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Destinations / GO

If you’re traveling to Maui, you may also be required to take a second Covid-19 test upon arrival, this time for free; don’t plan a swift exit from the airport. Maui also requires you to show you’ve downloaded the AlohaSafe Alert app on your mobile phone, which notifies you of any Covid-19 exposure by others using the app. Once in the islands, expect to wear a face mask in public except when eating, drinking or exercising, including in parks and on beaches, especially when you can’t maintain 6 feet distance from people who aren’t in your traveling party. Social distancing is still required in stores, restaurants and other public places. Each county has slight variations on the rules, so click on the “While in Hawaii” link on the hawaiicovid19.com/travel for details. Not all restaurants have reopened, and sadly a number have closed for good. Some hotel restaurants, like Number Three at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, have been open during holiday weeks, then shut back down as soon as visitor numbers dropped. Especially given varying occupancy restrictions, it’s best to make reservations as far in advance as you can for your favorite spots. Admission and parking fees have been introduced or increased at a number of state parks, including Iao Valley and Makena on Maui; Kokee, Waimea Canyon and Haena

on Kauai; Akaka Falls and Hapuna Beach on Hawaii Island; and Diamond Head and Nuuanu Pali on Oahu. See dlnr.hawaii.gov/ dsp/ for details. Hanauma Bay on Oahu (honolulu.gov/parks-hbay) has raised admission for nonresidents to $12 and limited the number of daily visitors and reduced its days and hours of operation. Although the parks are open, at press time, visitor centers remained closed at Haleakala and Hawaii Volcanoes national

parks. However, the latter’s famed lava tube has reopened, featuring new lighting and oneway foot traffic, while the glow from a new eruption in nearby Halemaumau Crater can be seen at night. Check nps.gov./havo for the latest updates. Jeanne Cooper is the former travel editor for the San Francisco Chronicle. She supports the Hawaii Island Humane Society and the St. James’ Community Meal in Waimea, Hawaii.

Outrigger Waikiki is coming up with some creative ways to connect guests to local pro surfers. These include the Surfer In Residence program, their relationship with Faith Surf School, and the onsite Sunrise Shack, serving possibly the best açai bowls in town — created by surf influencers Koa Rothman and the Smith brothers: Alex, Koa and Travis. Surfers who drop in for the program include Kelly Slater, Bill Kemper and more. This summer the lineup includes Carissa Moore, Kai Lenny and Mark Cunningham, just to name a few. Not only will guests have the opportunity to talk shop with these pros, legendary board shaper and surfer Pohaku Stone is on site to discuss the history of how Hawaiians shaped the early surfboards. There are some Covid-19 adjustments to the program for safety. For those looking to just chill and work on their glide, the Duke’s Package includes daily breakfast or lunch for two, a discount board rental with Faith Surf School and the fourth night free. outrigger.com MT WANT MORE? For more tips on the best places to visit on our neighboring tropical islands, visit on marinmagazine.com/hawaii

BRYAN MCDONALD (SURF'S UP)

Surf’s Up!

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5/4/21 10:50 AM

Profile for Make It Better

Marin June 2021  

Thought-provoking stories, profiles of Marin personalities, journeys to destinations near and far — plus the best places to dine, shop, play...

Marin June 2021  

Thought-provoking stories, profiles of Marin personalities, journeys to destinations near and far — plus the best places to dine, shop, play...

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