apply for a permit in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 YES NO x (Act 25 of 1999)? If yes, please submit or, make sure that the applicant or a specialist submits the necessary application to SAHRA or the relevant provincial heritage agency and attach proof thereof to this application if such application has been made. Alternative S2 Are there any signs of culturally or historically significant elements, as defined in section 2 YES NO x of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999, (Act No. 25 of 1999), including archaeological or palaeontological sites, on or close (within 20m) to the site? Uncertain If YES, explain: If uncertain, conduct a specialist investigation by a recognised specialist in the field to establish whether there is such a feature(s) present on or close to the site. Briefly explain the findings of the specialist: Will any building or structure older than 60 years be affected in any way? YES NO x Is it necessary to apply for a permit in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 YES NO (Act 25 of 1999)? If yes, please submit or, make sure that the applicant or a specialist submits the necessary application to SAHRA or the relevant provincial heritage agency and attach proof thereof to this application if such application has been made. Alternative S3 Are there any signs of culturally or historically significant elements, as defined in section 2 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999, (Act No. 25 of 1999), including archaeological or palaeontological sites, on or close (within 20m) to the site? If YES, explain:

YES

NO

Uncertain

If uncertain, conduct a specialist investigation by a recognised specialist in the field to establish whether there is such a feature(s) present on or close to the site. Briefly explain the findings of the specialist: Will any building or structure older than 60 years be affected in any way? YES NO Is it necessary to apply for a permit in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 YES NO (Act 25 of 1999)? If yes, please submit or, make sure that the applicant or a specialist submits the necessary application to SAHRA or the relevant provincial heritage agency and attach proof thereof to this application if such application has been made.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

SECTION D: PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 1.

ADVERTISEMENT

The environmental assessment practitioner must follow any relevant guidelines adopted by the competent authority in respect of public participation and must at least – 1(a) Fix a notice in a conspicuous place, on the property where it is intended to undertake the activity which states that an application will be submitted to the competent authority in terms of these regulations and which provides information on the proposed nature and location of the activity, where further information on the proposed activity can be obtained and the manner in which representations on the application may be made. 1(b) inform landowners and occupiers of adjacent land of the applicant’s intention to submit an application to t he competent authority 1(c) inform landowners and occupiers of land within 100 metres of the boundary of the property where it is proposed to undertake the activity and whom may be directly affected by the proposed activity of the applicant’s intention to submit an application to the competent authority; 1(d) inform the ward councillor and any organisation that represents the community in the area of the applicant’s intention to submit an application to the competent authority; 1(e) inform the municipality which has jurisdiction over the area in which the proposed activity will be undertaken of the applicant’s intention to submit an application to the competent authority; and 1(f) inform any organ of state that may have jurisdiction over any aspect of the activity of the applicant’s intention to submit an application to the competent authority; and 1(g) place a notice in one local newspaper and any Gazette that is published specifically for the purpose of providing notice to the public of applications made in terms of these regulations.

2.

CONTENT OF ADVERTISEMENTS AND NOTICES

Advertisements and notices must indicate that an application will be submitted to the competent authority in terms of the EIA regulations, the nature and location of the activity, where further information on the proposed activity can be obtained and the manner in which representations in respect of the application can be made;

3.

PLACEMENT OF ADVERTISEMENTS AND NOTICES

Where the proposed activity may have impacts that extend beyond the municipal area where it is located, a notice must be placed in at least one provincial newspaper or national newspaper, indicating that an application will be submitted to the competent authority in terms of these regulations, the nature and location of the activity, where further information on the proposed activity can be obtained and the manner in which representations in respect of the application can be made, unless a notice has been placed in any Gazette that is published specifically for the purpose of providing notice to the public of applications made in terms of the EIA regulations. Advertisements and notices must make provision for site alternatives where appropriate.

4.

DETERMINATION OF APPROPRIATE MEASURES

The practitioner must ensure that the public participation is adequate and must determine whether a public meeting or any other additional measure is appropriate or not based on the particular nature of each case. Special attention should be given to the involvement of local community structures such as Ward Committees, ratepayers associations and traditional authorities where appropriate. Please note that public concerns that emerge at a later stage that should have been addressed may cause the competent authority to withdraw any authorisation it may have issued if it becomes apparent that the public participation process was inadequate.

5.

COMMENTS AND RESPONSE REPORT

The practitioner must record all comments and respond to each comment of the public before the application is submitted. The comments and responses must be captured in a comments and response report as prescribed in the EIA regulations and be attached to this application. The comments and response report must be attached under Appendix E.

6.

LOCAL AUTHORITY PARTICIPATION

Local authorities are key interested and affected parties in each application and no decision on any application will be made before the relevant local authority is provided with the opportunity to give input. The planning and the environmental sections of the local authority must be informed of the application at least 30 (thirty) calendar days before the submission of the application. Has any comment been received from the local authority?

YES NO x If “YES”, briefly describe the feedback below (also attach any correspondence to and from the local authority to this application): The local authority is the applicant

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

7.

CONSULTATION WITH OTHER STAKEHOLDERS

Any stakeholder that has a direct interest in the site or property, such as servitude holders and service providers, should be informed of the application at least 30 (thirty) calendar days before the submission of the application and be provided with the opportunity to comment. Has any comment been received from stakeholders?

YES NO x If “YES”, briefly describe the feedback below (also attach copies of any correspondence to and from the stakeholders to this application): See appendix E

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

SECTION E: IMPACT ASSESSMENT The assessment of impacts must adhere to the minimum requirements in the EIA Regulations, 2006, and should take applicable official guidelines into account. The issues raised by interested and affected parties should also be addressed in the assessment of impacts.

1.

ISSUES RAISED BY INTERESTED AND AFFECTED PARTIES

List the issues raised by interested and affected parties. See Appendix E Response from the practitioner to the issues raised by the interested and affected parties (A full response must be given in the Comments and Response Report that must be attached to this report): See Appendix E

2.

IMPACTS THAT MAY RESULT FROM THE PLANNING AND DESIGN PHASE

List the potential site alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the planning and design phase, including impacts relating to the choice of site alternatives. Alternative S1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: No direct negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design of the project. While planning is underway, the lower car park, its access road and the ablutions opposite the upper car park continue to be inundated by sand, hampering full use of these facilities. Indirect impacts: No indirect negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design of the project. People continue to be inconvenienced in terms of beach access. Cumulative impacts: No cumulative negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design of the project. Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city. Alternative S2 Direct impacts: No direct negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design of the project. While planning is underway, the lower car park, its access road and the ablutions opposite the upper car park continue to be inundated by sand, hampering full use of these facilities. Indirect impacts: No indirect negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design of the project. People continue to be inconvenienced in terms of beach access. Cumulative impacts: No cumulative negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design of the project. Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city. Alternative S3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative S1 Alternative S2 Alternative S3 The listed activities applied for in this The listed activities applied for in this Basic Assessment were designed to Basic Assessment were designed to address the impacts occurring address the impacts occurring presently at Sardinia Bay, including presently at Sardinia Bay, including the planning and design stage. the planning and design stage. List the potential activity/technology alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the planning and design phase: Alternative A1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: No direct impacts were identified. Indirect impacts: No indirect impacts were identified. Cumulative impacts: No cumulative impacts were identified. Alternative A2 Direct impacts: No direct impacts were identified. Indirect impacts: No indirect impacts were identified. Cumulative impacts: No cumulative impacts were identified Alternative A3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative A1: Alternative A2: Alternative A3: As no impacts were identified, there As no impacts were identified, there are no mitigation measures to are no mitigation measures to consider consider

3.

IMPACTS THAT MAY RESULT FROM THE CONSTRUCTION PHASE

List the potential site alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the construction phase: Alternative S1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: Dismantling of the ablutions block opposite the upper car park may leave rubble and timber behind if site cleanup is ineffective. Closure of the lower car park and access road may leave wire fencing, rubble and timber poles behind if site cleanup is ineffective. Upgrade of the jeep track to gravel road standard will damage natural vegetation in its path.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Upgrade of the jeep track to gravel road standard may create dust and noise pollution from the operation of earthmoving machinery. Construction of the ramp to the beach for emergency services will damage natural vegetation in its path. Indirect impacts: People will no longer be able to use the old amenities. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative S2 Direct impacts: Dismantling of the ablutions block opposite the upper car park may leave rubble and timber behind if site cleanup is ineffective. Closure of the lower car park and access road may leave wire fencing, rubble and timber poles behind if site cleanup is ineffective. After closure of the lower car park and access road normal private cars would no longer be able to reach the clubhouses. Municipal quad bikes or 4x4s would have to be used for bringing and collecting goods from the clubhouses. Municipal offroad vehicles are licensed to go on the dunes, private vehicles are not licensed for this. Indirect impacts: Minor interference with local ecological processes. People will no longer be able to use the old amenities. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative S3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative S1 Alternative S2 Alternative S3 Adoption and adherence to the Adoption and adherence to the Environmental Management Plan Environmental Management Plan provided in Appendix G forms the provided in Appendix G forms the most effective mitigation of the most effective mitigation of the impacts. impacts. List the potential activity/technology alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the construction phase: Alternative A1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: Small-scale removal of indigenous vegetation to clear the route for the boardwalk staircase would be necessary. Widening of the jeep track to 6 metres from the turnoff at Green Gate to the proposed new car park would result in the removal of indigenous fynbos vegetation. Given a width of 2.5 m at present, approximately 460 x 3.5 = 1610 m2 would be destroyed. For the proposed new car park at the edge of the escarpment approximately 3000 m2 of fynbos would be destroyed. Grading of the new car park would create dust and noise pollution. Construction may lead to veld fires from sparks during grinding or from smoking by workers. Littering at the construction site may occur from construction materials. Wildlife may be disturbed through noise. Construction workers may be tempted to set snares to catch animals for food. Construction of the ramp for emergency purposes to the beach would damage natural vegetation and promote erosion. Indirect impacts:

22


BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Minor interference with local ecological processes. People will no longer be able to use the old amenities. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative A2 Direct impacts: As the boardwalk is constructed, natural fynbos vegetation will be permanently destroyed. The area destroyed is approximately 500 m long x 3 m wide = 1500 m2. Digging of holes to place the walkway foundation poles into the ground and subsequent compacting of the sand to stabilise the foundations would occur. Construction may lead to veld fires from sparks during grinding or from smoking by workers. Littering at the construction site may occur from construction materials. Wildlife may be disturbed through noise. Construction workers may be tempted to set snares to catch animals for food. Indirect impacts: Minor interference with local ecological processes. People will no longer be able to use the old amenities. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative A3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative A1: Alternative A2: Alternative A3: Demolition of lower car park, access Demolition of lower car park, access road and toilet block should only road and toilet block should only occur once the new facilities are occur once the new facilities are operational. operational. Potential damage to fynbos Potential damage to fynbos vegetation by construction workers is vegetation by construction workers is readily mitigated by using the readily mitigated by using the smallest practicable team of smallest practicable team of construction workers for completion construction workers for completion of the job, and by educating them of the job, and by educating them about the sensitivity of the about the sensitivity of the vegetation to trampling. Potential vegetation to trampling. Potential impacts can be further reduced by impacts can be further reduced by locating the construction material locating the construction material stockpile on already disturbed stockpile on already disturbed ground, e.g. the upper car park. ground, e.g. the upper car park. Removal of indigenous vegetation Removal of indigenous vegetation can be minimised by careful can be minimised by careful selection of the route of the selection of the route of the boardwalk. It may also be possible to boardwalk stairs down to the beach. rescue at least some indigenous Creation of the new car park at the plants by planting them elsewhere, edge of the escarpment above the e.g. by using them for the clubhouses could be offset by revegetation of previously damaged closing the upper car park as well, sections. ripping the ground and allowing Adoption and adherence to the natural revegetation processes to Environmental Management Plan take place. provided in Appendix G forms the Effective stormwater control

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

measures will have to be implemented during construction of the ramp for emergency services to manage run-off. Adoption and adherence to the Environmental Management Plan provided in Appendix G forms the most effective mitigation of the impacts.

4.

most effective mitigation of the impacts.

IMPACTS THAT MAY RESULT FROM THE OPERATIONAL PHASE

List the potential site alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the operational phase: Alternative S1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: It is a benefits of this alternative that the existing footprint of the jeep track will allow a road upgrade. Compared to S2, he toilets will be closer and more regularly used. The walk to the beach will be a lot shorter ensuring the popularity of the beach is maintained. The reduction in the length of the boardwalk will be an aid in offsetting costs for the road upgrade and leveling of the new car park. Medical emergencies on the beach only will have to be transported on stretcher up the stairs before being loaded into a car for transport into hospital in town. Alternatively, a quad bike with a stretcher trailer could transport medical emergencies up the ramp. This is a much shorter distance than S2. The rescue helicopter could still land on the beach if necessary. People may attempt to drive into parts of the nature reserve where vehicle access is prohibited. Law enforcement and emergency services will have access to the beach (and the clubhouses) when needed. Indirect impacts: Crime will be deterred as access control will be improved, especially if the gatehouse option at the Green Gate turnoff is implemented. Cumulative impacts: The mobile dune will never be a factor preventing beach access. Alternative S2 Direct impacts: After closure of the lower car park and access road the beach and the clubhouses become inaccessible by vehicles. Medical emergencies on the beach will have to be transported on stretcher to the upper car park before being loaded into a car for transport into hospital in town. This is a longer distance than S1. In order to protect the boardwalk from being destroyed in a fire, a fire break with a width of at least 5 m would have to be cleared from natural vegetation and maintained. The fire break adds approximately 5 x 500 m = 2500 m2 to the 1500 m2 of vegetation destroyed during construction. Indirect impacts: With car parking restricted to the upper car park, vehicles will be out of sight for beachgoers. Fearing car break-ins some people may no longer come to Sardinia Bay beach to avoid the risk. Cumulative impacts: Natural sand movement would no longer be impeded. Alternative S3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative S1 Alternative S2 Alternative S3 Appropriately placed signage and A firebreak on the landward side of physical barriers should be erected the boardwalk where it follows the to keep vehicles out those parts of Sacramento hiking trail should be the nature reserve where motorised maintained. access is prohibited. Car guards could be placed on duty at the upper car park, although this is likely to be uneconomical during low season. NMBM Beach Office may have to assist the lessees of the clubhouses with offroad vehicles when goods too heavy to carry have to be transported.

List the potential activity/technology alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the operational phase: Alternative A1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: Some patrons may sidestep the boardwalk and attempt to reach the beach by making a shortcut path instead. This may lead to trampling of sensitive vegetation. The stairs leading to the beach will be visible from the sea but the car park on the top of the ridge will be largely obscured by vegetation. Indirect impacts: With Borelli’s path closed for riders, potential conflict between riders and bathers on the beach near the clubhouses is averted. Cumulative impacts: Sardinia Bay will once again fulfil its role as an important beach for the metro. Alternative A2 Direct impacts: There’s a threat that the proposed boardwalk is destroyed in a veld fire, which is common in fynbos. Unsanitary conditions are likely to arise as for many people the walk back up the stairs and along the boardwalk over a minimum distance of approx. 600 m is too far to use the formal toilets provided there. That means relieving yourself on the beach, in a rock pool, or behind a dune will become common place. With the lower car park closed for the public, some patrons may not use the boardwalk to reach the beach but walk across the active dune instead. This may lead to trampling of sensitive dune vegetation. The stairs leading to the beach will be visible from the sea but the boardwalk on the top of the ridge will be obscured by vegetation. Indirect impacts: With Borelli’s path closed for riders, potential conflict between riders and bathers on the beach near the clubhouses is averted. Alternative 2 makes no positive contribution to preventing car break-ins if there is no permanent car guard because cars are way out of sight. Cumulative impacts: With walking distances being fairly far patrons may not adopt the use of the facilities. Alternative A3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative A1 Alternative A2 Alternative A3 Putting up signage not to step off the Portable toilets could be placed at stairs. Use of the road to the beach the top of the stairs so that people for emergency and law enforcement don’t have to walk all the way back must be controlled by appropriate to the upper car park. However, means, e.g a boom. without an improved jeep track they would be difficult to service.

5.

IMPACTS THAT MAY RESULT FROM THE DECOMMISSIONING AND CLOSURE PHASE

List the potential site alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the decommissioning or closure phase: Alternative S1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: Small-scale trampling of sensitive vegetation by demolition workers may occur in the immediate vicinity of the boardwalk stairs and the ramp leading down to the beach. Demolition of the jeep track upgraded to gravel road standards is unlikely to occur as it provides access into the reserve. It is more likely that the road be upgraded to tar standard if it is found to deteriorate under heavy traffic from patrons. Indirect impacts: None were identified. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative S2 Direct impacts: No negative direct impact were identified in respect of the demolition of the boardwalk where it follows the Sacramento trail. Small-scale trampling of sensitive vegetation by demolition workers may occur in the immediate vicinity of the boardwalk stairs leading down to the beach. Indirect impacts: None were identified. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative S3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative S1 Alternative S2 Alternative S3 Should against expectations the Potential damage to vegetation by road ever be decommissioned, the the demolition team is readily

26


BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

standard mitigation measures to control, noise, petrochemical pollution will have to be adhered to.

mitigated by using the smallest practicable team of workers for completion of the job, by educating them about the sensitivity of the vegetation to trampling, and by working backwards towards the starting and end points.

List the potential activity/technology alternative related impacts (as appropriate) that are likely to occur as a result of the decommissioning and closure phase: Alternative A1 (preferred alternative) Direct impacts: Small-scale trampling of sensitive vegetation by demolition workers may occur in the immediate vicinity of the boardwalk stairs leading down to the beach. Demolition of the jeep track upgraded to gravel road standards is unlikely to occur as it provides access into the reserve. It is more likely that the road be upgraded to tar standard if it is found to deteriorate under heavy traffic from patrons. Indirect impacts: None were identified. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative A2 Direct impacts: No negative direct impact were identified in respect of the demolition of the boardwalk where it follows the Sacramento trail. Small-scale trampling of sensitive vegetation by demolition workers may occur in the immediate vicinity of the boardwalk stairs leading down to the beach. Indirect impacts: None were identified. Cumulative impacts: None were identified. Alternative A3 Direct impacts: Indirect impacts: Cumulative impacts: No-go alternative (compulsory) Direct impacts: The no-go option provides no solutions to the parking and access problems and could lead to considerable environmental damage. This would come mainly from patrons walking through the bush and trampling the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. With no direct costs involved, this would be the cheapest option, if knock-on effects are not considered. Indirect impacts: The unmanaged parking situation increases the risk of car accidents. Cumulative impacts: Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on tourism income of the city.

Indicate mitigation measures that may eliminate or reduce the potential impacts listed above: Alternative A1 Alternative A2 Alternative A3 In the (unlikely) event that the In the (unlikely) event that the facilities will be decommissioned the facilities will be decommissioned the removal should be guided by a removal should be guided by a dedicated environmental dedicated environmental management plan. management plan.

6.

PROPOSED MANAGEMENT OF IMPACTS AND MITIGATION

Indicate how identified impacts and mitigation will be monitored and/or audited. Alternative S1 Alternative S2 Alternative S3

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality must appoint a suitably qualified person as Environmental Control Officer (ECO), either from its own Environmental Health Directorate or from an environmental consultancy. The ECO must be comprehensively briefed on site management and environmental issues. The ECO monitors compliance with the EMP during the construction phase and advises the Project Manager on environmental matters relating to construction. The ECO must conduct regular audits of the construction site to ensure that environmental health, social wellbeing and safety on site is maintained until construction has been completed.

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality must appoint a suitably qualified person as Environmental Control Officer (ECO), either from its own Environmental Health Directorate or from an environmental consultancy. The ECO must be comprehensively briefed on site management and environmental issues. The ECO monitors compliance with the EMP during the construction phase and advises the Project Manager on environmental matters relating to construction. The ECO must conduct regular audits of the construction site to ensure that environmental health, social wellbeing and safety on site is maintained until construction has been completed.

Alternative A1 It will be the responsibility of the appointed ECO, Project Manager and Resident Engineer to ensure that mitigating measures and conditions attached to the environmental authorisation regarding environmental health, social wellbeing and safety during the construction activities is adhered to at all times.

Alternative A2 It will be the responsibility of the appointed ECO, Project Manager and Resident Engineer to ensure that mitigating measures and conditions attached to the environmental authorisation regarding environmental health, social wellbeing and safety during the construction activities is adhered to at all times.

7.

Alternative A3

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT

Taking the assessment of potential impacts into account, please provide an environmental impact statement that sums up the impact that the proposed activity and its alternatives may have on the environment after the management and mitigation of impacts have been taken into account with specific reference to types of impact, duration of impacts, likelihood of potential impacts actually occurring and the significance of impacts. Preferred alternative (S1, A1) While planning is underway, the lower car park, its access road and the ablutions opposite the upper car park continue to be inundated by sand, hampering full use of these facilities. However, no direct negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design activities of the project. This prediction is made with high confidence. During the construction phase, it is definite (>90% sure) that plants will be impacted upon during staircase construction, jeep track upgrade and emergency beach access ramp construction. This negative impact is permanent but it occurs at a very localised scale. The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as very low (of little real effect), and the prediction is made with high confidence. For the proposed new car park at the edge of the escarpment approximately 3000 m2 of fynbos would be destroyed. The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as low as it can be alleviated by the implementation of effective mitigation measures consisting of the closure of the upper car park (straight swap of land). The prediction is made with high confidence. Very low negative impacts of dust, noise and litter pollution probably occur (<50%) from the proposed construction works. Disturbance of wildlife and the starting of accidental veld fires by workers are assessed as improbable with effective mitigation measures in place. Formal rating of the impacts of the preferred alternative (S1, A1) for the construction phase is provided below. Rating of impacts during the construction phase for the preferred alternative Impact

Extent

Duration

Intensity

Probability

Significance

Status

Confidence

Destruction of vegetation

Site

Long term

Medium

Definite

Low

Negative

High

Dust, noise and littering

Site

Temporary

Low

Probable

Low

Negative

High

Wildlife disturbance

Local

Temporary

Low

Improbable

Low

Negative

Medium

Veld fires

Local

Short term

Low

Improbable

Low

Negative

Medium

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Significant positive environmental impacts (benefits) are expected to arise during the operational phase of the project. Benefits are an access route to the shore that is within easy walking distance and that is not prone to sand inundation. The benefits will definitely (>90% sure) accrue for the life time and they will be felt on a local scale. The environmental significance of the benefits is rated as high, and the prediction is made with high confidence. The visual impact of this alternative is rated as low because the parked cars will be mostly obscured by vegetation, except for the stairs and ramp section that will be visible from the sea. The prediction is made with high confidence. Law enforcement and emergency services will be able to access the beach and the clubhouses if necessary. This benefit will probably accrue for at least 30 years before the mobile dune will have swamped the bottom end of the lower car park. Crime will probably be deterred as access control will be improved and more patrons frequent the facilities. Some patrons may probably sidestep the stairs to the beach trampling vegetation and promoting erosion, but this negative impact is rated as low as it can be alleviated by the implementation of effective mitigation measures. Formal rating of the impacts of the preferred alternative (S1, A1) for the operational phase is provided below. Rating of impacts during the operational phase for the preferred alternative Impact

Extent

Duration

Intensity

Probability

Significance

Status

Confidence

Improved access

Local

Long term

High

Definite

High

Positive

High

Visual impact

Site

Long term

Medium

Probable

Low

Negative

Medium

Beach access for vehicles

Regional

Long term

High

Definite

High

Positive

High

Improved access control (crime prevention)

Local

Long term

High

Highly

High

Positive

High

Trampling of vegetation

Site

Low

Negative

Medium

probable Long term

Low

Probable

During the decommissioning phase, small-scale trampling of sensitive dune vegetation by demolition workers in the immediate vicinity of the structure is probable (>70% sure). This negative impact is of short duration (weeks) and occurs at a localised scale (500 m2) as workers will work backwards towards the starting and ending points of the structure. The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as very low (of little real effect), and the prediction is made with high confidence. This alternative is preferred because it combines convenient beach access with low visual impact from the beach. The mobile dune will never be an issue with this alternative. Second alternative (S2, A2) While planning is underway, the lower car park, its access road and the ablutions opposite the upper car park continue to be inundated by sand, hampering full use of these facilities. However, no direct negative environmental impacts are expected to arise from the planning and design activities of the project. This prediction is made with high confidence. During the construction phase, it is probable (>70% sure) that plants will be trampled upon. This negative impact is of short duration (weeks) and occurs at a very localised scale (1500 m2) because the boardwalk will follow the existing Sacramento trail and because workers will use the finished section of the boardwalk to reach the construction site. The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as very low (of little real effect), and the prediction is made with high confidence. It is definite (>90% sure) that plants will be impacted upon during staircase construction. This negative impact is permanent but it occurs at a very localised scale (Âą200 m2). The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as very low (of little real effect), and the prediction is made with high confidence. Very low negative impacts of dust, noise and litter pollution probably occur (<50%) from the proposed construction works. Disturbance of wildlife and the starting of accidental veld fires by workers are assessed as improbable with effective mitigation measures in place. Formal rating of the impacts of the second alternative (S2, A2) for the construction phase is provided below. Rating of impacts during the construction phase for the second alternative Impact

Extent

Duration

Intensity

Probability

Significance

Status

Confidence

Trampling of vegetation

Site

Temporary

Medium

Highly probable

Low

Negative

High

Destruction of vegetation

Site

Long term

Medium

Definite

Low

Negative

High

Dust, noise and

Site

Temporary

Low

Probable

Low

Negative

High

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Impact

Extent

Duration

Intensity

Probability

Significance

Status

Confidence

Wildlife disturbance

Local

Temporary

Low

Improbable

Low

Negative

Medium

Veld fires

Local

Short term

Low

Improbable

Low

Negative

Medium

littering

Positive environmental impacts (benefits) are expected to arise during the operational phase of the project. Benefits are an access route to the shore that is likely to be not prone to sand inundation. The benefits will definitely (>90% sure) accrue for the life time of the walkway (many years), and they will be felt on a local scale. The environmental significance of this benefit is rated as high, and the prediction is made with high confidence. There will also be negative impacts arising from the operational phase of the project. The potential negative visual impact of a manmade structure meandering along coastal escarpment will be present for the life time of the structure (many years). The visual impact is rated as low because the boardwalk will be mostly obscured by vegetation, except for the stairs section that will be visible from the sea. The prediction is made with high confidence. The long walking distance between the upper car park, along the boardwalk and then down the stairs to the beach results in several negative impacts, namely problems with sanitation, bypassing of the boardwalk by patrons (trampling of vegetation) and poor control over parked vehicles. These negative impacts are rated medium in intensity, they will be present for the life time of the structures (many years) and they have the potential to spoil the Sardinia Bay experience for families with young children. Even with a firebreak in place along the entire length of the boardwalk the risk of its destruction by the commonly occurring veld fires is still assessed as probable. After the closure of the lower car park access to the beach will no longer be possible. This negative impact is rated as a major blow for law enforcement and medical emergencies responses. Formal rating of the impacts of the second alternative (S2, A2) for the operational phase is provided below. Rating of impacts during the operational phase for the second alternative Impact

Extent

Duration

Intensity

Probability

Significance

Status

Confidence

Access not prone Local to sand inundation

Long term

High

High probable

High

Positive

High

Visual impact

Site

Long term

Low

Probable

Low

Negative

High

Problems with sanitation

Local

Long term

Medium

High probable

High

Negative

High

Trampling of vegetation

Site

Long term

High

Probable

Low

Negative

High

Problems with car Site break-ins

Long term

High

Highly probable

High

Negative

High

Veld fires

Short term

Low

Probable

Medium

Negative

High

Long term

High

Definite

High

Negative

High

Local

No vehicle access Regional to beach

During the decommissioning phase, small-scale trampling of sensitive dune vegetation by demolition workers in the immediate vicinity of the structure is probable (>70% sure). This negative impact is of short duration (weeks) and 2 occurs at a localised scale (500 m ) as workers will work backwards towards the starting and ending points of the structure. The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as very low (of little real effect), and the prediction is made with high confidence. This alternative is not preferred. No-go alternative (compulsory) Since the pressing problems arising from the mobile dune and from sea level rise would not be addressed with the no-go option it has a considerable environmental cost. Without an alternate formal beach access point it is definitely (>90% sure) certain that Port Elizabeth would be losing one of its most scenic beaches in the long term with concomitant negative impacts on recreation potential for its citizens and tourism income of the city. Those continuing to come there would soon make paths through the bush and trample the dune vegetation to get to where they want. The ablution facility would eventually be inundated by the sand, leaving no sanitation amenities. The lower parking area would be totally lost, decreasing the parking capacity of the beach. People would park their cars wherever they can find space. The cumulative impacts lead to ecological degradation of the coast in the long term (many years). The environmental significance of this negative impact is rated as high and the prediction is made with high confidence. Formal rating of the impacts of the no-go alternative is provided below.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Impact

Extent

Regional Loss of recreational beach facilities

Duration

Intensity

Probability

Significance

Status

Confidence

Permanent

High

Definite

High

Negative

High

Trampling of vegetation

Site

Permanent

High

Definite

High

Negative

High

Unsanitary conditions

Site

Permanent

High

Definite

High

Negative

High

Permanent

High

Highly

High

Negative

High

Local Ecological degradation of the coast

probable

Impacts were assessed in terms of the criteria presented in the table below. Criteria used to determine the significance ratings Criteria Spatial extent

Description The extent of impact describes the region in which the impact will be experienced:

• • • • Intensity or Magnitude of impact

Duration

Site specific Local (< 2km from site) Regional (within 30km of the site) National

The intensity describes the magnitude or size of the impact:

• • •

High: Natural and/or social functions and/or processes are severely altered Medium: Natural and/or social functions and/or processes are notably altered Low: Natural and/or social functions and/or processes are negligibly altered

The duration is the time frame in which the impact will be experienced:

• • • • • Probability

Temporary (<1 year) Short term (1 to 6 years) Medium term (6 to 15 years) Long term (15 - 30 years) Permanent

The probability of the impact occurring:

• • • •

Improbable (little or no chance of occurring) Probable (< 50% chance of occurring) Highly probable (50% - 90% chance of occurring) Definite (>90% chance of occurring)

The impacts are assessed (rated) in terms of their significance (high, medium, low), status and confidence through a synthesis of the criteria in Table 1. The rating system is outlined in the table below. Method for Rating of Impacts Class Significance

Description

• • •

High: impacts of high magnitude locally for longer than 6 years and/or regionally and beyond. The impact results in major alterations to the environment even if effective mitigation measures are implemented and will have an influence on decision-making. Medium: impacts of moderate magnitude locally to regionally in the short term. The impact results in medium alterations to the environment and can be reduced or eliminated by the implementation of effective mitigation measures. Low to very low: impacts will be localised and temporary. Impacts result in minor alterations to the environment and can easily be alleviated by the implementation of effective mitigation measures.

• Status

No impact: a potential concern or impact, which, upon evaluation, is found to have no significant impact at all. The status is the overall effect on the environment:

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

Class

Description

• • •

Confidence

Negative - a 'cost'

Neutral The degree of confidence in predictions based on available information and specialist knowledge:

• • •

8.

Positive - a 'benefit'

Low Medium High

RECOMMENDATION OF PRACTITIONER

Is the information contained in this report and the documentation attached hereto sufficient to YES x NO make a decision in respect of the activity applied for (in the view of the environmental assessment practitioner). If “NO”, indicate the aspects that should be assessed further as part of a Scoping and EIA process before a decision can be made (list the aspects that require further assessment): If “YES”, please list any recommended conditions, including mitigation measures, that should be considered for inclusion in any authorisation that may be granted by the competent authority in respect of the application: Based on the low environmental impact it is recommended that the proposed activities receive environmental authorisation. The EAP recommends that activity alternative A1 be adopted at site alternative S1. Best management and construction practices must be implemented by the contractor, from the onset of the construction works to ensure that disturbances to the nature reserve are kept to a minimum. The environmental management plan and other conditions of environmental authorisation must be adhered to. Given the location of the site, the contractor and all his personnel must take extra care to limit the disturbance of the natural environment to the absolute minimum.

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BASIC ASSESSMENT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM, PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

SECTION F: APPENDIXES The following appendixes must be attached as appropriate:

Appendix A: Site plan(s) Appendix B: Photographs Appendix C: Facility illustration(s) Appendix D: Specialist reports Appendix E: Comments and responses report Appendix F: Information in support of applications for exemption Appendix G: Other information

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Sardinia Bay Assesment Report