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L INES O F EN Q UIR Y


L INES O F EN QU I R Y 17th September – 8th November 2019

Lyndsey Ingram 20 Bourdon Street London W1K 3PL T. +44 (0)20 7629 8849 E. info@lyndseyingram.com W. lyndseyingram.com


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'As the artist picks his way along, rejecting and accepting as he goes, certain patterns of enquiry emerge.’ – Bridget Riley


F ORE WO R D Lyndsey Ingram

At the heart of this exhibition is a

the possibility of combining images and

complete survey of Bridget Riley’s early

objects from different periods and places.

prints (1962-1968). I am delighted that

For this exhibition, we have included a

we have been able to include all of her

number of small classical marble sculp-

early black and white screenprints,

tures and a few examples of fine Regency

starting with Primitive Blaze (1962) Lyndsey Ingram through to Winged Curve (1966). We

furniture. Spanning a vast expanse of

have also assembled all seven Fragment

prints and objects share a fundamental

works, which were printed on Plexiglas

formal rigour. My aim in bringing them

in 1965, a revolutionary process at the

together in this exhibition is to create an

time. These monochrome works mark the

interesting and unexpected experience

start of the artist’s exploration into visual

for viewers that sparks conversations

sensation that continues throughout her

and connections.

FOREW OR D

time, style, and technique, all of these

career. After the mid-1960’s, Riley gradwould notquodientius have been possually moved towards and final Nenit. Rae, colour ex mora esthe nocaelatu non This show ves? Orum huissuam o

therdiusa support of ignorte several rmissignox work in our exhibition the complete es mena, quo is mor, Pal vesid fueritiste ible without vivirio iam

colleagues, clients, and friends. Amanda portfolio of Nineteen Greys (1968), which pula Ti gra? Quon sesid con Etravol nostrum dentris. Essensu ppliur. Sim, David Case, and Desmond Page marks this crucial transition. tussere issum tum int. Fuides si silne Valesse ntilis. Overo adhuideri sa who have all been fundamental in et ingulerfir ad alego patum ad nit? ad is esis, que cuppli comnocrum et helping us to assemble a truly complete These prints were made during a Muli, demusci enatidem inatiliquit; dena, quostinatum sum vivehebem survey of these rare prints. We also particularly dynamic period in Riley’s nequem fore es con aurnihi lintem nultum imoenitio ina, publius, publiu would like to thank Simon Aaron, James career and at a time when her work omnimus int perid maiorum fiti in sus. Vivis conlos videm ocupplin Graham-Stewart, and the team at Jamb, was first being introduced to a global peconsu liaequeri nesum es a prio hor in hicaedem periver ratussi milisto all of whom are experts in their respecaudience. In 1965, she was included in que quo con sisse videst vit. Patudea rtaber pultus Ahae res preo, sulibus tive fields and have generously shared the Museum of Modern Art’s seminal dii popossa niam publique et L. Ti. con acit, eo, dierem di conterv ividewith us their knowledge and their Op-Art exhibition The Responsive Eye Cupiora patriptem is bonsupio aperi licae nostri incuteri sene fac rem te objects to realise the interdisciplinary and in 1968 she represented Britain at consule retiam proreciam sum tre tere murnius publice perede publi aspect ofcoereme this show. And lastly, we owe the 34th Venice Biennial. The drawing

norbis, nonum atus, criam Study forcrio Deny I, which is included in our abus cut faci fuemus nonsus, senderips, show, was shown in the British Pavilion.

sene nox quamque pericio an enormous debtsilina, of gratitude to our late nfendam. Seriver oravero pterort friend and colleague Karsten Schubert,eatime

nonfectum medii patratis. Haberitra who sadly maio, clatuam inatort atastra, diedsisquod earlier this year. Karsten oc,our C. gallery Serum is caucta atam nos erissilis was a great quisupporter spieric aequidi hos ina, of thisenatum gallery and Although very firmly Catiurio clabus, demnerficam cont, nonferum confico also a stalwart supporter publicii of Riley’spre work. grounded in art from the post-war periodsesis es poptili ustris comnem publibus et erioremque ina, fac vivstrae. quont? He will be deeply missed. to the present, I have always enjoyed

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Based on Movement in Squares) Screenprint, 1962. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 26. (Schubert 1) 52 Ă— 52 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Based on Primitive Blaze) Screenprint, 1962. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 40. Published by the artist. (Schubert 1a) 45.7 Ă— 45.7 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Circular Movement) Screenprint, 1962. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 35. (Schubert 2) 27.3 Ă— 27.4 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Oval Image) Screenprint, 1964. Signed in penci and numbered from the edition of 50. Printed by Kelpra Studio. (Schubert 3) 76.4 Ă— 35.6 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Based on Blaze) Screenprint, 1964. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 50. (Schubert 4) 52.9 Ă— 52.1 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 1) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5a) 67.4 Ă— 83.9 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 2) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5b) 71.2 Ă— 69.3 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 3) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5c) 62.2 Ă— 80.5 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 4) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5d) 71.2 Ă— 69.6 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 5) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5d) 63 Ă— 81.4 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 6) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5d) 74.5 Ă— 73.8 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 7) Screenprint on Plexiglas, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Robert Fraser Gallery, London. (Schubert 5d) 50.9 Ă— 99.2 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (La Lune en Rodage – Carlo Belloli) Screenprint, 1965. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 200. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. Published by Editions Panderma, Basel. (Schubert 6) 31.9 × 31.9 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Winged Curve) Screenprint, 1966. Signed in pencil and numbered from the edition of 75. Printed by Kelpra Studio, London. (Schubert 7) 57.8 Ă— 62.5 cm

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Bridget Riley Untitled (Nineteen Greys) The complete set of four screenprints in colour, plus the additional fifth screenprint on mylar, 1968. Each signed in pencil and numbered 10 from the edition of 75. In the original grey board portfolio with title, colophon, text and justification pages. Printed on card by Kelpra Studio, London. Publisher unknown. (Schubert 8a-d) Each 75 Ă— 75 cm

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Untitled (Nineteen Greys) The additional fifth screenprint on mylar

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Untitled (Nineteen Greys A) (Schubert 8a)

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Untitled (Nineteen Greys B) (Schubert 8b)

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Untitled (Nineteen Greys C) (Schubert 8c)

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Untitled (Nineteen Greys D) (Schubert 8d)

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Bridget Riley Study for Deny Paint on paper, 1967. Signed in pencil and titled Study for Deny. 50 Ă— 68 cm

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A Roman veined marble torso of an athlete 1st-2nd centuries A.D. Height: 54cm

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Roman marble head of Venus Circa 1st – 2nd century A.D. Height: 18 cm

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Hellenistic marble head of Venus Circa 2nd century B.C. Height: 13.5 cm

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A Roman marble head of Venus Circa 2nd Century A.D. Height: 15 cm

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Greek marble head of a boy 4th century B.C. Height: 15 cm

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Regency Chimneypiece by Sir John Soane Carrara marble and Welsh slate, 1828. Originally from Pell Wall Hall in Market Drayton, Shropshire. 99.7 × 136.5 × 17.8 cm

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A Late Regency Rosewood Two-Tier Side Table, circa 1820. With original statuary marble top and mercury-gilt mirror panel. 34.75in. (88cm) high; 46.5in. (118cm) wide; 15in. (38cm) deep.

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' Focusing isn't just an optical activity, it is also a mental one' – Bridget Riley

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Published by Lyndsey Ingram Designed by Lucy Harbut Printed by Dayfold Image credits: p.2 Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 3), 1965 (detail) p.5 Bridget Riley Untitled (Nineteen Greys),

1968 (detail) p.51 Bridget Riley Untitled (Fragment 6), 1965 (detail) Artwork photography by Jamie George and Hugh Kelly. All images Š 2019


Profile for Lyndsey Ingram

Lines of Enquiry 2019  

At the heart of this exhibition is a complete survey of Bridget Riley’s early prints (1962–1968). I am delighted that we have been able to i...

Lines of Enquiry 2019  

At the heart of this exhibition is a complete survey of Bridget Riley’s early prints (1962–1968). I am delighted that we have been able to i...

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