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SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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PNM emission reduction debate

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The New Mexico Environment Department has received broad, bipartisan support for a proposed state plan to reduce emissions at San Juan Generating Station by the year 2017. Local government entities, energy industry organizations, state and federal elected officials and environmental groups have stepped forward to offer support for the alternative state implementation plan, or SIP, put forth after a year of negotiations between Public Service Company of New Mexico, the EPA and the Environment Department, according to Ryan Flynn, secretary designate of the department. “We had four different public meetings, including three in Farmington. Each was dedicated to discussing the economic and environmental impacts – the impacts on jobs in the region,” Flynn said of the process leading up to presenting the SIP to the Environmental Improvement Board during a two-day meeting that began Sept. 5 A7

New Mexico Environment Department Secretary Ryan Flynn speaks to the Environment Improvement Board during a two-day hearing beginning Sept. 5 at San Juan College. Bill Grantham, also with the Environment Department listens to Flynn’s testimony regarding the State Implementation Plan for San Juan Generating Station. – Debra Mayeux photo.

Prioritizing projects

City discusses hike to upgrade Council considering top 5 infrastructure, technology capital improvement projects DEBRA MAYEUX Council last raised rates. The Farmington Electric Utility would like the Farmington City Council to approve a rate increase that would raise residential rates by a dollar per month. Mike Sims, utility director, presented the plan to the Council during a Sept. 3 work session, saying there are repairs needed to the aging infrastructure which was last upgraded in 1983, when the

Two of the four councilors opposed the plan, but it was moved forward with Mayor Tommy Roberts saying “a rate increase is warranted and needed.” Roberts said that he believes the utility is a “good buy” with low rates and reliable service. He also pointed out that the utility has a $49 million cash reserve and has been managed by a team of fiscally responsible leaders. He

* electric

NMAC priorities

County reviews 2014 legislative list LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune San Juan County Commissioners adopted a resolution at the Sept. 3 regular meeting supporting six of the seven 2014 legislative priorities of the New Mexico Association of Counties, or NMAC. Every year, NMAC requires the state’s 33 counties to adopt a resolution that supports the organization’s legislative priorities, which are introduced by NMAC affiliates, or organizations representing areas of expertise in county government, such as

* NMAC

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Sutherland Farms Harvest Fest

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50¢

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FPD chief will leave at year’s end DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

Electric rate increase

Tri-City Tribune

VOL. 3 NO. 49

Westall retiring

State, local groups in favor of regional haze plan

* emissions

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DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

The city of Farmington has several capital improvement projects that staff would like to see completed in the next five years. It is the task of the City Council to prioritize the projects and send a list of the top five to the state in hopes of receiving funding for their development. The Council got a first look at the projects during the Sept. 3 Council work session, and they entered into discussions about which should receive funding. The projects include everything from the $19 million Piñon Hills

* improvements A18

Farmington Police Chief Kyle Westall has announced his plans to retire at the end of the year. Westall cited changes in the Public Employee Retirement Account, or PERA, as the basis for his decision to leave the department after 25 years of service. “The recent changes in PERA have prompted those eligible for retirement to evaluate the Westall loss of benefits which will occur if a member is not retired by next June. Specifically, anyone retiring past June 1st, will experience a delay in retirement cost of living raises,” he wrote in a resignation letter dated Sept. 4 and sent to City Manager Rob Mayes. “This will be a huge loss to the city,” Mayes wrote in a Sept.

* Westall A5

First in New Mexico SJC, Highlands create oil, gas management bachelor degree program DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

Dr. James Fries, president of Highlands University, as he signed the agreement. “This is a program that has been needed.” San Juan College approached Highlands with the idea about a year ago, and Highlands developed the oil and gas management degree from the ground up. It was done to help support the industry, which Fries said is a key industry to the state. “The oil and gas industry is a tremendous part of the Dr. Toni Pendergrass, president of San Juan College, left, and Dr. James Fries, pres-

San Juan College and New Mexico Highlands University have partnered to create the state’s first bachelor degree program in oil and gas management. The presidents from both institutions signed a memorandum of understanding Sept. 3 to begin offering the program to students from San Juan College’s School of Energy. “This is a very momentous and important occasion,” said * degree A2

Challenge met

Inside Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 Pawsitively Pets .........................A10 PRCA Tracks ..............................A11 Pets of the Week........................A12 Sports.........................................A13

ident of New Mexico Highlands University, talk before signing some 18 agreements and memorandums of understanding between the two entities just before the college board meeting at San Juan College. – Debra Mayeux photo

Real Estate.................................A17 Business.....................................A19 Classifieds..................................A20 Nosey Nellie ...............................A21 NYT Crossword..........................A22 Movies........................................A23

College wins challenge, BP contributes another $1M

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

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Rise Set 6:48 a.m. 7:32 p.m.

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NMAC the clerk’s office. This process allows NMAC to “demonstrate to the state legislature local and statewide support for NMAC’s legislative priorities,” according to Resolution 14-14-20, which was adopted by County Commissioners. The one legislative priority County Commissioners did not approve was the “notice of liens,” which requires liens to contain language that notice of the lien was sent to the property owners prior to filing the lien, according to the adopted resolution. Commissioner Jack Fortner expressed concerns regarding this priority because “By giving someone notice that you will file a lien they will transfer that property out

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of their name. I don’t think it would serve the public if you have to give someone a notice of a lien prior to filing the lien.” County Clerk Debbie Holmes said the reasoning behind this priority was “We have a lot of people who come in and a lien has been filed against them and they have no idea until they go to purchase something and this is showing on their credit report.” Fortner said he would support the priority if its language was revised to say “the notice of lien is sent to the property owner after the filing of a lien.” Holmes said she would bring his concerns to the next NMAC affiliates meeting to see if the language could be revised. If this happens, commissioners could revisit the approval of the priority. “The reason why we like the

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counties to review our (priorities) is so they understand there may have been something we missed. They can bring it back to our board and the affiliates and we will see if we need to tweak it a bit,” NMAC Executive Director Paul Gutierrez said. While Commissioners did not approve the “notice of liens” priority, the six priorities they approved included: • Delinquent property tax payments Amend state law to authorize County Treasurers to receive all payments of property taxes, including those properties that have been turned over to the Property Tax Division for collection and that have been placed on installment agreements. • Delinquent property tax list Clarify the responsibility of

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County Treasurers and the Property Tax Division, so that if a delinquent property does not appear on the most recent delinquent property tax list, that property reverts back to the County Treasurer for collection, and the penalty and interest collected are distributed to the county. • Medicaid benefits suspension Support suspension of Medicaid benefits in lieu of termination during incarceration in county detention facilities. • County correctional facility gross receipts tax Increase existing county local option gross receipts tax for county correctional facilities • Property tax equity Provide for a more equitable, transparent, and understandable property tax system. • Real property sales disclosure

Sun

Rise Set 6:53 a.m. 7:23 p.m.

Provide for the disclosure of sales data for all real property, which includes non-residential but not agricultural land or subsurface rights on mineral needs. These priorities were introduced by NMAC’s affiliates. Once the priorities are chosen by the affiliates, they are brought to NMAC’s board of directors who vote on the “most pressing issues” and what will be presented to the state Legislature, according Gutierrez. “These are the certain legislative issues that came to the NMAC board for consideration,” Gutierrez said. “We want to make sure our membership fully supports what we are doing. We sent the priorities to the counties for the commissioners to reaffirm that support so we have all the counties aware of what (NMAC) is doing and to endorse them.”

degree economy in New Mexico,” he said. “It’s important there be a new generation of people with oil and gas experience ready to move into management positions and become future leaders in the industry.” That was the idea behind developing the bachelor’s and master’s degree program with a focus on oil and gas management, said Randy Pacheco, director of the San Juan College School of Energy. “This degree is specifically for the oil and gas industry,” Pacheco said, explaining that the School of Energy gives students an opportunity to receive an associate degree and then get a ground-level job in the industry. “The student ends up working in the field and is a great lease operator,” he said. “Management wants to promote the worker into a management positions. If they go out and pursue a little bit of education with this degree program, they learn about human resources, how to budget and how to forecast – all skills they need in the industry.” It will cover such issues as oil and gas finance, accounting, oil and gas contract law, energy policy and the environment, petroleum economics and project management. The program will be offered in San Juan County, but it is an Internet-based program. “The focus is on the Four Corners region, but it is applicable nationwide,” said Buddy Rivera, director of the Highlands University Farmington Center. San Juan College President Toni Pendergrass added that this program will allow San Juan College students an opportunity to be successful and “pursue ambitious career goals.” In addition to the oil and

gas degree partnership, SJC and Highlands also signed 18 admission agreements that guarantee San Juan College students a seamless transition of SJC credits to Highlands to as they work to complete their bachelor’s de-

gree. The college also signed a second memorandum of understanding focused on professional and personal development. It is an agreement of reciprocity that will allow employees at both institutions

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an opportunity to take free courses at each institution. San Juan College employees have an opportunity to continue their education at Highlands with a four-credit hour tuition waiver for classes, while Highland’s employees receive the same

benefit at SJC. “This will help in professional development and advancement in their careers,” Pendergrass said. Fries added that his employees are excited to be able to use the Health and Human Performance Center

at SJC through this memorandum of understanding. “Our partnership with San Juan College has been phenomenal,” he said. For more information on the oil and gas business degree program call Highlands at 505.566.3805.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS AN ADVENTURE IN THE ARTS This exhibit from the collection of the Guild Hall Museum on Long Island includes 73 works of art from a stellar array of artists. They include: Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, Thomas Moran, Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning, Peggy Bacon, Chuck Close, Max Ernst, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Roy Lichtenstein and George Bellows among many others. The exhibit will be at the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center through Sept. 22. An Adventure in the Arts, selections from the permanent collection of the Guild Hall Museum, was organized by the Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, N.Y., in association with Landau Traveling Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Calif. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org THREE WATERS TRADING POST EXHIBIT The Three Waters Trading Post exhibit features a walkthrough replica of a 1930’s trading post, including a bull pen stocked with period goods and artifacts, pawn room and office showcasing jewelry and rugs. The exhibit is on display at the Farmington Museum in the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St.,

Farmington. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org MUSIC IN THE WINERY’S COURTYARD Enjoy live music & great wine at Wines of the San Juan from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. every Sunday through Sept. 22. Wines of the San Juan is located at 233 Hwy. 511 in Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan.com PICNIC IN THE PARK FOR PRESCHOOLERS Preschool children and their families bring lunch and meet at the Riverside Nature Center for a picnic from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., followed by a story or activity and a stroller-friendly walk in the park. Learn about plants, insects, birds, and all the interesting wildlife. Feed the friendly ducks and go home

in time for naps. This program continues weekly through to September. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI SEPT. 6 TEA PARTY SJC 9-12/TEA Party Patriot Lunch Meeting will be 11:30 a.m. on Friday at Los Hermanitos East Restaurant in Farmington. This is a forum meeting where all present can bring up issues that concern them. Several elected officials often attend. For more information call 505.324.1102.

SAT SEPT. 7 BOOTS & BREWS FEST Country music festival held at Riverside Park in Aztec. A full day of country music that will feature five national bands, food, brews, wine and vendors. Free admission for kids 12 and under. RV and tent camping available in the park. Call for details. Information: www.bootsandbrews.com SYCAMORE PARK YARD SALE Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., South of Murray Drive between Graham and Griffith Road, is hosting a Yard Sale and Craft Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept.7. Booths are available for $10 per table for both

2013 NISSAN

the yard sale and craft fair. To register for a booth, go to fmtn.org/spcc, under the quick links tab on the right. This will be an outdoor event, so bring the family and enjoy a day in the park! Come out and help us make this an annual event. For additional information call 505.566.2480.

SUN SEPT. 8 3RD ANNUAL “TRI-CITY CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT” Held at Hidden Valley Golf Course in Aztec, 72 teams of four will try to make a hole-in-one for a cash prize of $10,000. Other prizes throughout the day will be awarded. Information: 505.334.7646, 505.632.0880, or 505-3250279

FRI SEPT. 13 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION 300 to 400 hand woven Navajo rugs are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian art and craft vendors also onsite. Auction sponsored by Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing from 4 to 6 p.m. and auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

FRI SEPT. 13 SUN SEPT. 15 COLLECTOR CAR WEEKEND Friday, come cruise East Main Sonic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Car show registration is available. Saturday, the Swap Meet is from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Gateway Park Museum and Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., and on Sunday, the Annual Collector Car Show at Brookside Park in Farmington is from 9 a.m. to noon. Awards begin at 3 p.m. Information: 505.716.7100 or 505.327.6887

SAT SEPT. 28 FOUR CORNERS ANTIQUE POWER & TRACTOR SHOW Come to the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., and experience a bit of agricultural past. Enjoy antique tractors, engines, and vehicles at this annual event. A highlight of the show is the tractor pull. Information: 505.334.1339 BREWS, MEATS, BANDS From 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28, there will be music, food and 13 breweries at Lions Wilderness Park Amphitheater for a day of fun, food, music and beer. The barbecue cookoff will supply pork ribs in many styles. Bands including Boom, Little Miss

Chievous, Jose Villarreal and Those Devils will play during the day with Durango band Hello, Doll Face performing the main concert that night. The event is sponsored by Majestic Media, Distil, KOBF Channel 12, Big Dog 96.9, Kool 104.9 and KTRA 102. Tickets can be purchased on line at bmbfestival.com or at Distil. Tickets are $25 on line and at Distil and $30 at the gate. Call Distil or Majestic Media for more information. A REAL NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM Exhibits come to life at this annual event in the Farmington Museum, Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., in Farmington. Be a part of this fun family event for all ages. Information: 505.599.1147 or www.fmtn.org

SAT SEPT. 28 SUN SEPT. 29 HARVEST FESTIVAL & GREAT GRAPE STOMP Celebrating, in style with live music, juried art show, specialty foods, grape stomp competition, and many activities commemorating the state’s centennial at Wines of the San Juan, 233 Hwy. 511, Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan .com

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Need Dental Care Care, e, but can’t afford a f f ord it? i t? Put a smile back on your fface when New N ew Mexico Mexi xico Mission xico Mis Misssiio on of of Mercy Merrcy c y comes comes to to San San Juan Ju Juan County, Cou Coun nttyy, September S e p t e m b e r 13 - 14 14, 4, aatt M McGee cG e e P Park a rk During the large scale, two-day dental clinic, dental profeessionals will provide FREE services for adults and children who cannot aff ffo ord care. t No appointments needed t First-come, first-served t Come Early – Doors open at 5 a.m. t Dentists will not be able to address every dental issue a patient may have. During dental triage, a volunteer dentist will determine which procedures would be most beneficial to the patient. For more infformation: ww w ww..nmdentalffoundation.org or call 1-888-723-8820

The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Duff 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

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505-215-4559 505-486-6046 505-947-7872


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Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar ADULT EVENTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.5991380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. September 7 - Otis & the Rhythm September 14 - Off the Interstate September 21 - Grant & Randy September 28 - Vintage People Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. September 18 - Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – Noon Friday, Sept. 6 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14, $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. BIBLE READING IN NAVAJO 10 – 11:30 a.m. Fridays, Starting Sept. 6 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bible reading in the Navajo Language, taught by Dorothy Tewangoitewa. BACK AND HOME SAFETY 9 -10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex,

208 N. Wall Ave. Get basic tips on how to prevent back injuries by developing habits that reduce the strain on the back, how to prevent falls in the home, create a safer living environment, and low impact exercises to do at home. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by Todd, Thomas, and Therese from San Juan Regional Medical Center. Info: 505.566.2287. WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S 9 a.m. - ? Saturday, Sept. 14 Berg Park, at Scott and San Juan Boulevard. Team Big Deal is coordinated by Sharon Deal and will meet at the Berg Park Pavilion. Please come and walk to support the cause. Make a contribution to the team to help eradicate Alzheimer’s. Make a difference. Wear good walking shoes. For more information or to sign up for Team Big Deal, call 505.566.2287.

Tuesdays, Sept. 17 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Are you a character? Would you like to be? Join us for an exciting and creative time in Acting 101 – a beginner class for 50+ adults looking to create through acting. Discover the basics of acting through improvisation, games, monologues, and scene work. Have fun crafting new scenes and making new friends. Plan to attend Bottom of the Barrel’s Production of Robin Hood on Oct. 19; costs no more than $10. Details will be discussed on the first day of class. Performance from a showcase of scenes worked on in the final class. Class will be taught by Mellissa Souers, B.A. in Theater from Fort Lewis College, who has instructed people of all ages in acting, theater and film. For more information call San Juan College at 505.566.3121.

Learn about Health Directives, Powers of Attorney, and additional advice on steps to take in case of an unexpected illness that can lead to incapacitation, where someone else has to communicate your wishes. Handouts will be available and refreshments provided. Taught by Brenda Atencio with PMS – Northwest New Mexico Hospice and Home Care. Handouts and refreshments will be available. For more infor mation call 505.566.2287

ENCORE CLASS – ACTING 101 9:30 -11:30 a.m.

HEALTHCARE DIRECTIVES 10 -11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave.

CHANGES TO MEDICAID, 2014 10 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Medicaid is changing in New Mexico. If you have Medicaid or you assist people who use Medicaid, we invite you to join us for this presentation. Orlando Vasquez, Program Manager, Self-Directed Community Benefits HSD/MAD Centennial Care Bureau, will be here to explain the changes and what you need to do. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

The PERA change has prompted the two men to develop a reorganization plan for the department “to stabilize and phase out the impact of retirements,” Westall stated, after saying there were seven out of nine 9 commissioned staffers who might be leaving the agency before June 1, 2014. “This plan includes the conversion of two captain positions to deputy chief positions. The other captain

position will remain,” Westall wrote. There are three captains within the Farmington Police Department. They are Capt. Vince Mitchell, Capt. Keith McPheeters and Capt. Dan Calkins, and Westall wrote that Calkins would not seek a deputy chief position. Mayes added that he also will enter into a national search for a new police chief, who will come in under the reorganized staff

that will include two deputy chiefs, one captain, one commander and four lieutenants. “We will still be affected by some retirements, but this plan will allow for several of our highest ranked and most experienced members of the command staff to stay with us,” Mayes said in his memo. Westall was hired as a Farmington Police Officer on his 22nd birthday and stated that to date is has

COLOR TRIP 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Are you 60+? Join us for a day trip, Durango to Silverton. Bring your camera, good walking shoes, a jacket, and hat. Prepare for any kind of weather as we meander through the mountain passes and take in the glorious fall colors. Cost is $5; pre-registration and filled out trip form is required. You will be responsible for your own lunch. There are several restaurants in Silverton from which to choose, and you will have some time to shop before leaving for the return trip at 2 p.m. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information

Westall 4 memo to the Farmington City Council and staff. “Chief Westall and I have

been discussing and preparing for the PERA changes for many months.”

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been the best birthday gift he ever received. “I can't put into words how proud I am of our agency and all of you who make it an outstanding organization. I will miss the friendships from the department deeply,” he wrote. His future plans have “little do with law enforcement,” Westall stated. “I do plan to spend more time chasing muscle cars, frequenting beaches and pretending to be a farmer.”

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, September 6, 2013

A6

E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

Fax: 505-516-1231

Proposal not ideal, but it’s our best option As a lifelong resident of Farmington, I have seen the enormous positive impact that the energy industry has on our area. We are in a resource-rich part of the country with deep reserves of gas and coal that have provided meaningful jobs for thousands in the community. While energy helps our economy thrive, we have the best of all worlds, with an abundance of blue skies, access to a vital river and some of nature’s best habitats. From that perspective, it may seem out of character that I believe a plan to close two of the four units at the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station is the best path forward for our state. Yet that’s the conclusion I’ve ar-

rived at after more than a year of grappling with it. Before describing what led me to that conclusion, I should say that I would rather have our state’s original plan for San Juan in place. That plan would have required a relatively inexpensive technology on all four units to meet a federal visibility rule that applies to San Juan. The fact is, however, that plan was rejected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Instead the feds decided that San Juan would have to install technology that would cost almost $1 billion. Basic economics would tell you that with that kind of investment, generation from San Juan would lose its af-

GUEST EDITORIAL

Tom Taylor Representative District 1 fordability edge and be less competitive with generation from other non-coal sources. So while it might not happen overnight, the nine owners of San Juan likely would begin looking elsewhere for their electricity needs, and we’d be left without a backup plan. Given coming environmental regulations, over time that picture could become even bleaker. The other potential outcome of that scenario is that electricity rates for much of

our state could go up more than in the rest of the country, which would make it even harder to recruit new businesses to New Mexico, and make it tougher on a population that’s already economically challenged. Gov. Susana Martinez recognized the quandary we were facing last year and asked the N.M. Environment Department, PNM and the EPA to work together to attempt to find a better solution – and they did. The

compromise they reached would lead to the closure of two of four units at San Juan by the end of 2017, and the installation of less expensive haze-reducing technology on the remaining two units. The plan costs less than the federal plan that had been in place, but – more important to me – it includes some protections for the Four Corners economy. For example, PNM has agreed to build a natural gas power plant in the Four Corners area to replace some of the power it will lose from the shutdown. PNM also has agreed to no layoffs as a result of the closures. The company says it can achieve the reductions through at-

trition. Finally, it still keeps two of the four units operational. Another benefit of the state plan is that it reduces several emissions that are expected to be regulated in the near future. This will help protect consumers in the state from the costs of those future federal rules. The state plan also reduces fresh water use by about 50 percent, another important step in a state that is struggling with severe drought. The EIB meets on Sept. 5 in Farmington to consider this plan. It’s not a perfect plan, but I strongly believe it’s the best option for our state and our area.

Are Common Core standards needed in public schools? Back to school for millions of American children this year means a new set of academic standards. Called the Common Core State Standards Initiative, the new national benchmarks will help U.S. students compete with their peers internationally and leave them better prepared for college and work, proponents say. Forty-five states and the District of Columbia adopted the Common Core in 2010, enticed by Obama administration waivers to federal accountability rules as well as billions in Race to the Top funds. But a number of states, including Indiana, Michigan, Florida and Pennsylvania, are having second thoughts about the standards. Critics contend they’re too expensive and too intrusive on state prerogatives. Are the Common Core standards really necessary? Or just another case of federal overreach? Ben Boychuk and Joel Mathis, the RedBlueAmerica columnists, weigh in. BOYCHUK: Most parents have no idea what the

RED & BLUE STATES Joel Mathis & Ben Boychuk

Common Core has in store for their kids. A recent Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll found that two-thirds of Americans didn’t know the standards even existed. They’re in for a shock. The Common Core was sold as a voluntary, statebased solution to the problem of inconsistent academic standards. Unfortunately, the standards didn’t remain voluntary for long. The Obama administration in 2010 told cash-strapped state officials they would need to adopt the standards if they wanted a cut of the billions in onetime federal education stimulus funds. Incredibly, only a handful of states refused. But the real problem with the Common Core isn’t that the standards are one more way for the feds to take over K-12 education – though that’s bad. No, the problem is the standards just

aren’t very good. Common Core math is a rehash of the “new math” of yore, stressing “real world problems,” “higher-order thinking” and “collaborative learning,” at the expense of rudiments, practical skills and memorization. Worse, the Common Core language frameworks diminish the role of literature in favor of reading more nonfiction, such as “informational texts,” technical manuals, even newspaper editorials. What could be drearier? The United States has spent billions over the decades to raise academic standards and demand greater accountability, but even our advanced students seem to know little worth knowing. If you doubt it, peruse the National Assessment of Educational Progress, better known as “the nation’s report

card.” U.S. fourth-, eighthand 12th graders have shown little improvement in math, reading, civics, science or history in the past 20 years. It’s fair to say they’ve stagnated. Lost in the drive for “college and career readiness,” as the edu-wonks say, is the original purpose of American public education: to make good citizens, as opposed to productive employees. Viewed in that light, the Common Core is simply a new gloss on the same old faddish nonsense. In a few years, we may have a nation full of magnificent test-takers adept at “processing information” – but they won’t be educated in the least. MATHIS: Defending the Common Core standards shouldn’t be that difficult. Despite the conservative love of local decision-making about education, English – the formal, written kind – isn’t any different in Louisiana than it is in Oregon. Math? The same in Massachusetts as it is in New Mexico. There’s no reason,

really, to expect kids in one part of the country to learn less than kids in another, is there? But Common Core also seems kind of irrelevant to the problems facing education where I live. Forgive me for being provincial in my concerns: I live in Philadelphia, where my son begins kindergarten this fall at a public school. The school district is a mess – as of this writing, the teachers still don’t have a contract for the school year, the district is tens of millions of dollars short of the funds needed to operate, and so many schools have closed that many students will be venturing outside their neighborhoods to go to class. There’s plenty of blame to go around. The city originally, years ago, ran the schools into the ground. The state took over the schools more than a decade ago, but lately Republican Gov. Tom Corbett has slashed funding to local districts. The teachers’ pensions are becoming a bigger drain on the budget, yes,

but the local teachers are also underpaid compared to their counterparts in the rest of southeastern Pennsylvania. There’s violence and poverty and all the rest. Everybody’s to blame and nobody’s fixing anything. My kid’s school? Still has a good reputation. But the principal is asking parents to donate $613 per child this year. The only way to preserve a good public school, it seems is to operate it like it’s a quasi-private school. That obviously won’t work in the poorer parts of town. These are not just Philadelphia problems. But Common Core standards don’t really address them. The standards deserve a defense, probably. I’m just too worried about my own kid’s education to offer one. Ben Boychuk is associate editor of the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal. Joel Mathis is a contributing editor to Philadelphia Magazine online. Reach them at bboychuk@city-journal. org, joelmmathis@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/benandjoel.


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Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

emissions at San Juan College in Farmington. “It became clear we could not come up with an alternative that would receive an endorsement from everyone,” Flynn said, adding that some environmental groups wanted to see PNM completely shut down the San Juan Generating Station. The city of Farmington also opposed the SIP in a resolution adopted during a Sept. 3 Council meeting. The resolution stated that the plan would have a severe economic impact on the region through job loss, and therefore the Council could not agree with it. The alternative SIP would include the shutting down of Units 2 and 3 at San Juan Generating Station and the installation of Selective NonCatalytic Retrofit technology on units 1 and 4, so the plant can meet the Regional Haze requirements put forth by the federal rule adopted in 1999. PNM and the state had until 2007 to come up with a plan to reduce haze as well as nitrous oxide emissions from the plant. The state presented the EPA with a plan in June 2011. This included the best retrofit technology for the plant, with a less severe impact on jobs and coal-fired electrical output from the communi-

ty. The EPA rejected the plan, saying the state missed the 2007 deadline, which Flynn said was the result of a lack of interest in the project from the Bill Richardson administration. “I think it’s really important to emphasize we inherited a really bad problem. We were forced to consider a plan that the state promulgated after the 2007 deadline. That was a failure of leadership by the prior administration. They put the state and this region in a bad position,” Flynn said. Governor Susana Martinez sued the EPA in the Tenth Circuit Federal District Court and the case is ongoing. The alternative SIP came as a result of the parties sitting down outside of that lawsuit to try to come up with a plan to address the federal environmental regulations being imposed on the plant. “The state decided it was best for New Mexicans to move forward with a plan that included the shutdown of two units,” Flynn explained. “It will improve visibility, cut down on pollution, and conserve water.” Under the SIP, PNM has agreed to ensure there will be no layoffs, despite the shutdown. The company also promises to build a 200 megawatt peaking natural

gas plant in San Juan County, which will provide approximately 300 construction jobs. PNM also has given more than $1 million to the Navajo Nation to provide for educational opportunities within the tribe and has donated more than $100,000 to Four Corners Economic Development. “We cannot say this plan is perfect, but it is the best path forward in a very difficult situation,” Flynn told the Environmental Improvement Board. Despite the plan not being perfect, the San Juan County Commission passed a resolution during its Sept. 3 meeting in support of the SIP. “The SIP was the best option there was, and us voting against it could result in more harm and result in the loss of more jobs,” County Commissioner Jack Fortner said during the meeting. The city of Farmington voted against the SIP in a three-to-one vote, where Councilor Mary Fischer voted against the resolution that opposed the SIP. This left PNM Spokeswoman Valerie Smith telling the Tri-City Tribune that the company would have liked to have had the Council’s support along with other governmental entities as it presented this plan to the

Environmental Improvement Board. “We recognize a two-unit closure will have an economic impact and we have looked for ways to minimize the economic. We think we can achieve workforce requirements through attrition,” Smith said. “We would like the Council’s support, but we recognize they have concerns.” One big portion of the plan that has received public support from the Navajo Nation and tribal members speaking at the meeting is that PNM is investing in workforce training for Navajo tribal members. “I’m in support of the PNM and the state plan,” said James Pioche, president of one of the chapter houses near San Juan Generating Station. “Of course we would prefer that all units stay open, but we also understand compromise. We can plan and do our best to prepare for what comes next.” Pioche said his people are happy about the new natural gas plant as well as the contribution to the Navajo workforce plan. “Many of our members will be able to obtain training to further their career goals in energy. This mitigates the economic impact and helps create a future for the Navajo people, especially our youth.”

Clayton Benally, a union worker, also offered his support to the plan, despite concerns about the plant’s longevity. “We’ve negotiated wages with the company. These wages are spent here in the local community,” Benally said. “You’re not only seeing the attack on the coal industry at PNM, but also at APS. This is a good plan; it benefits the community.” James Crawford agreed there has been an attack on the coal industry and therefore he opposed to SIP, blaming the outcome on the “environmental, global warming evangelists who are preaching” against fossil fuel. “They are not going to be happy until affordable electric energy is not available,” he said. Crawford pointed out that windmill and solar powered plants would take up a great deal of acreage in the area and not produce as much energy. “Any idea that renewables could replace largescale fossil fuel generation is grounded in rainbows and fairy dust,” he said, adding that the natural-gas plant would be reliable. It was the proposed natural-gas plant that led Steve Henke, president of the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association, or NMOGA, to speak in favor of the SIP, saying that “NMOGA and its mem-

bers are here to endorse the SIP. We do that for several reasons. It does appear to meet the federal mandate. I believe it provides the best prospect, long-term for the preservation of jobs in the Four Corner,” Henke said, adding that NMOGA would endorse any plan that includes a natural gas plant. “That conversion to natural gas will have less impact long term.” The SIP will have less of an environmental impact, according to Smith, who said it will surpass President Obama’s pledge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It will reduce sulfur dioxide emissions by 67 percent, particulate matter by 50 percent, carbon monoxide by 44 percent, carbon dioxide by 50 percent, volatile organic compounds by 51 percent, nitrogen oxide by 62 percent, coal ash by 48 percent and mercury by 50 percent. There also will be an estimated reduction in water use by 50 percent. Public comment will continue throughout the day on Friday, Sept. 6, in Room 7103 at San Juan College, and once the Environmental Improvement Board makes its decision on the SIP, the plan will be forwarded to the Public Regulation Commission for approval.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

September 28 • 11am - 7pm

bands

meats

brews

Lions Wilderness Park and Amphitheater

featuring styles of BBQ Ribs from around the country:

CHICAGO

basted spare ribs ST. LOUIS KANSAS CITY BAKED & GRILLED dry rub memphis baby back ribs TEXAS

HELLO DOLLFACE Little Miss Chievous Jose Villareal BoomTown Those Devils

Tickets $25 in Advance online or at distil and $30 at the gate.

schedule of events BBQ Rib Cook Off and Tasting 11AM-3PM Beer Tasting Event 11AM-5PM Live Music 11AM-4:30PM Concert Hello DollFace 5PM-7PM Art Show Vendors + Food Vendors

21 AND OVER ONLY EVENT

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AND

MM LIFE LEISURE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

A9 (Right) Metal sculpture by Dick Bollie. (Below) Ceramic by Toni Trosky.

Feat of Clay show benefits local P.O.E scholarship program The public is invited to come out and enjoy a crisp fall evening from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 20, with art, food, wine and music as the Feat of Clay Gallery in Aztec hosts the second annual P.E.O. scholarship fundraiser. The silent auction, cohosted by P.E.O. Chapter

AE, will feature Feat of Clay member artists along with several local artists who have come together to provide beautiful and unique works of art that will go to the highest bidder after the two-hour event. One hundred percent of the money raised goes to P.E.O. – Philanthropic Educational Organization – scholarships to help women in our community continue, or begin, their college education. “P.E.O. is an organization where women celebrate the

advancement of women,” said Lona Warne, P.E.O. member and coordinator of the auction. “There are no age restrictions for college bound candidates and no specified area of study restrictions. Many women in our community just need some monetary assistance and we try to provide that hand up.” While Chapter AE provides one or more scholarships to San Juan College each year, they also provide local women with scholarships to other institutions of higher learning. “This is our biggest fundraiser of the year,” said Warne, “and I am especially grateful to all my artist friends at Feat of Clay and in the community who are supporting this.” In addition to Feat of Clay member art, several San Juan College students and instructors are donating beautiful pottery, glass and encaustic art to the auction. “Last year we had more than 70 items in the silent auction. This year looks to be even bigger,” said Warne.

Besides works of art, P.E.O. members are donating gift baskets, baked goods and an array of other unusual gifts to the twohour auction. Bruce and Marj Black are once again donating a night at the Kokopelli Cave B&B to the list. Music during the evening will be provided by local favorite, Gypsyfire. The heART Auction will be set up all day Friday, Sept. 20 for early viewing. Bidding will end promptly at 7 p.m. P.E.O. educates women through scholarships, grants, awards, loans and stewardship of Cottey College for Women in Nevada, Mo., owned and operated by the P.E.O. Sisterhood since 1927. For more information on P.E.O. and their scholarship programs, visit www.peointernational.org. Feat of Clay Gallery is a co-op gallery that features local artists and is located at 107 S. Main Ave., Aztec. The hours of operation are Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

(Above) ‘Fisherman’s Wharf’ by Curt Stafford. (Left) ‘Two Whistles’ by Richard DuBoise. (Below) Pottery by Fiona Clarke.

For more information about the silent auction or to donate items, please contact Lona Warne at

505.320.5634 or email her at: lona1207@yahoo.com. Tax receipts will be issued for all donations.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

library events Get the latest information about what’s happening at the Farmington Public Library. Follow us on twitter @FarmPubLib. The Farmington Public Library’s annual book sale will be Saturday, Sept. 7, through Wednesday, Sept. 11, during regular library hours. Saturday, Sept. 7 – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8 – 1 to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday, Sept. 9, 10, 11 from – 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Volunteers are needed for unpacking boxes on Friday, Sept. 6, starting at 8:30 a.m. Volunteers must be able to lift 40 pounds, and will be asked to wear “work clothes,” including closed toed shoes. For more information and to sign up to help, please contact the library at 505.599.1270. Thursday, Sept. 5 – 6:30 p.m. The Mayor’s Teen Advisory Council, MTAC, will meet in the Farmington Public Library Teen Zone. MTAC is open to all San Juan County teens who would like to make a difference in their community. For more information about MTAC and other teen programs, please call 505.566.2201 or log on to www.infoway.org. Sunday, Sept. 8 – 2 p.m. Celebrate “International Literacy Day” at the Farmington Public Library with a Story

Time and Activity: La Gallinita Roja. First grade students who show their library card will receive a canvas book bag, while supplies last. For more information, go to www.infoway.org and click on the events calendar. Tuesday, Sept. 10 – 9:45 a.m. Come to the Farmington Public Library for a free computer class. Learn the basics in today’s “Intro to Internet” class. Registration is required and may be completed by calling 505.599.1270. Thursday, Sept. 12 – 9:45 a.m. Come to the Farmington Public Library for a free computer class. Learn the basics in today’s “Intro to Email” class. Registration is required and may be completed by calling 505.599.1270. Tuesday, Sept. 17 – 6 p.m. The Farmington Public Library will be presenting a slide-illustrated program covering 400 years of livestock history in New Mexico, based on William W. Dunmire’s latest book New Mexico’s Spanish livestock heritage: four centuries of animals, land, and people. For more information about this free event call 505.599.1260.

TUESDAY – SEP 10 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Farmington Chamber of Commerce 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Chloride Bank: the bank never opened but has been restored and today is a café 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday WEDNESDAY – SEP 11 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: San Juan Regional Medical Center 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Cady Wells: artist who found Santa Fe a place where he could be gay and accepted 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk THURSDAY – SEP 12 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: 4 Corners Economic Development 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Urton Reservoir: Planned expansion of Urton Lake never happened making nearby Kenna a boom and bust town 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews FRIDAY – SEP 13 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: San Juan Co.

A change of diet, exercise may do the trick I distinctly remember in high school meeting a new girlfriend’s parents at her house. While sitting on the couch a now forgotten-named English bulldog came to rest by my feet and I of course obliged with the courtesy petting. Within a minute or two, a very foul odor filled the room and I really did not know the cause and was aghast thinking this newly introduced family thought it was me. As I sheepishly peeked up, I noticed the family smiling which turned into a laugh. Yes, this dog had predictably passed gas and I was the most recent victim. I have since learned that some breeds, especially the short-nosed breeds such as bulldogs and boxers, had a higher tendency to

Thursday, Sept. 19 – 6 p.m. In honor of Hispanic Heritage month, the Farmington Public Library will celebrate the seminal work, Bless Me, Ultima, by New Mexico’s own Rudolfo Anaya, with a free screening of the movie based on his book. For more information, please call 505.599.1260. Sheriff’s Reserve Program 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Massacre Cave in Canyon de Chelly: Spanish army killed more than 100 old men, women, and children in efforts to stop Navajo raiding 7:30 a.m.: San Juan College Chautauqua Program Noon – Book Buzz: a Best of program

MONDAY – SEP 9 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: San Juan College HHPC 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Tribal Bison Herds: Inter-tribal bison cooperative working to restore buffalo herds to the west 7:30 a.m.: Archeologist Paul Reed 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News

Does your dog have gas? PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson be flatulent! Thus, today’s article is on flatulence. The excessive formation of gas in the stomach or intestine is referred to as flatulence. Flatus is the medical term used to describe air or gas expelled through the anus. The term originated from the Latin flatulentus which means “a blowing.” The most common cause is a change in diet or from the dog eating something new or spoiled (dietary indiscretion). Most cases of chronic flatulence are caused by a diet that is poorly digested by the

dog. These poorly digestible diets cause excessive fermentation in the colon and subsequent gas formation. Soybeans, peas, beans, milk products, highfat diets and spicy food are all commonly associated with flatulence in dogs. Dogs and cats are lactose intolerant and if they are fed milk or dairy products they will often experience flatulence and GI upset. A dog that is being fed a premium diet and is still experiencing flatulence should be tested for malassimilation – meaning either poor di-

gestion or poor absorption of nutrients from the diet. Dogs that swallow air, especially those that eat rapidly, are more likely to experience flatulence. Overweight, obese and sedentary dogs are at higher risk for developing chronic flatulence, regardless of diet. The most common clinical signs include expulsion of gas from the anus, with or without odor, mild abdominal discomfort, mild stomach distention or bloating, and excessive gaseous sounds or rumbling from the abdomen – borboygmus. If the dog has an underlying malassimilation problem, clinical signs will also include loose stools or diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss.

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KNMI Vertical Radio 88.9 FM Farmington 90.5 FM Durango, CO 90.9 FM Pagosa Springs, CO 100.9 FM Cortez, CO www.VerticalRadio.org MONDAY – FRIDAY 5 a.m. – 5:30 a.m.: Focus on the Family 5:30 – 6 a.m.: Adventures in Odyssey 6 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.: "The Morning Show" with Devin and Rachel 9:30 – 10 a.m.: "Four Corners Spotlight" with Jim Baker Sept. 9: San Juan Safe Communities – Greg Allen Sept. 10: Total Joint NeuroSpine - Jennifer Boyd, Todd Thomas Sept. 11: Red Mesa Leadership Dev. Network – Caleb Dickson Sept. 12: When Your Parents Need You – Glenn Perica, Rebecca Morgan Sept. 13: Cancer Walk-A-Thon – Carrie Olson 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.: "The Lunch Crunch" with Leah 3 – 8 p.m.: "The Drive" with Donnie SATURDAY Noon – 2 p.m.: The Weekend 22 10 – midnight: The HypeChristian Hip Hop Show SUNDAY 5 – 6 a.m.: Focus on the Family's Weekend Magazine 10 a.m. – noon: The Weekend 22

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A11

Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Deep-Sky Extravaganza

Learn about deep space at AstroFriday on Sept. 6 has started. If weather permits, we will offer a free public stargaze with telescopes at 8:30 p.m., after the last show, in the courtyard behind the planetarium. The stargaze will last a maximum of one hour. There is no capacity limit for

evening, then in the morning. We will also give out autumn sky maps while supplies last. The show times are Sept. 6, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. There is no admission charge, but there is a maximum seating capacity of 60 in the planetarium, so seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis. In order to preserve dark-adaption, there is no late admittance into the planetarium once the show

The season-opening presentation at the Planetarium will be September Deep-Sky Extravaganza, which will showcase the September night sky as it looks this year, highlighting, of course, the fantastic offerings of star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies that we can see in the evening sky. Besides deep-space objects, we will also see where the Moon and all the planets are, first in the

Win a Huffy or a Magna – bicycle, that is! Come to the Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., through the month of September, for your chance to win a boys’ Huffy bicycle, or a girls’ Magna bicycle. Any child that comes in for public swim, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday,

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hope to be able to show you the following deepsky objects: the globular cluster M13 in Hercules, the ghostly Ring Nebula, M57, in Lyra, the starstudded Wild Duck Cluster, M11, in Aquila, and the Dumbbell Nebula, M27, in Cygnus. We might

even be able to glimpse M31, the Andromeda Spiral. We hope you’ll be able to join us.

for Sept.17 to Paint like Andy Warhol and create Pop Art. Registration is required and can be completed by registering online at fmtn.org/museums, or by coming in to the museum. The cost is $5 per person. If you have kids and have been attending Musical Mondays at the Museum from 10 to 11 a.m., please note that the program is now called Tunes for Tots. This music, story-telling, and crafts program will remain the same, but will now be offered twice a week on Mondays and Wednesdays, starting in September. Come early and be prepared to get musical and messy! The recommended age for Tunes for Tots is Pre-K through first grade. Admission is free. For more information on all of these exciting programs, please call 505.599.1169.

the second Sycamore Park Community Center Yard Sale and Craft Fair on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Booths are still available for $10 per table for both the yard sale and craft fair. This will be an outdoor event, so take the family and enjoy a day in the park! Come out and help make this the best yard sale ever! Sycamore Park is located at 1051 Sycamore St., south of Murray Drive between Graham Road and Griffith Avenue. For additional information call 505.566.2480 or www.fmtn.org/spcc.

For more information, please feel free to call David Mayeux at 505.566.3361, or email at mayeuxd@sanjuancollege.edu

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the stargaze, so please join us for views of multiple deep-sky objects. Binary star targets for the evening feature the always-spectacular Albireo in the Northern Cross, the “double-double� stars Alcor and Mizar, and our binary north star, Polaris. We

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can put their name in the drawing box. The drawing will be Monday, Sept. 30. you need not be present to win. For more information call 505.599.1167. Museum madness On Friday, Sept. 6, at 6 p.m., meet at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St., for a walking tour for a look at downtown Farmington’s fascinating early h i s t o r y. Learn a little about the devastating Main Street fires, early architecture, pioneer community builders, and more! This program is free and available to all ages. Transportation will be provided. To celebrate the opening of the visiting exhibition, “An Adventure in the Arts,� the Farmington Museum will be offering a fine arts program for adults on Tuesday evenings, continuing through Sept.17 from 10 a.m. – noon. Each class will feature an art project in the style of an artist featured in the exhibition. On Sept. 10, paint like Jasper Johns and create 3D paintings. Mark your calendar

Everything must go Take all the stuff from your fall cleaning to the Sycamore Park Community Center and join them for

Keep your back healthy and strong If you are 50+, you can’t afford to miss this clinic, Back Care & Home Safety, presented by San Juan Regional Medical Center at the Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center, behind the Annex, 208 Wall Ave. The program will be on Wednesday, Sept. 11, from 9 to 10 a.m. Find out how to prevent back injuries by learning new habits; get tips on how to create a safer living environment; and learn some low impact exercises for the home. Handouts will be provided. Free. For more information please call 505.599.2287.

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A12

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

aztec pets of the week

Hi. We are Sinch and Blue Bonnet. Sinch is a loving 1 þ-year-old, male, Lab/Border Collie. Blue Bonnet is a pretty 6-month-old female Blue Heeler. These two would do great on a ranch or farm. Both are great with other dogs, kids and cats. They make awesome companions.

My name is Luther and this is my big buddy Zolo. I am a handsome 1-yearold male Lab/German Shepherd mix. I love other dogs and kids. Zolo is a striking 1 þ-year-old male Husky. He loves older kids, but will have to be the only fur child. Will you open your hearts and big fenced-in yards to us?

The Aztec Animal Shelter, 825 Sabena, is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily.

farmington pets of the week

Dixie Lee is a 1-year-old Labrador Retriever who is good with other dogs. She loves to run and play and wants to go home with you today. She is very sweet, loving and kind, and she enjoys attention more than anything else in the world.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given

mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal. Zeppelin is an 8 –month-old male Bernese Mountain dog that loves to run and play. He is friendly, and sweet, and does great on a leash. He is looking for a loving home.

by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6

Fun and more fun are these two. Just throw down a paper bag and see the never-ending free entertainment. Soot is a spectacular 2year-old male black cat. Cleo is a rowdy 4-month-old female Tabby. These two will chase anything that moves. Please adopt today.

These are China and Scooter. China is an adorable little 1-year-old female Shar Pei/Pit Bull mix. Scooter is a cutie pie, a 3-year-old spayed Greyhound mix. These two girls are good with cats, other dogs and kids. Both love being at your side and making you happy. VERY good girls. 24-Hour Emergency Water & Fire Restoration

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(Right) Druno has the biggest smile that lets you know everything is wonderful in the world. He would make a great friend and would be wonderful for children. He is a heeler/German shepherd mix with a great personality.

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MM SPORTS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

A13

More work to be done

Lobos drop season opener to UT-San Antonio 21-13 One thing is obvious after week one of the college football season. The University of New Mexico football team has a lot of work to do. The Lobos dropped their season opener to UT-San Antonio, 2113. The Lobos were up 13-0 but gave up 21 unanswered points. Offensively, they couldn’t get much going. Cole Gautsche’s touchdown pass to Marquis Bundy was their only offensive score. Gautsche led the Lobos in rushing with his 118-yard effort. But his pounding came with a price. UNM head coach Bob Davie made it official on Monday announcing Gautsche would not play this week. Junior college transfer Clayton Mitchem will get the start at UTEP. Gautsche suffered concussion-like symptoms Saturday and was pulled out of the game in the fourth quarter. Mitchem replaced Gautsche and finished 2of-5 passing for 19 yards. He was also sacked once. “It’s very unfortunate for Cole,” Davie said. “There’s not a player in college football who worked harder over a year’s period of time than Cole Gautsche.” Davie said Gautsche was

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta improving on Sunday, but “took a step back” on Monday and was dismissed from team meetings. “Gautsche was having trouble with bright lights,” explained Davie. Davie said he doesn’t plan to limit the playbook just because Mitchem hasn’t started a game at the FBS level. “I know just as much as Gautsche knows,” said Mitchem. “I just have to make the right reads and be confident in myself.” Mitchem was named the Southwestern Junior College Football Conference Player of the Year in 2012 for Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College. He threw for school records of 2,435 yards and 27 touchdowns and also ran for 728 yards with 13 TDs in ‘12. “Clayton Mitchem throws the ball quickly and has good velocity,” said Davie when asked about his starter. “He’s fast and smooth and that’s a good combination. He’s got all the skills, he just

lacks experience.” Former New Mexico Military Institute standout David Vega will be the Lobos’ backup quarterback in El Paso this weekend. One aspect of the UTSA loss that disappointed Davie was that he didn’t play more guys. “There’s no way Kasey Carrier should play 61 plays in that game.” “You’re so afraid someone’s going to make a mistake that you don’t put another guy in. We’ve got some guys behind the starters who are pretty good. I don’t care how young they are, we have to get more guys in the game. I understand why. When the game is so close and we have no margin for error – but we have to bite the bullet and get guys in there.” So what does Davie expect from the Miners? “We know they’re going to be a man-pressure, up in your face kind of team. It will be a good challenge for us.” One bright spot out of

Set configuration might be holding you back The United States Golf Association allows for golfers to carry a maximum of 14 clubs in a golf bag for tournament play. The choices that people make is a continual fascination of mine, especially players that shoot scores that are higher than 85 for 18 holes. The first thing I look at

FIRST TEE Tom Yost in a bag of a mid to high handicap amateur player is their driver. Most drivers that I notice for these play-

ers have too little loft, meaning that the angle of the

* Yost A14

Dungeons & Dragons for the Sports Nerd Draft days are over and it’s time to get your lineup together and make some guesses on who is improved and who has stepped back. It’s hard to work matchups when you haven’t seen anyone play yet, especially since the preseason really doesn’t tell you much. Each week the Fantasy

THE FANTASY GEEK Rick Hoerner

Geek will give you some unsolicited advice on playing NFL fantasy football. Realizing that the Thursday

night game is already over, players from Thursday’s

* Geek A15

Clayton Mitchem

Saturday’s loss was UNM’s punting game – but when your punter is the player of the game, you have reason for concern. Regardless, senior punter Ben Skaer punted seven times for an average of 47 yards per kick. He hit three punts 50 yards or more and landed four inside the 20, with two of them downed at With cross country and golf beginning this week, fall sports get into full swing. Football teams continue their non-district season, and tournaments abound for high school soccer and volleyball. Time to put the mileage on the car as teams crisscross the state preparing for district play. Last Week … Week No. 1 of high school football is in the books as the local teams look to improve on what is usually a mess of a week for teams, officials, coaches and fans. The teams look to fix their mistakes, as do official crews getting back in the groove. Coaches look to improve on their game plans and fans – especially in Farmington – work on telling time to

the one. The Lobos did take a loss on special teams. Davie said kick returner/wide receiver Chase Clayton will miss the next couple weeks of action. Clayton suffered an injury to a ligament in his knee in the second half on Saturday. Davie hopes Clayton will be back by their game

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner get to the game promptly. On the field the local teams produced mixed results. Aztec was sent home early by the No. 2 ranked Los Lunas Tigers falling 50-0. Navajo Prep did likewise to Thoreau whipping the Hawks 50-0. Farmington blitzed Gallup 48-0. Kirtland Central knocks off Bayfield 28-6. The games of the weekend were Bloomfield and St. Michaels and PV and Miyamura. The Bobcats fell 27-24 to the Horsemen in a matchup of top-tiered 3A teams. Piedra Vista scored with 2.3 seconds

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against UNLV on Sept. 28. Clayton was named the Mountain West Preseason Special Teams Player of the Year. From Big 12 to Big 10 It’s true. Most things are bigger in Texas, including college football losses. The New Mexico State football team opened up the 2013 season with a loss to No. 15 Texas, 56-7. NMSU quarterback Andrew McDonald completed 32 passes for 242 yards on the night. He threw the Aggies’ only touchdown to New Mexico native, Joshua Bowen. The Aggies are home this weekend against Minnesota. The Golden Gophers become the first ever Big Ten team to visit Aggie Memorial Stadium. de Rouen’d New Mexico State men’s basketball coach announced this week that guard Terrel de Rouen was suspended indefinitely for a violation of team rules. The former Oñate High School standout played in 32 games last season and was the 2nd best threepoint shooter on the team (.357). The junior also underwent off-season surgery on his foot.

505-516-1234

left to come from behind and knock off Miyamura 31-30. Soccer tournaments were plentiful this past week with the Farmington women’s team winning the Taos Tournament by knocking off Santa Fe Prep and East Mountain before taking down the host team in the championship 4-1. Aztec continued its winning way, knocking off Bloomfield 10-0. Piedra Vista improved to 5-1, defeating Bosque 2-1. Bosque returned the favor at Bloomfield, knocking off

* Hoerner A14

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A14

Hoerner the Bobcats. Navajo Prep lost a pair of games to Rehoboth and Hatch. On the men’s side, Farmington and Piedra Vista headed to Los Alamos for their annual tournament. PV goes 1-2, knocking off Bernalillo and losing a pair of games on a penalty kick and a shootout. The Scorpions go 2-1, losing to Roswell and beating Clovis and Bernalillo. Aztec fell to Grants, Bloomfield lost to Bosque, and Prep was shut out by Robertson. The local volleyball teams got off to a great start with Kirtland Central sweeping Bosque, Piedra Vista routing Gallup in three, and Aztec taking a pair of games from Thoreau and Belen. Navajo

Yost face is less than 10 degrees. With the evolution of the adjustable driver, I can’t – for the life of me – understand why anyone would play a driver that has 8 or 9 degrees of loft, and here’s why…. A driver with less loft will not stay in the air as long nor will it go as straight as a driver that has more loft. With a driver that has at least 10.5 degrees of loft or more, a player will hit the ball straighter and actually increase the carry distance on their driving club. There is a reason that your 5-wood goes straighter than your driver, the same reason that your pitching wedge goes straighter than your 5-iron – the answer is more loft. The next thing I look at is how low the numbers on their iron set go down. If I see the numbers 3 or 4 in the bags of these amateurs, I immediately explain to them the power of the hybrid club. Unbeknown to me, club manufacturers continue to produce sets with 3 and 4 irons, when in my opinion they should be obsolete – at least to the higher handicapper. A hybrid club offers the same loft as the 3 and 4 irons – and lower – but offer more mass behind the hitting area – like a wood. The center of gravity of the hybrid club is lower, thus allowing

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

Prep defeated Shiprock 31. This Week’s Schedule Friday, Sept. 6 Football Schedule Piedra Vista hosts Grants on Fox Sports AM 1340 and 93.9 FM Aztec hosts Roswell Goddard Bloomfield is at Pojoaque Farmington heads to Los Alamos Navajo Prep travels to Wingate Kirtland Central welcomes Durango Aztec Women’s Soccer hosts Belen Piedra Vista Women’s Soccer at St. Pius Kirtland Central Women’s Soccer at Show Low Tournament Farmington Volleyball at Gallup

Saturday, Sept. 7 Piedra Vista Cross Country at UNM Lobo Invitational Piedra Vista Women’s Soccer at Roswell Piedra Vista Soccer hosts Alamogordo Navajo Prep Women’s Soccer hosts Desert Academy

for a higher ball flight. Hybrids are also infinitely easier to hit out of rough than their long iron counterparts. If you have a 3 or 4 iron in your bag, take them out immediately and use them to clean cobwebs or dig trenches. If you don’t have a hybrid, go see your PGA golf professional to discuss your options and hit some demos. Finally, I look to see how many wedges these players carry. If a higher handicap player only has a pitching wedge and sand wedge in their bag, then I know that they are leaving a bunch of strokes on the course around the greens. At a minimum, players should have three wedges, and I would highly recommend they carry four. The wedges that would greatly improve their games come in the form of a gap wedge – wedge in between their pitching wedge and sand wedge – and a lob wedge which has more loft than their sand wedge. Wedges are considered scoring clubs, which means they are designed to get the ball close to the hole when a player is close to the green. The closer the shot gets to the hole, the lower the score for the hole becomes. Therefore, the more options a player has, the better the chance the player has of getting it close. When a pitching wedge has 46 degrees of loft and their sand wedge has 56 de-

Kirtland Central Women’s Soccer continue at the Show Low Tournament Farmington Women’s Soccer hosts Miyamura Aztec Soccer entertains Bernalillo Aztec Women’s Soccer welcomes Capital

to Los Alamos Farmington Volleyball hosts Pagosa Springs Aztec Women’s Soccer vs. Oñate

Kirtland Central Women’s Soccer at Gallup Farmington Soccer at Academy Tournament Farmington Women’s Soccer goes

Oh Technology Football season rolls around and I’m obsessed with fantasy football. But technology has ruined a day that I look forward to like Christmas. When fantasy football started, most groups got together and drafted teams while sharing a beverage and making fun of the other guy’s picks. No more. Now we sit in front of our computer watching a clock tick down, looking at who our provider rated as the best choice or being stuck with an autopick because you are off line. You don’t have to even be in the same room. This is the largest downfall of our obsession with tech-

grees of loft, the loft difference of 10 degrees is way too much in between these clubs. Most clubs have a difference of 4 or 5 degrees of loft, which is a good starting point for the wedges you put in your bag. Therefore a player with a 46 and 56 degrees configuration should look to add a 51 degree gap wedge and a 60 degree lob wedge. The loft difference has now been cut in half and a player can now hit accurate shots from a plethora of different distances and situations. Oh, and on a side note, a lot of players carry a rock

club as one of their 14 clubs to prevent scratching up their “real” clubs. This rock club is a waste of space and is delaying the inevitable scratch and nick that will be coming out of your brand new set sooner rather than later. Hit your rock shots with your newly acquired gap wedge – it will give it character and will actually guarantee that the ball gets out of the desert. So this offseason, become proactive and change your set configuration. This will give you a head start in allowing you to play your best golf in the 2014 season.

Monday, Sept. 9 Bloomfield Boys’ and Girls’ Soccer are at Miyamura

Tuesday, Sept. 10 Piedra Vista Volleyball at Bayfield Aztec Volleyball hosts Shiprock Bloomfield Volleyball heads to Kirtland Central Navajo Prep Volleyball travels to Santa Fe Indian Kirtland Central Women’s Soccer continues, welcomes Rehoboth Bloomfield Boys’ and Girls’ Soccer host Gallup

Thursday, Sept. 12

nology. We are more connected than ever with cellular devices and social media, yet we are more isolated than ever as well. I for one love my laptop and my cell, but I also miss having the guys get together for our annual draft, and I enjoy their company. By the way, when did it become socially acceptable to interrupt a person-to-person conversation to answer your phone or check a text? It’s good to know that your face-to-face time with me is not as important as checking the message from somebody not even around. It’s like having the restaurant you’re at wait on their drive-thru customers before the people

that actually take time to come into the establishment. But that complaint is for another day. Sports on Fox Sports New Mexico AM 1340 & 93.9 FM Friday Night Experience Piedra Vista hosts Grants Pre-game 6:30 Kickoff at 7 p.m. Florida Gators vs. Miami Hurricanes, Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Atlanta Falcons vs. New Orleans Saints, Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Green Bay Packers vs. San Francisco 49ers, Sunday at 2 p.m. Philadelphia Eagles vs. Washington Redskins, Monday at 4:30 p.m. Houston Texans vs. San Diego Chargers, Monday at 8 p.m. First Sports with Steve Bortstein, weekday mornings from 7 to 10 a.m. The Fast Track, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 to 9 a.m.

Coming Sept. 22 Light - Meditative Worship 8:15 am Bread - Traditional Worship 10 am Salt - Contemporary Worship 11:30 am

Bethany Church • 711 E. 30th St. Farmington

www.bethanydisciples.net


A15

Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

electric asked Sims to justify the need for a rate increase. “We have had such system expansion that our efforts have been on building and expanding the system rather than modernizing it,” Sims said. “We have a very reliable system; we don’t have the most reliable system. We need to spend more money on modernization of the system. We are one of many electric utilities going through the process.” Councilor Jason Sandel said he wasn’t looking for a justification for a rate increase, but he would like an accounting for the system during the past 30 years. “I want to know why it has not been upgraded over time. We showed ourselves as profitable in 1982, and we have not been upgrading over 30 years,” he said. City Manager Rob Mayes stated that the plan is to raise rates and move forward with upgrades that are estimated to cost $20 million a year. The types of upgrades include burying electrical lines throughout the city

and put in some new switches. Any new or upgraded infrastructure might be going underground but might not. “We are committed to doing it – it can’t be 100 percent – we are committed to doing it for specific reasons, reliability and aesthetics,” Sims said. Councilor Mary Fischer said she also was confused about what the utility has been doing each year with regards to upgrades. “It sounds like we haven’t been upgrading our system, but at every budget session, we have heard that we have been allocating money to upgrade,” she said. Sims said the system upgrades consisted of building the utility out to reach new customers. “Not to say that we weren’t doing upgrades. We haven’t done enough of that and there has to be more done in the future for this utility that is, quite frankly, in serious need of replacement,” he said. Fischer asked what the most critical thing is that needs to be completed. “The distribution system, the lines, and the substations and switch yards that serve them need to be upgraded – either replaced

San Juan Wildlife Federation

GUN & KNIFE SHOW

Friday Sept. 13 5 pm - 9 pm Saturday Sept. 14 9 am - 5 pm Sunday Sept. 15 9 am - 3 pm Admission $5 Farmington Civic Center 200 W. Arrington

505-360-3334

2013 NISSAN

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game will not be in consideration, and since most leagues let you change players that haven’t played yet, every other squad is fair game. Beginning next week the Geek’s Love Them and Loathe Them sections will consist of players that have killed me in one of my leagues. There will be a section on Studs and Duds, who you may look at starting and sitting this week. Finally, there will be a quick section on pick-ups on the waiver wire for some players who may be available in your league. This week with the Geek… This week we’ll look at IDP or Individual Defensive Player strategies. Depending

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their own rates. The end result is the rate proposal we put in front of you,” Burnham said. His company designed a rate for Farmington’s utility that would allow it to spend 51 percent of its revenue on power supply costs and 22 percent on capital improvements. “You are not the only utility facing this – both water and electric utilities are facing the need to upgrade their facilities,” Burnham said. He projected that the overall revenue requirement for the utility would be an $8 million increase. “We are proposing to change the base rate to .035 cents.” The current rate is .0295 cents. Business users would be increased one time, while the residential customers would be phased in across three years and would pay more. “We’re seeing a higher percentage increase in residential users than the large user. That is because the subsidization is being

reduced,” Roberts said. “The rates are designed to cover the costs that are caused by the customers. We line all those costs up and get to a cost-of-service rate,” Burnham said. “It is based on the aggregate demand. Let’s say there is a system peak. Who is driving that system peak at that time? Typically it is the residential customers. It’s that system peak that drives the costs for the facility to operate as a whole.” Mayes said residential users would see the increased rate phased in over time to avoid “sticker shock.” Councilor Dan Darnell said the utility is at “critical mass,” and he is ready to move forward with the preliminary approval of a rate increase. Roberts, however, said the next step should be to solicit public responses to a rate increase. He asked Mayes to set up public meetings and go out into the community to make presentations to various

community organizations before the Council makes a final consideration. Sims said that prior to the plan being finalized there would be a presentation to both the San Juan and Rio Arriba County Commissions, which purchase power from the city. There also would be a presentation to the city of Bloomfield, another customer of Farmington’s Electric Utility. There also would be public hearings planned before the City Council as well as presenting the plan to the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission. Darnell made a motion to authorize staff to move forward with the process. Councilor Gayla McCulloch seconded the motion. She and Darnell voted in favor of the plan, while Councilor Mary Fischer opposed it, as did Councilor Jason Sandel, who had to leave the meeting early, but asked that the record reflect his opposition to the plan.

on the number of defensive players your league plays, IDP strategies may not make a real difference at all. On the other hand, if you are playing in an IDP league that uses the full 11-man defensive roster, the strategy has to change, Linebackers are premium, especially ones that accumulate sacks, such as Terrell Suggs. Linebackers also usually lead their teams in tackles as well, so look for prime linebackers in leagues that play one defensive player or have deep defensive drafts. In comparison, linemen score few points. Stay away from defensive tackles if possible. They usually have low sack totals and low tackles as well, since their main job is taking up blockers for others. Try to get a big-time lineman like JJ Watts quickly, then back to the linebackers. If you can’t get a prime lineman, wait it out to the end. There just isn’t a big enough point differential to matter on most defensive ends. If your league doesn’t differentiate between corners and safeties, draft safeties. Safeties are more likely to make tackles, blitz for an occasional sack, and be in position for turnovers. By most projections, safeties

score double the points of cornerbacks. The Playlist Studs… Saints QB Drew Brees – First game back with Payton at the helm. Saints will be motivated. Colts QB Andrew Luck – Raiders may have issues stopping anyone. Falcons RB Steven Jackson – Falcons will show off their new toy to balance the offense. Chiefs RB Jamal Charles – Should shine against questionable Jaguars DST. All Wide Receivers in the Saints-Falcons Game – Should be a shootout. Patriots TE Zach Sudfeld – Brady loves the TEs and he’s the best healthy one left. Duds… Bengals QB Andy Dalton – Faces what should be a solid Bears DST on the road. Jets QB Geno Smith – Good luck to anyone that steps behind center for the Jets. Raiders RB Darren McFaddden – Box should be loaded up with Pryor at QB. Packers RB Eddie Lacy – Rookie gets a strong test at 49ers. Panther WR Steve Smith

– Seahawks defensive backfield will be tough to break. Packers WR James Jones – Fourth option on a passing team, hope for long TD. Bengals TE Jermaine Gresham – Sharing time with rookie Tyler Eifert hurts his looks. Waiver Wire… The following are some potentially undrafted players to keep on your watch list.

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or put underground,” Sims said. Sandel wanted to know what electric utility customers would get for their increased rates. “You will be seeing a lot more underground lines – you can say that with a straight face,” Sims said. “We have a lot at once – we have a spike of things that need to be done,” City Manager Rob Mayes said, adding there are technological changes to the switching centers and those upgrades need to be made. Mayes put forth the funds for a cost of service study completed by Science Applications International Corporation, or SAIC. The study showed that residential rates should go up 15 percent, according to Scott Burnham of SAIC. His company, however, proposed an 8 percent increase that would be implemented over a threeyear period. “Some utilities go a clear cost of service – Farmington has an ability to design

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Bills QB, EJ Manuel – Could run for as much as he throws, which would make him a potential No. 2 QB Jets RB Bilal Powell – Jets can’t throw it and have chose to hand it to Powell instead of Chris Ivory. Browns WR Greg Little – Norv Turner has done wonders as an offensive coordinator, would should improve QB Brandon Weeden and help Little who could be the typical third year breakout receiver. Giants TE Brandon Myers – Had a huge year with the Raiders last year, should be better with Eli Manning. Browns DST – Ray Horton takes over in Cleveland, meaning a ton of blitz packages, which should make the Browns playable in deep leagues or off weeks. Good luck this week !!

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

Green Chile Festival

Sutherland Farms celebrates harvest, roasts fresh chile specialty dishes such as the green chile cheeseburger. Wines of the San Juan will be serving wines beginning at 10 a.m. on Saturday and noon on Sunday. While tasting the chile peppers, local bands will perform music throughout the day. On Saturday, Blue Moon Ramblers will perform at 10:30 a.m. and The Assortment will perform at 1:30 p.m. Then on Sunday,

LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The smell of roasted green chile peppers will fill the air during the 8th Annual Sutherland Farms’ Animas Green Chile Festival on Sept. 14 and 15. Each day, the festival will go from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission into the festival is free. “This is a time for us to celebrate the harvest and for the public to visit with the farmers. It is a beautiful time of year and we encourage people to come out and visit us,” said Sutherland Farms owner D’rese Suther-

land. The public may choose between mild, medium, or hot green chile peppers,

which will then be roasted in front of them. “Our promotion is we pick the green chiles all day long and you

will get them fresh,” Sutherland explained. The Purple Cow Kafe also will be serving chile

• Diseases • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) • Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) • Tumors • Irritable bowel Syndrome (IBS) • Intestinal parasites • Enteritis • Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) Other diagnostic tests include fecal examination and evaluation, rectal cytology, fecal cultures, blood and urine tests, trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI), serum cobalamin and folate tests, abdominal radiographs, abdominal ultrasound and intestinal biopsies.

involve a change in diet. Diet recommendations include a diet that is highly digestible with low fiber and fat. Medical therapy may include carminitives – medications to relieve flatulence – such as zinc acetate, Yucca schidigera, and dry activated charcoal. Small, frequent feedings are encouraged for dogs that eat rapidly or are hyperexcitable. Your veterinarian will outline a treatment plan specifically designed for your pet. Most patients with uncomplicated cases respond well to dietary and lifestyle changes. Once offending dietary substances and products are identified, it is important to avoid them. Of couse you may be one of those families who own a “gassy” dog and

are entertained by your dog irritating your daughter’s new boyfriend!

Grant and Randy will perform at 10:30 a.m. and Royal Flush will perform at 1:30 p.m. Craft vendors, face painting, train rides and horse drawn wagon rides will also be available to the public. “We enjoy celebrating (the festival) with the community. That is why we started it,” Sutherland said. Sutherland Farms is located at 745 Road 2900 in Aztec.

Woodson Diagnosis is based on medical history and clinical signs. Some of the common causes that must be ruled out include: • Increased Swallowing of Air (Aerophagia) • Gluttony or compulsive eating • Respiratory disease • Feeding shortly after exercise • Brachycephalic or flatfaced breeds • Diet • Diets high in soybeans, peas or beans • Diets high in fermentable fibers such as lactulose, psyllium or oat bran • Spoiled food • Milk and dairy products • Sudden change in diet • Spicy foods and food additives

How is flatulence treated? Treatment is based on diagnosis and commonly

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MM REAL ESTATE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

This big family home at 4771 Sundance Road in Farmington has enough extras and space to satisfy the needs of everyone in your family. For Mom, there’s a huge open kitchen with a center island that includes a cook top and more cabinets than she will ever need. It also includes ceramic tile floors and stainless appliances. There are two separate living areas that allow the parents and the kids to entertain separately or get together for game night. Everyone will love the beautiful plush green backyard that can be accessed from the family room, dining room or master suite. Mom and Dad will enjoy the large master suite that includes a walk-in closet, a master bath with double vanities, a

garden tub, sitting area and a space that could be a sunroom for Mom or an office for both. With four bedrooms and two baths there’s more than 2,700 square feet of space for the family. The open floor plan assures easy access to everyone. There is an attached oversized garage, refrigerated central air conditioning, and sprinkler systems and landscaping in both the front and backyards. This home, in the Sunrise Subdivision, has been pre-inspected and is ready for you and your family to move right in. Priced at $369,900, you can call Sam Todd at RE/MAX of Farmington, 505.327.4777, for more information or to set up a private showing.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

Butterfly Bush

Add color, fragrance and beauty to your yard Want to add a little life to your yard? Maybe you need to add a burst of color? Perhaps something that adds an attractive fragrance? Maybe a tall arching plant with a free-flowing form that can provide a nice backdrop or block a bad view? Maybe you need a mid-size or smallgrowing plant that will provide flowers all summer. I have the perfect plant for all of those needs, butterfly bush. With a name like butterfly bush, you might expect a plant to be attractive to butterflies. In fact, it’s more than attractive; it’s a magnet for all the butterflies and hummingbirds that pass through your garden seeking nectar. Near a

ADVICE YOU CAN GROW WITH Donnie Pigford

path or patio, the shrub provides a delightful fragrance for you, too. Another reason for the

popularity of the butterfly bush is that it’s easy to grow – even hard to kill. It performs well in poor

soil, preferring a welldraining sunny spot. A light application of fertilizer in spring and a few deep waterings in summer will do this plant just right. Cut back to about a foot high in late winter, before new growth appears. You’ll be amazed by the height the shrub

improvements Boulevard extension and bridge to a new $16.5 million Farmington Police Station. “I worry about the PiĂąon Hills bridge extension. ‌ I don’t think that is going to happen,â€? Councilor Mary Fischer said. Mayor Tommy Roberts echoed her concerns. “It’s not likely it would be funded,â€? he said. It is the most expensive project on a list of 22 presented to the Council by staff. The extension could, however, receive some support from the state, because it would have an impact on the entire region. “Regional is a very high emphasis,â€? said Farmington Budget Officer Teresa Emrich, explaining how the state determines which projects to fund. “They want the project to be absolutely shovel-ready.â€? The last city project to receive state funds was the Farmington Regional Animal Shelter. The city had a location and a construction plan when it received the money to construct a facility that would benefit the entire county. Councilor Dan Darnell asked if the PiĂąon Hills Boulevard extension could be presented to the state as a regional project, if the San Juan County Commission decided to partner with the city on it. Emrich said she could approach the county and discuss that possibility. Roberts added that he did not want to remove the project from the list of capital projects, because it might appear as though the city were abandoning it. “That is not the case,â€? he said. “What we want to do is have our top five projects be those that have a reasonable chance of being funded.â€?

City Manager Rob Mayes suggested it be included with the list of five, but it would be considered an alternative project to show it is not being abandoned. “There are no rules set on it, per se. The governor – she wants shovel-ready projects,� Mayes said. “She wants communities that have demonstrated their ability and have had audits done. She also wants projects that have a regional basis.� Fischer asked if the “meatand-potato� projects would take priority over “fluff � projects. “It looks like a fire station might be more of a priority over a river park,� Emrich said. The city has a new Fire Station No. 7 as a possible project with a $4 million price tag. Mayes said it depends on which projects have broad support from the community. Darnell wanted to know if a proposed $1 million compressed natural gas, or CNG, filling station might have that support. Four Corners Economic Development is championing the use of CNG in fleets, according to Roberts, who said, “The bottom line is it’s going to take some type of policy development at the state level for that type of project to be given. It is a little premature, but there is discussion ongoing.� The mayor also suggested this might be a project better handled by the private sector, because several oil and gas companies and PNM have natural gas-powered vehicles. Darnell asked if the former Tibbetts Middle School on Apache Street might be something the city would want to purchase. “That is a great, great location. What are some of the potential things we can do? What if we used that footprint for a

police station,� he said, adding that it is an asset to the community. “That is one of those jewels that we need to keep our eyes on,� Darnell added, asking if the city might consider entering into an intergovernmental agreement with the Farmington Municipal School District to purchase the building. “That is just north of our MRA (metropolitan redevelopment area) and is sitting right in the middle of our community, and it is a pretty significant piece of property.� Roberts stated that the city has discussed the use of the property with the school district and those discussions will continue. Other projects on the list include an expansions to the Farmington Civic Center, the Farmington Museum and the Sycamore Park Community Center; widening Foothills Drive from Holmes to Lakewood; construction of river trails and walking bridges along with Animas Riverine corridor and an airport runway ex-

pansion and airport terminal remodel and expansion; among other things. The discussion on capital improvement projects will continue during the next City Council meeting at 7 p.m. Sept. 10 in the Council chambers at city hall.

attains by midsummer. You’ll also get larger flowers and a neater-looking shape. Butterfly bush comes in an array of shapes and colors. Some plants will grow as much as 8 feet tall, with others ranging anywhere from 4 feet to 5 feet tall, and wide. Re-

cently new lower growing varieties have been introduced, reaching only 11/2 feet tall. These plants come in many colors, including blue, purple, red, pink, white and yellow. There are a few varieties that actually come with multiple colors on the same plant. So if you are looking for something to add life to your garden, look no further than butterfly bush. This plant will add color, fragrance and animation, as it will attract every butterfly and hummingbird in the neighborhood. Best thing of all, the butterfly bush is a xeric plant that requires little care.

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Business

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

A19

SJC wins challenge

BP contributes another $1M for new school of energy DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The San Juan College Foundation succeeded with a challenge from BP America – raise $5 million to construct the new School of Energy and the company would match that amount. The college did just that, and during the Sept. 3 college board meeting, BP followed through on the promise. Julia Levy, director of government and public affairs for BP America, presented the foundation with a $1 million check, bringing the company’s total contribution to $5 million for the project. The contribution came as the result of a year-old conversation between Levy and Randy Pacheco, director of the School of Energy. Levy asked Pacheco what the college needed to improve programming at the school of energy. He told her a new facility.

Julia Levy, director of government and public affairs for BP America, holds a large copy of $5 million check, BP gave to the San Juan College Foundation on Sept. 3 during the college board meeting. Also pictured is the college board, as well as Randy Pacheco, dean of the School of Energy and the Gayle Dean, president of the college foundation. The money will go toward construction of a new School of Energy. – Debra Mayeux photo

“Randy told me that he gets 100 applications a year, but only has room for 30. We thought, ‘We have to do something about this,’” Levy said. “I said, ‘We need to help our students,’ and we talked about what the future would look like to help our students move forward

and obtain positions,” Pacheco said, adding that the lengthy relationship between the college and BP America helped by offering the “seed money” to move the project forward. During the initial conversation, Levy asked how much a new facility would cost, and he estimated

the college would need $15 million. “I looked at him and laughed, saying, ‘Do you know what the price of natural gas is right now?’ We decided to push and be a part of this,” Levy said. “We are so grateful to the state that they were able to come up with their matched funds, as well as the college coming up with its portion as well.” The state of New Mexico gave the college $5.08 million through Governor Susana Martinez’s capital projects campaign. The college foundation raised $3 million, including donations of $1 million from Merrion Oil and Gas; $1 million from the Westmeath Foundation; $500,000 from the Dugan family; $300,000 from ConocoPhillips; $150,000 from Arizona Public Service, $100,000 from XTO Energy and $50,000 from D.J. Simmons/Twin Stars, and then the college itself contributed $2 million in capital improvement

funds. The total contributions are $15.18 million. The money will be used to build a 50,000-square=foot building on the San Juan College Campus on College Boulevard. The existing school is on Hutton Street on Farmington’s south side. Levy said she is excited for students to attend the new facility, which will carry on the tradition of providing a topnotch oil and gas education to students. “On the BP side we are so thrilled to have a partner like San Juan College, not only to meet our educational needs, but to empower people to have a career in not only the oil and gas industry but to just be empowered,” Levy said, adding that San Juan College is the national and international leader in oil and gas education. “We are looking at bringing this all over the world. Farmington is the headquarters of where we see that development coming from.”

Box Tops for Education

Program helps fund field trips, buy supplies LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune San Juan County is encouraging county employees and residents to participate in the Box Tops for Education program, which provides funding for school field trips and the purchase of supplies such as computers and art materials. Through the collection of box top coupons and labels from products at grocery stores, area school districts can raise money for the elementary and junior high schools. “We are doing this to create

more awareness and help people get into a habit of collecting various coupons to assist the kids,” County CEO Kim Carpenter said. The box tops can be found on more than 240 products. These products include Ziploc, Cheerios, Hamburger Helper, Betty Crocker, and Kleenex.

“These are things that most of us buy when we shop at a grocery store. It is just a matter of identifying the label, clipping it” and sending them to local schools, Carpenter explained. Each box top is worth 10 cents. “Whether you have kids or not, you are buying products that can earn money” for the schools, Carpenter added. James Lesser, local retail sales representative for General Mills, the company that sponsors Box Tops, said he is “ecstatic” that the county adopted the program. “I think it is a great program considering the amount of fund-

ing that has been cut in our state. This is something we need.” Every public school within the county is involved in the Box Tops program, Lesser said, but the level of involvement differs at each school. It is important for the public to become involved in the program because New Mexico is the second lowest state in the country for collecting box tops, according to Carpenter. Where the money raised in Wisconsin accounts for $5.03 per student, in New Mexico, the money raised accounts for only $1.27 per student. “There is potential

to generate almost four times the money and give it to the schools. I think it would be very valuable to spread the urge for people to participate,” Carpenter explained. Schools in the United States have earned more than $558 million through the Box Tops for Education program since the program started in 1996. In the 2012-2013 school year, $80 million was donated to the schools. To learn more about the Box Tops program and for a list of participating products, visit www.boxtops4education.com.

Chapter 11 Gallup Catholic Diocese files bankruptcy DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The Roman Catholic Diocese of Gallup has announced it will file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in response to civil court claims from victims of sexual abuse by clergy members. Bishop James Wall outlined his plans in an Aug. 29 letter to people in the diocese, which is one of the poorest dioceses in the nation. The Diocese of Gallup was founded as a missionary diocese with the purpose of providing Catholic outreach to the Navajo Nation. It is one of the largest dioceses in size because it includes the entire Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona. San Juan and McKinley

counties’ Catholic Churches are included in the Diocese of Gallup, which primarily is funded through donations from entities outside of the region. “There’s great poverty in most of the parishes,” said the Rev. Tim Farrell, spokesman for the diocese and pastor at Farmington’s Sacred Heart Catholic Church. “Catholic Extension Service pays the salaries of many of the priests serving reservation parishes.” Because of the poverty within the diocese, it is unable to meet the rising number of civil claims being brought against the Catholic Church with regard to sexual abuse by clergy. There have been 20 lawsuits filed against the diocese, thus far. “It’s just overwhelming,”

Farrell said. Bishop Wall said there has been an increase in these abuse claims since he became bishop. “I have worked to seek ways to bring healing to those who were harmed by sexual abuse,” he wrote in his letter. “Unfortunately, since becoming Bishop, the number of claims has continued to increase. These claims relate to events that occurred decades ago.” Some of the claims relate to times when the Diocese of Gallup had insurance to cover these types of issues, but many happened when the diocese was not insured, so the Bishop stated he had to explore alternative options. “I have tried to resolve these claims outside of

litigation, unfortunately with limited success,” Wall said, adding he also has attempted to treat those harmed in a “just, equitable and merciful manner.” Wall also has been trying to continue the daily work of the diocese which is to share the message of Jesus Christ with all people in the region as well as to help those in need of charity. “After considering all of the options and after consulting with advisors inside and outside the Diocese, I have determined that filing a petition for Chapter 11 Reorganization for the Diocese of Gallup is the most effective and thoughtful course to take in light of the claims from those who were harmed,” Wall wrote.

The Diocese of Gallup, through this process, has joined nearly 10 other dioceses throughout the U.S. that have had to take similar action in response to claims of sexual abuse by clergy. Two of the largest dioceses to file for bankruptcy were Milwaukee, Wis., and San Diego, Calif. Tucson, Ariz., and Fairbanks, Alaska, also filed for Chapter 11 reorganization, and Farrell said all of the dioceses are doing fine after entering this process. “Chapter 11 will provide for an orderly process by which those who have been harmed can make a claim, and for the Diocese to propose and confirm a plan that will compensate those who were harmed while, at the same time, continue its ministry and

mission now and into the future,” Wall wrote in his letter. “It is the purpose of the Bankruptcy Court to provide a neutral forum to all who seek protection or require resolution of disputes. In our present circumstances, we need that neutral forum with its protection and fair judgment so that we can justly and equitably compensate people who have been harmed.” Farrell and Wall said the church will work to be transparent and open with its records throughout this process, which does not include the property and assets of local churches. “Local churches are separate entities,” Farrell said. “It only affects the diocesan offices. Parishes are our own entities.”


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

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1/01 JH@ Noshl` DW+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $1/+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS

1/01 BNQNKK@ KD+ $04+882 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X0036//@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 EH@S 4// svn cnnq+ GA RonqsY015268V`r $06+876+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- 'Knv lhkdr(Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 ENQC E,04/ WKS+ bqdv b`a+ kn`cdc- Oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS

SUVS/VANS

1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS 1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rntk+ 20+574 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $04+884 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G264046- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

Sarah Bernhardt, the French star of stage and early film, who was often referred to as "the most famous actress the world has ever known" and "the divine Sarah," often slept in a coffin. She said it helped her to better understand tragic roles.

MISC.

BGHKC @ATRD @v`qdmdrr 4J Qtm.V`kj+ Rdosdladq 03sg+ 1/02EQDD DUDMS! Qdfhrsq`shnm hr `s 592/`l: qtm rs`qsr `s 692/`l- Sgdqd vhkk ad ` qdkd`rd ne a`kknnmr sn q`hrd `v`qdmdrr nm bghkc `atrd- Srd C`` Jº``m Bg`osdqNsgdq `bshuhshdr vhkk hmbktcd9 Hmenql`shnm`k annsgr+ ennc+ rod`jdqr+ cnnq oqhydr+ gd`ksg rbqddmhmf+ ytla`+ ltrhb+ enns l`rr`fd+ dsb- Ktmbg vhkk ad oqnuhcdc- Sn rds to ` annsg+ bnms`bs Cntfk`r Ind `s 4/4, 257,02//Lnqd hmenql`shnm+ bnms`bs Sr` C`` Jº``m Bg`osdq+ 4/4,257,0488SGD E@QLHMFSNM Qhn cdk Rnk Jhv`mhr `mc sgd R`m It`m Ghrsnqhb`k Rnbhdsx `qd ronmrnqhmf sgd dudms ³Chmhmf Vhsg Sgd Cd`c½ nm Rdosdladq 10rs+ eqnl 3ol sn 7ol `s sgd Fqddmk`vm Bdldsdqx+ 05/5 MCtrshm+ E`qlhmfsnm+ ML- Sghr dudms vhkk qdoqdrdms 01 ne sgd d`qkhdrs `qd` ohnmddqr onqsq`xdc ax knb`k `bsnqr `mc ghrsnqx ateer@ a`qadptd vhkk `krn s`jd ok`bdShbjdsr `qd `u`hk`akd `s Gnv`qcºr Bkd`mdqr+ Gns Rstee Ro`r+ `mc R`m It`m Ghrsnqhb`k Rnbhdsx- Enq lnqd hmenql`shnm+ b`kk 4/4,215,/076 nq 4/4, 22/,8566-

LEGALS COUNTY OF SAN JUAN STATE OF NEW MEXICO ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT KERRY KOLE, Individually and as Natural Parent and Next Friend of COURTNEY McKNIGHT, a Minor, Plaintiffs, v. LATISHA and GEICO, Defendants.

SCHELL

NOTICE OF COMPLAINT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Kerry Kole filed a Complaint against Latisha Schell in the District Court in San Juan County Farmington, New Mexico at 103 S. Oliver Drive, Aztec, NM, on the 9th day of May, 2013. The Plaintiff seeks compensation for a October 3, 2012 automobile accident. You are notified that, unless you so serve and file a responsive pleading or motion, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for a Default Judgment. Electronically filed /s/ Victor A. Titus Victor A. Titus, Attorney for Plaintiffs 2021 E. 20th Street Farmington, NM 87401 (505)326-6503 Legal No.119 Dates 8/23, 9/6/2013

8/30,

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With your Arian charm quotient at an almost all-time high this week, plus all the facts to back you up, you just might win over the last doubters to your proposal. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You might be in line for that job change you applied for. But be advised that you could be called on to defend your qualifications against supporters of other applicants. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Creating a new approach to an old idea is one way to get beyond that workplace impasse. No such problems in your personal life, where things continue to flow smoothly. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Be more forthcoming about your feelings concerning a proposed change either in your workplace or in your personal life. Your opinions are valuable. Don't keep them hidden. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A changing situation in your life needs more patience than you appear to be willing to offer. Allowing it to develop at its own pace is the wisest course you can take at this time. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) With more stability in your life -- on both personal and professional levels -- this could be a good time to strengthen relationships with both friends and colleagues. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) People have always relied on your integrity not only to get the job done, but to get it done right. So don't be pressured by anyone into cutting corners to save time. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) While others might get rattled over unexpected changes, your ability to adapt calmly and competently helps you make a positive impression during a crucial period. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A changing environment might be daunting for some, but the adventurous Sagittarian takes it all in stride. A friend from the past could awaken some meaningful memories. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) With your self-assurance rising to full strength, the bold Goat should feel confident about opening up to new ventures as well as new relationships. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Reaching out to someone who has been unkind to you might not be easy. But in the long run it will prove to have been the right thing to do. A friend offers moral support. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your keen insight once again helps you work through a seemingly insoluble problem in your workplace. The weekend offers a good chance to develop new relationships. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a knack for finding details that others would overlook. You would make a fine research scientist.


A21

Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Nosey Nellie has always wanted a breakfast nook. Not that NN ever has breakfast (at a nook or anywhere else) or that she has a “nook” place in her casita. However, NN watches a lot of House Hunters and Property Brothers and the Next Design Star, so she knows breakfast nooks are cute, can make an area “cozy,” and are nice for “staging” when/if you decide to sell your casita for a gazillion dollars to pay off credit card debt. So, NN ordered a breakfast nook (NN could not find one locally, and she did try, just so’s ya know) and anxiously awaited its arrival. Every day, NN drove by the casita at noon to see if a big package was setting on her porch. Every day, NN was disappointed. Then, last Friday, when

NN got home, there was a package on her porch. Not a big package that would mean a cute breakfast nook was inside, but a smaller package. Confused (which is a regular state of mind for NN), she hauled the really, really heavy smaller package inside. On the outside, it said it was a breakfast nook, but NN was certain that couldn’t be right, unless modern technology had improved so much that it all folded together and all NN would havta do was hit a switch and – viola – a breakfast nook would appear. Because NN pretty much lives by Murphy’s Law, when she opened the package, she discovered her breakfast nook – in a gazillion pieces and with three paragraphs of “instructions.” NN is not a “put it together” kinda woman. Her talents – which are many, just so’s ya know – don’t lend themselves to putting things together. It’s all NN can do to put herownself “together,” let alone anything

else. So, NN did what any other woman who doesn’t “do” putting together stuff – she screamed. Loud. Law enforcement was called, but when NN explained her scream and her situation, they wouldn’t put the nook together for her either. So much for “serving the public.” Whatever. So, NN called on her friend, Sultry Sheri, who is one of those women who could draw a plan, buy the stuff and build a house in three days. For reals. And she’s not even licensed from an online Professional Contractor/Builder School on DIY Licenses. But she’s good. So if you’re thinkin’ about remodeling your own casita, or pouring concrete for a new patio or roller rink, or if you just want a professional to help you tear out your fireplace and replace it with a more modern, classic look (NN does learn from the Property Brothers, ya know), Sultry Sheri is the one to call.

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SS arrived at NN’s with her hammer, screw drivers, first aid kit and a sense of humor. NN provided adult beverages and a gazillion pieces of a breakfast nook. NN was already to spend the 45 minutes necessary to put the nook together so she and SS could sit at the nook and enjoy an adult beverage – or two or 32. But first, SS wanted to look at the instructions. When NN gave SS the three paragraphs of instructions, SS screamed and law enforcement came again. This time, on accounta SS has “ties” to law enforcement that might may be a tad better than NN’s “ties,” they laughed with her, shared a few stories, caught up on mutual friends and – three hours later – left. By this time, NN had already tapped into the adult beverages. SS pulled out all the pieces and laid them out, one by one, all over NN’s casita – in the order in which she would need them. She put the little screws and wooden plugs (or whatever they call ’em) and the pieces exactly where she could find ’em when she needed ’em. That lasted about 30 seconds, before Mojito, the Devil Kitten, and Oliver, the Cat Who Won’t Stop Talking, decided to chase each other all over the casita, kicking up little screws, wooden plugs and pieces of nook everywhere but where SS had ’em. That was ugly. SS let out another scream, but this time, in addition to law enforcement, the medics came. This time, the nice law enforcement people weren’t quite as friendly with SS as they were the first time and the medics reminded SS and NN that their time was for people who really needed medical attention, not help putting a breakfast nook together. Whatever. So SS and NN began put-

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505-327-2255

ting the nook together – one piece, one screw, one plug at a time. It took a little longer than they thought – especially since the DK and OTCWWST managed to shred the three paragraphs of instructions provided. For five hours, SS and NN put together, took apart and put back together again, the little breakfast nook. We muscled screws into place, we forced little plugs into holes we thought they belonged in, and we matched up pieces we thought looked good together. It was fun – well, maybe not FUN, but we did laugh and we did use a coupla four letter words (although four letter words to SS and NN are “diet,” “work,” and “exer” “cise”) and the adult beverages made things better. The nook is set up in NN’s dining area, and while it may not look exactly like the breakfast nooks on the Property Brothers, it’s cute and as long as no one sits on the benches, it’ll be fine. While NN and SS were putting together nooks and crannies, lots of ’nother people were doing lots of ’nother things. Birthday people this week include one of NN’s bestest buddies and pals, Scott Eckstein, another buddy of NN’s, Peter Saltzman, Danni Andrew, Theresa McBee of Century One SoWesCo Realty, Fred Turner, Tim Lane, the always smiling, always wonderful Aaron Bluehouse and the beautiful Monica Nagl Stoker. Also celebrating a birthday this week was former Farmington Mayor and Always Wonderful Bill Standley, who NN has known like forever and who has been a mentor, role model and treasured friend of NN’s. One ’nother of NN’s most favorite of all time people, Adam Kinney, and the beautiful and wonderful Natosha

Valdez, welcomed a baby girl into this world. Little Brooklynn will undoubtedly bring much joy and happiness to her new family and NN can’t be happier for all of ’em! Pat Badsgard enjoyed some “down time” with friends this week, Marianne Harmon (a mover and shaker if NN ever saw one!) became the proud owner of Planet Beach Contempo Spa this week, and Julie Blair celebrated a first year anniversary/birthday of her real estate office, Golden Door Realty. NN had coffee with Cheryl and Roger Sitton and their family and friends at Great Harvest last weekend. (Who doesn’t love Great Harvest and its incredibly special owners, Kim and Tye Bell?). NN sends hugs and prayers to Samantha Covert of Real Estate Matters on the death of her beloved grandfather, and NN visited with the always wonderful Heather Fortner and Matt Camacho this week. Football season starts this week (NN is a die-hard Denver Bronco fan and loves, loves, LOVES Peyton Manning, who should have dated NN before he married that pretty woman he married, just so’s ya know. But then, he prob’ly wouldn’t have married anyone on accounta once men have tasted the wine known as NN, their taste buds change forever) and Dancing With the Stars also starts this week. NN isn’t much of a television watcher if it’s not HGTV or sports, but DWTS is the best reality show ever and NN loves it. Also, NN is going to have a birdhouse for sale in the Desert View Family Counseling Birdhouse Sale October 11. She will be working on the design for it and preparing to create a masterpiece that will sell for a gazillion dollars. For reals. Tweet, tweet.

VERSA NOTE

Stk#6397

$

0 DOWN

249

UP TO 40 MPG PER MO. HWY! ONLY 4300 E. MAIN ST. • FARMINGTON, NM 505-327-0366 • 1800-530-8310 www.horacehyundai.com

$

95

*

*1 Stk#6397 Sale Price $16,982.15 plus TT&L and $279.95 Dealer Service Transfer Fee. Based on 72 months at 1.9% WAC. Deal #45661 Picture is for illustration purpose only


A22

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle CAPITAL L’S By Victor Barocas / Edited by Will Shortz

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755 1

2

3

4

19

5

6

7

8

9

20

55 Provide with a quality

109 Three, for a short hole

9 Cry of epiphany

56 Daisylike bloom

111 Postwar prime minister

11 Director George

57 Massive ref.

5 Auto parts giant

59 Maze explorer

113 Simpson case judge

9 Pot user, maybe

61 Turn over 62 Disencumber

114 11th-century hero, with “El”

14 Nike rival

14 Peyote and saguaro 19 Rossini’s William Tell and others

64 Not beat

116 Religious art figures

16 Butcher ’s tool

21 Lump in one’s throat

68 Drain

1 Item whose name is derived from the Latin “aquarius”

22 First acrylic fiber 23 Superlative for Sirius 24 Rush job? 26 Home security system component 27 Big kahunas 29 Stationery item: Abbr. 30 Had 31 Log 33 Abbr. on a lawyer ’s stationery 35 Censure 37 Berry used to make gin 40 They have pluses and minuses 42 In ___ 44 ___-pedi 45 Medicine label info 47 Putting out on an anniversary, maybe 51 Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights,” for one 53 Lustrous fabric

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

66 Collapses

118 Country crooner Randy

71 White-suited “Dukes of Hazzard” villain 73 Spartan

123 Emergency Broadcast System opening 126 Kind of treatment

75 ___ Party 76 Some bio majors 78 Fails to 80 Court judgment 82 Barrett of gossip 83 “Phooey!” 85 ___ Moines 87 Mentions 91 Apple line

128 Still goopy, as concrete

95 Guaranteed 97 Darwin stopping point, with “the” 99 Founder of the Missionaries of Charity

27 31

17 Layered dessert

37

38

33 40

45

42

46

51

52

20 He wrote “It is life near the bone where it is sweetest” 25 French waves

53

35

18

49

50

89

90

36

43 48

56

57 62

68

69

70

76

63 71

54

58 64

59 66 73

78 83

60

65

72

77

82

55 61 67

74

75

79

80

84

85

86

81 87

88

28 —

34 Eccentric

91

92

97

93

94

98

99

102

95

96

100

101

103

104

105

37 Pantry lineup 38 Squad, e.g.

106 107 108

109 110

111

112

39 —

113

132 Jerks

41 Author Zora ___ Hurston

123

133 Some screens, for short

43 Athlete’s foot treatment

128

129

130

134 Glacial

44 Where Charlie may ride forever, in song

131

132

133

46 Connecticut city 47 Carom

114

115

124

116

117

125

120 121 122

127

134

84 Sag

96 Markdown markers

86 Rug fiber

98 Author Nin

112 Year the emperor Claudius was born

67 Sweater option

100 New DNA evidence may lead to one

115 1991 P.G.A. champion John

103 It’s been shortening for over 100 years

117 —

105 —

121 Skinny

106 Ask for money

122 Fuss

107 Prefix with musicology

124 French possessive

108 —

127 British dessert, for short

4 Semis

50 Hollywood’s Davis

70 Like some codes

90 “___ who?”

5 Unprepared

52 Crow, e.g.

72 —

103 Singer Peniston

6 Hydrocarbon suffix

54 Byes

74 —

104 Einstein and Camus

7 Basil sauce

58 Thingamabobs

77 1990s craze

8 One end of New York’s Triborough Bridge

60 Cow’s fly swatter

79 Related on the mother ’s side

92 TV show on which Charlie Sheen replaced Michael J. Fox

63 Dummy

119

65 Bad thing for a roommate to do

89 Start of a count-off

48 Words of explanation

118 126

69 Rosemary feature

3 Girl’s name that’s also a place name

17

30

47

68 Rosemary piece

106 Hint-giving columnist

34

41

49 Blue flick

102 Lead singer on “Octopus’s Garden”

16

25 29

32

39

44

18 Head of state?

36 —

2 Suffix with hard or soft

15

22

28

88 Jeff Bridges sci-fi classic

101 Epitome of cool, with “the”

14

15 Parenthesis shape

130 Pixar movie between “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 2”

Down

13

24

26

13 Tear

32 Kaley of “The Big Bang Theory”

1 Goes down

12

12 Bull or cow

129 Poet/dramatist Federico García ___

131 Verse-writing

93 Experience you might want to forget

10 Suggests

11

21

23

Across

10

81 Renowned jeweler

94 Best-selling author who once worked for Britain’s MI6

110 Imitation

119 Is unwell 120 Obscure

125 “___ cool!”

thought for the week “Just because a man lacks the use of his eyes doesn’t mean he lacks vision.”

— Stevie Wonder

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A23


A23

Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

at the movies ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US

GETAWAY

Rating: PG Synopsis: ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US is a captivating and intimate all-access look at life on the road for the global music phenomenon. Weaved with stunning live concert footage, this inspiring feature film tells the remarkable story of Niall, Zayn, Liam, Harry and Louis' meteoric rise to fame, from their humble hometown beginnings and competing on the X-Factor, to conquering the world and performing at London's famed O2 Arena. Hear it from the boys themselves and see through their own eyes what it's really like to be One Direction.

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Brent Magna (Ethan Hawke) is a burned out race car driver who is thrust into a do-ordie mission behind the wheel when his wife is kidnapped. With Brent's only ally being a young hacker (Selena Gomez), his one hope of saving his wife is to follow the orders of the mysterious voice (Jon Voight) who's watching his every move through cameras mounted on the car Brent's driving.

RIDDICK

THE WORLDS END Rating: R Synopsis: In "The World's End," 20 years after attempting an epic pub crawl, five childhood friends reunite when one of them becomes hellbent on trying the drinking marathon again. They are convinced to stage an encore by Gary King (Simon Pegg), a 40-year-old man trapped at the cigarette end of his teens, who drags his reluctant pals to their hometown and once again attempts to reach the fabled pub - The World's End. As they attempt to reconcile the past and present, they realize the real struggle is for the future, not just theirs but humankind's. Reaching The World's End is the least of their worries.

MORTAL INSTRUMENTS Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Lily Collins stars as a young girl whose life is upended when she realizes that she's part of a long line of demon-slayers in this Screen Gems adaptation of Cassandra Clare's first book in her series of best-selling novels. Lena Headey and Jonathan Rhys Meyers head up the rest of the starring cast.

2 GUNS Rating: R Synopsis: Two crooked undercover officers - one from the DEA and the other from the Navy - unknowingly lead investigations on the other in this crime thriller from director Baltasar Kormakur. Mark Wahlberg, Denzel Washington, and Bill Paxton head up the starring cast.

THE BUTLER Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER tells the story of a White House butler who served eight American presidents over three decades. The film traces the dramatic changes that swept American society during this time, from the civil rights movement to Vietnam and beyond, and how those changes affected this man's life and family. Forest Whitaker stars as the butler with Robin Williams as Dwight Eisenhower, John Cusack as Richard Nixon, Alan Rickman as Ronald Reagan, James Marsden as John F. Kennedy, Liev Schreiber as Lyndon B. Johnson, and many more. Academy Award (R) nominated Lee Daniels (PRECIOUS) directs and co-wrote the script with Emmy (R)-award winning Danny Strong (GAME CHANGE).

Answers to this week’s puzzles E B B S

W A R E

E R I N

J M A T R A S

U N I T

S P R I G

A R O M A

P E N A L

H I T U P

E T H N O

L O I S E

R N I T O G H T S O R R E N E A I D P T Y E R R I D B O M E D A O C S A P A R I N E N A C I S I S E T S Y

A P A N E S E S T T O C O R U I O S A C H O E D L O S T O S D H D A O R D G O S G O P A D P A T E L O R Y O Y

E U R P E D O N G E S A L S E N O E R N E A T C E R I E S T C A O S

E V O K E S T A T A S L E C A R

L U C A S R E B O U N D R E T R I A L

E R L A K C O E N Q D U T E E I S E N R A T C A S T I T L E S R I S E S A A L T L E E T N P A B U G C D S

C O N V E R S E V N E C K

A C T I R L O N C E R T A T E N V E R O U I N G N D U E C E D E E S I N T E A T I T E S F R E E F O N Z A N Y

B E R A V I T I E N S L I F S L O

Rating: R Synopsis: Diesel reprises his role as the antihero Riddick, a dangerous, escaped convict wanted by every bounty hunter in the known galaxy. The infamous Riddick has been left for dead on a sunscorched planet that appears to be lifeless. Soon, however, he finds himself fighting for survival against alien predators more lethal than any human he's encountered.

WE’RE THE MILLERS Rating: R Synopsis: David Burke (Jason Sudeikis) is a small-time pot dealer whose clientele includes chefs and soccer moms, but no kids-after all, he has his scruples. So what could go wrong? Plenty. Preferring to keep a low profile for obvious reasons, he learns the hard way that no good deed goes unpunished when he tries to help out some local teens and winds up getting jumped by a trio of gutter punks. Stealing his stash and his cash, they leave him in major debt to his supplier, Brad (Ed Helms).

SMURFS 2 Rating: PG Synopsis: The Smurfs team up with their human friends to rescue Smurfette, who has been kidnapped by Gargamel since she knows a secret spell that can turn the evil sorcerer's newest creation - creatures called the Naughties - into real Smurfs.

THE WOLVERINE Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Hugh Jackman returns as Wolverine in this sequel to the member of the X-Men's first solo outing. Mark Bomback and The Usual Suspects' Christopher McQuarrie penned the script, which takes its inspiration from the Chris Claremont/Frank Miller Marvel miniseries from the 1980s dealing with the character's adventures in Japan as he fights ninjas in the ceremonial garb of the samurai.

GROWN UPS 2 Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The all-star comedy cast from Grown Ups returns (with some exciting new additions) for more summertime laughs. Lenny (Adam Sandler) has relocated his family back to the small town where he and his friends grew up. This time around, the grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their kids on a day notoriously full of surprises: the last day of school.

DESPICABLE ME 2 Rating: PG Synopsis: Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment's worldwide blockbuster Despicable Me entertained audiences around the globe in 2010, grossing more than $540 million and becoming the 10th-biggest animated motion picture in U.S. history.

PERCY JACKSON Rating: PG Synopsis: Percy Jackson, the son of Poseidon, continues his epic journey to fulfill his destiny, as he teams with his demigod friends to retrieve the Golden Fleece, which has the power to save their home and training ground, Camp Half-Blood.

THE CONJURING Rating: R Synopsis: Before there was Amityville, there was Harrisville. "The Conjuring" tells the true story of Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga), world renowned paranormal investigators, who were called to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in a secluded farmhouse. Forced to confront a powerful demonic entity, the Warrens find themselves caught in the most horrifying case of their lives.

PLANES

S T E W

Rating: PG Synopsis: Dusty is a cropdusting plane who dreams of competing in a famous aerial race. The problem? He is hopelessly afraid of heights. With the support of his mentor Skipper and a host of new friends, Dusty sets off to make his dreams come true.

ELYSIUM

Puzzles on page A22

Rating: R Synopsis: In the year 2154, two classes of people exist: the very wealthy, who live on a pristine manmade space station called Elysium, and the rest, who live on an overpopulated, ruined Earth. The people of Earth are desperate to escape the planet's crime and poverty, and they critically need the state-of-the-art medical care available on Elysium - but some in Elysium will stop at nothing to enforce anti-immigration laws and preserve their citizens' luxurious lifestyle.

KICK-ASS 2

522 E. Broadway

327-6271

Did you give up finally? “We Sell the Best and Service the Rest!”

Rating: R Synopsis: His heroic antics having inspired a citywide wave of masked vigilantes, Kick-Ass (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) joins their ranks to help clean up the streets, only to face a formidable challenge when the vengeful Red Mist (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) transforms himself into the world's first super villain in this sequel written and directed by Jeff Wadlow (Never Back Down). Dave/Kick-Ass and Mindy/Hit Girl (Chloë Grace Moretz) are about to graduate high school and become a crime-fighting duo when their noble plans are foiled by Mindy's strict parents.

YOU’RE NEXT Rating: R Synopsis: One of the smartest and most terrifying films in years, YOU'RE NEXT reinvents the genre by putting a fresh twist on home-invasion horror. When a gang of masked, ax-wielding murderers descend upon the Davison family reunion, the hapless victims seem trapped...until an unlikely guest of the family proves to be the most talented killer of all. Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.


A24

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

09/06/13-09/12/13

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

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ALLEN 8

No Passes or Discounts R

R

PG

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

3:30 6:30 9:40 12:40 SAT & SUN

2:10 4:20 6:50 9:20 11:50 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

R 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 11:30 SAT & SUN

3:40 6:40 9:25 12:50 SAT & SUN

  

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

1819 E. 20TH STREET

4:00 8:35 R

PG

R

Online ticket sales available at 2:50 5:10 7:30 10:00 12:20 SAT & SUN

2:10 4:40 7:10 9:50 11:40 SAT & SUN

1:45 6:20 11:25 SAT & SUN

www.allentheatresinc.com

1:50 4:30 7:20 9:55 11:15 SAT & SUN

Movie Gift Passes can be purchased at any location. Allen Theatres Gift Ticket Good for ANY movie, any time. Not good for special events. Cost: Normal adult evening price. Good for 3D film with additional cash upcharge.

Allen Theatres Discount Ticket Not good for 3D films or special events. Good for movies before 6:00 pm and nonrestricted movies after 6:00 pm for adults. Cost: Normal adult matinee price

ANIMAS 10

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts PG 3D*

No Passes or Discounts R 1:45 4:25 7:00 9:35 11:10 FRI - SUN

1:40 6:40 9:00

PG-13

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

PG

6:30

1:35 6:05

No Passes or Discounts PG 3D* 2:05 7:15

PG

PG

3D*

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

PG-13 3:25 6:20 9:15 12:30 FRI - SUN

PG

3D*

No Passes or Discounts 4:00 11:05 FRI - SUN

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts

3:50 8:20 11:15 FRI-SUN

2:00 6:50 R

4:40 9:45 11:30 FRI-SUN R

PG

 

 

PG-13

2:30 5:00 7:25 9:55

OMING SOON

3:35 9:30 12:40 FRI-SUN

No Passes or Discounts 2:10 4:30 6:55 9:20 11:45 FRI - SUN

4:20 9:10 11:40 FRI - SUN

No Passes or Discounts 1:55 4:35 7:10 9:40 11:25 FRI - SUN

   12:00 FRI - SUN

PG-13


SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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VOL. 3 NO. 49

Labor Day festival

Totah Festival celebrates cultural diversity, heritage

LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune American Indian culture filled the Farmington Civic Center during the 25th annual Totah Festival, which showcased artwork, Navajo rugs, and powwow dancing. The festival began on

Saturday, Aug. 31, at 10 a.m. and ran through Sunday, Sept. 1. It is a tradition that enables the community to witness the beauties of the American Indian culture. Totah Board Member George Francis encourages the public to attend this

year’s Totah Festival because they can “educate themselves and understand another culture. We have many different cultures, and if we can blend them and understand them then we will have harmony within the community.” But before the festival began the public was in-

vited to the Totah Festival poster unveiling at 5 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 30, at the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park. Artist Roy Kady from Goat Springs, Ariz., was

chosen to display his artwork in this year’s poster. His artwork, a photograph of an intricately woven rug, is titled “Looking Towards the Carrizo.” The rug itself, to be sold at the Festival, was inspired by his hometown of Goat Springs, a town on the outskirts of Teec Nos Pos, Ariz. In his artwork, vibrant colored dyes

form visuals that represent his childhood experiences. “This is a little bit of my personal experience as a young individual when I was growing up,” Kady, who has been weaving since he was 9 years old, explained. The artwork represents various landscapes. The

* festival 5

Artist Roy Kady from Goats Springs, Ariz. was selected to display his artwork in this year’s Totah Festival poster.

We want your stories Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

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Dental care at McGee Park Sept. 13 & 14 Pg. 5


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

Navajo Code Talker’s legacy

Shelly expresses gratitude for brave service Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly expressed his gratitude for the service of the Navajo Code Talkers during Navajo Code Talkers Day celebration. “On behalf of First Lady Martha Shelly, Vice President Rex Lee Jim, and myself, we salute our Navajo Code Talkers, who turned the tide of the war in the Pacific Theater, and brought our country to victory,” President Shelly said in his welcoming address. Approximately 20 Navajo Code Talkers and 200 people attended the welcoming ceremony at the Window Rock Navajo Tribal Park and Veterans Memorial. President Shelly read a Loyalty Pledge to the United States that was passed by the Navajo Nation Council in 1940 as World War II escalated. “Now therefore, we resolve that

the Navajo Indians stand ready as they did in 1918 to aid and defend our Government and its institutions against all subversive and armed conflict and pledge our loyalty to the system which recognizes minority rights and a way of life that has placed us among the greatest people of our race,” President Shelly stated. President Shelly cited Congressional reports that more than 5,000 American Indians served in the armed forces during World War II and about half of them were Navajo. “We welcome you to this day, whereupon we will bestow honor to you, and to the spirit of the ones who have passed. This day shall forever be set aside in your tribute and honor,” President Shelly said. President Ronald Regan set aside Aug. 14 as National Navajo Code Talker Day beginning in 1982.

Appropriations

Shelly meets with House committee to keep ONHIR Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly joined members of the Navajo-Hopi Land Commission as they met with U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations staff on the proposed defunding of the federally funded Office of Navajo-Hopi Indian Relocation, or ONHIR. “If Congress shuts down ONHIR, then our Navajo families ought to move back to Hopi Partitioned Lands,” Shelly said. “If they can’t fund us, we will allow our people to go back from where they were chased off. We’ll have to redo the relocation policy all over again. ONHIR can do a 638 with BIA.” “Our Navajo families’ rights are being violated. We need a House com-

mittee to come here and look into this,” President Shelly added. The president read from a letter he wrote to Congress on the proposed defunding of ONHIR. “Not funding this program will deprive hundreds of Navajos the benefit and due process that they are entitled to under the law,” the president reiterated to the House staff. “The Navajo Nation has hundreds of families who are still awaiting their relocation benefits,” President Shelly stated. “To base a funding decision on the statements of a now non-impacted party is a flawed rationale for action.” The House Appropriations Interior bill for fiscal

year 2014 proposes to “zero out” funding for the Office of Navajo-Hopi Indian Relocation. By federal law, the power to terminate the office rests with the United States president. Congress can effectively close the office by defunding ONHIR. The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, one of 12 subcommittees on appropriations, ordered a study to be conducted by the General Accountability Office. More than 200 Navajo families are awaiting relocation benefits, and another 350 are appealing denials by the federal relocation office in Flagstaff, Ariz. More appeals may be filed for some 2,000 denied applications for re-

location benefits. The Navajo-Hopi Land Commission still has some 400,000 acres of land to put into trust under the 1980 amendment to the Settlement act passed originally made into law in 1974. There are more than 9,000 acres of land the Navajo-Hopi Land Commission needs to select and purchase under the Settlement Act, incumbent on congressional funding. The House staff acknowledged President Shelly’s statements at the meeting, and responded that they will return to Washington, D.C., with information and testimony they received from the Navajo Nation leadership, and from individuals affected by relocation.

“It is up to the appropriators to make the decisions,” the House staff acknowledged. In April, President Shelly testified before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Interior for fiscal year 2014, which begins Oct. 1, 2013. His testimony emphasized more vibrant self-sustained tribal economies, tribal consultation on the sequestration, empowering infrastructure costs, and tax incentives for private industry development. The Hopi tribal leadership offered testimony at the April House Appropriations Subcommittee hearing to “close” ONHIR. Relocation for Hopi families was completed in 2011.

Congress is currently in recess and will return on Sept. 3. They are expected to resume debates on the 12 annual appropriation bills. Appropriation amounts of proposed spending that differ between the House and Senate will be discussed in conference by both houses. “If Congress passes the appropriation bill to zero out funding for ONHIR, we still have President Obama’s veto power we can pursue.” President Shelly said. Council Delegate Walter Phelps, who serves on the Navajo-Hopi Land Commission, and Raymond Maxx, director for commission, joined President Shelly.

N.M. Delegation:

$26 million in mineral royalty payments returning to state WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and U.S. Reps. Ben Ray Luján, Michelle Lujan Grisham and Steve Pearce announced the U.S. Department of the Interior will return $26 million in mineral royalty payments to the state of New Mexico as a result of the state lawmakers’ call for the state to be rightfully paid under the Mineral Leasing Act, or MLA. In fiscal year 2013 administration officials unilaterally made the decision that the state’s share of royalties under the MLA would be subject to sequestration – automatic, across-the-board federal government spending cuts.

The New Mexico delegation uniformly opposed the move, which would cost 35 states a total of $109 million, including $26 million from New Mexico in 2013, and similar amounts in future years. The delegation, along with lawmakers from other Western states, led a bipartisan call for the administration to return the payments. In a May 16 letter www.scribd.com/doc/16 2241535/05-16-13MLA-Revenue-Availablefor-States?secret_password=25aatrgum03571fu xa0s, they also noted the hardship that states and local communities would experience if the sequestered revenues were

not returned. The Interior Department responded to the delegation’s request by announcing it will return the fiscal year 2013 royalty payments beginning in October of this year, which is the start of fiscal year 2014. As long as sequestration is in place, it is expected that future funds will still be subject to sequester in the year they are collected, but they will be returned the following fiscal year – in effect, refunding the funds to states after a delay. At the end of the fiscal year, the amount to be refunded to New Mexico is expected to be $26 million. “This is extremely good news for New Mexico –

I’m very pleased that the administration has seen reason and will return the revenue owed to states from energy production on federal lands,” Udall said. “These funds are the result of an existing agreement for mineral development. They provide a vital source of funding for public education and other functions New Mexicans rely on, and the federal government shouldn’t be using them to balance its books. I’m relieved that we were able to reverse this aspect of sequestration and restore $26 million back to our state this year and in years ahead.” “I’m pleased the Department of Interior heeded our call to return $26

million in mineral royalty payments to New Mexico that were withheld due to sequestration,” Heinrich said. “Our federal lands and natural resources provide significant revenue that fund infrastructure, education, and flood protection projects, which are especially critical for rural communities across New Mexico. I will work to ensure every dollar is returned and continue to protect these much-needed funds that belong to our state.” “Returning these funds to New Mexico and other states that receive mineral royalty payments is the right course of action and will have an important impact in communities

across New Mexico,” Luján said. “These payments represent a significant source of funding that help support vital programs and critical investments that make a difference in the lives of the people of New Mexico.” “This is great news for our state,” Lujan Grisham said. “The Department of Interior’s announcement reaffirms what I said previously: these mineral royalties belong to New Mexico, and they should stay in New Mexico. I’m proud to have fought for New Mexico, and I’m pleased that these mineral royalty payments will once again be able to support our

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Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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Service recognized

President Shelly honors former leaders Navajo President Ben Shelly bestowed honor to Dr. Guy Gorman and to former Speaker Nelson Gorman during an honoring ceremony, declaring that both gentlemen leaders taught him leadership. “Dr. Gorman has given leadership in his years of service to the Navajo people,” President Shelly said at the Chinle chapter house on Sunday. “He (Dr. Gorman) is a man of honor, wisdom, and great dedication.” President Shelly bestowed Dr. Gorman with a Pendleton blanket, as he declared Dr. Gorman, a man whose leadership will al-

ways be known. He served with Dr. Gorman, as the two were members of the Diné Rights Association, a group dedicated to government accountability. Dr. Guy Gorman was first elected to the Navajo Nation Council in 1974, and served concurrently with the late William D. Tsosie, as the two represented Chinle. “Thank you Mr. Gorman for what you’ve done – I am a part of you, of what you have done,” President Shelly said as he gave honor to former Speaker Nelson Gorman. The former speaker served concurrently in the Coun-

cil with President Shelly in 1991. Dr. Gorman and the former speaker are related by Navajo clan. Sunday afternoon, President Shelly attended a public meeting regarding the proposed purchase of BHP Billiton’s Navajo Mine. The meeting was at the Shiprock chapter house and was attended by more than 200 people. A resolution “supporting the Diné citizenship against ruining our environment” was placed on the agenda, but not acted on. “Give us four to five years to transition from coal to clean coal,” President Shelly said.

“How do you close down a government?” he asked, referring to closure of the mine and the adverse effect it would have on the Nation’s gross revenue receipts. “I will be prepared,” President Shelly said. “For the people who say ‘no’ here, give me an alternative plan. Just don’t say ‘no’.” Sunday’s meeting was cosponsored by BHP-Billiton and Diné Care. “President Obama is saying ‘no’ to coal, but yet in China they’re still using coal,” President Shelly added.

The Navajo Nation is working to build a railroad spur in Thoreau, N.M. Plans call for an inland port authority for imports and exports, shipping coal on the transcontinental for export to foreign countries. The railroad spur is expected to be in project initiation by December. Coal from the Navajo mine can be used for the local power plants, and for foreign shipment. The Navajo Nation is currently in the process of buying the Navajo coal mine operated by BHP-Billiton for an estimated $85 million.

Route dedicated

President cuts ribbon to open Navajo Route 20 Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly delivered statements of teamwork and gratitude during a speech near Navajo Route 20 during a dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony. “You have your new N20. It is complete,” President Shelly announced before a crowd of about 300 people.

President Shelly was a guest speaker at a dedication ceremony for the opening of N20 on Thursday morning with other speakers from the local chapters, Navajo Division of Transportation, Arizona Department of Transportation, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Federal Highway Administration. “This is all it takes,” President

Shelly said about teamwork. “Let’s work together and look at the future.” Navajo Route 20 was designated the alternate route after U.S. Hwy. 89 was closed in February because a dry land slide caused portions of the road to collapse. U.S Hwy 89 is the main road between Flagstaff and Page, Ariz.

N20 was a 28-mile dirt road that for decades community members have asked to be paved. The closure of U.S. Hwy. 89 sparked efforts to fast track the paving of N20. It took more than 750 workers and 79 days to complete. “This project was completed as an emergency detour route, and

you did things properly, ensuring the safety of all who will travel this road,” President Shelly said. He expressed gratitude for leaders and communities members who have been advocating for the paving of N20. “Thank you from the bottom of my heart,” President Shelly said.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

Data Center

Navajo President helps opens new facility Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly opened a tier three data and network operating center as part of the broadband initiative he began in 2009. “Today, we celebrate our very first data center of many to come,” said President Shelly at NTUAWireless’ new 6,400square-foot facility. “We are a technology nation just as much as we are an energy nation.” The technology center will be operated by NTUAWireless, LLC., a for profit company created three years ago as the Navajo Nation headed the broadband effort for a Broadband Technology Opportunities Program, or BTOP, grant.

“The day following the field hearing in Flagstaff, our Navajo staff formed a broadband work group,”

said the president. “They brought together telephone companies, Internet Service Providers, government of-

fices, enterprises, hospitals, schools, city and county governments. They even reached out to the Hopi

tribe, and the Hopi Telecommunications Inc.” The tier three site is a secure facility that relies on card keys and bio metrics for staff access, with 30-inch raised floors, and security cameras. There is one uplink through a fiber backbone to Albuquerque, with another pathway being negotiated through Gallup creating redundancy. The facility has two power feeds, and one Cummings diesel generator with storage batteries on site. “With the cloud, we are inviting companies, corporations, large groups across America to store their data here on the Navajo Nation,” said the president. It is a smart move.” U.S. Senators Tom

Udall, D-N.M., and Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., were represented by staff, along with U.S. Congressman Ben Lujan, D-Dist. 3-N.M. Governor Susana Martinez was represented by the Indian Affairs Department’s Arthur Allison. State Representative Sharon Clahchischilliage, R-Dist. 4, N.M., said that President Shelly led the effort in Washington, D.C., during the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act period in which the Navajo Nation received more than $500 million for infrastructure projects. NTUA General Manager Walter Haase acknowledged that 70 percent of the workforce at the new facility are Navajo.

Adaptive golf clinic

Train the trainer clinic deadline is Sept. 13 Piñon Hills Golf Course will host a two-day First Swing Golf Clinic presented by the Farmington Living Life After Stroke Support Group on Friday, Oct. 11 and Saturday, Oct.12. The train the trainer clinic will be conducted by Instructors from The National Amputee Golf Association. The morning session of the first day will be held at San Juan College, Room 9008, in the Henderson Fine Arts Building. The class is designed for local therapists and golf Pros who will be instructed on how to work with disabled persons who want to golf. The afternoon session will be held at Piñon Hills Golf Course, where the participants will put into practice what they learned in the classroom, in order to facilitate the free clinic for disabled persons on the second day. Golf professionals, occupational therapists, physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, or speech therapist are invited to the clinic. Also, attending therapists will receive 1.2 Continuing Education Units for their both days of participation, through the NMAPTA OTA and SLP. There is a registration fee of $25 for all attending therapists to cover the cost of Continuing Education Units. Registration deadline, for attending thera-

pists, is Friday, Sept. 13. The second day at Piñon Hills Golf Course will facilitate the free session for disabled persons who want to golf. The trainers will work with them one-on-one. Participants need to bring golf clubs (driver and putter), comfortable clothing for golf, sunscreen, water, and a desire to play golf. If you do not have clubs, please let Gary Willmart know by Oct. 1, so loaner clubs can be provided. Gary Willmart

can be contacted at 505.632.0440 or email, flyfshrs@wildblue.net. Golf Professionals, Healthcare Professionals, and NAGA instructors will work one-on-one with individuals with all types of physical disabilities to teach the following objectives: 1. How to hold the golf club 2. Overcoming challenges with the appropriate grip 3. How to assume the stance 4. Addressing the ball, set-up, and balance

5. The rules of golf and differences presented by various types of disabilities 6. Element of the swing (standing and seated) 7. Demonstrations of adaptive equipment 8. ADA implications 9. Use of accessible golf carts 10. Safety The First Swing program was designed to bring golf professionals, healthcare professionals, and the physically challenged together to teach, learn – or

relearn – and enjoy the game of golf. Why golf ? Golf offers many possibilities to all ages and all potential abilities. It can contribute dramatically to an individual’s physical well being, instilling confidence and pride in personal achievement, and can be a lot of fun! This event is sponsored by Disabled American Veterans Charitable Trust, Orthotic & Prosthetic Assistance Fund, or OAPF, PGA Foundation, and The National Amputee Golf Association, or NAGA. Through grants from these organizations, NAGA is able to bring this free clinic to us. Travel, lodging, and meals for the instructors are funded through the NAGA First Swing budget. This program has been presented at over 400 sites throughout the United States and Canada. It has provided instructional insight to more than 2,000 therapists and golf professionals and over 9,000 disabled individuals. Piñon Hills Golf Course is located at 2101 Sunrise Parkway in Farmington, N.M. For additional information, contact the Piñon Hills Golf Course Pro Shop at 505.326.6066 or Gary Willmart, U.S. Air Force, retired, and stroke survivor, at 505.632.0440 or email, flyfshrs@wildblue.net..

Permit OK’d

Aztec’s vote moves free pre-K childcare forward DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Sixty Aztec 4-year-olds are eligible for free preKindergarten classes after A Gold Star Academy re-

ceived a conditional use permit from the city to operate a childcare in Westside Plaza. Despite concerns about the children’s safety in a crowded and busy strip mall, the City Commissioners vot-

ed 4 to 1 to approve the permit that will allow the academy to turn retail space into classrooms for 35 children. The project is led by Barbara Tedrow, owner of

Farmington’s A Gold Star Academy and Smiling Faces Childcare. She received a $15,000 grant for the Children, Youth and Families Department to set up a classroom facility, along with

funds to provide pre-K services to the children. While the program is not based on income, it is based on need, Tedrow said. “It is based on the fact that CYFD and the state are out there

looking at children who have been staying with neighbors, staying with grandma and grandpa or a stay-at-home mom, who

* permit

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Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

5

2 days of free dental care

Mission of Mercy will have 125 dentists at McGee Park Sept. 13, 14 LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune New Mexico Mission of Mercy San Juan County will provide children and adults with free dental care during the two-day dental clinic at the McGee Park Convention Center. The clinic will begin at 5 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 13 and 14. For access to the clinic, e n t e r McGee Park from Highway 64 by turning south onto County Road 5500. Enter the gate marked “Patient Parking” next to the San Juan County Sheriff ’s Office. In anticipation of big crowds, patients may line up outside of the clinic a day earlier at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12. There will be 125 dentists on hand to provide services on a first-come, first-served basis for people who cannot afford dental care. “Not all of the patients’ needs will be taken care of. Each patient will be seen by a triage team who decides what treatment will be best and most needed,”

said Dr. Jennifer Thompson, Mission of Mercy cochair. Because long lines are expected, patients are encouraged to bring a chair, hat, water, and snacks. “If they plan arriving early, they need to be prepared for the overnight stay,” said Dr. John McNeill, Mission of Mercy co-chair. Patients also are asked

to bring a list of medications they are currently taking and medical history information. Patients may continue to take regular medications before the event. However, they should consult with a doctor if they have any questions, McNeill added. A photo I.D. is not required to receive the provided services. As patients walk into the clinic, they will receive a medical evaluation, talk with the triage team, and receive X-rays. Then, they will enter the clinic floor, which will have areas for fillings, tooth extraction, partial dentures, root canals and an area for children

and dental hygiene care. Mission of Mercy has been a community-wide endeavor, with 1,300 citizens signing up to volunteer at the event. “We are excited about volunteering and we are pleased with the support from the volunteers and what the community has provided for this event,” McNeill explained.

Thompson said she looks forward to helping the patients with their needs. “The community can come together and receive treatment they might not have access to.” Mission of Mercy San Juan County follows on the heels of two other dental clinics held in Albuquerque in 2010 and in Las Cruces in 2012. During

these two events, 3,722 patients were helped by 3,200 volunteers, and more than $2.2 million in free dental care was donated. Mission of Mercy San Juan County expects to serve approximately 1,500 area patients and provide more than $1 million in dental services. Beginning in 2000, Mission of Mercy started in

Virginia to help provide free dental care to individuals in need. New Mexico was the 15th state to initiate Mission of Mercy, which is a program of the New Mexico Dental Foundation. For more information about Mission of Mercy, go to www.nmdentalfoundation.org or call 1.888.723.8820.

me some of the plants that occupy the San Juan River.” Above that, mesas begin to appear as well as juniper trees. Then the top layer is green and lush with mountains towering over the scenery. In the middle stands a purple mountain named Carrizo. Symbols

that move up and down the mountains represent the movement between the river and the mountains. Above is a sapphire blue sky with clouds. Kady grew up with a family of weavers and he remembers a photo of him as a child, sitting next to his mother as she is weav-

ing. “These story-telling pieces are stories that are tied into it and inspired by your upbringing. It becomes a part of your palette and canvas,” Kady said. The woven artwork took Kady more than 300 hours to complete. The dyes used to stain the wool were ex-

tracted from plants such as sage, indigo, and logwood bark imported from Africa. Kady considers his artwork to be more contemporary compared to traditional Navajo weaving. “From what I was exposed to, traditional designs refer to the ones that we use to weave when we used them

for utilitarian purposes,” he explained, adding the traditional designs are usually associated with regional styles. Along with viewing Kady’s artwork during the poster unveiling, he was also at the Totah Festival to answer questions about his artwork.

From left, local dentists Drs. Charles Schumacher, John McNeill, Jennifer Thompson and, seated, Julius Manz are co-chairs for the San Juan County Mission of Mercy. – Tony Bennett photo

festival bottom of the rug represents San Juan River and in front of the river are symbols called “Whirling Logs,” which refer to the river’s motion. The next layer shows a sandy ground with medicinal plants scattered throughout. “My mom is an herbalist and she taught

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6

SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS AN ADVENTURE IN THE ARTS This exhibit from the collection of the Guild Hall Museum on Long Island includes 73 works of art from a stellar array of artists. They include: Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, Thomas Moran, Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning, Peggy Bacon, Chuck Close, Max Ernst, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Roy Lichtenstein and George Bellows among many others. The exhibit will be at the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center through Sept. 22. An Adventure in the Arts, selections from the permanent collection of the Guild Hall Museum, was organized by the Guild Hall Museum in East Hampton, N.Y., in association with Landau Traveling Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Calif. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org THREE WATERS TRADING POST EXHIBIT The Three Waters Trading Post exhibit features a walkthrough replica of a 1930’s trading post, including a bull pen stocked with period goods and artifacts, pawn room and office showcasing jewelry and rugs. The exhibit is on display at the Farmington Museum in the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., Farmington. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org MUSIC IN THE WINERY’S COURTYARD Enjoy live music & great wine at Wines of the San Juan from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. every Sunday through Sept. 22. Wines of the San Juan is located at 233 Hwy. 511 in Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan.com PICNIC IN THE PARK FOR PRESCHOOLERS Preschool children and their families bring lunch and meet at the Riverside Nature Center for a picnic from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., followed by a story or activity and a stroller-friendly walk in the park. Learn about plants, insects, birds, and all the interesting wildlife. Feed the friendly ducks and go home

in time for naps. This program continues weekly through to September. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI SEPT. 6 TEA PARTY SJC 9-12/TEA Party Patriot Lunch Meeting will be 11:30 a.m. on Friday at Los Hermanitos East Restaurant in Farmington. This is a forum meeting where all present can bring up issues that concern them. Several elected officials often attend. For more information call 505.324.1102.

SAT SEPT. 7

FRI SEPT. 13 SUN SEPT. 15 COLLECTOR CAR WEEKEND Friday, come cruise East Main Sonic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Car show registration is available. Saturday, the Swap Meet is from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Gateway Park Museum and Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., and on Sunday, the Annual Collector Car Show at Brookside Park in Farmington is from 9 a.m. to noon. Awards begin at 3 p.m. Information: 505.716.7100 or 505.327.6887

SAT SEPT. 28

BOOTS & BREWS FEST Country music festival held at Riverside Park in Aztec. A full day of country music that will feature five national bands, food, brews, wine and vendors. Free admission for kids 12 and under. RV and tent camping available in the park. Call for details. Information: www.bootsandbrews.com

FOUR CORNERS ANTIQUE POWER & TRACTOR SHOW Come to the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., and experience a bit of agricultural past. Enjoy antique tractors, engines, and vehicles at this annual event. A highlight of the show is the tractor pull. Information: 505.334.1339

SYCAMORE PARK YARD SALE Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., South of Murray Drive between Graham and Griffith Road, is hosting a Yard Sale and Craft Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept.7. Booths are available for $10 per table for both the yard sale and craft fair. To register for a booth, go to fmtn.org/spcc, under the quick links tab on the right. This will be an outdoor event, so bring the family and enjoy a day in the park! Come out and help us make this an annual event. For additional information call 505.566.2480.

BREWS, MEATS, BANDS From 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28, there will be music, food and 13 breweries at Lions Wilderness Park Amphitheater for a day of fun, food, music and beer. The barbecue cookoff will supply pork ribs in many styles. Bands including Boom, Little Miss Chievous, Jose Villarreal and Those Devils will play during the day with Durango band Hello, Doll Face performing the main concert that night. The event is sponsored by Majestic Media, Distil, KOBF Channel 12, Big Dog 96.9, Kool 104.9 and KTRA 102. Tickets can be purchased on line at bmbfestival.com or at Distil. Tickets are $25 on line and at Distil and $30 at the gate. Call Distil or Majestic Media for more information.

SUN SEPT. 8 3RD ANNUAL “TRI-CITY CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT” Held at Hidden Valley Golf Course in Aztec, 72 teams of four will try to make a hole-in-one for a cash prize of $10,000. Other prizes throughout the day will be awarded. Information: 505.334.7646, 505.632.0880, or 505-3250279

FRI SEPT. 13 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION 300 to 400 hand woven Navajo rugs are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian art and craft vendors also onsite. Auction sponsored by Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing from 4 to 6 p.m. and auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

A REAL NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM Exhibits come to life at this annual event in the Farmington Museum, Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., in Farmington. Be a part of this fun family event for all ages. Information: 505.599.1147 or www.fmtn.org

SAT SEPT. 28 SUN SEPT. 29 HARVEST FESTIVAL & GREAT GRAPE STOMP Celebrating, in style with live music, juried art show, specialty foods, grape stomp competition, and many activities commemorating the state’s centennial at Wines of the San Juan, 233 Hwy. 511, Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan .com

ADULT EVENTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.5991380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. September 7 - Otis & the Rhythm September 14 - Off the Interstate September 21 - Grant & Randy September 28 - Vintage People Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. September 18 - Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – Noon Friday, Sept. 6 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14, $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. BIBLE READING IN NAVAJO 10 – 11:30 a.m. Fridays, Starting Sept. 6 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bible reading in the Navajo Language, taught by Dorothy Tewangoitewa. BACK AND HOME SAFETY 9 -10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Get basic tips on how to prevent back injuries by developing habits that reduce the strain on the back, how to prevent falls in the home, create a safer living environment, and low impact exercises to do at home. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by Todd, Thomas, and Therese from San Juan Regional Medical Center. Info: 505.566.2287. WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S 9 a.m. - ? Saturday, Sept. 14 Berg Park, at Scott and San

Juan Boulevard. Team Big Deal is coordinated by Sharon Deal and will meet at the Berg Park Pavilion. Please come and walk to support the cause. Make a contribution to the team to help eradicate Alzheimer’s. Make a difference. Wear good walking shoes. For more information or to sign up for Team Big Deal, call 505.566.2287. ENCORE CLASS – ACTING 101 9:30 -11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 17 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Are you a character? Would you like to be? Join us for an exciting and creative time in Acting 101 – a beginner class for 50+ adults looking to create through acting. Discover the basics of acting through improvisation, games, monologues, and scene work. Have fun crafting new scenes and making new friends. Plan to attend Bottom of the Barrel’s Production of Robin Hood on Oct. 19; costs no more than $10. Details will be discussed on the first day of class. Performance from a showcase of scenes worked on in the final class. Class will be taught by Mellissa Souers, B.A. in Theater from Fort Lewis College, who has instructed people of all ages in acting, theater and film. For more information call San Juan College at 505.566.3121. HEALTHCARE DIRECTIVES 10 -11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Learn about Health Directives, Powers of Attorney, and additional advice on steps to take in case of an unexpected illness that can lead to incapacitation, where someone else has to communicate your wishes. Handouts will be available and refreshments provided. Taught by Brenda Atencio with PMS – Northwest New Mexico Hospice and Home Care. Handouts and refreshments will be available. For more infor mation call 505.566.2287 CHANGES TO MEDICAID, 2014 10 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Medicaid is changing in New Mexico. If you have Medicaid or you assist people who use Medicaid, we invite you to join us for this presentation. Orlando Vasquez, Program Manager, Self-Directed Community Benefits HSD/MAD Centennial Care Bureau, will be here to explain the changes and what you need to do. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. COLOR TRIP 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 24 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Are you 60+? Join us for a day trip, Durango to Silverton. Bring your camera, good walking shoes, a jacket, and hat. Prepare for any kind of weather as we meander through the mountain passes and take in the glorious fall colors. Cost is $5; pre-registration and filled out trip form is required. You will be responsible for your own lunch. There are several restaurants in Silverton from which to choose, and you will have some time to shop before leaving for the return trip at 2 p.m. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 - 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 505.599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390


SHIPROCK

Friday, September 6, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

7

payments schools, hospitals and infrastructure.” “I’m pleased that the Department of the Interior has decided to return the mineral royalties withheld earlier this year,” Pearce said. “It is unacceptable that a unilateral deci-

sion in Washington can so easily cut off millions of dollars that are the lifeblood of western states such as New Mexico. New Mexico’s classrooms and communities should not suffer at the whim of D.C. bureaucrats—the Administration’s

reckless handling of this issue led to delays and uncertainty that are sure to impact our economy.” Udall, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, questioned Department officials about the issue during an Ap-

propriations subcommittee hearing while asking that they reevaluate their decision and solve the issue administratively. For full video of the exchange, go to www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iI McPYIEvg&feature=youtu.be&t

=2m43s . The full text of the letter from the Department of the Interior can be viewed at w w w. s c r i b d . c o m /doc/163310122/Letter-fromDepartment-of-the-Interior-onMLA-Payments.

a Domino’s Pizza and a Durango Joe’s drive-through location. The parking lot can be busy at times and there was a concern about dropping children off in that parking lot. Tedrow said the building’s owner gave her permission to use an alley behind the building as a drop-off point. “The landlord has worked with me to make the most feasible and safe options for the children. In the back – I know we consider it an alley, but it is used for loading and unloading,” Tedrow said. Moojen agreed the alley could be used, because it is on private property and the city would not tell the property owner how to use the alleyway. She, however, was concerned that the alley access could be changed if the property was sold in the future. “We are pesky planners and we are supposed to think longterm,” Moojen said. “At this point in time there is access and people do go whichever way is most convenient for them.” Moojen’s other concern was an off-site playground proposed by Tedrow. The property owner gave her permission to use an empty lot across Frederick Avenue, and planners did not like the idea of children crossing the road for access to an outdoor recreation area.

Tedrow said she would put in a crosswalk, have the children accompanied by adults. and have those adults wearing bright-colored safety vests. The children also would be encouraged to hold a rope that would be strung up while they were crossing the street. This did not sit well with Commissioner Sherri Sipe. “I can see that we could use another pre-K program. I think the need is there, especially for the lowincome, but for myself I am having major heartburn about the safety of the kids,” she said. “I know Frederick Road and that strip mall. I’ve about got run over there myself many times,” Sipe continued. “It’s not a good place for a daycare. I don’t think it’s a safe place for those kids. That is my gut feeling.” Commissioner Jim Crowley pointed out that Tedrow had a safety plan, which she presented to the Commission, and that plan was approved by CYFD. “There is risk at every location. I’ve read that at other locations throughout the state parents walk their children inside,” he said. “You never eliminate risk, you do the best you can to minimize it. The concern for the safety of those kids is of the utmost, that is why you have a safety plan.”

Commissioner Gene Current agreed, saying “The playground aside, delivering kids and picking kids up is going to be dangerous no matter where you are. There is risk in everything. It looks like the safety issues have been addressed. You could put it out in the country and there would still be risks. I feel they are going to be responsible and handle this in an appropriate manner.” Rod Foss, an Aztec resident and owner Just Us Kids in Aztec, stated that he did not believe the safety issues had been met. He called the proposal “mindboggling,” and claimed the issue had nothing to do with children. “My concern is when you are designing a childcare you need to keep the kids first,” Foss said. “Would the city of Aztec design a park and put the parking lot across the street?” He stated that if Tedrow did not receive the permit, and her grant dollars went back to the state, then he would be able to take in 60 more children through CYFD funds in FY2015. He currently provides pre-K services to 20 children. “I’m going to get 80 kids next year, if you lose your grant,” Foss said, adding that he has been “swallowing it for our community,” because “the Aztec peo-

ple need childcare.” Tedrow stated that if the center was not approved the funding for the 60 children would be gone and not available again for maybe two to three years. Her plans would be to get this facility off the ground by using the state funds, and then within a year’s time expand the facility by building a new childcare center from the ground up in a new location. The new center could be built within six months of Tedrow identifying and purchasing the land, and it would be a facility licensed for 100 children. Commissioners asked City Attorney Larry Thrower whether a time constraint could be placed on the conditional use permit, because the permits typically are in place as long as the property owner remains the same. He said he could research the issue but it would take time, and Crowley pointed out time was something Tedrow did not have. “I’m looking at a time limit. We need to look at making some type of decision yea or nay with a ruling,” Crowley said. He moved to approve the conditional use permit. It was seconded by Commissioner Roberta Clover, and all but Commissioner Sipe voted in the affirmative to allow the permit.

permit might not be able to put them in pre-K,” she explained. The program, developed nine years ago by the Bill Richardson administration, targets 4-yearold students and provides them with half-day classes in preparation for kindergarten. Prior to her receiving the funds to expand services from Farmington into Aztec, only 7 percent of Aztec children had access to statefunded pre-K classes. Twenty students were attending another private daycare, and 20 were being bused out of Aztec and into Farmington for services because, according to Tedrow, the program only existed in Farmington, Bloomfield, and within Central Schools’ boundaries. With the addition of the new facility and 60 new slots opening up, Aztec would then receive services for 29 percent of its 4year-old children. The permit, however, was met with resistance from Aztec city planners, who asked the Commission to deny the conditional use permit. “The primary concern staff has is the safety concern. Staff is not contesting the need for additional child care in Aztec,” said Roshana Moojen, a city planner. “Staff does not believe it is a safe location.” Westside Plaza consists of two neighboring strip malls with a variety of businesses, including

calendar ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information Monday through Friday, noon to 1 p.m., no charge – Walk Laps in the Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, interval-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the

website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/S aturday, 8:30 a.m. Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Jazzercise Dancing Days are here! Come see us at the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road (next to Ricketts Park). Start for $0 – plus get unlimited classes for only $33 per month (check or credit card)! Cardio, Strength, Stretch, Fun! This is your hour – come try your 1st class for free! Info: 505.320.5364, or 505.599.1184, or visit www.jazzercise.com LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., 12 – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30-minute lessons are $20 or eight 30minute lessons are $35. Info:

505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday CROSS POOL* 11:15 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Friday EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday AQUACISE CLASSES $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Road Call 505.599.1167 for more information

EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. Call 505.566-2480 for more information DO YOU SAVE BOX TOPS? Please save your box top labels that can be found on office supplies and all General Mills foods. Bring them to the Sycamore Park Community Center to help us earn free recreational supplies! Please call us with any questions at 505.566.2480. SENIOR FITNESS 9 – 10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays Senior Fitness is offered at Sycamore Park Community Center through the San Juan College ENCORE program. Info: 505.566.2481

COMMUNITY LINE DANCE CLASS 6 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Floread Hodgson is teaching a free line dancing class each Tuesday from 6 – 7 p.m. at Sycamore Park Community Center. You will enjoy learning different line dances and have a lot of fun along the way. Info: 505.566.2480 FIT CLUB 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays Join Nexal Flores-Baez for the free community Fit Club fitness class at Sycamore Park Community Center. This is a great cardiovascular workout that is sure to get your heart pumping! Info: 505.566.2480 -8111 or 505.566.2480 SAN JUAN COUNTY VICTIM IMPACT PANEL Doors open 6:30 p.m., presentation begins 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12 Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., is home of the San Juan County Impact Panel. Visitors are welcome at no cost. If you need additional information or have questions please contact coordinator Carol Kohler

at 505.334.8111 505.566.2480

or

COMMUNITY YARD SALE AND CRAFT FAIR 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7 Get a booth NOW, and mark your calendars for Sept. 7. Join us for the Sycamore Park Community Yard Sale and Craft Fair. Booths are $10 per table for both the yard sale and craft fair. This will be an outdoor event. Bring the family and enjoy a fun day in the park! Info: 505.566.2480 FARMINGTON MUSEUM 3041 E. Main St. Call 505.599.1174 for more information www.farmingtonmuseum.org FARMINGTON MUSEUM EXHIBIT TOURS By appointment Let an experienced docent at the Farmington Museum be your host for guided tours of the permanent and visiting exhibits. Tours are FREE and available to the public by appointment. Any size group is welcome! Call 505.599.1169 for more information about the Museum’s current exhibits or to schedule a guided tour.


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SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, September 6, 2013

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1229 12 29

$

799

$ NORDALE LUXURY FIRM

Queen Set

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999

$ SAMSON PARK PILLOW TOP

Queen Set

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lvd Blvd Hills B inon Hills P Pinon

English Rd

Lowe’s Lowe’s

Target Target St in in Ma

516 516 Animas Valley V alley Mall

5200 E. Main Street Farmington, NM 87402 505.516.1030 STORE HOUR HOURS: S: Mon-Sat 1 10am-8pm 0am-8pm | Sun 1 12pm-6pm 2pm-6pm

Shann na

www.ashleyfurniturehomestore.com

*O f fer applies onl y to single -receipt qualif ying purchases. No interes t will be charged on promo purchase and equal monthl y payment s are required equal to 1.6 67% of ini tial promo purchase amount for 6 0 months, u n t i l p r o m o i s p a i d i n f u l l . T h e e q u a l m o n t h l y p a y m e n t w i l l b e r o u n d e d t o t h e n e x t h i g h e s t w h o l e d o l l a r a n d m a y b e h i g h e r t h a n t h e m i n i m um p a y m e n t t h a t w o u l d b e r e q u i r e d i f t h e p ur c h a s e w a s a n o n - p r o m o t i o n a l p u r c h a s e . R e g u l a r a c c o u n t t e r m s a p p l y t o n o n - p r o m o t i o n a l p u r c h a s e s . F o r n e w a c c o u n t s : P u r c h a s e A P R i s 2 9 . 9 9 %; M i n i m u m I n t e r e s t C h a r g e i s $ 2 . E x i s t i n g c a r d h o l d e r s s h o u l d s e e t h e i r c r e d i t c a r d a g r e e m e n t f o r t h e ir a p p l i c a b l e t e r m s . Sub j e c t t o cr e di t a p pr ov a l . -NAREKQOLQN?D=OAOAT?HQ@A@ =JJKP>A?KI>EJA@SEPD=JUKPDANLNKIKPEKJKN@EO?KQJP!EO?KQJPKB BANOAT?HQ@A1AILQN-A@E? Į " T PNAIA3=HQA 0EIIKJO A=QP U/AOP=J@ODHAU0HAALI=P PNAOOOAPO ŃKKNIK@AHOKN?HA=N=J?AEPAIO O=HAOP = T BQNJEPQNALNKPA?PEKJLH=JO S=NN=JP U @AHERAN UKN OAN RE?A?D=NCAHPDKQCDARAN ULNA?=QPEKJEOP =GAJ ANNKNOEJLNE?A=J@KNOLA?Eł?=PEKJI=UK??QNEJLNEJP4ANAOAN RAPDANECDPPK?KNNA?P=JUOQ?DANNKNO-NE?AOR=HE@BKN=HEIEPA@PEIAKJHU-=N PE?EL=PEKJPEIAOI=UR=N U-E?PQNAI=UJKPNALNAOAJPEPAIAT=?PHU=OODKSJ =@RAN PEOA@EPAIOI=U JKP>AKJ@EOLH=U=P=HHHK?=PEKJO%KIA0PKNAO=NAEJ@ALAJ@AJPHUKSJA@=J@KLAN=PA@@ALKOEPAMQ=HPK=J@=J=IKQJPAMQ=HPK0=HAO1= T=J@@AHERAN U?D=NCAO=NANAMQENA@BKN=HHłJ=J?A@LQN?D=OAO=J@I=UJKP>AAHECE>HABKNPDEO?NA@EPLNKIKPEKJ0""01,/"#,/!" 1&)0ˆ!QN=>HAJ@ HAJ@A@)A=PDANQLDKHOPAN ULNK@Q?POBA=PQNA=OA=PEJC=NA=I=@AQLKB=?KI>EJ=PEKJKB-KHUQNAPD=JA=J@ KN-3 -KHU?KP PKJ =J@=PHA=OP)A=PDAN0D=REJCOSEPD=OGEHHBQHHUI=P?DA@?KI>EJ=PEKJKB-KHU?KP PKJ=J@-KHUQNAPD=JA=J@ KN-3 ARAN U SDANAAHOAĪ ODHAU%KIA0PKNAO )P@ " TLENAO


Tri-City Tribune 09062013  

Weekly newspaper in Farmington, New Mexico

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