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COLLECTOR’S EDITION • 2019 SALUTE TO MAINE VETERANS

11 Bravo Vietnam MUSIC KEPT HIS SOUL INTACT

Tribute to

Veterans Photos & bios of 430+ fallen heroes from our hometowns across the state November 2019 $5.95 • meseniors.com

95-year-old Iwo Jima vet PHOTO: JASON P.AIGE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

LEROY PEASLEY

Plus!

FLAG LADIES OF FREEPORT

The Amazing Patriot Riders Vets Helping Vets THE GARY OWENS HOUSE


Proud Veteran. Loving Father. Generous Donor.

How a Salvation Army charitable gift annuity benefits Bill, his daughter, and others. Before he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force at age 18 in 1951, Bill had left the state of Maine only once: when his North Yarmouth Academy basketball team was treated to a Boston Bruins hockey game after winning the 1950-51 state championship. Bill’s horizons widened considerably as his Air Force stint took him from Rome, New York, to Cheyenne, Wyoming, to San Francisco, where he boarded a ship for Japan. For the next two years, he served his country in Korea and Japan as an airman first class, specializing in communications.

Stationed at Andrews Air Force Base upon his return to the U.S., he met Mary Ann, the love of his life. They were married in 1955 and soon returned to Maine, living in a tiny apartment in South Portland. Bill remembers the apartment was so small, that the toilet seat had to be used as a fourth seat when guests came to call. Bill spent the latter part of his career as a mediator, specializing in labor relations. He had one daughter, Kathleen “Kathie”. Now that Mary Ann has passed away, Bill and his daughter, a retired nurse who works for Senior Homecare, live together on Memorial Highway in North Yarmouth. In the past few years, Bill began donating regularly to The Salvation Army because he likes helping people in his community

and, as he puts it, “The Salvation Army keeps its administrative costs remarkably low.” Recently, Bill looked into the idea of investing in one of The Salvation Army’s charitable gift annuities. The rate of return had just been increased, and Bill liked the idea of being able to give his daughter a lifetime stream of income, while enjoying a sizable charitable tax deduction for himself. Both Bill and Kathie are also pleased to know that their charitable gift annuity will be helping those who are hurting and hungry in their local area. Kathie says, “I know The Salvation Army will help those in need, because you are a wonderful, trustworthy organization.” This Veteran’s Day, we are proud to salute veterans and donors like Bill for their service and support.


Serving those who serve our country since 1919. From the donut girls of WWI to those helping homeless veterans today, the people of The Salvation Army have been providing comfort and care to generations of service men and women. Veterans support us too – through generous bequests, as well as charitable gift annuities, which provide them and their loved ones with fixed income for life. On this Veterans Day, we thank you for your service and support. To learn how we help – and how you can help us through charitable gift annuities – call Amy Anderson at 207-245-3734.

NOVEMBER 2019 • 1


d WickeMEMORIES A CONVERSATION WITH

Bobby Rydell “FORGET HIM” – YES, THIS WAS ONE OF

BOBBY RYDELL’S MOST FAMOUS SONGS — A NUMBER ONE HIT IN 1963. WELL, THE SONG MAY GIVE YOU DIRECTION TO “FORGET HIM”, BUT FORGETTING BOBBY RYDELL, IS JUST

D

uring a recent conversation with him, I did forget his fame — that image I had in my head of girls screaming at his feet during the Dick Clark American bandstand show. Bobby Rydell the “first American Teen Idol”? That memory started to fade as talking with him made me realize I was in the presence of something so much more. Bobby hails from south Philly. There is even a BOBBY RYDELL BLVD named after him by the mayor of Philadelphia. As a young boy he hung out with his neighborhood buddies Frankie Avalon and Fabian. They stood around the burning trash barrels on the sidewalks of south Philly and sang. “All the kids sang,” he told me. “That’s what we did!” What a grand time for them. When 2 • MAINE SENIORS

I asked Bobby if it was something in the water. There must have been. The neighborhood was overflowing with gold record winners. Imagine! Bobby lived at home with his mother and father Jennie and Adrio Ridarelli. He was an only child. Yes, that’s Bobby Rydell … real name … Robert Louis Ridarelli. Don’t you love it? Bobby had a grand close relationship with his dad. Talking with him, I could feel the love and intense respect he had for his dad with every word he spoke. He shared with me how his dad would take him around the different clubs, just to show off his son. He wanted the world to hear his son’s golden voice! One night his dad took him to see some amazing big band music. This man was playing the drums, and the sound mesmerized Bobby. “I said to my father … I don’t know who he is, Daddy, but I want to be him!” That guy was Gene Croupa, one of the world’s most renowned drummers. “I have been playing drums ever since that night, and I was only five years old at the time!” When I asked if he ever had any

performance he wished he had done, he had no hesitation. “Playing the drums behind Frank Sinatra’s singing,” was his quick response. Bobby’s early experiences with his dad made him comfortable around crowds. It was addicting, knowing the happiness he could bring just by singing. It was always the giving that gave Bobby his appetite for performing. It was in 1963 that Bobby had his first record deal. He signed with Cameo Records.  Songs like “Wild One”, “Volare”, and “Forget Him” just kept on coming. He had 34 top 100 hits. He was among the top five artists of his era. He found himself on the Dick Clark Show at 17-years-old … and the first American Teen Idol was born. How did you deal with girls screaming, fainting at your feet? Bobby laughs, “I loved it!” He has sung with all the great ones in his life. A little-known fact is that Bobby's hit “Forget Him” was the song that inspired Paul McCartney and John Lennon to write “She Loves You”. “She Loves You” was an answer to Bobby’s Number 1 hit at the time.

PHOTOS: ??

NOT AN OPTION. by James Kendrick


Paul McCartney tells how he and John Lennon sat in a hotel room listening to Bobby’s song and writing and answering his words. Paul would sing, “She loves you” and John would answer, “Yah yah yah!” Aw! The creation of music! A wonder it is. Bobby went on to perform all over the world. He spoke about his role in “Bye Bye Birdie” and how wonderful it was to perform with Ann Margaret. While he was in London performing with Miss Margaret, he was told he had some mail waiting for him. Yes, it was 1964 and Uncle Sam was calling, as he did with many young lads of the day. There was no hesitation with Bobby. He was on the next plane, greeting his new life with the same joy as he had in the one he was leaving.

gals with a bit of joy, a song of home. So off he went … going to places that Bob Hope could never get into, because it was so dangerous, Yes, Bobby and two “Go Go Girls” and his musicians were off to the jungles of Vietnam. His manager insisted he sing his first song, “What Kind of Fool Am I?” “Here I am with planes shooting about my head … whizzing by with the noise so loud … and I’m singing, “What Kind of Fool Am I” He loved so much entertaining the troops. “The guys,” he said. They were the best!” Bobby never will know of how many of the young boys he brought joy to over the time he spent in Vietnam. One has to wonder how many survived the horror of the war. However, Bobby chose to bring them Off to Fort Dix! hope … to bring them a touch of home He talked with … a song in their hearts … a memory enormous excite- of love waiting for them. ment about how That is who Bobby Rydell is. much he loved basic He was given a medal of recognition training at Fort Dix. by Vietnam Vets for his service to the “I was only 95 pounds when I troops, honored in 2013 by a group of landed. However, with three square Vietnam Veterans from New Jersey. meals a day, you ate them because Bobby came home and his career there was nothing else coming during continued. Song after song, all across the day. He said he was in the best the world. He and his voice were shape of his life. When he was finished everywhere. You couldn’t begin to with basic training he was 125 pounds. turn on the transistor radio or walk Bobby’s voice lights up when he into the local soda shop without speaks of his basic training buddies Bobby Rydell playing on the juke box! from Brooklyn and the Bronx. They His life went on. He married his could not believe that Bobby Rydell high school sweetheart, Camille. She was with them! They kept asking him, was his girl at 15, and they were “Hell. Couldn’t someone make a together all those years.  phone call for ya?” they asked in their His heart was tremendously strong Brooklyn accents. broken, though, when his wife died of Bobby just chose to do his duty like cancer at 60. Bobby was very candid all the kids he knew.  about the loss and the difficulties he He wasn’t stationed in Vietnam as had trying to mend his broken heart. so many were. But at 25 — in 1966 — He went through very trying times, no he made a choice that he needed to go one to talk to, no one to lay in bed to Vietnam. He felt like he needed to with, no one to have the intimate fill the hearts of these young guys and conversations with. He had lost

himself along the way. She was his only true confidant, the link he craved. Loss of loved ones is so great. Bobby candidly spoke of his choice to turn to the bottle. His depression and drinking led him to a double organ transplant. Bobby has two Children and five grandchildren. His daughter Jennifer and a son Robert. He celebrates his beautiful wife Linda of ten years now, who he loves dearly. “She saved my life,” he confesses. An amazing woman she is. When I asked Bobby if he ever sang to anyone when he sings a song, or if there is any song that affects him, without hesitation he says, “Oh yes!” “When I sing “Forget Him”, I think of my wife Camille and I think of my dad. I miss them. Sometimes I can’t get the words out to the song, I get so choked up.” Bobby still performs all over the world. He begins his show with his first hit song, “Volare”, but always ends the show with asking his audience to make a personal pledge for him. “Donate your organs! It’s on your license. Give the gift of life to someone!” Yes, his sincere joy is to give back. Bobby said to me, “I just want to always be remembered as a decent good guy. Well Bobby? You’re a great guy. You’re someone who understands the idea of giving of oneself.  Ahhh … we truly knew how to pick a teen idol in our generation! Thank you for your service, Bobby Rydell. Thank you for you and your music. Bobby’s albums and books still sell in volume. His music always keeps our hearts smiling. He still sells out to crowds across the country. You can go to his web site and to see where he will be performing next. His auto biography is also available on amazon.com.  NOVEMBER 2019 • 3


A NOTE FROM THE PUBLISHER

“ Never was so much owed by so many … to so few.” — Winston Churchill

4 • MAINE SENIORS

MARINE 1ST LT. JAMES R. ZIMMERMAN of Smyrna, Maine, was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, of Camp Lejeune, N.C. He was the commander of 3rd Platoon, Echo Company, deployed June 13, 2010, to Operation Enduring Freedom in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. James died from wounds received in combat Nov. 2, 2010, at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. He was 25 years old, born May 18, 1985; the son of my beautiful sister Jane and his father, my friend Tom Zimmerman. Two years later, James was honored as a hero August 12, 2012, when a newly constructed Marine Corps Reserve Training Center in Brunswick was dedicated to and named for him. I’ll report to you that my nephew was a happy kid, who first sent in a recruitment card to the U.S. Marine Corps at 10 years old. The recruiter told him to pay attention in school and one day, he just might be a Marine. That day did come for him, and his huge family and seemingly endless circle of friends could not possibly take a breath of fresh air without thinking about the good man James had become. I have two sets of powerful memories connected to James’ death — neither of which will ever leave my consciousness: First, I’ll always remember James (named for his grandfather — also a veteran) as the happiest, smiling-est kid I’ve ever known. As I write this, I can picture his happy face crawling up over the picnic table in my father’s dooryard in Oakfield, wearing a kid’s camo soldier uniform, carrying his plastic rifle in his hands. My father was a veteran of horrific battles during WWII, and James’ uncle — my brother Harry — is a veteran of 20 years in the U.S. Air Force. And young James’ most passionate wish, even as that happy kiddo, was to become a

U.S. Marine. His life’s dream was fulfilled. How many of us achieve our childhood dreams? Not that many, I’d guess. And with that, my sadness over his death is spiced with a pinch of joy. He was one of the very few of us whose best dream came true. The second memory I have to mention has to do with how the Marines treated my sister (and, of course, the family). Two Marines came to her door to give her the heartbreaking news about her third child, and one of them stayed behind and pledged to stay by her side throughout the upcoming ordeal of the funeral service and memorials. He lived up to his promise … times 100! For everyone in our family, it felt as if the entire U.S. Marine Corps was standing close behind sister Jane through it all. They flew in his platoon brothers directly from Afghanistan to Smyrna, Maine, to attend the services, and I watched the young Marines gather around my sister and her family. They didn’t stray for more than a few moments … telling wonderful stories about how good and kind her James always had been. They talked about his bravery … about how their lives had been spared specifically because of his selflessness. Two years later, when the dedication ceremony happened in Brunswick, the U.S. Marine Corps was there again -- front and center. This time several of James’ Marine brothers spoke to the gathering, talking about him, about his gifts to them, about his love of life, his family, and of life itself. Thank you, Marines! Thank you for honoring James. And thanks to every single woman and man who has answered the call to duty. We live free and secure because of your courage and your countless gifts to us. Thank you to all veterans … every single one of you. Thank you for your service. Thank you from the hearts and the souls of all our families!


IN THIS ISSUE

|| N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

E D I TO R / P U B L I S H E R

70

Jim Kendrick jk@jameskendrick.net AS S O C IAT E P U B L I S H E R

Mary Frances Barstow mary@maineseniorsmagazine.com

6

AS S O C IAT E E D I TO R

Jacqueline Harjula jackie@maineseniorsmagazine.com MA R K E T I N G C O N S U LTA N T S

Bob Bird bob@maineseniorsmagazine.com Bill Burrows bburrows@villagesoup.com Carrie Colby carrie@maineseniorsmagazine.com

2 | WICKED MEMORIES A Conversation with Bobby Rydell | 4 PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Ann Duddy aduddy@theforecaster.net

SPECIAL SECTION

A SALUTE TO VETS

Randy Nichols randy@maineseniorsmagazine.com

6 | A Fire that Never Goes Out

S O C IAL M E D I A

10 | Craig McIntire’s Song

Tyler Southard tsouthard@villagesoup.com AR T D I R E C TO R

Sandy Flewelling sandy@truebluedesign.us PRODUCTION

COLLECTOR’S EDITION • 2019 SALUTE TO MAINE VETERANS

11 Bravo Vietnam MUSIC KEPT HIS SOUL INTACT

20 | Fortunate One Tribute to

Veterans Photos & bios of 430+ fallen heroes from our hometowns across the state November 2019 $5.95 • meseniors.com

BUSINESS OFFICE

12 | The Patriot Riders Give Back in a Big Way! 14 | Our Fallen Heroes September 11, 2001–Present

Ian Marquis marquisij@gmail.com

91 Camden Street, Suite 403 Rockland, ME 04841 Phone (207) 299-5358

32

95-year-old Iwo Jima vet PHOTO: JASON P.AIGE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

LEROY PEASLEY

26 | Vets Helping Vets Plus!

FLAG LADIES OF FREEPORT

The Amazing Patriot Riders Vets Helping Vets THE GARY OWENS HOUSE

ON THE COVER Vincent Gabriel, see page 20 Cover photo by Jason Paige Smith Photography

32 | Freeport Flag Ladies Stand for America 34 | Stop the Scam

64 | GUEST ARTICLE Duff and Associates 68 | HUMOR There’s something in the leaves 70 | IN THE GARDEN Impress them with amaryllis 72 | GUEST ARTICLE Maine VA Healthcare 76 | FEATURED RECIPE French Chicken 78 | CROSSWORD 80 | ADVICE FROM JIMMY & MARY

36 | Our Fallen Heroes Maine’s Vietnam Vets who gave their lives

NOVEMBER 2019 • 5


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Fire That Never Goes Out

IWO JIMA VETERAN LOOKS BACK ON TEACHING, COACHING AND SHARING THE STAGE WITH PRESIDENT OBAMA by Daniel Dunkle

6 • MAINE SENIORS

W

hen Iwo Jima veteran Leroy Peasley, 95, of Rockland, visited the Appleton Village School for a Veterans Day program, he said something to the kids that resonated. “Be sure you always have a chair for me, whether I’m here or not,” he said. “Because my spirit will always be here with you.” As a result, the school’s class of 2018 presented him with the Leroy Peasley chair that is always at the school with a plaque saying, “Thank you for your World War II service at Iwo Jima and Guam and for helping to ensure that we live in freedom today.” Leroy was 21 when he witnessed the events of Iwo Jima as part of the Third Marine Division on the U.S.S.

Callaway. “I thought at the time, I would never see my 22nd birthday,” he said. “Off Iwo Jima, our ship took on many casualties. We would sail close to the shore to take on the wounded. We had to move fast because the Japanese would start bombing us.” He remembered working on the deck and helping bring wounded down to the operating room. “I was holding one Marine’s stretcher and he said, ‘Don’t drop me, will you buddy?’ and I said, ‘You’re damn tootin’ I won’t, buddy.’” He witnessed the horrors and injuries, the men breaking down with emotion. He had to help bury the dead at sea.

PHOTOS: DANIEL DUNKLE

A


“I was holding one Marine’s stretcher and he said, ‘Don’t drop me, will you buddy?’ and I said, ‘You’re damn tootin’ I won’t, buddy.’” —Leroy Peasley Leroy was born in Rockland. He lived for a time with his grandparents, but the family fell on hard economic times after his grandfather was injured. At a young age, Leroy learned what it was to go without food. When he was about eight years old, he moved to the Children’s Home in Bath, where he was happy to receive three meals a day and make new friends. He noted there was a military connection to the home. “I was in the Marine Corps at eight years old,” he jokes. At 18, he really joined the Marines and in 1943 was selected to be a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s guard at Camp David, which was known at the time as Shangri-La. He was extremely proud of the assignment and the place made a huge impression on him. He has been trying for years to obtain permission to re-visit his Shangri-La, but without any luck so far. In the Pacific Theater, he said his division was “shot up pretty good” in Guam before going on to Iwo Jima. He recalls an incident in Guam when he saw a colonel dress down a lieutenant for making the enlisted men dig his fox hole for him. The colonel told the lieutenant to lead by example or find himself busted down to private for the remainder of his military career. “He was five-foot-ten, this colonel, but by the time he was done talking, he was nine feet tall,” Leroy says. “I would have followed him into Hell.” After the war, Leroy worked as a teacher, helping special education students. He worked in New York for

Buried At Sea By Leroy Peasley Beside the rail I stood that day, To bury a fallen Marine Though years have passed since then This memory still remains.

Above: This picture from Leroy Peasley’s scrapbook shows him during World War II. Opposite top: Leroy Peasley, 95, of Rockland is proud to wear the same Marine uniform he wore when he served at Camp David in World War II. He salutes during an American Legion ceremony at his home in 2013. Opposite bottom: Rockland veteran Leroy Peasley enjoys wearing this hat to remember Iwo Jima.

a while before returning to Maine and working in towns in Knox County including Thomaston, St. George and Appleton. Like any Rockland boy, he loved basketball, which he only gave up at the age of 75 due to the state of his knees. He even tried his hand at coaching it at one point. He had suffered what he called a breakdown before he came back to Maine and struggled for years, but a friend in Maine got him back into teaching and he found himself

The rifles cracked! The bugle, taps! All heads were bowed in prayer, And when the last “Amen” was said Only “silence” filled the air. For saddened eyes, That day did see; Their fallen brother there. And slowly, slowly, downward plunged His body to the sea. Not a word was spoken after that, For our throats were sadly dry. And our eyes were dimmed with sadness, tears That our brother had to die. But God in All His Mercy Knew The Hurt we felt that day For God came and took our brother Marine Up in Heaven with him to stay!

NOVEMBER 2019 • 7


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enjoying time working with young people. “I’ll let the kids tell you if I was any good or not,” he said. He said they often asked him, “Tell us a story!” And Leroy loves to tell stories. Though the decades passed, his service was not forgotten. On April 1, 2010, he shared the spotlight with the President of the United States in Portland. Thousands gathered at the Portland Expo Center that day to hear a speech by President Barack Obama, and Leroy was chosen to lead the Pledge of Allegiance. “This is the best day of my life,” he said as he took the stage. He was 87 at the time. He thanked Obama for his efforts to help veterans, led the pledge, and received a warm reception and thunderous applause. “It was a great honor,” he said. Later, in 2013, members of 8 • MAINE SENIORS

Winslow-Holbrook-Merritt American Legion Post 1 awarded a U.S. flag to Leroy at his home. At one point over the years, Leroy recalls, a friend said to him, “You’ve got a fire that will never go out.” Today, in the home he shares with Ruth Stevens, he is happy to show that is the case. He brings out his footballs and basketballs to show his love of sports, and pointed to the many pictures on his walls, memories of presidents he supported and images from the Marine Corps. He still plays his guitar over at St. Bernard’s Catholic Church in Rockland as it provides meals each week for people in need in the community. Taped to his guitar is a sticker that says, “God Bless America.” “If you’re going to have your country and liberty, you’re going to fight for it,” he said.

PHOTO: (BOTTOM LEFT) DANIEL DUNKLE

Above: Leroy Peasley of Rockland, right, stands with Robert Mueller, center, and Rob Phieffer, who was a captain in the 1st Marine Division in Vietnam. Top Left: Leroy Peasley of Rockland leads the assembled in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. “This is the best day of my life,” he said as he took the stage right before the president in 2010. Bottom left: Leroy Peasley provides music at St. Bernard’s Catholic Church in Rockland as its soup kitchen feeds those in need.


NOVEMBER 2019 • 9


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Craig McIntire’s he year was 1967. A young Pemetic High School graduate had completed his post-high school disc jockey school in Boston when he got word that he was being drafted into the US Army. He, along with other Pemetic graduates, were sent to serve in the unpopular Vietnam war. He was a member of the 199th infantry. He would leave behind a high school sweetheart with plans to return and plan a future together. Sadly, in the middle of those jungles full of leeches and snakes, with heightened anxiety and fear from every breath, his world would be shattered forever! A “Dear John” letter from that young dark-haired beauty, informing him that she could not wait for him and that she was marrying someone else, brought him to his knees. Amidst the intense enemy fire, the heartbreak and tears, and the chronic pain over the loss of his high school sweetheart, one soldier would be forever a changed man. Faced with the incredible heartache, he had to choose between

10 • MAINE SENIORS

by Carroll Harper

giving up (as the tiny thread of hope that kept him alive was gone,) or digging in and fulfilling his patriotic duty as a soldier. The latter he would take on, and he became a different man and soldier fueled by the devastating loss of his high school sweetheart. He was toughened overnight and would proudly serve his country, earning the CIB (Combat Infantryman Badge) and Purple Heart All men grieve, but in different ways. Most hold it inside; few can open up about it; some are unable to live with it. The healing process differs among them. Years later, Craig would begin the painful journey to healing by putting his thoughts in song and handing it to his lifetime friend, singer-songwriter, Danny Harper. Danny quickly loved the song for its lyrical content, knowing that every line was from the heart. He agreed to record it. It was included on the “One More Time” CD released in 2004. As a songwriter, I was moved by the lyrical content and the raw emotion that came from the poetic verse. Years

later, while in Cabela’s in Scarborough, ME, I noticed a large-framed man wearing a Vietnam hat. I walked up to him and shook his hand and thanked him for the service and sacrifice. He immediately began weeping. Big tears streamed down his face. I could not get him out of my mind. Traveling back north on 95, I wrote the words to the song, “If Their Hats Could Only Talk”. This turned out to be one of my most requested Veteran tribute songs to date. A couple of years ago I read an article where several roofers were doing a roof job on a building across the street from a school yard and there was a football game going on. Prior to the game, the Star Spangled Banner played and each roofer stood with their hats off and hands across their hearts as the song was being played. I was so moved that I wrote the song, “We Stand.” Thanks to all that inspire and a very special thanks to all that served, are serving and will serve! May you have a special place in heaven! May God bless you and yours! 

PHOTOS: (???

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Song

THE STORY BEHIND THE SONG


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It’s been some 40 years or more since that forgotten Asian war But he can’t forget the living hell and all the bloodshed that he saw Now he still fights a battle every day just to keep his head on straight Of those haunting memories, that CIB and those Purple Heart plates.

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CHORUS: A CIB, a Purple Heart and ribbons on his chest It’s a measure of a soldier who’s given all his best But friends don’t try to thank him now, cause your timing’s much too late His only thanks, a CIB and Purple Heart plates.

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One day he went to hell and back, someday he’ll go to heaven, He can’t forget that awful Asian war back in 1967 No crowds, parades or banners to welcome him back to the states Just haunting memories, a CIB and Purple Heart plates. He was sent to fight a conflict no one seemed to care about He left behind his future bride that he thought day and night about Then one day a Dear John letter, said, “I’m so sorry, but I just can’t wait.” More bad memories, a CIB and Purple Heart plates.

Your Quality of Life Begins at Home

Veter an

A CIB and PURPLE HEART PLATES

L NEVER

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Schedule a visit today and find the key to your new home!

bartlettwoods.com • 207.594.1159 • 20 Bartlett Drive • Rockland

Words by Craig McIntire, © 2004

NOVEMBER 2019 • 11


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resident of Patriot Riders, Gregg Lozier, originally from West Bath, and vice-president Shayne Leavitt, originally from Augusta, have decided not to “talk the talk,” but to really “walk the walk” when it comes to helping fellow veterans in need. There are 78,000 homeless veterans in the USA. Maine is home to 3% of them. And every Tuesday night, Patriot Riders meet in the Preble Street Center in Bath, planning their upcoming efforts to reach out a helping hand to less fortunate Maine veterans. There are many chapters of this organization all over New England, and several in Maine. “What exactly does this organization do?” I asked the two men. “Well,” they answered, “We do everything we can to help our fellow veterans.” Top left: L to R, President of Patriot Riders & Gregg Lozier, vice-president Shayne Leavitt Bottom left: President Lozier and vicepresident Leavitt are proud of their jackets. Below: Caption, caption caption.

The Patriot Riders Give Back in a Big Way! TWO MAINE VETERANS HAVE TAKEN ON QUITE A CHALLENGE.

PHOTOS: (???

by Mary Frances Barstow

12 • MAINE SENIORS


And if there is a fallen hero coming back to Maine, they drive to meet the casket and to be with the family of the fallen soldier. When asking Shayne how he became involved in the group, he answered with no hesitation. “I was a homeless vet. They helped me. They took me in.” As he described his experience of sleeping in his car in Augusta, I noticed a tear flowing down his cheeks. “After they found me, I was never alone. The police in Augusta would check on me every two or three hours. They’d bring me coffee and food.” Next, for Shayne, the Patriot Riders came along. They took him in. They provided a warm bed, but most of all, they provided hope and love. “I was one of them. I was a Veteran who needed help, and help they gave me!” Shayne’s story continued. “I enrolled in college and now live on my own with a full-time job. I am only

three courses away from receiving my bachelor’s degree. I’m so grateful. So now I give back.” If there is a vet who needs help, we are available 24/7. If they’re suicidal, or need food, or if they need their house cleaned, we do it. We have many calls for ramps or for some help with war injuries. Gregg adds to the story, saying, “What a rewarding feeling you get when you help a man who is stuck in a home, with no way out, because of one leg, or even no legs. We all get together and build ramps to make it possible for them to get outside and live the best life they can.” He tells a story about helping one totally house-bound man who just broke down and cried. They helped him to be free and to be outside and hear the birds sing. These men, Gregg and Shayne, feel with every fiber of their soul the life they can give to fellow Veterans. They participate in every possible funeral for the fallen. They ride their motorcycles and do a flag line. If you

Top: Caption, caption caption. caption, caption, caption. Above: Caption, caption caption.

don’t ride a motorcycle, there are members who drive their cars to honor the fallen at their funerals. In addition, the Patriot Riders strive to be a support system for the families of the fallen. They never turn away a veteran in need. They hold fundraisers all year long to support their never-ending giving. They split wood, mow grass, shovel snow. The Patriot Riders support their activities through local business donations and private donations. You too can donate to this incredible movement at BROAME.org. NOVEMBER 2019 • 13


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Our Fallen Heroes SEPTEMBER 11, 2001 – PRESENT

Army PFC Blaine Nicholas Benjamin Adams, 19, of Farmington; assigned to D Co, 4/160th SOAR (A) at Fort Lewis, Washington died November 29, 2008. Marine Maj. Jay T. Aubin, 36, of Waterville; assigned to the Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz.; killed March 20, 2003 in Kuwait. Marine Cpl Joshua P. Barron, 22, of Standish; stationed at Marine Corps Station Yuma, with Marine Logistics Squadron 13; died March 21, 2011. Army Spc. Beau R. Beaulieu, 20, of Lisbon; assigned to the 27th Main Support Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; killed May 24, 2004 in Taji, Iraq.

Army Capt. John R. “Jay” Brainard III, 26, of Newport and Atkinson; assigned to 12th Combat Aviation Brigade, Ansbach-Katterbach, Germany; died May 28, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Army Pfc. Jordan M. Brochu, 20, of Cumberland; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry 14 • MAINE SENIORS

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Marine Lance Cpl. Joshua M. Bernard, 21, of New Portland; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Div., III Marine Expeditionary Force, died Aug. 14.


Division, Fort Lewis, Wash.; died Aug. 31, 2009 in Shuyene Sufia, Afghanistan. Clinton A. “Clint” Brown, 43, of Stillwater; served in Korea, Saudi Arabia, Panama, and Iraq; died Nov 10, 2011. Army Spc. Justin L. Buxbaum, 23, of South Portland; assigned to the 62nd Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas; died May 26, 2008 in Kushamond, Afghanistan. Army CPT Christopher S. Cash, 36, of Old Orchard Beach; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 120th Infantry, Army National Guard, Jacksonville, N.C.; killed June 24, 2004. LCDR Robert Clukey, 33, of Orono; assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 34 embarked on the USS George Washington (CVN 73); died on November 3, 2002.

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Army 1st Sgt. Christopher D. Coffin, 51, of Kennebunk.; assigned to the USASOC; died July 1, 2003 in Iraq. Army Spc. Daniel F. J. Cunningham, 33, of Lewiston; assigned to 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Stewart, GA; died April 3, 2004 in Iraq. Army Sgt. Tyler Ray Curtis, 25, of Jay; assigned to the Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment,2nd Brigade

Combat Team; died November 22, 2007. Army Sgt. Corey A. Dan, 22, of Norway; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky; killed March 13, 2006 when he came under small arms fire and an improvised explosive device detonated during combat operations near Ramadi, Iraq. Navy PO2 Benjamin Albert Demers, 26, of Auburn; died in September 18, 2016, while serving in the U.S. Navy on the USS Nimitz. Army Spc. Jason E. Dore, 25, of Moscow; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died July 8, 2007 in Baghdad. Army Spc. Thomas J. Dostie, 20, of Sommerville; assigned to 133rd Engineer Battalion, Maine Army National Guard, Portland; killed Dec. 21, 2004 in Mosul, Iraq. Army Sgt. Blair W. Emery, 24, of Lee; assigned to the 504th Military Police Battalion, 42nd Military Police Brigade, Fort Lewis, Wash.; died Nov. 30, 2007 in Baqubah, Iraq. Maine Army National Guard Spc. Christopher D. Gelineau, 23, of Portland; assigned to the 133rd Engineer Battalion, Army National Guard, Gardiner, Maine; killed April 20, 2004.

Marine Cpl. Mark R. Goyet, 22, of Westbrook; assigned to 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Twentynine Palms, Calif.; died June 28, 2011 in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Air Force SrA Dustin J. (Hadfield) Eldson, 26, of Mechanic Falls; died Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014 after a tour in Afghanistan. Army Spc. Dustin J. Harris, 21, of Patten; assigned to the 172nd Brigade Support Battalion, 172nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, Fort Wainwright, Alaska; killed April 6, 2006 in Bayji, Iraq. Army Sgt. 1st Class Aaron A. Henderson, 33, of Houlton; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Oct. 2, 2012 at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan. Navy PO1 Bryan James Hobart, 30, of Scarborough; served in Sea Control Squadron Thirty One as an Aviation Machinists Mate and transferred to Special Projects Patrol Squadron One as a Quality Assurance Representativ; died Friday, September 11, 2015. Army National Guard Spc. Jeremiah J. Holmes, 27, of North Berwick; assigned to the 744th Transportation Company, Army National Guard, Hillsboro, N.H.; died March 29, 2004 near Balad, Iraq.

NOVEMBER 2019 • 15


Army Master Sgt. Robert M. Horrigan, 40, of Limestone; assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Fort Bragg, N.C.; killed June 17, 2005 in Qaim, Iraq. Army Sgt. Joel A. House, 22, of Lee; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died June 23, 2007 in Taji, Iraq. Army Cpl. Andrew L. Hutchins, 20, of New Portland; assigned to 3rd Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Nov. 8, 2010 at Combat Outpost Sabari, Afghanistan. Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael D. Jones, 43, of Unity; assigned to the 133rd Engineer Battalion, Maine Army National Guard, Belfast, Maine and served in Iraq; died March 3, 2005 in Syracuse, N.Y. Army 1st Lt. Benjamin D. Keating, 27, of Shapleigh; assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment (Reconnaissance, Surveillance, Target Acquisition), 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.; died Nov. 26, 2006 in Kamdesh, Afghanistan. Army Staff Sgt. Dale J. Kelly Jr., 48, of Richmond; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 172nd Infantry (Mountain), Maine Army National Guard, Brewer, Maine; killed May 6, 2006 when an improvised explosive

16 • MAINE SENIORS

device detonated near his M1083 cargo truck during combat operations in Diwaniyah, Iraq.

USN EN1 Aaron J. Marquis, 36, of Millinocket; served 18 years in the Navy; died in September 9, 2009.

Army PFC Justin J. Kennie, of Cornish, stationed at Fort Drum; died on November 2, 2008. Army Sgt. Joshua J. Kirk, 30, of South Portland; assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colo.; died Oct. 3, 2009 in Kamdesh, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his contingency outpost with small arms, rocketpropelled grenade and indirect fires. Marine Maj Samuel C. Leigh, 35, of Belgrade; assigned to HMLA-469, MAG-16, 3rdMAW,1stMEF; died on October 29, 2009. Marines CPL Dustin J. Libby, 22, of Presque Isle; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1 Marine Expeditionary Force Echo Company; died December 6, 2006. Marine MSgt Ryan C. C. Love, of Frankfort, passed away unexpectedly on July 19, 2012; he was a dedicated career Marine. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan A. Lowery, 38, of Houlton; assigned, 3rd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, III Corps, Fort Hood, Texas; died Dec. 14, 2007 in Mosul, Iraq.

Army Sgt. Edmund W. McDonald, 25, of Casco; died of injuries March 29, 2007 in North Kabul, Afghanistan. Air Force SrA Shawn Arnold McKeough, Jr., 23, of Westbrook; served in Germany, Kuwait, and South Korea; died March 15, 2019. Army Pfc. Buddy W. McLain, 24, of Mexico; assigned to 1st Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Nov. 29, 2010 in Nangarhar province, Afghanistan. Army SGT Brett E. Pelotte, 35, of Waterville; died in Seoul, South Korea on duty on August 19, 2003. Army Sgt. Lynn R. Poulin Sr., 47, of Freedom; assigned to the 133rd Engineer Battalion, Maine Army National Guard, Belfast, Maine; killed Dec. 21, 2004 in Mosul, Iraq. LCpl Andrew J. Quasnitschka, 21, of Bridgton; served in the U.S. Marine Corps as a machine gunner; died on April 1, 2009.


Army Sgt. Nicholas A. Robertson, 27, of Holden; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.; died April 3, 2008 in Afghanistan. Army Staff Sgt. Eric Ross, 26, of Glenburn; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died Feb. 9, 2009 in Baqubah, Iraq. Army Sgt. Lawrence A. Roukey, 33, of Westbrook; assigned to Detachment 1, 3rd Battalion, 304th Regiment, 98th Division, Army Reserve, Lewiston, Maine; killed April 26, 2004, in Baghdad.

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SPECIAL SECTION Colorado; died June 30, 2009.

CPO Robert Michael Paul Roy, 33, of Lisbon; assigned to Naval Air Station Whiting Field near Milton, Florida; died April 28, 2013. Derek Russell, 20, of Hollis Center; served as a fireman aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Munro and worked in the engine room; died December 22, 2012. Navy CDR Robert A. Schlegel of Gray, died September 11th, 2001 at the Pentagon.

Army Staff Sgt. Brandon M. Silk, 25, of Orono; assigned to the 5th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, KY; died June 21, 2010 near Gaza Ridge, Afghanistan. Army Spc. Wade A. Slack, 21, of Waterville; assigned to the 707th Ordnance Company (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.; died May 6, 2010 at Forward Operating Base Shank, Afghanistan. Army PVT Dustin R. F. Small, 19, of Palmyra; prevIously stationed with the 2nd HET 360th Transportation Company at Fort Carson in 18 • MAINE SENIORS

Army Pfc. Andrew R. Small, 19, of Wiscasset; assigned to 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, N.Y.; died August 11, 2016 in Nangalam, Afghanistan. Navy LT Jerry R. Smith, 26, of Greenville; assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 120, based at Norfolk Naval Station; died Aug. 15, 2007. Army Pfc. Tyler M. Springmann, 19, of Hartland; assigned to 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, died July 17, 2011 in Talukan, Afghanistan. Army SGT Nathan C. Stewart, 29, of Waldoboro; deployed twice to Iraq; died on Jan. 1, 2013. Army Sgt. Jason W. Swiger, 24, of South Portland; assigned to the 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team; died March 25, 2007 in Baqubah, Iraq. Army Spc. Deon L. Taylor, 30, of Lexington; assigned to the 27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, New York Army National Guard, Syracuse, N.Y.; died Oct. 22, 2008 in Bela Ba Luk, Afghanistan.

Army CPT Daniel J. Tranchemontagne, 32, of Portland; assigned as a staff officer with the 368th Engineers in Kuwait; died May 30, 2004. Army Staff Sgt. David M. Veverka, 25, of Orono; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 172nd Infantry (Mountain), Maine Army National Guard, Brewer; killed May 6, 2006 in Diwaniyah, Iraq. Navy EN2 Austin Thomas Williams, 22, of Freeport; served on the USS Sentry in Manama, Bahrain; died on April 5, 2008. Army Spc. Christopher M. Wilson, 24, of Bangor; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y; died March 29, 2007 in Korengal outpost, Afghanistan. Army Staff Sgt. Jessica Wing, 42, of Glenburn; assigned to 1st Battalion, 126th Aviation Regiment, Maine National Guard, Bangor; died Aug. 27 in Kuwait City, Kuwait. Marine 1st Lt. James R. Zimmerman, 25, of Aroostook; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died Nov. 2, 2010 at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan.


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NOVEMBER 2019 • 19


SPECIAL SECTION

FOR THIS VIETNAM VETERAN

by Daniel Dunkle

20 • MAINE SENIORS

E

ven after 50 years, the sound of a helicopter brings unwanted emotions. “As soon as I hear a helicopter, I’m right back in Vietnam, to this day. Because that sound was a good sound, and it was a bad sound. It was a bad sound when they came to pick you up in the morning to take you and drop you in the jungle to go look for the Viet Cong. But it was a good sound when they picked you up to get you out of there; then we loved them.”

Vincent Gabriel doesn’t look like he’s 72. Surrounded by instruments in his Rockland home studio, in his big black boots, loose shirt and stylish glasses, he looks like a rock star. In Maine, that’s just what he is, having played venues throughout the state for decades. Here in Midcoast Maine, everyone knows him by his musical persona, Blind Albert. If you happen to catch him playing at Fog on Main Street in Rockland, you may notice one ever-present

COURTESY VINCENT GABRIEL

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PHOTOS (ABOVE) DANIEL DUNKLE: (RIGHT)

Fortunate


Vincent Gabriel doesn’t look like he’s 72. Surrounded by instruments in his Rockland home studio, in his big black boots, loose shirt and stylish glasses, he looks like a rock star.

One

accessory: his beat-up old dog tag. He says it’s to remind him, though he quickly adds that he isn’t ever going to forget, his service in Vietnam. While his experience in the Army’s infantry in the Tet Offensive of 1968 was a terrifying chapter in his life, he remains very proud to have served. Gabriel grew up in California and New Jersey. Music ran in his family, his father and siblings having played on the radio in the 1940s. In the ‘50s his father decided to pick up the guitar, and the result was that there was always an instrument in the house for Vincent to learn on. He was playing in rock bands by the time he got out of high school. The Rolling Stones, in particular, had influenced his desire to play, and

they provided his first exposure to the blues. He was in California visiting cousins, enjoying the perfect American summer in 1967 when his father called to let him know he had been drafted. He had to cut his vacation short to go first into basic training and then to infantry training. “They sent us home for a 30-day leave, and it was around Christmas and New Year’s, which was a good time to be home,” he said. “On Jan. 4, 1968, my parents took me to the airport in Newark, NJ. I got on the plane, looked back at them, and Top: Vincent Gabriel Far left: Vincent Gabriel plays the guitar while in Vietnam in 1968. Middle: Vincent Gabriel leaves his family and boards a plane on his way to the war in 1968. Below: Vincent Gabriel during Vietnam.

NOVEMBER 2019 • 21


thought that was the last time I was going to see my family.” He notes that his timing was not the best, arriving just before the North Vietnamese launched the Tet Offensive. Named for the Vietnamese new year holiday, Tet was one of the largest military campaigns of the war, beginning on Jan. 30. In coordinated attacks, 80,000 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese People’s Army troops assaulted strategic points in South Vietnam. This New Jersey boy found himself in the jungle, guarding the flank, knowing he didn’t want to shoot

anyone or be shot. “The first time you get shot at, you sure as hell don’t forget it,” he said. “When I first got shot at or was in combat, I figured, I’m going to be here a whole year and I don’t know how I’m going to make it. That first firefight was crazy. There were some new guys that had just come over about the same time I did that had gotten killed, and they had only been there two weeks.” He remembers losing a buddy who stepped on a landmine. “They basically tell you not to get close to anybody for obvious reasons. ...It’s tough because this guy was a human

being, breathing, and you were joking around with him, and then he’s not there anymore. ...It scares the shit out of you, because you figure you’re going to be next.” The result for a creative young man was a feeling of being in Hell. “It was like a hallucinogenic experience. It was surrealistic, is what it was. It was really happening, but it was so far out that it wasn’t really happening. It was like being in a dream, but it was real. You couldn’t daydream very long. You had to pay attention to everything. If you let your mind wander while you’re out in the boonies, you might not

“The first time you get shot at, you sure as hell don’t forget it. When I first got shot at or was in combat, I figured, I’m going to be here a whole year and I don’t know how I’m going to make it.” —Vincent Gabriel

22 • MAINE SENIORS

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE COURIER-GAZETTE

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Left: Vincent Gabriel fronts the Blind Albert Band playing at Montpelier in Thomaston for Memorial Day in 2016. The event honored Vietnam veterans and the band played hits from the era including songs by The Doors and The Rolling Stones.

come back. And all of a sudden, you’re rattled back by an explosion or something, maybe a helicopter.” How does one keep his soul intact in a situation like that? Vincent and a few others played music together when they could. “I had this old beat-up guitar that I bought over there,” he said. “I carried it with me when we went to base camps. Helicopters came in, dropped you off in a place in the jungle; you would dig foxholes, and that’s where you were for months. I didn’t take it with me on missions. The rifle was more important. When we came in at night, I would hang out with a couple of guys that played guitars. The guitars we had were pieces of shit, the worst possible guitars you could imagine, but they had strings on them, and you could play them. We would sit down and play anything that any of us knew, even songs we didn’t like, just to take our minds off the shit for a while.” He worried about what it would do to his mother if he got killed. Laughing about it now, he notes that his mother, who he had a very close relationship with right up until her death, and who he still wishes he could call on the phone to talk about things, used to force him to go to Sunday School. He said there was no choice in the matter. “I did a lot of praying when I was in Vietnam. I did. I prayed to whoever was up there, whoever was available to help. If you’ve got some pull up there, please help me out and help my buddies out. I did a lot of praying

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On the convoy ride back to civilization, he questioned so often if his transfer was really happening that a sergeant finally told him to shut up.

24 • MAINE SENIORS

PHOTOS: (TOP) DANIEL DUNKLE; (LEFT) COURTESY OF THE COURIER-GAZETTE

because I had nothing else. There was nothing else.” Sometimes prayers are answered. About halfway through his tour, Vincent was transferred to color guard duty, providing security for generals and others away from the jungle combat zones. He couldn’t believe his good fortune. On the convoy ride back to civilization, he questioned so often if his transfer was really happening that a sergeant finally told him to shut up. He found himself in a clean, crisp, starched uniform. It was the next best thing to being home. V i n c e n t a c k n ow l e d g e s t h a t although America’s Vietnam veterans did not come home to ticker-tape parades, nor receive a heroes’ welcome, when his grandparents came to pick him up and take him home from the airport, just seeing his family again was far more important. He does not hold a grudge against protesters, noting they may have played a role in ending the war. After that, he pursued his passion for music, making whatever living he could by playing guitar and singing in bands. For a while he ran a little


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record store in Rockland, and he has given lessons over the years. He eventually came to realize that he suffered post-traumatic stress disorder from his combat experience. It manifested with short-term memory loss, anxiety, and hyper vigilance. He had to struggle several times to rediscover the person he knew he was. In 2000, he released an album of songs all written about his experiences in Vietnam. It was called “11 Bravo Vietnam,” a reference to the Army’s job classification for infantryman. He followed that up with a documentary video featuring both his story and songs. Today, he is retired, living in Rockland with his wife, artist Lee Gabriel. He enjoys time with his friends, making music and the power to say no to anything that isn’t fun. In 2016, when The Moving Wall was brought to Montpelier in Thomaston for Memorial Day, Vincent and his band played songs from the “rock n’ roll” war, as hundreds of veterans and their families gathered around to be recognized. Wearing uniforms and military hats, ribbons and medals and, in some cases, decorated leather jackets or vests, veterans listened to the anthems of the era, songs by The Doors, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Vincent’s beloved Rolling Stones. On The Moving Wall nearby were the names of 58,228 Americans killed in Vietnam. Among them were Vincent’s relatives, friends, and those he counted as brothers. Around his neck, he carries the reminder that his name could have been one of them, if not for some miracle. And for that his fans are thankful. Vincent plays on.

On Route 1 • Hancock, Maine • 207-460-4104 HancockHeightsEstates@gmail.com www.HancockHeightsEstates.com NOVEMBER 2019 • 25


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“THIS PLACE SAVED MY LIFE.” WHEN A YOUNG MAN BARES HIS SOUL AND HAS THE COURAGE TO MAKE THAT STATEMENT TO A TOTAL STRANGER, ONE BEGINS TO REALIZE THE DEPTH OF HIS CONVICTIONS. by Beth A. Birmingham

26 • MAINE SENIORS

F

or veteran paratrooper Nicholas, who fought in Afghanistan, the Garry Owen House in Searsmont was his long sought-after sanctuary. Little did he know, after living homeless under a San Diego bridge for three years, that his life’s journey would actually come to a new beginning in Maine. The Garry Owen House opened in 2016 and is a combined effort of the Garry Owen Motorcycle Club and the Board of Directors of the house. Senior veterans Warren Ard, president of the MC, and Dana Philippi, president of the OH Board, have heard all too many stories like Nicholas’. Philippi had just checked in two new residents the day before our visit on Oct. 4. “Winter is coming, so those numbers will grow,” he said. The house, which was leased to

Ard in 2016 by John McCafferty, has a note of $50,000 due by November 2020. The nonprofit pays no rent, but is responsible for maintenance, insurance coverage and property taxes. It presently houses six veterans comfortably, but could accommodate a couple more. Ard said the motorcycle club created the house as the result of an idea formulated by three or four veterans who were riding together. They came across some homeless veterans. “They had nowhere to go,” he said, “So, as one veteran helping another veteran, we decided to see what contacts there are to get them help.” “But,” said Ard, “There were no avenues for help … especially for veterans with post traumatic stress disorder. Other places that would take the veterans in would take their

PHOTO: BETH A. BIRMINGHAM

Vets Helping Vets


Left: Garry Owen House: Brotherhood —Members of the Garry Owen House and Motorcycle Club along with some resident veterans.

disability pay.” Then, looking further into things, he found there were veterans who did have homes but could not afford to heat them. Now the organization provides heating oil to fellow veterans from Searsmont to Fort Kent. “If they need help, we help them,” Ard said, explaining the Garry Owen MC took over and got the “house” going. “Without us, these veterans wouldn’t even be here,” he said. It took only 12 days of intense work for the group to transform the former Apple Squeeze on Route 3 into a habitable residence for homeless veterans. “It takes money to run it,” Ard said, explaining there is not a veteran in the house who pays a cent. It’s all provided by donation. Alex Allmayer-Beck, past director of the Garry Owen House and retired social worker, said it’s very difficult to find affordable housing, and most landlords want credit references. “For somebody who has been living under a bridge for three years, they’re not going to have a credit score,” he said. “The political storm that we have today … there’s a divide there that, in my opinion, is not right,” Ard said. “When we take people that have served this country, who gave us the rights that me and you have today, and push them aside and start supporting people who have never done anything for this country … it’s just not right.” Beck said most veterans who have come out of combat have PTSD. He said anyone presenting with those symptoms is sent to a psychiatrist, and

if diagnosed, lose their 2nd Amendment rights, meaning they cannot possess a weapon or even hunt. “That’s why a lot of veterans are not going to the VA and saying they have nightmares and stuff like that, because they immediately lose their right to go hunting,” Beck said. One veteran said the police are on high alert when they see a veteran’s license plate – specifically with a purple heart symbol on it. “They make an assumption that you’re armed and dangerous,” veteran Jim Booth said. MC Treasurer Gene Kelly said the group’s mantra is “No brother left behind,” adding that any veteran who has a clean bill of discharge is welcome to the house. “They just basically fell through the cracks, and we give them the opportunity to get themselves back into society and be productive.” Besides a roof over their head, a hot meal and a place to sleep, the group also provides a case manager and a connection with the VA. “We help give them a solid foundation so they can move on and possibly help some other vets,” Kelly said. “A diagnosis of PTSD has a stigma that one will be violent toward others,

void, and filled it.” “We’re doing it on the help of the good people of the state of Maine,” he said. He added that Maine has more veterans per capita than any other state. “Maine people care for their veterans 100 percent,” Ard said, adding that a veteran rings a place in a Mainer’s heart. The house does not take any state or federal funding; it’s all funded by donations. “When you have some really burly looking, Harley-driving guys who ask for funding, it’s amazing how much we really get,” Ard said, laughing. “They just understand.” Ard told of an incident at a local fair where someone wanted to burn an American flag, and instead of the instigators being reprimanded, the MC was kicked out for trying to stop the incident. Beck said the only blemish on his soul was defending the burning of an American flag. Kelly said the combined organizations are reaching out to the community to raise the $50,000 to keep the place flourishing. Nicholas spent 11 months at the house, the most time by any veteran thus far. He had been through

“They just basically fell through the cracks, and we give them the opportunity to get themselves back into society and be productive.” — Gene Kelly but the reality is that one will be violent toward themselves … each case is so different,” Beck said. Ard said the motorcycle group is known as a bunch of vagabonds …”that got together after seeing a

numerous programs from San Diego to Maine, but said, “This place is something special. It’s a hell of a lot more therapeutic than any of the other programs I’ve been through.” He explained that the program’s NOVEMBER 2019 • 27


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needed a place of his own. So he began the process of building a space for himself and quickly found that “time and money were just not on my side.” At that point, Tom said, he moved from his 10x10-foot unheated cabin to his van, which presented a whole new experience for him. Then he came across a telephone number on a community board. It was for a case worker in Ellsworth who directed him to the Garry Owen House. “I was hesitant, and flat-out refused,” Tom said, explaining that his pride was getting in the way. He used to be an advocate for low-income people in Maine and worked at the Greater Bangor Area Shelter for many years. “I would intake people. I would give them meals and a bed and listen to their stories,” he said. “I would make them feel as comfortable as I could.” “Now I found myself on the other end of that stick, and these guys came to my rescue,” he said. “When I came through that door, I was damn near dead.”

Beck said Tom wasn’t making any sense when he first arrived at OH. He was delirious and in the second stage of hypothermia, and his blood sugar levels were critically low. “This place brought me back,” Tom said. That was in January of 2017. Tom stayed at the house through May, worked with Beck and was assigned a case worker at Preble Street in Portland. “Liz Frank was her name — an angel,” he said. Together they worked on his placement at Bar Harbor Housing Authority. He said from there, the Patriot Riders came to his rescue — providing him with the household items he needed to start over. “These folks here provide a service that is very much needed,” Tom said. “There is a void. Without these folks I would not be sitting here — it’s just that cut and dried.” Ard said the group is known at Togus as the “outlaw shelter to veterans,” because they don’t have to follow state or federal regulations. “We work on the Good Samaritan Law of Maine,” he said, explaining that as long as they do not charge any

PHOTO: BETH A. BIRMINGHAM

success comes from the veterans’ being able to police themselves, along with the constant supervision from the board and the club members. “It’s really nice to connect with people who are/were struggling with similar situations as I was,” Nicholas said. He was a transplant from San Diego, then moved to Eugene, Ore, where he felt veterans were not given a fair shake. “I came here, and it would not have worked out had I not found this place,” he said, adding that he was able to network, get the necessary treatment, and has paid off his debt and found a place to live. “I’m debtfree today,” he said. “This is the most stable I’ve been in my entire life,” Nicholas said. Fellow veteran, Tom, agreed. “Literally, this place saved my life.” Tom had returned to Maine from Florida, to help his son and family. After purchasing a piece of property and building a cabin, Tom realized he

28 • MAINE SENIORS


This is the Lifestyle you’ve been waiting for veteran for their services, they do not have to be licensed as a shelter. At any other shelter, such as Preble Street or the one in Bangor, a veteran gets checked in at 4 p.m. but is back out on the street by 8 a.m. the next morning. “Here, you’re here until you get your stuff together,” he said. Tom also said other shelters have a variety of barriers, whereas the Garry Owen House has a simple set of rules — no alcohol, no substance of any kind, and one is expected to be an upstanding member of the community. “This is a one-of-a-kind place,” Nicholas said, adding, “They’ve helped me more than all the other places put together. There’s just something about being able to connect with other veterans … there’s a therapeutic value of working through these issues as a team rather than feeling you’re alone.” Beck said that he and Philippi do Left: (From left) Alex Bower, Road Captain of the Mother Club Motorcycle group; Warren Ard, President of the Garry Owen Motorcycle Club; and resident Lt. Ramirez holds Diego while they share stories and support at the Garry Owen House. Right: Veteran Nicholas, a past resident of the Garry Owen House, says the place saved his life.

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pop-in visits just to make sure everything is in order. “If the place isn’t standing tall, we say something, but nobody is breathing down their necks.” Kelly said between the board and the motorcycle club they keep an eye on things. “We’ve got our own lives, too, but what makes it work is everybody puts in their time.” He said one key is that everyone at the shelter is allowed to be themselves, which helps them reintegrate back into society. Beck noted that with PTSD, sleep patterns are interrupted, so someone may be up all night and then sleep all day. “There aren’t a hell of a lot of places that you can do that, but you can here,” he said. Case management plays a huge role in getting these veterans on the right track and making connections for them. “It’s crucial,” Nicholas said, explaining that when he first came to Maine, he was told he didn’t qualify for the service through Preble Street because he made too much money as a disabled veteran. Frank from Preble Street hooked him up with Beck and Philippi, who connected him with a case manager from Easter Seals. “When they say they’re going to do something, it gets done,” Nicholas said. “It’s a mission, and in a military way of thinking, the mission comes first.” Resident John Richardson of Rockland has been at the house for five months following a falling-out with family, while fellow Marine veteran Danny Sentell, of Connecticut, found the OH two months ago. “I had enough money to get alcohol and a hotel room, and got so drunk I tried to 30 • MAINE SENIORS

kill myself.” He was admitted to the hospital and through the Veterans’ Crisis Center was put in contact with the OH/MC group. “I came into contact with these wonderful gentlemen who served our country … a great support group,” he said. After losing friends and seeing so much death during his tour of duty in Afghanistan, Nicholas said, “This place … it’s everything I needed.” “It’s vets helping vets,” Ard said, adding that he has been credited with being the founder of the house and the motorcycle group, but insisted “You listen to the stories you’re hearing today … these guys are the founders. A true leader makes everybody who’s with him look better, and that’s what veterans do.” The MC does a lot of fundraising, but the annual cost of upkeep on the house is between $25,000 and $30,000. Beck said what’s going to really hurt this winter are the drafty windows, which will force the furnace to work overtime, making the oil bill astronomical. Kelly said the fundraising the MC does is twofold. “We have the rest of the veterans in the state that we help,” he said, adding, “We pay mortgages, put in handicap showers … whatever their need is to keep them safe.” The fundraisers also help get the word out about what the OH and MC is all about, and that travels through word of mouth — which is the primary way they locate veterans in need. “Or they see a pamphlet somewhere, show up here down and out, and now they’re out in the community doing good things,” Nicholas said. He said most other places have a timeline that a person must adhere to. “Here, the timeline adheres to you.” “I was sleeping underneath a bridge

in San Diego, and I would not be sitting here right now without these guys,” Nicholas said. He said what makes it even more special is the camaraderie after leaving. “If I need something, I pick up the phone and call them, and they are always there,” he said. “These guys have told me ‘we’ve got your back’ and they’ve proved it in spades,” he added. “It’s a brotherhood, and I feel like I’ve found it.” Kelly said that’s a common theme with most every veteran who has come through the house, now more than 30. He said they are free to leave the house anytime they want, but most stay until “their head is in a safe place.” Philippi concurred, and said those who live in the house are selfmonitored, and some can’t live in a group situation. “Not everybody’s willing to help themselves,” Nicholas said, “A lot of people are looking for a handout, not a hand up.” The goal is to complete the purchase of the present house, then expand to another foundation next door. “There’s room to expand here to at least 16 to 20 beds,” Philippi said. Every cent of contributions made to Garry Owen House and Garry Owen Motorcycle Club stays in Maine and goes to veterans. Tax-deductible donations can be sent to Garry Owen House, P.O. Box 34, Liberty, ME 04949 or to Bangor Savings Bank, 7 Belmont Ave., Belfast, ME 04915. For more information on the groups, visit garryowenhouse.org. Kelly said everything that has been said and done is great, but if the $50,000 for the matured lease can’t be realized, then it’s all for naught. In the same breath, he said, “Maine’s great … I’ve got a feeling the people are going to step up.”


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IT ALL STARTED WITH A BROKEN HEART AND A RAISED FLAG. “LIKE ANY TRUE-HEARTED AMERICAN CITIZEN, WHEN I SAW THE SECOND PLANE FLY INTO THE SECOND TOWER, I KNEW WE WERE UNDER ATTACK,” SAID ELAINE GREENE. by Sheila D. Grant

32 • MAINE SENIORS

“I

knew it meant war. I was too old to enlist. I said one of the most sincere prayers that I have ever prayed, and asked to be shown something that I could do for my country.” When President George W. Bush called for a candlelight vigil on the evening of Friday, September 14, 2001, Elaine found her something. Elaine, and friends JoAnn Miller and Carmen Footer, decided to go to a hill on Main Street to display their candles. Elaine also brought an American flag. “I wondered if it was right to raise it, but I felt a nudge and I just did it,” she recalled. “People starting beeping their horns and yelling ‘God bless America!’ I told JoAnn and Carmen, ‘My prayer was just answered.’ I asked them to stand with me on that hill every Tuesday morning between 8 and 9 a.m. for one year to remember the people who lost their lives.” And when troops began to deploy to Afghanistan and Iraq, they decided to

stand for many years, for other things. Over the past 18 years, the Freeport Flag Ladies have supported soldiers, veterans and families in many ways. “Our classmates, brothers and friends were of the Vietnam era,” said Elaine. Not willing to risk that veterans post 9-11 might be “mistreated like Vietnam vets were, we decided let’s not let people forget they are out there laying down their lives, their limbs and their sanity for the rest of us.” The Flag Ladies would jump out of bed in the middle of the night to make the 2.5-hour drive to Bangor to greet troops. When multiple flights arrived, they would spend much of the day there. “We felt like we were filling in for mothers who couldn’t be there, because we were doing this out of real love,” said Elaine. “We would shake hands, give out hugs, kiss them goodbye, the same as we would have for our own child. And we posted the photos online so that parents

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF JOANNE MILLER

Freeport Flag Ladies STAND FOR AMERICA


Left: JoAnn Miller, Elaine Greene and Carmen Footer were surprised when a ceremony in Columbia Falls in September turned out to be in their honor, and included a monument commemorating their patriotic efforts Right: The Freeport Flag Ladies are often asked to pose for photos, as they did with this group of U.S. Marines at the Great State of Maine Air Show in Brunswick. Bottom Right: For the past 18 years, Freeport Flag Ladies Elaine Greene (pictured), Carmen Footer and JoAnn Miller waved the American Flag in every kind of weather each Tuesday morning to commemorate 9-11 and to honor our troops.

could pick them up.” The group also sent hundreds of packages to soldiers. They grew and sold “freedom flowers” by donation and held yard sales to fund their efforts. Elaine, 74, is the youngest of the trio; Footer is 78; Miller, 83. The trio “retired” from standing on the hill on September 10, 2019. The following Tuesday, they were invited to a ceremony in Columbia Falls. “Lo and behold, they put in a big flagpole with a big star, and an enormous rock with a plaque saying what we did and an even bigger plaque with a picture of the three of us,” Elaine said. “These people did this in our honor! Can you imagine? We got a letter from the President and something from both Senators. We don’t deserve all that! We are just common folks that showed that we cared.” The Freeport Flag Ladies continue to work with Wreaths Across America, Patriot Guard Riders, VFWs and other veterans’ groups. “We’ve attended the funerals of our Maine fallen soldiers, which is the hardest thing we’ve done,” said Elaine. “We witness the agony of the parents, and the courage and strength they have in the things they’ve done afterwards to honor the son or daughter they lost.”

Caption Goes Here for Flag Lady in the Snow

The Flag Ladies also speak with school and church groups, “not to tell you what to think, but hopefully, to inspire you to get involved in service to something besides yourself,” Elaine said. “Everyone can do something. Just be a good neighbor. If your neighbors are older, or injured or sick, help without waiting to be asked. Most people don’t want to ask, so offer. Open doors for people; help a mother get her stroller up over a curb. It’s the little things. Each time you do a little thing, without knowing it, you are encouraged to do another and it becomes part of who you are.”

“We felt like we were filling in for mothers who couldn’t be there, because we were doing this out of real love.” —Elaine Greene

NOVEMBER 2019 • 33


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STOP the SCAM VETERANS: LET’S WORK TOGETHER TO STAY AHEAD OF THE SCAMMERS by Jane Margesson,

T

he statistics we hear about scams and fraud are nothing short of staggering. Imposter scams such as the grandparent scam, the sweetheart scam, the IRS scam and many other variations claim millions of victims across the US each year. There are also scams that specifically t a r get A mer ic a ’s her o e s: ou r veterans. Scammers will stop at nothing to steal veterans’ benefits including pension payments and much more. Consider the following scams: The Update Your Military File Scam: A caller claims to be from the Department of Veterans Affairs and asks to “update” your information, but really is hoping to get personal information to steal your credit. 34 • MAINE SENIORS

Veterans Choice Program (VCP) Scam: Scammers have set up a phone number nearly identical to the number veterans dial to find out if they are eligible to use approved health care providers outside of the VA system. Vets call the fake number, and a message prompts them to leave their credit card information in return for a rebate. They debit your account, and the vet gets nothing in return. Make sure to dial the correct number for the VCP: 1-866-606-8198. T h e C a s h fo r B e n e f i t s Scheme: Predatory lenders target veterans in need of money by offering cash in exchange for future disability or pension payments. These buyouts are typically a fraction of the value of the benefit.

Charging for Records Scam: A scammer attempts to charge for access to a veteran’s military records or government forms. Never pay for your records; all information is free through your local VA. Employment Scams: Con artists post bogus job offers to recruit veterans on various online job boards. The scammer may use or sell your personal information provided in the job application. It’s likely a scam if you have to pay to get the job, you need to supply credit card or banking information, or the ad is for “previously undisclosed” federal government jobs. If you are a veteran, you are unfortunately a target, so be mindful of this reality in your day-to-day transac-

PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK.COM / ALPHASPIRIT

AARP Maine Communications Director


tions. Remember that The Veterans Administration will never call you, e-mail or text you to verify or update your information. Only work with VA-accredited representatives when dealing with VA benefits; you can search for them online at the VA Office of General Counsel website. If you would like a copy of the Veteran’s Edition of the AARP Watchdog Alert Handbook: 9 Ways Con Artists Target Veterans, you can download it for free by visiting www. aarp.org/veterans or call AARP Maine at 1-866-554-5380. Another important way to protect yourself from scams and identity theft is to place a freeze on your credit report. Identity theft can be devastating because once armed with enough personal information, a scammer can access their victim’s credit report. With access to the credit report, an identity thief can then open a credit card, apply for a loan or even apply for government benefits, all in the name of their victim. The best way we can protect ourselves from identity theft is to prevent criminals from obtaining our sensitive information in the first place. This is why placing a credit freeze with all three major credit bureaus is considered the most effective way to block identity thieves. When the freeze is in place, our credit reports are protected. Visit the Maine Bureau of Consumer Credit Information for all the details: https://www.maine.gov/pfr/consumercredit/file_freeze_info.htm As a veteran, you have protected our country with your service. Now let us help you protect yourself from scams that target veterans and your guaranteed benefits. As with all scams, vigilance is your number one weapon. 

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NOTE FROM TIM TETZ, DIRECTOR OF OUTREACH, VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL FUND (VVMF)

Our Fallen Heroes THE VIETNAM LISTINGS

Regards, Tim www.vvmf.org 36 • MAINE SENIORS

PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK.COM / SAMANTONIOPHOTO

“I

’d be remiss if I didn’t also highlight that of the approximately 40,000 Vietnam era veterans who reside in Maine, 31 are also honored on our In Memory Honor Roll. These veterans returned from Vietnam and later died of illnesses and injuries related to their service. Thousands of their fellow Maine veterans are or were in similar circumstances.  It’s yet another way to make sure your readers honor and remember all those who served in Vietnam — especially those who came home. Please note that many photos are very poor quality.  While we have just slightly more than 400 photos (of 58,276) left to find nationally, many are classified as poor quality.  For example in the set there is a drawing for Robert B. Young (York) and a very poor quality wedding photo for Sproul.  These are but two dozen photos that were reviewed in this last photo series we’d like to replace. As I always tell family members, “Doesn’t your friend/loved one deserve more than just one photo to highlight their life? Your readers could help us immensely by submitting additional photos, both military and civilian, they might have of anyone on The Wall.  They can do that directly on their page on our website. If I can answer any questions or help further, please don’t hesitate to ask.”


Albert Lee Belanger,

ALBION Brian Leroy Buker, Sergeant; DET B-55 (5TH MSFC), 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Albion, Maine; November 03, 1949 to April 05, 1970

ANSON Gene Fletcher Matthews, Captain; D TRP, 3RD SQDN, 5TH CAVALRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Anson, Maine; January 11, 1942 to May 26, 1967

ASHLAND Robert Earle Goding, Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Ashland, Maine; September 21, 1948 to March 03, 1969

Emery Norman Poitrow, Staff Sergeant; C CO, 5TH BN, 60TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Ashland, Maine; January 26, 1931 to April 09, 1968

James Crawford Skinner,

PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK.COM / REDPIXEL

First Sergeant; 238TH AERIAL WPNS CO, 268TH AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Ashland, Maine; February 23, 1928 to October 26, 1971

AUBURN William Russell Almon, Private First Class; G CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Auburn, Maine; May 30, 1948 to July 30, 1968

Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 5TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Auburn, Maine; March 03, 1948 to September 13, 1969

Michael Hubert Deschenes, Private First Class; H CO, 2ND BN, 26TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Auburn, Maine; December 05, 1947 to September 16, 1968

Bertrand Ronald Gagne, Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 82ND ARTILLERY, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Auburn, Maine; July 08, 1948 to August 22, 1969

Allen Melvin Hutchinson, Corporal; 3RD FORCE RECON CO, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Auburn, Maine; June 27, 1949 to February 05, 1970

Bruce Irving Luttrell, Master Sergeant; DET B-36 (3RD MSFC), A CO, 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Auburn, Maine; April 09, 1934 to May 20, 1969

Reginald Pamphile Nicholas, Sergeant; M CO, 3RD BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Auburn, Maine; March 03, 1936 to October 03, 1965

Peter George Vlahakos, Staff Sergeant; VMGR152, MAG-15, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Auburn, Maine; April 12, 1935 to February 01, 1966

Harold Everett Walker, Jr, Specialist Five; 446TH TRANS CO, 7TH TRANS BN, 26TH GS GROUP, ARMY SPT CMD DANANG, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Auburn, Maine; February 16, 1948 to March 08, 1968

AUGUSTA Richard W. Arnold, Specialist Six; 147TH ASHC, 11TH AVN BN, 12TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; December 23, 1930 to March 13, 1966

Raymond Joseph Bechard, Staff Sergeant; A CO, 3RD BN, 12TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; November 03, 1943 to March 09, 1969

Gilbert Stevens Bell, Jr, Sergeant; HHC, 2ND BN, 47TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; November 16, 1947 to December 13, 1968;

Norman Joseph Chavarie, Corporal; D CO, 9TH ENG BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Augusta, Maine; August 16, 1949 to July 21, 1969

Christopher J. Childs, III, Specialist Five; 221ST SIG CO (PICTORAL), 69TH SIG BN, 160TH SIG GROUP, 1ST SIGNAL BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; December 04, 1939 to May 09, 1970

NOVEMBER 2019 • 37


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Robert Dorian Cranson,

Richard James Goggin, Sergeant; HHC, 1ST BN, 327TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; April 18, 1947 to April 26, 1971

Edwin Matti Kahkonen, Jr, Lance Corporal; A CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Augusta, Maine; February 09, 1949 to October 29, 1967

Ronald Irving Kirkpatrick, Specialist Four; ADV TEAM 162, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; February 17, 1945 to July 16, 1969

Gregory Cornelius Quinn, Private First Class; B CO, 2ND BN, 27TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; June 13, 1949 to November 16, 1967

Gilbert Craig Turner, Jr, Staff Sergeant; HHC, 4TH ENG BN, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Augusta, Maine; March 01, 1941 to September 06, 1969

BANGOR William Francis Callinan, Major; HHD, 52ND AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine, October 06, 1930 to November 11, 1966 38 • MAINE SENIORS

Specialist Four; B CO, 4TH BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; March 24, 1950 to December 18, 1970

James George Deschenes, Sergeant First Class; D CO, 6TH BN, 31ST INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; January 09, 1932 to November 16, 1968

David Bruce Fogg, Private First Class; CAP 2-7-4, CACO 2-7, 2ND CAG, COMBINED ACTION, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bangor, Maine; July 07, 1948 to February 06, 1970

Martin Lee Freeman, Private First Class; E CO, 3RD BN, 7TH INFANTRY, 199TH INFANTRY BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; February 19, 1947 to March 03, 1967

William E. Jordan III, Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; May 27, 1941 to January 11, 1966

Edward Leonard Mann, Jr, Lance Corporal; H&S CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bangor, Maine; March 07, 1949 to April 30, 1968

Frederick William McHugh, Corporal; C CO, 3RD BN, 187TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; July 10, 1947 to September 08, 1968

James Bruce Mc Laughlin, Sergeant; L CO, 75TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; May 03, 1948 to April 16, 1971

Walter Forrest Merrick, Lieutenant Commander; USS ORISKANY, TF 77, 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; Bangor, Maine; February 10, 1920 to October 26, 1966

Charles Edgar Stuart, Staff Sergeant; 919TH AIR REFUELING SQDN, 4252ND STRAT WING, SAC; United States Air Force; Bangor, Maine; March 16, 1932 to May 19, 1966

Charles Edward Sullivan, Jr, Corporal; C CO, 1ST BN, 9TH MARINES,3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bangor, Maine; February 17, 1946 to June 29, 1967

Thomas Michael Sullivan, Private First Class; C CO, 2ND BN, 27TH INFANTRY,25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bangor, Maine; July 22, 1948 to March 31, 1967

Michael Peter Umel, Private First Class; AMMO CO, SUPPLY BN, 1ST FORCE SVC RGT, FORCE LOG CMD, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bangor, Maine; September 16, 1949 to April 10, 1968

BAR HARBOR Nelson Grafton Richardson, Specialist Five; A CO, 815TH ENG BN, 35TH ENG GROUP,18TH ENG BDE, USARV ENG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Bar Harbor, Maine; April 14, 1951 to February 04, 1971


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Ronald Owen Smiley,

BATH Dennis Owen Crocker, Private First Class; 156TH MAINT CO, 92ND SVC BN, 80TH GS GROUP, ARMY SPT CMD DANANG, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Bath, Maine; August 15, 1948 to August 16, 1968

Wayne Clifton Cyr, Staff Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 20TH INFANTRY, 11TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bath, Maine; April 18, 1947 to May 07, 1968

Merwin Alexander Delano Jr, Private; C CO, 1ST BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Bath, Maine; December 25, 1947 to March 17, 1966

BERWICK James Richard Dufault, Private First Class; B CO, 2ND BN, 7TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Berwick, Maine; September 20, 1945 to June 22, 1966

John Wallace Knight, Sergeant; 2ND PLT, B CO, 2ND BN, 327TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Berwick, Maine; February 13, 1942 to January 21, 1968

BETHEL Carl Russell Churchill, Captain; 497TH TAC FTR SQDN, 8TH TAC FTR WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Bethel, Maine; July 08, 1945 to May 03, 1970 40 • MAINE SENIORS

First Lieutenant; D CO, 1ST BN, 506TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bethel, Maine; September 05, 1946 to May 10, 1970

BIDDEFORD Raymond Arthur Borduas, Private First Class; 2ND PLT, G CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Biddeford, Maine; September 29, 1947 to June 04, 1968

Robert Normand Dechene, Warrant Officer; D CO, 229TH ASLT HELO BN, 11TH AVN GROUP, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Biddeford, Maine; March 12, 1944 to September 17, 1967

Herve Joseph Guay, Lance Corporal; M CO, 3RD BN, 26TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Biddeford, Maine; August 27, 1945 to June 02, 1968

Roger Edward La Bonte, Second Lieutenant; C CO, 8TH ENG BN, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Biddeford, Maine; December 23, 1940 to December 08, 1966

Reynald Gerard Lepage, Private First Class; K CO, 3RD BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Biddeford, Maine; April 12, 1947 to May 25, 1967

Norman Gerald Joseph Poitras, Lance Corporal; SPT CO, 3RD ENG BN, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Biddeford, Maine; May 25, 1946 to August 22, 1966

BINGHAM Joseph Kenneth Larry Belanger, Private First Class; 18TH AFLD OPS DET, US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Bingham, Maine; January 23, 1945 to February 07, 1965

BLAINE Stanley John Lento, Sergeant; H CO, 75TH INFANTRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Blaine, Maine; January 19, 1949 to July 24, 1969

BOOTHBAY HARBOR Jonathan Ansel Sawyer, Hospitalman; H&S CO, 1ST BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Navy; Boothbay Harbor, Maine; January 27, 1949 to July 02, 1967

Gordon Edmund Tibbetts, Sergeant; 1099TH TRANS CO, 159TH TRANS BN, 4TH TRANS CMD, ARMY SPT CMD SAIGON, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Boothbay Harbor, Maine; October 13, 1949 to March 26, 1971

BOWDOINHAM Michael Edward Poliquin, Private First Class; MABS16, MAG-16, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bowdoinham, Maine; April 25, 1949 to August 19, 1969


Ronald Russell Fitch,

BREWER Phillip J. Cayford, Jr, Specialist Four; A CO, 4TH BN, 12TH INFANTRY, 199TH INFANTRY BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Brewer, Maine; September 25, 1946 to March 22, 1968

Michael Henry Deragon, Private First Class; A CO, 1ST BN, 501ST INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Brewer, Maine; November 14, 1946 to August 14, 1969

Joseph Emerson Heath, Specialist Four; 137TH ENG CO, 19TH ENG BN, 35TH ENG GROUP, 18TH ENG BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Brewer, Maine; October 18, 1946 to October 29, 1968

Loring William Watson, Private First Class; D BTRY, 2ND BN, 11TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Brewer, Maine; July 15, 1949 to March 19, 1969

BRUNSWICK James Daniel Cressey Jr, Lance Corporal; 1ST BRIDGE CO, 7TH ENG BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Brunswick, Maine; July 25, 1946 to January 13, 1969; (Incident Date December 23, 1968)

David Littlehale Farley, Specialist Four; HHC, 1ST BN, 35TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Brunswick, Maine; October 26, 1944 to October 09, 1967

Specialist Four; D CO, 1ST BN, 12TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Brunswick, Maine; October 09, 1946 to November 20, 1968

Earl Stanley Garrison, Private First Class; C CO, 2ND BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Brunswick, Maine; June 02, 1948 to March 03, 1967

BRYANT POND John Henry Ralph Brooks, Staff Sergeant; 129TH AHC, 268TH AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Bryant Pond, Maine; April 08, 1949 to February 11, 1974; (Incident Date May 13, 1969)

Neil Howard MacKillop, Specialist Four; B CO, 2ND BN, 60TH INFANTRY 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Bryant Pond, Maine; August 18, 1948 to February 01, 1969

BUXTON Donovan Keith Elwell, Private; B CO, 2ND BN, 27TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Buxton, Maine; October 31, 1946 to February 25, 1967

CALAIS Ira Hilton Perkins Jr, Staff Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 327TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Calais, Maine; March 15, 1937 to June 07, 1966

CAMDEN Clarence Lawrence Chase, Specialist Four; B CO, 2ND BN, 12TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Camden, Maine; August 30, 1947 to August 21, 1967

CANAAN Edwin Ellis Elliott, Specialist Four; B TRP, 1ST SQDN, 9TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Canaan, Maine; May 16, 1946 to

BUCKSPORT Roy Clifford McEwen, Corporal; 3RD PLT, D CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bucksport, Maine; February 03, 1946 to June 19, 1966

Eric Michael Wardwell, Lance Corporal; A CO, 3RD ENG BN, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Bucksport, Maine; October 20, 1946 to September 04, 1967

April 11, 1967

CARIBOU Richard Perley Bubar, Private First Class; 573RD TRANS DET, 118TH AHC, 145TH AVN BN, US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Caribou, Maine; January 30, 1942 to November 01, 1964

NOVEMBER 2019 • 41


SPECIAL SECTION

CHISOLM

DIXFIELD Larry Freeman Faulkner,

John Edgar Gagnon, Master Sergeant; HHC, 2ND BDE, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Caribou, Maine; May 26, 1931 to February 01, 1968

Percy Charles Gagnon, Specialist Four; C CO, 2ND BN, 47TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Caribou, Maine; January 13, 1945 to March 23, 1970

Roger Edward Gauvin, Captain; 114TH AHC, DELTA AVN BN, US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Caribou, Maine; October 19, 1935 to March 15, 1964

Private First Class; D CO, 1ST RECON BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Chisolm, Maine; March 05, 1948 to July 13, 1967

CLIFTON John Edward Mogan, Specialist Four; A CO, 1ST BN, 50TH INFANTRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Clifton, Maine; September 27, 1946 to December 15, 1967

CORINNA Paul Earl Sudsbury, Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Corinna, Maine; February 27, 1945 to August 10, 1966

COUSINS ISLAND

Dana Leroy Mace, Specialist Five; HHT, 7TH SQDN, 17TH CAVALRY,1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Caribou, Maine; June 30, 1946 to July 07, 1969

Scott James Roderick, Lance Corporal; MACS-4, MACG-18, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Caribou, Maine; November 16, 1945 to January 21, 1970

CARMEL Sheldon Wayne Hicks, Staff Sergeant; HQ & SVC BTRY, 8TH BN, 6TH ARTILLERY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Carmel, Maine; December 17, 1949 to June 07, 1969

42 • MAINE SENIORS

Charles Oakes Baker, II,

Bruce Harold Tibbetts, Private First Class; A CO, 3RD BN, 21ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Dixfield, Maine; August 01, 1948 to June 11, 1969

DOVER-FOXCROFT Richard Clair Dority, Sergeant; 329TH TRANS CO, 159TH TRANS BN, 5TH TRANS CMD, ARMY SPT CMD DANANG, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Dover-Foxcroft, Maine; January 27, 1952 to November 04, 1971; (Incident Date November 03, 1970)

Johnson Ashley Meade, Airman First Class; 12TH CE SQDN, 12TH TAC FTR WING, 13TH AF; United States Air Force; DoverFoxcroft, Maine; June 02, 1941 to December 17, 1965

Gregory Alec Sloat,

Sergeant First Class; 85TH ORD DET, 45TH GS GROUP, ARMY SPT; CMD QUI NHON, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Cousins Island, Maine; February 04, 1934 to June 15, 1968

Sergeant; H&HS-1, MWHG-1, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Dover-Foxcroft, Maine; May 31, 1949 to February 18, 1971

DANFORTH

EAST HIRAM Louis Basil Albert, Jr,

Private First Class; B CO, 11TH MOTOR TRANS BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Danforth, Maine; September 28, 1948 to October 08, 1969

DEXTER Malcolm Cyril Dulac, First Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 50TH INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Dexter, Maine; December 25, 1931 to May 05, 1968

Daniel Arthur Foss, Sergeant; D CO, 3RD BN, 1ST INFANTRY, 11TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; East Hiram, Maine; December 22, 1946 to February 10, 1969

EAST HOLDEN Bruce Allyn Abdellah, Private; 576TH ORD CO, 3RD ORD BN, 29TH GS GROUP, ARMY SPT CMD SAIGON, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United


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NOVEMBER 2019 • 43


SPECIAL SECTION

Robert James Wiggin,

States; East Holden, Maine; December 15, 1952 to October 26, 1971

Staff Sergeant; 335TH RR CO, 509TH ASA GROUP, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Eliot, Maine; April 02, 1932 to February 13, 1968

EAST LEBANON

ELLSWORTH

Robert Lee Baker, Major;

Francis George Stevens,

19TH TAC ALFT SQDN, 315TH TAC ALFT WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; East Lebanon, Maine; June 07, 1930 to November 27, 1970

Private First Class; A CO, 2ND BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Ellsworth, Maine; June 18, 1945 to June 29, 1966

Richard John Stewart, Sergeant; H&S CO, H&S BN, 1ST FORCE SVC RGT, FORCE LOG CMD, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; East Lebanon, Maine; May 03, 1945 to March 12, 1968

EAST SEBAGO Harvey James Douglas, Petty Officer Third Class; RIVDIV 553, TF 116, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; East Sebago, Maine; July 31, 1946 to January 18, 1969

EAST WILTON Leslie Aaron Dalrymple,

Specialist Four; C CO, 23RD MED BN, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Fort Fairfield, Maine; April 06, 1949 to February 20, 1970

FORT KENT Technical Sergeant; HQ, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Fort Kent, Maine; July 26, 1927 to June 11, 1966

Dana Leon Gerald, First Lieutenant; C CO, 2ND BN, 5TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Fairfield, Maine; June 21, 1942 to March 11, 1967

FARMINGTON Rodney George Johndro, Staff Sergeant; 269TH ORD DET, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Farmington, Maine

Gary Oral C Manchester,

ELIOT

FORT FAIRFIELD

44 • MAINE SENIORS

Kenneth Lee Higgins,

Kenneth James Bossie,

Private First Class; B CO, 1ST BN, 20TH INFANTRY, 11TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Farmington, Maine; July 19, 1948 to December 26, 1969

Private First Class; G CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Eliot, Maine; January 29, 1948 to May 02, 1968

Corporal; B CO, 3RD BN, 21ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Fort Fairfield, Maine; October 29, 1949 to September 22, 1969

FAIRFIELD

Corporal; A CO, 2ND BN, 60TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; East Wilton, Maine; October 12, 1949 to November 20, 1969

James Paton Nicholson,

Danny Lee Duprey,

David Austin Cox, Lance Corporal; E CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Fort Fairfield, Maine; March 15, 1949 to May 17, 1968

Richard Thomas Corriveau, Corporal; 1ST PLT, D CO, 1ST BN, 506TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Fort Kent, Maine; June 21, 1949 to July 11, 1969

Joseph Dennis Gagnon, Sergeant; 303RD MM SQDN, 3RD TAC FTR WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Fort Kent, Maine; April 13, 1943 to August 22, 1970

Benton Michaud, Corporal; D CO, 3RD BN, 21ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Fort Kent, Maine; May 22, 1947 to January 10, 1968

FREEDOM Theodore Glenn Drew, Private First Class; D CO, 3RD BN, 1ST INFANTRY, 11TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States;


Freedom, Maine; May 09, 1949 to May 12, 1970

GRAY

FRYEBURG

Private First Class; C CO, 3RD BN, 47TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Gray, Maine; November 02, 1948 to January 05, 1969

Robert Stewart Graustein, Lieutenant Commander; VA-75, CVW-3, USS SARATOGA, TF 77, 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; Fryeburg, Maine; September 29, 1939 to March 03, 1975; (Incident Date December 21, 1972)

GARDINER Jon Bailey, Specialist Four; 176TH AHC, 14TH AVN BN, 16TH AVN GROUP, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Gardiner, Maine; December 05, 1947 to February 24, 1969

Guy Robert Bean, Private First Class; E CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Gardiner, Maine; February 19, 1947 to February 23, 1968

David Dan Foster,

James Russell West, Private First Class; H CO, 2ND BN, 7TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Gray, Maine; March 03, 1947 to January 24, 1968

Terence Higgins Hanley, Lieutenant; VAP-61, CVW-16, USS ORISKANY, TF 77, 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; Gardiner, Maine; March 16, 1942 to May 24, 1973; (Incident Date January 01, 1968)

Harold W. Reynolds, Staff Sergeant; B CO, 3RD BN, 60TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Gardner, Maine; December 25, 1941 to January 22, 1967

HALL QUARRY Joseph Tony Musetti Jr, Petty Officer Second Class; PBR-100, RIVDIV 51, TF 116, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; Hall Quarry, Maine; January 17, 1943 to September 28, 1967

HALLOWELL Malcolm Arthur Avore, Lieutenant; VA-163, CVW-16, USS ORISKANY, TF 77, 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; Hallowell, Maine; August 25, 1938 to

GREAT POND Herbert Francis Hardy Jr, Captain; DET A-334

July 18, 1965

(PLEI DO LIM), C CO, 1ST SF GROUP, US ARMY SF VIETNAM, MAAGV; Army of the United States; Great Pond, Maine; March 01, 1928 to March 04, 1964

GREENVILLE / GREENVILLE JUNCTION

Gerald Andrew Dorr, Warrant Officer; 128TH AHC, 11TH AVN BN, 12TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Gardiner, Maine; July 05, 1944 to January 28, 1967

Maine; January 31, 1949 to January 21, 1968

Rance Alden McEachern Jr, Sergeant; 3RD 155MM GUN BTRY, 11TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Greenville, Maine; March 31, 1946 to July 14, 1968

Jon Irving Clifford, Private; I CO, 3RD BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Hallowell, Maine; July 30, 1941 to March 09, 1966

Leo Edward Michaud, Private First Class; 2ND PLT, A TRP, 3RD SQDN, 4TH CAVALRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Hallowell, Maine; January 20, 1945 to January 20, 1968

HAMPDEN Curtis Stewart Anderson, First

Edwin Byron Ryder, Sergeant First Class; 59TH ENG CO, 39TH ENG BN, 45TH ENG GROUP, 18TH ENG BDE, USARV ENG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Greenville Junction, Maine; April 08, 1938 to August 31, 1969

Lieutenant; 74TH AVN CO, 210TH AVN BN, 12TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Hampden, Maine; June 10, 1947 to January 17, 1969

HARRISON

GUILFORD Thomas John Moody, Private First Class; 2ND PLT, C CO, 3RD RECON BN, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Guilford,

Louis J. Geneseo, Captain; DET A-414 (MOC HOA), A CO, 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Harrison, Maine; September 18, 1936 to July 24, 1969 NOVEMBER 2019 • 45


SPECIAL SECTION

Thomas Wayne Bazemore, Private First

HOWLAND James Francis Chase,

Ronald George St John, Hospitalman; H&S CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Navy; Harrison, Maine; September 26, 1946 to September 16, 1966

HOLLIS CENTER Vaughan Shaw Morgan, Specialist Four; A CO, 4TH BN, 9TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Hollis Center, Maine; December 27, 1943 to August 30, 1967

Milan Elmer Whitten, Private First Class; 3RD PLT, C CO, 2ND BN, 35TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Hollis Center, Maine; September 30, 1945 to October 29, 1966

Robert Emery Wills, Sergeant; B CO, 2ND BN, 14TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Hollis Center, Maine; May 20, 1947 to March 31, 1970

HOULTON

Corporal; 2ND PLT, C CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Howland, Maine; February 24, 1947 to December 17, 1968

JACKMAN STATION Henry Louis Dew,

Specialist Four; HHC, 2ND BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Houlton, Maine; July 25, 1948 to November 20, 1967

Harry John McGuire, Private First Class; A CO, 1ST BN, 35TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Houlton, Maine; February 08, 1947 to May 22, 1967 46 • MAINE SENIORS

KENNEBUNKPORT Terry Francis Drown,

Specialist Four; C CO, 2ND BN, 2ND INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Jackman Station, Maine; September 16, 1944 to April 19, 1966

Specialist Four; E CO, 4TH BN, 21ST INFANTRY, 11TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Kennebunkport, Maine; October 24, 1944 to June 11, 1969

JAY

KITTERY / KITTERY POINT David Alan Lane, Lance

Corporal; B CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Jay, Maine; July 15, 1945 to January 27, 1966

Freddy Alford McGee, Specialist Five; B CO, 1ST BN, 69TH ARMOR, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Kittery, Maine; July 20, 1946 to January 22, 1969

JEFFERSON

Larry Aime D’Entremont, James Walter Godfrey,

Warrant Officer; B TRP, 1ST SQDN, 9TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Jefferson, Maine; August 22, 1945 to April 16, 1967

Lewis Carlton Jones Jr, Weston Joseph Langley,

Class; 2ND PLT, D CO, 1ST BN, 501ST INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Kennebunk, Maine; December 12, 1947 to August 20, 1969

Private First Class; L CO, 3RD BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Jefferson, Maine; February 14, 1949 to February 06, 1969

KENNEBUNK Robert Lester Berry, Corporal; 221ST AVN CO, 307TH AVN BN, 164TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Kennebunk, Maine; July 31, 1949 to March 18, 1968

Private First Class; HHC, 2ND BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Kittery Point, Maine; March 29, 1948 to November 20, 1967

LA GRANGE Herbert Elbridge Armstrong, Sergeant First Class; HHB, 3RD BN, 18TH ARTILLERY, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; La Grange, Maine; March 09, 1930 to September 27, 1971

Larry Daniel Boobar, Specialist Four; C TRP, 1ST SQDN, 11TH ARMORED CAVALRY, USARV; Army of the United States; La Grange, Maine; December 04, 1948 to September 06, 1969


Respect. Honor. Gratitude.

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NOVEMBER 2019 • 47


SPECIAL SECTION

Forest Clayton Hodgkin, Specialist Four; 174TH AHC, 14TH AVN BN, 16TH AVN GROUP, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; October 12, 1947 to November 15, 1969

LEE Edward Senior Hall, Specialist Four; C CO, 2ND BN, 2ND INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lee, Maine; January 14, 1946 to March 10, 1967

LEWISTON Leo Roger Asselin, Private First Class; HHC, 4TH BN, 21ST INFANTRY, 11TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; April 17, 1950 to June 12, 1969

Harold George Breton, Private First Class; B CO, 1ST BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Lewiston, Maine; July 30, 1948 to February 23, 1969

Laurier Don Derosier, Sergeant; B BTRY, 1ST BN, 44TH ARTILLERY, 108TH ARTY GROUP, I FIELD FORCE, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; January 21, 1946 to December 03, 1967; (Incident Date August 31, 1967)

Normand Camille Deschaine, Corporal; D CO, 1ST BN, 26TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Lewiston, Maine; November 11, 1947 to June 07, 1968

Roland Philippe Guerette, Private First Class; M CO, 3RD BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Lewiston, Maine; March 23, 1947 to December 14, 1966 48 • MAINE SENIORS

Ronald Medford Thomas II, Private First Class; B CO, 1ST BN, 12TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; February 19, 1944 to April 09, 1967

Michael John McGonagle, Sergeant; C CO, 4TH BN, 9TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; September 25, 1946 to October 17, 1966

Thomas Joseph McMahon, Specialist Four; HHC, 2ND BN, 1ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE \ AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; June 24, 1948 to March 19, 1969

James Joseph McMorrow, Lance Corporal; H&S CO, 3RD BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Lewiston, Maine; February 14, 1949 to November 10, 1969

Richard W. Rossignol, Petty Officer Third Class; RIVDIV 571, TF 116, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; Lewiston, Maine; December 03, 1946 to March 29, 1969

Paul Robert West, Staff Sergeant; 388TH TAC FTR WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Lewiston, Maine; November 15, 1938 to November 26, 1966

LIMERICK Fred William Morrill, Private First Class; HHC, 3RD BN, 47TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Limerick, Maine; April 18, 1948 to May 15, 1968

LIMESTONE Joe Stuart Burchfield, Captain; A TRP, 2ND SQDN, 17TH CAVALRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Limestone, Maine; July 02, 1946 to December 02, 1971; (Incident Date November 21, 1971)

Gary Dale Tracy, Corporal; HMM-161, 7TH FLEET; United States Marine Corps; Limestone, Maine; September 14, 1936 to June 06, 1965

Charles Howard Soule, Specialist Four; 57TH TRANS CO, 63RD MAINT BN, 26TH GS GROUP, ARMY SPT CMD DANANG, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; April 03, 1951 to February 08, 1971

William Edward Spencer, Sergeant First Class; DET B-36 (3RD MSFC), A CO, 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Lewiston, Maine; September 09, 1943 to December 29, 1969

LINCOLN Donald Leroy Brown, Corporal; HOW-6 PLT, H&S CO, 1ST AMTRAC BN, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Lincoln, Maine; April 04, 1944 to November 11, 1966; (Incident Date October 20, 1966


Durwood Bert Lombard, Specialist Five; E CO, 709TH MAINT BN, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Lincoln, Maine; October 27, 1944 to March 10, 1968

LISBON FALLS John Smythe Manchester, First Lieutenant; C CO, 2ND BN, 3RD INFANTRY, 199TH INFANTRY BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Lisbon Falls, Maine; February 12, 1946 to April 28, 1968

LIVERMORE / LIVERMORE FALLS Rodney George Shank, Lance Corporal; HMM-364, MAG-16, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Livermore, Maine; June 16, 1947 to February 07, 1969

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE.

Corporal; A CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Livermore Falls, Maine; February 10, 1945 to August 23, 1966

Colin Plummer Hurd, First Lieutenant; 189TH AHC, 52ND AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Lovell, Maine; October 24, 1945 to May 09, 1970

MACHIAS Richard Ralph Grinnell, Private First Class; H&S CO, 3RD BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Machias, Maine; September 04, 1950 to August 22, 1969

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NOVEMBER 2019 • 49


SPECIAL SECTION

MARSHFIELD

MILO

Roger Ellis Flaherty, Wayne Alan Watts, Specialist Four; 335TH TRANS CO, 14TH TRANS BN, 34TH GS GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Machias, Maine; October 04, 1940 to September 10, 1967

MADAWASKA Lawrence Joseph Cyr, Sergeant Major; HQ BTRY, 4TH BN, 12TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Madawaska, Maine; November 23, 1922 to January 08, 1968

Thomas Edward M Gray Jr, First Lieutenant; HHC, 1ST BN, 16TH INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Madawaska, Maine; December 22, 1939 to February 24, 1967

Joseph Adrian G Perron, Specialist Five; 605TH TRANS CO, 34TH GS GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Madawaska, Maine; August 19, 1944 to September 07, 1966

MADISON

Hospitalman; H&S CO, 2ND BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Navy; Marshfield, Maine; July 17, 1941 to April 06, 1967

MEDWAY Corporal; A TRP, 3RD SQDN, 5TH CAVALRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Medway, Maine; May 29, 1951 to September 28, 1971

Theodore Daniel Bernard, Specialist Four; C CO, 3RD BN, 60TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Mexico, Maine; November 22, 1947 to March 15, 1968

Edward J. Boivin, Specialist Four; 506TH SIG DET, 362ND SIG CO, 39TH SIG BN, 2ND SIG GROUP, 1ST SIGNAL BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Mexico, Maine; August 09, 1945 to November 24, 1966 Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 28TH INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Mexico, Maine; March 22, 1938 to January 14, 1967

50 • MAINE SENIORS

NEW SHARON George Leroy Bailey,

Petty Officer First Class; PBR-36, RIVPATGRP 62, TF 116, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; Madison, Maine; February 23, 1941 to October 06, 1970

Sergeant; C CO, 1ST BN, 502ND INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Mars Hill, Maine; August 29, 1944 to June 15, 1968

Private First Class; B CO, 2ND BN, 501ST INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Milo, Maine; April 26, 1947 to April 22, 1968

MEXICO

Roger Paul Gallant, Staff

Arthur James Hoyt,

Warrant Officer; 175TH AHC, 13TH AVN BN, 164TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Milo, Maine; November 11, 1948 to January 18, 1969

Henry Albert Heal Jr, Bernard Louis Coro,

Edward William Withee,

MARS HILL

James Earl Ellingson,

Frederick Raymond Milledge, Specialist Four; D CO, 1ST ENG BN, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Mexico, Maine; December 07, 1945 to July 09, 1968

Specialist Five; G TRP, 2ND SQDN, 11TH ARMORED CAVALRY, USARV; Army of the United States; New Sharon, Maine; October 25, 1946 to December 30, 1968

NEWPORT Donald Sidney Skidgel, Sergeant; D TRP, 1ST SQDN, 9TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Newport, Maine; October 13, 1948 to September 14, 1969

NEWRY Alonzo William Wight, Specialist Five; B TRP, 2ND SQDN, 1ST CAVALRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Newry, Maine; January 23, 1948 to February 22, 1969

NORTH LEEDS Morris Dominique Gagnon, Staff Sergeant; 2ND PLT, B CO, 1ST BN, 5TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; North Leeds, Maine; July 24, 1936 to June 21, 1967


NORTH NEW PORTLAND

OLD TOWN

Maurice J. Nile, Private; A CO, 1ST BN, 12TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; North New Portland, Maine; February 20, 1947 to August 22, 1967

NORTH WATERBORO Lloyd Burton Haskell Jr, Staff Sergeant; B CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; North Waterboro, Maine; July 21, 1934 to July 17, 1966

Charles Robert Coiley, Private First Class; D CO, 4TH BN, 503RD INFANTRY, ; 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Old Town, Maine; January 27, 1952 to November 30, 1970

Specialist Four; B CO, 5TH BN, 46TH INFANTRY, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Norway, Maine; March 15, 1945 to August 31, 1969

Captain; 118TH AHC, 145TH AVN BN, ARMY AVN GROUP (PROV),; US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Old Town, Maine; February 25, 1940 to June 10, 1965;

Raymond Ronald Sproul, Staff Sergeant; 537TH PERS SVC CO, ARMY SPT CMD SAIGON,; 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Old Town, Maine; June 04, 1945 to February 23, 1968

ORONO

OAKLAND Leland Eddy Lofstrom, Lance Corporal; L CO, 3RD BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Oakland, Maine; September 10, 1949 to May 15, 1968

Victor M. Plourde, Specialist Four; B CO, 2ND BN, 506TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Oakland, Maine; June 01, 1949 to August 28, 1968

OGUNQUIT Lyle Gibson Brooks,

Sergeant; B TRP, 3RD SQDN, 4TH CAVALRY,; 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Paris, Maine; June 30, 1944 to September 01, 1966

PATTEN Leslie Arthur Dickinson Jr, Second Lieutenant; G CO, 2ND BN, 7TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Patten, Maine; February 01, 1945 to February 03, 1968; (Incident Date January 30, 1968)

PEAKS ISLAND Bernard Francis Morrill, Technical Sergeant; 310TH TAC ALFT SQDN, 315TH TAC ALFT WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Peaks Island, Maine; July 03, 1934 to August 10, 1970

PERHAM Larry Joseph Nadeau,

Private; B CO, 2ND BN, 503RD INFANTRY,; 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Orono, Maine; August 11, 1947 to January 02, 1966

Clayton Edward Savoy, Sergeant First Class; ADV TEAM 92, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; Orono, Maine; March 04, 1941 to May 29, 1970

ORRINGTON Thomas Collins Shea,

Major; ADV TEAM 99, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; Ogunquit, Maine; May 06, 1936 to September 29, 1968

George R. Reynolds Jr,

Walter Louis Hall,

NORWAY Laurence Arthur Millett,

PARIS

Staff Sergeant; B CO, 8TH SPT BN, 196TH INFANTRY BDE,; USARV; Army of the United States; Orrington, Maine; April 24, 1934 to January 12, 1967

Dellwyn Allen Fitch, Corporal; B CO, 2ND BN, 501ST INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Perham, Maine; April 25, 1948 to April 11, 1968

PERRY Donald Hermon Trott, Private First Class; CAP 1-4-5, CACO 1-4, 1ST CAG, COMBINED ACTION, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Perry, Maine; December 23, 1950 to October 14, 1969

PITTSFIELD Burns Winship Knowlton Jr, Private First Class; G CO, 2ND BN, 7TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Pittsfield, Maine; August 15, 1947 to September 24, 1966 NOVEMBER 2019 • 51


SPECIAL SECTION

Donald Bing Dean, Private First Class; 1ST PLT, E CO, 1ST RECON BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Portland, Maine; March 29, 1948 to January 26, 1969;

PLYMOUTH Tarry Thomas O’Reilly, Warrant Officer; 281ST AHC, 10TH AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP,; 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Plymouth, Maine; May 30, 1949 to February 10, 1970; (Incident Date February 06, 1970)

PORTLAND Dennis Knute Blain, Private First Class; A CO, 101ST AVN BN, 160TH AVN GROUP, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; September 01, 1947 to September 25, 1968;

Norman Edward Colosanti, Private First Class; C CO, 2ND BN, 1ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; August 08, 1944 to January 05, 1968

Leslie Lee Craney, Private First Class; F CO, 2ND BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Portland, Maine; May 20, 1948 to April 03, 1968

Edward Joseph Darcy, Chief Master Sergeant; DET 1 (NHA TRANG), 314TH TAC ALFT WING, 13TH AF; United States Air Force; Portland, Maine; June 19, 1938 to April 27, 1978; (Incident Date December 29, 1967);

52 • MAINE SENIORS

Rocco Diphillipo, Sergeant; C CO, 2ND BN, 327TH INFANTRY, ; 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; January 14, 1950 to March 14, 1971

John Everett Duffy, Captain; 20TH TAC AIR SPT SQDN,; 504TH TAC AIR SPT GROUP, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Portland, Maine; January 23, 1946 to June 29, 1978; (Incident Date April 04, 1970)

Paul Everett Getchell, Lieutenant Colonel; 8TH BOMB SQDN, 35TH TAC FTR WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Portland, Maine; October 12, 1936 to March 21, 1979; (Incident Date January 13, 1969)

John Norman Huntley,

Maine; October 02, 1946 to April 07, 1968; (Incident Date April 02, 1968)

Thomas William Loughran, Specialist Four; HHC, 2ND BN, 28TH INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; October 25, 1946 to January 22, 1969

Lester Earl MacDonald, Sergeant; RECON PLT, HHC, 1ST BN, 327TH INFANTRY,; 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; March 18, 1941 to June 08, 1966

Richard Lee Matthews, Private First Class; G CO, 2ND BN, 7TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Portland, Maine; August 08, 1949 to November 21, 1968

James Michael McDonough, Captain; A CO, 2ND BN, 35TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; November 29, 1939 to August 02, 1966

William Frank Olsen,

Private First Class; 57TH AHC, 52ND AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; March 01, 1951 to September 27, 1969

Specialist Four; A CO, 20TH ENG BN, 937TH ENG GROUP, 18TH ENG BDE, USARV ENG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; April 12, 1948 to July 16, 1969

Lawrence Lano, Specialist

Lawrence William Shay, Jr, Lance Corporal; D CO,

Five; 57TH MED DET, 68TH MED GROUP, 44TH MED BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; September 26, 1946 to October 29, 1967

John H. Libby, Sergeant; A BTRY, 6TH BN, 15TH ARTILLERY, 23RD ARTY GROUP, II FIELD FORCE, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland,

1ST BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Portland, Maine; September 23, 1941 to June 15, 1966

James Allen Smith, Corporal; HHC, 26TH ENG BN, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; March 11, 1944 to May 23, 1968


Harold Ellsworth Southard, Private First Class; A CO, 1ST BN, 27TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; June 11, 1943 to June 24, 1967

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Paul Lewis Stimpson, First Lieutenant; 118TH AHC, 145TH AVN BN, 12TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; October 05, 1942 to April 22, 1967

Philip William Strout, Specialist Four; RT SAW, CCS, MACV-SOG, 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; March 14, 1948 to May 23, 1969

Robert Allan Turner, Petty Officer Second Class; H&S CO, 2ND BN, 26TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Navy; Portland, Maine; March 26, 1944 to May 18, 1967

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Wilbur Joseph Vachon III, Warrant Officer; HHC, 16TH AVN GROUP, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; September 05, 1947 to July 17, 1969; (Incident Date July 10, 1969)

Stephen John Whipple, Private First Class; A CO, 2ND BN, 22ND INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; December 11, 1948 to December 15, 1967

Robert Gregory Williamson, Private First Class; A CO, 3RD BN, 8TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Portland, Maine; June 28, 1946 to November 10, 1966

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SPECIAL SECTION

Donald Lewis Mansfield,

QUIMBY Joseph R L Blair, Staff Sergeant; DET A-244 (DAK TO), B CO; 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Quimby, Maine; March 13, 1943 to

PRESQUE ISLE Richard Berube, Specialist Five; 539TH TRANS CO, 34TH GS GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Presque Isle, Maine; February 25, 1945 to October 14, 1967

Thomas Grant Lovley, Specialist Four; C TRP, 1ST SQDN, 11TH ARMORED CAVALRY, USARV; Army of the United States; Presque Isle, Maine; October 31, 1944 to March 02, 1970

Raymond Nelson Pelkey, Specialist Four; A TRP, 3RD SQDN, 5TH CAVALRY,; 5TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Presque Isle, Maine; September 06, 1946 to February 01, 1970

Steven Lindsey Porter, Private First Class; 1ST PLT, E CO, 2ND BN, 1ST MARINES,; 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Presque Isle, Maine; March 01, 1950 to July 09, 1969

James Rodney Sowers, Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 46TH INFANTRY,; AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Presque Isle, Maine; January 14, 1948 to May 12, 1969

Stuart Alan Woodman, Corporal; C BTRY, 2ND BN, 19TH ARTILLERY,; 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Presque Isle, Maine; October 18, 1943 to May 31, 1970 54 • MAINE SENIORS

Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 27TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Rockland, Maine; July 18, 1949 to April 13, 1968

Earle Eugene McAuliffe Jr, Petty Officer Second

June 14, 1967

RANDOLPH Stephen Paul Schriver, Specialist Five; 544TH TRANS CO, 80TH GS GROUP, ARMY SPT CMD DANANG, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Randolph, Maine; October 12, 1950 to October 22, 1970

RANGELEY Dale Ryan Buxton, Private First Class; F CO, 2ND BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Rangeley, Maine; March 10, 1952 to August 01, 1970

Neil Brooks Taylor, Lieutenant (junior grade); VA-192, CVW-19, USS BON HOMME RICHARD, TF 77, 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; Rangeley, Maine; July 18, 1940 to September 14, 1965

ROCKLAND Anthony John Gustin, Sergeant First Class; B BTRY, 2ND BN, 33RD ARTILLERY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Rockland, Maine; August 09, 1929 to July 07, 1966

Malcolm Pierce Libbey, Staff Sergeant; ADV TEAM 86, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; Rockland, Maine; July 02, 1930 to October 12, 1967

Class; VF-74, CVW-17, USS FORRESTAL, TF 77, 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; Rockland, Maine; October 12, 1945 to July 29, 1967

Linwood Preston Rickards, GYSGT; VMFA-314, MAG-13, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Rockland, Maine; September 10, 1924 to July 09, 1968

Lynn Jordan Russell, Specialist Four; A CO, 2ND BN, 27TH INFANTRY,; 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Rockland, Maine; February 11, 1947 to November 05, 1966

ROCKPORT Fredrick Hazer Vester, Specialist Four; HHC, 2ND BN, 327TH INFANTRY,; 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Rockport, Maine; May 09, 1943 to June 21, 1966

RUMFORD Peter Lee Dube, Corporal; A CO, 2ND BN, 327TH INFANTRY; 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Rumford, Maine; March 04, 1947 to August 02, 1967

Thomas Bernard Ferguson, Second Lieutenant; D CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, ; 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps;


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SPECIAL SECTION

John Harold Cash, Jr, Corporal; B CO, 5TH TANK BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Sanford, Maine; June 20, 1949 to May 12, 1968

Rumford, Maine; January 14, 1943 to March 30, 1968; (Incident Date January 20, 1968)

Harry Everett Theriault, Corporal; D BTRY, 71ST ARTILLERY, 54TH ARTY GROUP,; II FIELD FORCE, USARV; Army of the United States; Rumford, Maine; May 14, 1949 to May 12, 1969

David Paul Thibodeau, Private First Class; HQ BTRY, 11TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Rumford, Maine; March 30, 1949 to July 19, 1968; SACO

Paul Leo Cyr, Private First Class; B CO, 4TH BN, 23RD INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Sanford, Maine; December 08, 1946 to April 29, 1967

Richard Paul Glaude, Corporal; CAP BRAVO-4, SVC CO, HQ BN, ; 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Sanford, Maine; June 06, 1948 to June 10, 1967; (Incident Date June 06, 1967)

Stephen Louis Bean, Private First Class; G CO, 2ND BN, 3RD MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Saco, Maine; November 21, 1949 to May 24, 1968

Paul Edward Belanger, Sergeant; 534TH TRANS CO, 7TH TRANS BN, 48TH TRANS GROUP, ; ARMY SPT CMD SAIGON, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Saco, Maine; October 24, 1946 to January 14, 1969

David Marius Duranceau, Lance Corporal; 1ST PLT, C CO, 1ST BN, 7TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Saco, Maine; December 28, 1948 to July 07, 1967

SANFORD David Harold Alexander, Specialist Four; A CO, 15TH ENG BN, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Sanford, Maine; January 18, 1948 to December 16, 1968 56 • MAINE SENIORS

Michael Richard Pickles, Chief Warrant Officer; D TRP, 1ST SQDN, 1ST CAVALRY, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Sanford, Maine; September 13, 1948 to April 27, 1970

SCARBOROUGH Robert John Smith, Airman First Class; 13TH TAC RECON SQDN, 13TH AF; United States Air Force; Scarborough, Maine; October 15, 1942 to June 25, 1965

SEBAGO LAKE Charles Norman Brown, Specialist Five; A TRP, 1ST SQDN, 4TH CAVALRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Sebago Lake, Maine; September 01, 1946 to July 11, 1967

SKOWHEGAN David Russell Bosworth, Specialist Four; C BTRY, 1ST BN, 30TH ARTILLERY, 41ST ARTY GROUP, I FIELD FORCE, USARV; Army of the United States;

Skowhegan, Maine; October 10, 1947 to February 20, 1968

Terry Charles Corson, Sergeant; D CO, 9TH ENG BN, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Skowhegan, Maine; October 14, 1947 to September 08, 1968

Joseph Ralph Foss, Specialist Five; 145TH AIRLIFT PLT, 52ND AVN BN,; US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Skowhegan, Maine; October 24, 1936 to April 05, 1965

Joseph G L Quirion, Corporal; D CO, 2ND BN, 35TH INFANTRY; 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Skowhegan, Maine; February 26, 1949 to April 03, 1968

Allen Lea Ward, Private First Class; F CO, 2ND BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Skowhegan, Maine; April 22, 1948 to August 13, 1968; (Incident Date August 06, 1968

Clyde William Withee, Private; C CO, 2ND BN, 2ND INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Skowhegan, Maine; March 30, 1945 to February 25, 1966

SOUTH BERWICK James William Cleary, Private First Class; D CO, 4TH BN, 47TH INFANTRY, 9TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Berwick, Maine; December 05, 1948 to April 29, 1969


Raymond Lyn Collier, First Lieutenant; ADV TEAM 87, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; South Berwick, Maine; December 22, 1945 to May 23, 1969

SOUTH PARIS Paul Leroy Barker, Private First Class; 3RD PLT, D CO, 3RD BN, 21ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Paris, Maine; December 07, 1947 to May 03, 1968

Thanking all veterans for their service Honoring their legacies Remembering them in our prayers

Robert Enoch Foster Jr, Staff Sergeant; A CO, 1ST BN, 28TH INFANTRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Paris, Maine; June 06, 1930 to April 29, 1966

William Frederick Harrington, Specialist Four; D CO, 1ST BN, 12TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Paris, Maine; September 18, 1942 to February 08, 1968

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Martin Keith Niskanen, Captain; A CO, 1ST BN, 327TH INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Paris, Maine; March 30, 1944 to November 28, 1971

SOUTH PORTLAND James Alexander Baka, Specialist Four; B TRP, 1ST SQDN, ; 11TH ARMORED CAVALRY, USARV; Army of the United States; South Portland, Maine; February 12, 1948 to April 18, 1969

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NOVEMBER 2019 • 57


SPECIAL SECTION

SOUTHPORT Edward W. Tibbetts,

George Robert Darling, Seaman; USS TAUSSIG (DD-746), 7TH FLEET; United States Navy; South Portland, Maine; March 28, 1946 to June 16, 1966; (Incident Date June 11, 1966)

William Glen Ferguson Jr, Corporal; D CO, 3RD BN, 8TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Portland, Maine; September 13, 1947 to October 01, 1968

John Wayne Roberts, Private First Class; B CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; South Portland, Maine; March 05, 1949 to October 14, 1967

Robert Willard Tewksbury, Corporal; A CO, 1ST BN, 8TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; South Portland, Maine; May 31, 1947 to December 07, 1967

Christopher John Toppi, Corporal; M CO, 3RD BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; South Portland, Maine; July 07, 1949 to January 27, 1968

Daniel Paul Tuell, Private First Class; D CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; South Portland, Maine; November 25, 1946 to December 05, 1966

58 • MAINE SENIORS

STARKS Raymond Edward Sterry, Private First Class;

Specialist Four; C CO, 3RD BN, 12TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Southport, Maine; November 29, 1946 to May 25, 1975; (Incident Date January 20, 1968)

A CO, 2ND BN, 1ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Starks, Maine; November 08, 1947 to July 02, 1967

SPRINGFIELD

STOCKHOLM

Edward T. Russell,

Bennett Joseph Daigle,

Private; 11TH AVN CO (GS), 11TH AVN GROUP, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Springfield, Maine; May 29, 1945 to April 30, 1966

Sergeant; B CO, 2ND BN, 12TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Stockholm, Maine; March 12, 1950 to October 02, 1970

SPRINGVALE

STOCKTON SPRINGS

William Robert Batchelder, Private First Class; A CO, 82ND AVN BN, ARMY AVN GROUP (PROV), ; US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Springvale, Maine; October 21, 1945 to June 10, 1965

ST. AGATHA Richard Patrick Albert, Corporal; D CO, 2ND BN, 12TH INFANTRY, ; 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; St Agatha, Maine; March 17, 1948 to August 20, 1969

Fred Milton Ellis, Seaman; PBR-729, RIVDIV 535, TF 116, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; Stockton Springs, Maine; January 31, 1950 to December 29, 1969

Bradford Scott Nickerson, Private; I CO, 3RD BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Stockton Springs, Maine; March 18, 1946 to September 01, 1966

STONINGTON Donald Harold Bartlett,

STANDISH Blenn Colby Dyer, Lance Corporal; 2ND PLT, A CO, 3RD ENG BN, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Standish, Maine; June 01, 1944 to April 27, 1967

Specialist Four; A CO, 54TH SIG BN, I FIELD FORCE, USARV; Army of the United States; Stonington, Maine; February 09, 1948 to October 31, 1968

Leslie Clyde Hicks, Sergeant; C CO, 1ST BN, 46TH INFANTRY, AMERICAL DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Stonington, Maine; October 30, 1949 to March 02, 1971


THOMASTON Arthur James Elliot II, Lieutenant Commander; River Assault Squadron 5, TF 116, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; Thomaston, Maine; April 09, 1933 to December 29, 1968

Sayward Newton Hall Jr,

Clair Hall Thurston Jr, Second Lieutenant; 3RD PLT, B CO, 1ST BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Thorndike, Maine; June 20, 1943 to November 08, 1965

TURNER Petty Officer Third Class; H&S CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Navy; Turner, Maine; December 16, 1946 to May 29, 1968

THORNDIKE

UNION

Second Class; DET 5 VUNG RO BAY, IUWG-1, TF 115, USNAVFORV; United States Navy; Thorndike, Maine; November 02, 1939 to June 06, 1968

Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Union, Maine; December 05, 1945 to May 21, 1966

UNITY Arthur Albert Crowell,

Major; 119TH AHC, 52ND AVN BN,; US ARMY SPT CMD VIETNAM, MACV; Army of the United States; Thomaston, Maine; December 26, 1928 to April 21, 1965; (Incident Date February 07, 1965)

Norman Laforest McKenney, Petty Officer

John Roger Goderre,

Philip Sherwood Bryant,

Corporal; D CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Unity, Maine; January 01, 1947 to May 26, 1968

VAN BUREN Joseph David Fournier,

Gardner John Brown, Private First Class; A BTRY, 1ST BN, 77TH ARTILLERY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Union, Maine; October 13, 1949 to August 26, 1969

Private First Class; M CO, 3RD BN, 3RD MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Van Buren, Maine; May 07, 1950 to June 17, 1969

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NOVEMBER 2019 • 59


SPECIAL SECTION

James Gerard Pomerleau, Corporal; B

WATERBORO Harry Clifton Shepard Jr, Technical Sergeant; J B L Levesque, Colonel; HQ SQDN, 14TH SPECIAL OPS WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Van Buren, Maine; April 08, 1921 to March 26, 1969

19TH SPECIAL OPS SQDN, 315TH SPECIAL OPS WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Waterboro, Maine; December 03, 1937 to October 10, 1969

WATERVILLE George Belanger, Private

VEAZIE Hayward Carl Spencer, Specialist Four; ADV TEAM 3, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; Veazie, Maine; October 13, 1943 to March 11, 1967

VINALHAVEN Owen H Webster, Specialist Four; 196TH ASHC, 268TH AVN BN, 17TH AVN GROUP, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Vinalhaven, Maine; April 19, 1947 to March 12, 1969

WALDOBORO William Conrad Shuman, Specialist Four; B CO, 2ND BN, 12TH INFANTRY, 25TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Waldoboro, Maine; January 03, 1947 to October 07, 1968

William D. Soule, Staff Sergeant; D CO, 2ND BN, 1ST INFANTRY, 196TH INFANTRY BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Waldoboro, Maine; February 01, 1940 to August 21, 1967

60 • MAINE SENIORS

First Class; C CO, 4TH BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Waterville, Maine; April 26, 1947 to October 24, 1966;

Robert Leopold Clukey Jr, Specialist Five; HQ, 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Waterville, Maine; March 03, 1946 to June 17, 1967

Rodney Jerome Delisle, Private First Class; 2ND PLT, F CO, 2ND BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Waterville, Maine; February 02, 1950 to July 06, 1969

CO, 1ST BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Waterville, Maine; July 02, 1946 to April 24, 1967

Eldon Wayne Smith, Sergeant; HMM-262, MAG-39, 1ST MAW, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Waterville, Maine; July 13, 1947 to October 06, 1968

WELLS Wayne Robert Elkins, Private First Class; A CO, 70TH ENG BN, 35TH ENG GROUP, 18TH ENG BDE, USARV ENG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; Wells, Maine; March 18, 1946 to October 04, 1969

Stephen Francis Gray, Specialist Four; C CO, 2ND BN, 319TH ARTILLERY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Wells, Maine; September 26, 1950 to May 08, 1971

Miles Robert Gregoire,

Charles Homer Mills, Staff Sergeant; B TRP, 1ST SQDN, 4TH CAVALRY, 1ST INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Waterville, Maine; April 19, 1941 to June 30, 1966

Lawrence Vincent Peters, Staff Sergeant; SD-5891, HQ, MACV ADVISORS, MACV; Army of the United States; Waterville, Maine; September 23, 1932 to April 20, 1966

Sergeant; C CO, 1ST BN, 502ND INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Wells, Maine; July 03, 1949 to July 01, 1968

WEST FARMINGTON James Allen McKechnie, Specialist Four; B CO, 2ND BN, 8TH INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; West Farmington, Maine; April 16, 1947 to March 22, 1969


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NOVEMBER 2019 • 61


SPECIAL SECTION

Robert John Nadeau,

WEST PARIS Hollis Winfield Buck, Staff Sergeant; C CO, 1ST BN, 22ND INFANTRY, 4TH INF DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; West Paris, Maine; September 17, 1931 to April 27, 1968

Chester Lee Hopkins, Corporal; 2ND PLT, D CO, 1ST BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; West Paris, Maine; December 25, 1946 to May 12, 1967

Leon Lovell Poland, Jr, Private; B CO, 1ST MP BN, 1ST FORCE SVC RGT, FORCE LOG CMD, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; West Paris, Maine; December 01, 1946 to March 26, 1967

WEST PEMBROKE Zane Aubry Carter, Technical Sergeant; 459TH TAC ALFT SQDN, 483RD TAC ALFT WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; West Pembroke, Maine; December 25, 1930 to August 03, 1967

WESTBROOK Benedict Maher Davan, Staff Sergeant; DET A-504, HHC, 5TH SF GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Westbrook, Maine; February 10, 1946 to March 17, 1969

Raymond Elton Leighton, Sergeant; L CO, 3RD BN, 7TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Westbrook, Maine; September 29, 1940 to March 21, 1966 62 • MAINE SENIORS

Staff Sergeant; I TRP, 3RD SQDN, 11TH ARMORED CAVALRY, USARV; Army of the United States; Westbrook, Maine; February 03, 1949 to November 25, 1969

Donald Myrick Russell, Colonel; 333RD TAC FTR SQDN, 355TH TAC FTR WING, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Westbrook, Maine; December 28, 1931 to December 05, 1967

WESTFIELD Keith Dobson Allen, Jr, Warrant Officer; A TRP, 7TH SQDN, 1ST CAVALRY, 1ST AVIATION BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; Westfield, Maine; December 09, 1946 to April 13, 1969

WINTHROP William Stephen Sanders, Captain; 23RD TAC AIR SPT SQDN, 504TH TAC AIR SPT GROUP, 7TH AF; United States Air Force; Winthrop, Maine; April 27, 1943 to June 30, 1970

YARMOUTH Robert White Boyd, First Lieutenant; TECH INTEL DET, 519TH MI BN, 525TH MI GROUP, USARV; Army of the United States; Yarmouth, Maine; November 03, 1943 to October 13, 1967

Douglas Emerson Googins Jr, Private First Class; A CO, 1ST BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Yarmouth, Maine; May 10, 1949 to January 14, 1968

WILTON

Clinton Eugene Tibbetts, Bard Elton Davenport,

Warrant Officer; C TRP, 1ST SQDN, 9TH CAVALRY, 1ST CAV DIV, USARV; Army of the United States; Wilton, Maine; December 16, 1946 to March 27, 1969

WINSLOW

Technical Sergeant; 393RD BOMB SQDN, 4133RD BOMB WING (P), SAC; United States Air Force; Yarmouth, Maine; January 22, 1926 to July 28, 1969

YORK Ronald Allen Parsons,

Carlton Andrew Frost, Private First Class; D CO, 1ST BN, 4TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Winslow, Maine; February 19, 1948 to May 19, 1968

Robert Richard Roy, Corporal; G CO, 2ND BN, 9TH MARINES, 3RD MARDIV, III MAF; United States Marine Corps; Winslow, Maine; January 30, 1946 to February 04, 1966

Private First Class; C CO, 1ST BN, 503RD INFANTRY, 173RD ABN BDE, USARV; Army of the United States; York, Maine; July 03, 1944 to December 24, 1967; (Incident Date November 11, 1967)

Robert B. Young, Specialist Four; 2ND SECURITY CO, 10TH TRANS BN, 124TH TRANS CMD,; ARMY SPT CMD CAM RANH BAY, 1ST LOG CMD, USARV; Army of the United States; York, Maine; July 04, 1949 to April 22, 1971


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NOVEMBER 2019 • 63


GUEST ARTICLE

Ready for Recession?

JOEL WEST Financial Advisor

T

his year, with increasing frequency, investors have been getting bombarded with negative news headlines regarding an impending recession. The implication, of course, is that if a recession happens, the financial markets are likely to be negatively affected. With headlines like these, who wouldn’t be concerned?

“Why Does a Yield Curve Inversion Suggest a Recession?” 1 64 • MAINE SENIORS

“The trade war hasn’t hit its peak yet. The US and China will both pay a heavy price” 2

These two headlines are a small sampling of the negative news at the present time. These types of headlines are very troubling to investors and money managers alike. It’s an almost certainty we will experience a recession in the future. However, barring something major and unexpected, we do not think we will experience a recession in the

PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK.COM / ELNUR

BY THOMAS DUFF President, Duff & Associates Branch Manager, RJFS

Not quite yet...


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GET TICKETS! next twelve months. Although there has been much ado about ‘yield curve inversions’, the correct definition of one, and its subsequent predictability of recession is dubious at best. In our opinion, recent yield curve inversions are a reflection of asset repricing given unexpected cuts in the federal funds rate and are not indicating recession at this time. Given the complexity of

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Thomas Duff, President, Duff & Associates Branch Manager, RJFS

the topic we would refer interested readers to a link at the end of this article, which we believe provides a good overview of the topic.3 Certainly, the ongoing trade disputes have had a negative impact on our economy. Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the measure of our combined productivity, has declined from approximately 3% in 2018, then to approximately 2% in 2019, a level where we have mostly been for the past several years. A slowing indeed, but hardly recessionary at this time.4 In September, the US Census Bureau released the 2018 edition of Income and Poverty in the United States. This recent report reflects unemployment at generational lows, rising wages, low poverty, and approximately 2.3 million more fulltime workers in the workforce in 2018 than the year before.5 The U.S. consumer is currently strong and, in our view, reflects a strong underlying economy. Legendar y investor, Sir John Templeton is credited with the quote “Bull markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, rise on optimism and die in euphoria.” We feel the investing collective is currently at ‘skepticism’ and believe the economy and the equity markets will continue to rise over the long term and that the odds of an impending recession remain low. We’d also like to thank our Veterans, both living and past. https://seekingalpha.com/ article/4293622-yield-curve-inversion-suggest-recession

1

Joel West, Financial Advisor

66 • MAINE SENIORS

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/04/ perspectives/china-trade-warweather/index.html

2

PHOTOS: (THIS PAGE) COURTESY DUFF & ASSOCIATES; (OPPOSITE) ADOBESTOCK.COM / AFRICA STUDIO

GUEST ARTICLE


Let us never forget that the true cost of our national freedom can be measured with great loss and bloodshed from countless individuals who were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice. Indeed, Some Gave All and All Gave Some. Let us never forget that the true cost of our national freedom can be measured with great loss and bloodshed from countless individuals who were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice. Any information is not a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision and does not constitute a recommendation. Any opinions are as of September 14, 2019 and are those of Thomas Duff and Joel West and not necessarily those of RJFS or Raymond James. Links are being provided for information purposes only. Raymond James is not

affiliated with and does not endorse, authorize or sponsor any of the listed websites or their respective sponsors. Raymond James is not responsible for the content of any website or the collection or use of information regarding any website’s users and/ or members. Duff and Associates,470 N Main St, Brewer Maine 04412, 207-989-6082. Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through Raymond James Financial Services Advisors, Inc. Duff and Associated is not a registered broker dealer and is independent of Raymond James Financial Services.

https://www.franklintempleton.com/investor/article?contentPath=html/ftthinks/ en-us-retail/cio-views/on-my-mind-yield-curve-hysteria.html&gclid=Cj0KCQjww7H sBRDkARIsAARsIT7uhCuAT3nd74f-GJblZgq1tTbI7EZacOtk7zuCBnFeuCWe7OrlyBMaAvG8EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

3

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A gift subscription to MAINE SENIORS makes it easy! Send their name and mailing address and your check for $29.95 to MAINE SENIORS Magazine 91 Camden St., Ste 403, Rockland, ME 04841

https://www.thebalance.com/us-economic-outlook-3305669

4

https://www.americanactionforum.org/insight/understanding-the-2018-income-andpoverty-in-the-united-states-report/

5

NOVEMBER 2019 • 67


THERE’S SOMETHING

in the Leaves HERE WE ARE IN

NOVEMBER, AND WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED? by Daniel Dunkle

M

ost of you will have cleared the leaves by now. I got out there with my son a year or two ago, at about this time, and he was fussing a bit about being away from his screens. I said, “Just breathe that fresh fall air!” and sucked in a lungful. Then I started having a coughing fit. He thought that was pretty funny. Every year, Christine and I have the same argument about what to do with the leaves. “You know, the city will come

around and get them if you just rake them into piles at the edge of the lawn.” I don’t know when the city’s coming and by the time they get here, some kid will have gone stomping around in the leaves and spread them all over the place. I’d like to get one of those creatures from the trash compactor in Star Wars to lie under my leaves. Then someone comes stomping in there and it just swallows them. Just kidding, I wouldn’t wish them

harm. Aside from that, you’d have to get young people outside, in daylight, away from their phones for a second, to have one jump in your leaf pile. I would probably find the sight refreshing. Anyway, I just haul them all down back and throw them on the pile in the willy-whacks along with the leaves from the past 20 years. That pile reminds me of “The Great Trash Heap” from Fraggle Rock. Only this one doesn’t share any wisdom. The whole time I’m doing it, I’m wondering how many ticks I’ll get. Even so, I get a certain satisfaction knowing the pile annoys Christine. It won’t be long until it’s time for Thanksgiving. We usually invite family over for the celebration these days. This is great fun, trying to figure out which of the 80 identical frozen birds in the freezer is best. My theory is and always has been: whichever one looks

PHOTO: ADOBESTOCK.COM / ALEKSANDR MATVEEV

HUMOR

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biggest is the best one. Christine, of course, wants to turn it into a mathematical equation. “We have 13 people coming, and it’s a pound and a half per person, so that’s about a 20-pound turkey once you round up.” About halfway through her sentence I’ve dropped a 25-pounder in the cart. Then you have the suspense. Will the bird actually thaw out in time for the big day? Oh boy! Nothing like reaching in there for guts and turkey neck and slicing yourself up on a blade of ice. Then the debate resumes, this time about the stuffing. “You’re not supposed to put it in the bird anymore.” “It’s in the name. Stuffing!” “It can make you sick.” “I had it in the bird every year the whole time I was growing up and didn’t get sick.” “You’re going to jinx us.” Christine and I both fully subscribe to the view that if you talk about a potential health problem out loud, God will hear you, and you are more likely to develop that problem. Theologians, please contact me with the chapter and verse to back this up. The meal commences with squash, turnip, sweet potatoes with melted marshmallows, and quarts of homemade gravy. It continues with my mom complimenting me as we work on the gravy. “Oh Danny, you have lovely drippings!” Indeed, I do. And all of it, in my opinion, is a preamble to the main event: pies. Choices include pumpkin, Toll House, mincemeat, and on and on. And of course, these days there’s always someone who can’t eat something. By now, you’ve already dirtied every dish in the house, including the good china (which usually just sits

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around gathering dust, still ringing ever so slightly with the songs from the wedding reception and generating guilt from some “thank you” note never written), in comes some relative with a whole second meal, all organic, free-range certified, in its own wad of hypoallergenic tinfoil. And then, just as you’re about to dig in, someone says, “Let’s go around and all say what we’re thankful for.” After

you’re done feeding them to the leafpile monster from Star Wars, you get to dig in, thankful to be done being thankful. By the time it’s all over and the pant buttons are all undone, December is on the breeze, and you suddenly remember what you’re thankful for as you confirm that no, you will not be getting up at 3 a.m. for Black Friday. That’s right, you’re thankful someone invented online shopping. NOVEMBER 2019 • 69


OUTDOORS

IMPRESS THEM WITH

Amaryllis

RING IN THE HOLIDAYS WITH COLOR AND STYLE

WITH ONE OF THE MOST IMPRESSIVE FLOWERS YOU’LL EVER GROW — AMARYLLIS. by Lynette L. Walther

70 • MAINE SENIORS

also make thoughtful gifts for anyone who enjoys the beauty of flowers. PLANTING AMARYLLIS Plant amaryllis bulbs in individual pots, or group several bulbs together in a larger container. Pots should have drainage holes on the bottom so excess water can drain out, and the roots do not get waterlogged. To plant a single bulb, select a pot that is seven to eight-inches deep and five to six-inches across. Place several inches of potting soil in the bottom of the pot. The bulb will eventually fill this space with its roots. Position the bulb on top of the soil and gently add more soil around the sides. The top third of the bulb should be exposed and sit above the soil surface. Cover the soil surface with moss or decorative stones if desired. Water well after planting and put the pot in a cool, sunny location. From then on, water sparingly, keeping the soil barely moist. Amaryllis bulbs may also be grown without soil. Fill a vase or watertight pot with about five inches of pebbles

PHOTOS: LYNETTE L. WALTHER

T

hese easy-to-grow sub-tropical bulbs produce huge, trumpetshaped blossoms that can measure up to eight inches across. They come in amazing colors, from velvety red through pink, peach, white and even pale green in single and double blooms. Grow them for your own holiday decorations or give them as spectacular blooming gifts. Amaryllis are tropical plants that are winter hardy in Zones 9-12. Here in Florida the bulbs are planted indoors, where they will bloom between November and April. Planting one now will ensure holiday blooms. According to Longfield Gardens, when you purchase an amaryllis bulb, it already contains everything that’s needed to produce a living bouquet of big, beautiful flowers. All you need to do is plant the bulb and water sparingly. There are dozens of gorgeous amaryllis varieties, each with its own unique color and style. Growing a few different varieties is the best way to discover your favorites. And, since the bulbs are so easy to grow, amaryllis


or coarse stone. Add just enough water to cover the stones. Position the bulb on top of the stones so the water is barely touching the bottom of the bulb. Add more pebbles or stones around the bulb to help anchor it, leaving the top third of the bulb exposed. Add more water, as water evaporates or is absorbed by the developing roots, keeping the level just below the base of the bulb. It can take a month or more for an amaryllis bulb to wake up and start growing. Timing depends on the variety and when the bulb is planted. Bulbs that are planted in the fall usually take longer to bloom than bulbs planted in winter. When the first sprout emerges from the top of the bulb, start watering more frequently. In most cases, the stem will emerge first, and the leaves will appear a couple weeks later. Turn the pot occasionally to keep the stem growing straight. Once the flowers begin to open, move the pot out of direct sunlight and keep the plant as cool as possible to extend the show. To display your amaryllis flowers in a vase, wait until the buds are fully formed and then cut the stems to whatever length desired. As the flowers fade, use scissors to snip them off. Once the entire stem has finished flowering, cut it back to just above the bulb. Most amaryllis bulbs will send up a second or even a third stem with additional flowers. All the stems may emerge at approximately the same time, or the bulb may rest for a week or two in between. AFTERCARE FOR AMARYLLIS There two options when amaryllis bulbs have finished flowering: either discard the bulbs and purchase new ones next year, or keep the bulbs

Top Left: Amaryllis papilio, also called butterfly amaryllis, has stunning blooms. Middle Left: Holliday cheer abounds with the gorgeous double blooms of this amaryllis. Bottom Left: Plant amaryllis bulbs now for holiday decorating or special gifts. Above: It all begins with a big bulb that can be planted now to provide handsome blooms for holiday displays. Then keep your bulbs growing for next year’s celebrations.

growing until they are ready to flower again next winter. To save the bulb for next year, here’s what to do: Once the flowers have faded, cut off the stem(s) so they are about one inch above the top of the bulb. Continue watering as needed to keep the soil barely moist. The bulb will send out long, strappy leaves that will grow for several months and produce the energy the bulb requires to form next year’s blossoms. Fertilize monthly, using a standard liquid houseplant fertilizer. When spring arrives and the weather has settled (several weeks after any danger of frost), put the pot outdoors in a partially shaded location. Or plant the bulb directly in the garden. Be sure to keep the bulb partially out of the soil and avoid overwatering. Care for the amaryllis

by watering and fertilizing as needed. The bigger and fatter the bulb gets, the more flowers it will produce. When fall approaches (and before any danger of frost), lift the bulb or bring the pot indoors. Put it in a cool, relatively dark place (garage or basement) and stop watering. This will tell the bulb that it’s time to rest and initiate flower formation. After six weeks, gently remove the bulb from the pot and pull off any dry leaves. Replant the bulb in fresh potting soil, and care for it as you would a newly purchased bulb. LYNETTE L. WALTHER is a four-time recipient of the GardenComm’s Silver Award of Achievement and the National Garden Bureau’s Exemplary Journalism Award. Her gardens are in Camden. NOVEMBER 2019 • 71


GUEST ARTICLE

Harold Norton, Volunteer

72 • MAINE SENIORS

PHOTO: ????

Volunteering at


Togus VA VOLUNTEERS FIND GIVING BACK IS ITS OWN REWARD by Sarah E. Reynolds

“I

t’s pretty surprising that I’m still growing at 70 years old,” said Harold “Butch” Norton, of Pittston. He has found personal growth and camaraderie as a volunteer at Togus VA Medical Center in Augusta. Butch served a tour of duty as an aircraft mechanic with the Air Force in Thailand during the Vietnam War, he said. His wife died a couple of years ago and he needed something to do, so he started volunteering at Togus in early 2019. Another reason he chose the VA hospital as a place to volunteer, he said, was that he had cancer five years ago and, “Togus got me through that time.” He finds his volunteer service, driving a shuttle van and transporting patients from one hospital department to another via wheelchair, rewarding because “it’s pretty amazing the appreciation they show for us helping them.” He also enjoys getting to know the other volunteers and hearing their stories. After surviving cancer, he said, he feels the rest of his life is “a bonus,” and has found himself more able to take risks and do things he might not

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GUEST ARTICLE

have thought he could before. Butch’s fellow volunteer Terry Washburn of Union, a 40-year veteran of the military who did two tours in Vietnam as an Army pilot and later spent more than 30 years in the Navy, drives veterans to their appointments at Togus in a program sponsored by Disabled American Veterans. He’s been a driver for six years. He explained that the VA maintains the shuttles, while the DAV supplies the vehicles and drivers and funds a person to coordinate the rides and 74 • MAINE SENIORS

take care of paperwork. The program provides around 6,000 rides a year to Maine veterans, he said. Terry said he grew up in Minnesota, and learned the importance of service from his parents and grandparents. His father is a veteran of World War II, and benefited from a similar ride service to the one Terry drives for. Although his mother is able to drive, he said, when his parents got signed up for the shuttle service for his father’s medical appointments, “all of a sudden, there

was no stress.” Besides getting transportation to an appointment, though, the veterans Terry drives get a sort of rolling informal support group. He makes a point of introducing his passengers to each other every time he drives, and soon enough, the vets are sharing stories and experiences, which, he said, is healing in itself. He appreciates the chance to get to know these men and women who served before him, and the opportunity to help them. To Terry, the reward is “when

PHOTOS: (ABOVE) UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT WORK; (OPPOSITE)???

Maine VA Medical Center, Augusta, Maine


you see the difference it makes.” Finally, we want to welcome new Veterans Affairs Maine Healthcare Systems Director Tracye Davis, who was named to the position in April. She is responsible for overseeing the treatment of about 43,000 veterans with an annual operating budget of more than $350 million, according to reports published at the time of her hiring. She replaces Ryan Lilly, who is now director of Veterans Integrated Service Network 1, overseeing VA in New England.  To volunteer, call or visit the Togus VAMC Voluntary Service Office. Call (207) 621-4886 or toll free: 1-877-421-8263 x 4886. Visit us at the Voluntary Service Office, Building 205, 3rd Floor, VA Center, Augusta, ME 04330. Email: VAVSMaine@va.gov

Tracye Davis Veterans Affairs Maine Healthcare Systems Director

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NOVEMBER 2019 • 75


FEATURED RECIPE

French Chicken

by Mary Frances Barstow

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 cup sour cream

1/4 cup leeks, chopped

1 tablespoon Grey Poupon mustard

2 tablespoons butter, melted

1/4 cup butter

1/2 cup white wine

1/4 cup flour

3/4 cup water

2 1/2 to 3 cups cooked chicken, in bite-size pieces

3/4 cup heavy cream

1/2 tsp pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: Prepare mushrooms and leeks and sauté in butter in a good-sized skillet for a few minutes until leeks are wilted. Remove vegetables to a bowl and wipe pan clean. In a saucepan combine wine, water, cream, sour cream and mustard. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer. Melt the second amount of butter (1/4 cup) in a skillet, and whisk in flour and pepper. Cook roux one minute and remove from heat. Slowly add boiling wine-cream mixture, whisking constantly to prevent lumps from forming. Fold in cooked chicken and vegetables. Serve immediately or reheat at 350 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes. Serves 4 to 5. NOTE: This incredible dish can be served in individual casserole dishes accompanied by white rice and green salad. My preference is serving it with linguine pasta.

Yum Yum!

76 • MAINE SENIORS

PHOTOS: (ABOVE, TOP & MIDDLE LEFT) MARY FRANCES BARSTOW; (MIDDLE & BOTTOM LEFT) SHUTTERSTOCK

8 to 10 medium mushrooms, sliced


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Become a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) and give a voice to children in need. We hope you can join us for our volunteer training on March 17-20, 2020.

Please contact us at casa@courts.maine.gov or 207-213-2865 for more information.

NOVEMBER 2019 • 77


CROSSWORD

November Crossword

ACROSS 1 “Lorna Doone” character 5 Sinbad’s bird 8 Demolish: Brit. 12 Idea (Fr.) 13 Alas 14 Cheese 15 Leg ends 16 Burmese knife 17 Taro 18 Small S.A. rabbit 20 Pilgrim 22 Skin vesicle 23 Veneration 24 Beginning 28 Blaubok 32 Public vehicle 33 54 (Rom. numeral)

78 • MAINE SENIORS

35 Israelite tribe 36 Ringed boa 39 Reading desk 42 Abdominal (abbr.) 44 Have (Scot.) 45 Female falcon 48 Butterfly 52 State (Fr.) 53 Television channel 55 Endearment 56 Mine (Fr. 2 words) 57 Rom. first day of the month 58 Per. poet 59 Maid 60 Compass direction 61 Foreign (pref.)

DOWN 1 Breach 2 Design 3 Profound 4 Hate 5 Fanatical 6 Wood Sorrel 7 Rudderfish 8 Flat molding 9 “Cantique de Noel” composer 10 Kemo _____ 11 Turk. title 19 Jap. fish 21 Intimidate 24 Amazon tributary 25 Grab 26 Kwa language 27 “____ Abner” 29 “Fables in Slang”

author 30 Rhine tributary 31 Television channel 34 Car 37 Insect 38 Presidential nickname 40 Helper 41 Caddy (2 words) 43 Male duck 45 Loyal 46 Hindu soul 47 Cella 49 Crippled 50 Dayak people 51 Aeronautical (abbr.) 54 Low (Fr.) Answers on page 80


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AdviceFROM MARY & JIMMY so that I don’t blurt out, “Dancing really sucks! Let’s go over to the bar and do some shots!” Right, Fred? Right?

Mary & Jimmy QUESTION: I am 80-years old. When my lady friend and I go dancing, I’m getting short of breath. I worry that she may start looking for a younger dance partner. What do you suggest?  — Fred MARY’S ADVICE: Dear Fred. I think your lady friend needs one thing -- And that is you! Just dance more slow dances, and hold her tight. Sing to her as you dance, and then give up some of the fast dances to hold her hand. She might be getting tired too!

JIMMY’S ADVICE: I’m getting tired of your story. Why? Because I think you’re like me – you really don’t even like to dance, right? Right? Because dancing isn’t that much fun, right? I get out of breath too. And why? Because I’m holding my breath in …

80 • MAINE SENIORS

QUESTION: I have a wicked sweet tooth, but my doctor says that my ticker won’t last much longer unless I cut out the sweets. I can’t resist snacking on Dorman’s ice cream every night. It’s so delicious that I’m finding it hard to quit. HELP!  —Kendrick MARY’S ADVICE: First, Kendrick, I suggest you do not buy the Dorman’s Ice Cream anymore. Secondly, I suggest that you throw out any that you have. You may consider buying some great flavored chewing gum, sugar-free. Or even try some of the amazing sugar-free ice creams. You can do this, Kendrick. Just keep telling yourself you can do this.

JIMMY’S ADVICE:

Nah. You can’t do this, Kendrick. You can’t. It’s Dorman’s! Give up! We all know that all those frozen yogurt containers in your freezers are stuffed with Dorman’s … and you know it too! Stop dreaming and get your affairs in order. Or? Eat a big can of sliced black olives right now. Eat them all! You’ll be cured of ice cream before half of the can is gone … guaranteed.

QUESTION: I go out to eat once a week with my friends. I’m gaining weight, so I try to eat healthily and skip dessert. My friends “poo-poo” my efforts. What should be my response?  — Marilyn

MARY’S ADVICE: It’s human for people to share meals with friends. We have a responsibility to ourselves, however, to stay healthy. So just laugh, Marilyn, and then do what you want. Be careful not to say, “I don’t want to indulge.” This implies that they are indulging. Maybe order a cup of tea, or coffee or fresh fruit. Let them enjoy their choices with no judgement.

JIMMY’S ADVICE: Or maybe rip off the edge of the tablecloth … pop it in your mouth … and chew away. I wonder if they’d “poo poo” that, huh?

Do You Have a Problem? Ask MaryandJimmy@maine seniorsmagazine.com


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