Georgie Hopton | Gary Hume | Hurricanes Hardly Ever Happen

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GEORGIE HOPTON

HURRICANES HARDLY EVER HAPPEN

GARY HUME



GEORGIE HOPTON HURRICANES HARDLY EVER HAPPEN

GARY HUME


A show in two parts: London Lyndsey Ingram 20 Bourdon Street London W1K 3PL 28th February – 3rd April, 2020 New York The Armory Show Stand no. 205 711 12th Avenue Pier 90 New York City 5th – 8th March, 2020




F OREWORD – Lyndsey Ingram

The opportunity to present this show is an

hard to describe but impossible to deny.

enormous privilege, both for me personally

As is the nature of any intimate relationship,

and for my gallery. Although active and

their pictures seem to do a quiet dance,

successful artists in their own rights, this

subtly yet surely intertwined.

is the first time that Georgie Hopton and Gary Hume have shown together. What

This show would not have been possible

began as an idea for a curated booth at the

without Matthew Marks, Monika Sprüth,

Armory Show, soon grew into something

and Philomene Magers, who represent

much more substantial. With such a broad

Gary and have allowed us to show his

breath of material to include, we have

work. I am extremely grateful to them

decided to present this as a show in two

and their teams for this opportunity. I

parts – half will be exhibited in New York at

would also like to thank Gary’s studio and

the Armory and half in our London gallery.

especially Kate Blake for her time and assistance with the many logistical chall-

Tasked with choosing the selection of works,

enges. And lastly, of course, this would not

Georgie has assembled carefully considered

have been possible without Georgie and

and elegantly curated pairings of her work

Gary, who have met this project with un-

with Gary’s, spanning over twenty years of

flagging energy, enthusiasm, and insights.

their careers and their lives together. She

It has been an enormous pleasure to see this

has chosen a group of beautifully synergistic

show come together. I sincerely hope that

images, covering a variety of mediums, dates,

anyone who visits this exhibition will enjoy

and subjects. In spite of this rich diversity, all

seeing it as much as we have enjoyed

of the works here share something essential –

watching it come to life. 5


FLOR A FAUNA AND P ORTR AITURE The Art of Georgie Hopton and Gary Hume – Katharine Stout

James Lovelock’s Gaia theory sets out the hypothesis that the entire Earth and all that inhabits it is a single living organism, arguing the planet cannot survive without the complex life systems which depend on it, and vice versa. He illustrates this with a simple computer simulation called Daisyworld, writing, ‘A main sequence Star like our Sun gradually heats the planet Daisyworld until it is just warm enough for a species of black daisies to colonise the entire surface. Black daisies absorb heat, so they thrive in these large temperatures. But there are mutant white daisies which reflect heat and, as the temperature rises even further, these begin to flourish. So Daisyworld is cooled by white daisies and warmed by black ones. A simple flower is able to regulate and stabilize the environment on a planetary scale. Moreover, this stabilization emerges from a strictly Darwinian process.’1 First developed in the 1960s, this theory sets out the concept and a fundamental recognition – only now seeping into the mainstream and political consciousness – that the Earth, nature and humanity are not only symbiotically dependent on each other, but are in fact part of one organic, complex ecosystem. Georgie Hopton and Gary Hume share a life that in recent years has been regulated by seasonal migration determined by growing cycles. They move between their farm in rural Upstate New York for the Spring planting season, returning for the ‘Fall’ harvest and then back to London for the rest of the year, their chosen home-town since studying here in the late 6



1980s. At that time, they became part of a generation of artists whose energy and innovation drew the international art world’s attention to London during the post-Thatcher period, when anything seemed possible, now increasingly distant as another century, another era. Working independently, with different career trajectories, styles and techniques, they have in common a belief that everything is connected, in particular treating ‘flora, fauna and portraiture’ as artistic themes that are fluidly aligned. On a more quotidian level, in different ways their work visualises Lovelock’s theory that diverse forms of life are co-dependent and generative. Hopton describes how, ‘A jug or an arrangement of objects or flowers can elicit such empathy in me. It is as though I am faced with a portrait of a person, a group or a family perhaps.’2 Similarly Hume has said of his flower paintings, ‘They’re not supposed to be allegories for anything. They’re just like you sat there, as far as I’m concerned.’3 Another aspect they have in common is their commitment to a studio practice. Instead of the romantic view that nature must be studied in the wild, they each start from an awareness that the natural environment is, more often than not, cultivated and they take it in any form. Using flowers or vegetables, photographs or illustrations, they each create works inspired by nature, but ‘cultivated’ in the studio. Preferring to be intrigued by the attempt at picture or object making, they share an ambivalence towards an obligation to offer a literal representation. It is notable that Hopton’s prolific output as an artist over the last decade coincides with her establishing a vegetable garden in upstate New York, an area whose abundant agriculture made the land so covetable to colonisers from the sixteenth century onwards. The productive relationship between her discovered ability to nurture life out of dirt and water and a renewed drive to experiment in the studio can be seen in playful monoprints such as Medium Size Veg Print (i), 2008, A Wet Season’s Veg Print (vii), 2011, or Levity, 2019. Like one of Hopton’s literary heroes, Emily Dickinson, whose poetry was consistently inspired by her gardening life, the artist’s engagement with nature allows her to explore wider, universal cycles of discovery and loss, life and death, presence and absence. Hopton perceives and adopts the poet’s phrase ‘Shouting Flower’ to describe all of these inevitabilities and comments, ‘I understand the world we live in, but it’s not the world I want. I want a sense of humanity. The grandiose in the small, that’s what I’m after…’4 Recognising a symbiosis between herself and her harvest, Hopton began to place both it 8


and herself in the photographic frame, as seen in works such as Cinderella Pumpkin, 2007, The Juggler, 2008 or The Long Gourd, 2009. Juxtaposing body parts with voluptuous, anthropomorphic vegetable shapes, Hopton performs the classic nude, whilst drawing attention to the short-lived but unarguable sensuality of flesh, whether vegetable or human. More recently, in works such as Dreamcatcher (ii), 2018 or the Verse series, 2018, Hopton has stripped back her work to line only. Made using wool, sticks, beans or feathers, these pieces increasingly make use of natural materials. By paring back the image, she is capturing the experience of ‘drawings in space’ – linear shapes made by branches, stems or stalks – happened upon when walking through the woods and meadows of her upstate farm. These works extend her ongoing commitment to collage, made using materials she creates, collects and hoards, finding joy in the decorative and the overlooked. Hume has flirted with the decorative ever since he chose a palette of sickly sweet colours selected from a household range of gloss paint for a number of his hospital door paintings, a subject that offered both a form of geometric abstraction and as a poignant symbol of the austerity measures faced by NHS during the 1980s. He commented, ‘Decorative arts were treated with disdain in contemporary art at the time. But I was interested in the embarrassment, working with it. It seemed that without embarrassment I wouldn’t move forward.’5 Hume deployed the same idiosyncratic palette as he widened his subject matter to include ‘fauna, flora and portraiture’, whilst introducing darker, more melancholy colours to signal the complexities of tackling more personal subjects. Flowers have been a recurring motif for Hume, both as a way to bring together elegant, intriguing forms with opulent colours for maximal visual pleasure, and as symbolic of the vulnerabilities of everyday life. In his portfolio of eight linocuts Here’s Flowers, 2006, each depicts an isolated flower, or a close-up fragment of a petal, stem or leaves, set against a flat plane of colour that further delineates the flower’s intricate pattern and sumptuous colour. The Sister Troop, 2009 offers a similar treatment, in this case his chosen subject being the all-American cheerleader, reduced to flattened shapes, body parts and contrasting blocks of colour. A disembodied body part topped with a floral-like pom-pom accessory, silhouetted against the dark background merges the flower and the young gymnastic body into one motif. A more recent series of pastel works on paper, Flora, 9


2016, introduces an atypical expressionist style of depicting a variety of blooms, in which the floral subject blurs with the colourful, gestural background, so that the overriding impression is an explosion of colour. Two studies in charcoal and pastel on paper, part of a wider series of paintings, Destroyed School, 2018 deploy a floral motif to focus attention on the destruction of war, offering an alternative to the mind-numbing images of seemingly relentless death and trauma caused by conflict in the Middle East. Looking through a newspaper, Hume describes how, “I see this hideous photograph of a school that’s being bombed or mortared or shelled, and there’s holes and shit everywhere, and broken equipment, and dust on everything. There’s books, and either a body or bodies, or pools of congealed blood. And I take out all of that and I just focus in on the little bit that I can see that was made with hope. Maybe it’s just me, but I’ve become so exhausted. How do we feel anymore? ...what struck an unbearable empathetic chord was seeing these fragments of hope and dreams and a sensation of safety.”6 Like so many of us, desensitised to the daily depictions of the horrors of war, Hume depicts something as innocent as a primary school’s mural – all that is left of a once lively classroom – in order to compel himself and the viewer to feel empathy once again with the suffering of ordinary people. It is unusual for Hopton and Hume to exhibit together, as for years they have kept their personal and professional lives quite separate. This exhibition reveals that whilst they each have very individual aesthetics and styles, they share an approach rooted in an overarching love of material and the keen observation of sensation brought about by their mutual appreciation and wonder for the common-or-garden world and its inhabitants, both human and organic. Katharine Stout curated Tate Britain’s survey of Gary Hume in 2013, and has published catalogue essays on Georgie Hopton’s work. Currently Director of Focal Point Gallery in Southend-on-Sea, she was previously Deputy Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London.

1

James Lovelock, Novacene: The Coming of Age of Hyperintelligence, Random House, 2019.

2

The Photographs of Georgie Hopton, Simon Grant, in Georgie Hopton, Still Life, published 2019.

3

David Barrett, Interview in Gary Hume, New Art Up-Close 1, London 2004.

4

The Botanical Theater of Georgie Hopton by Leigh Stein, in Georgie Hopton, Vegetable prints

5

Barrett, 2004.

6

Burger, Mark. “Gary Hume Paints The Beauty of What’s Left Behind.” Interview,

September 12, 2019.

10



Gary Hume Georgie Hopton

Here's Flowers

Little Dorrit

The complete portfolio of 8 linocuts printed

Wool and collage on paper, 2012

in colours, 2006

65 × 52.5 cm (25 5/8 × 20 5/8 in)

80.5 × 61 cm (31 3/4 × 24 1/8 in)

12


13




Georgie Hopton

Gary Hume

Untitled

Destroyed School

Collage on photograph, 2009

Charcoal and pastel on paper, 2018

30.5 × 40.5 cm (12 1/8 × 16 in)

100 × 70 cm (39 3/8 × 27 1/2 in)

16


17


Gary Hume Untitled Charcoal on paper, 2004 70.5 × 50 cm (27 3/4 × 19 3/4 in) 18


Georgie Hopton White Cyclamen (ii) String drawing, 2006 29.5 × 36 cm (11 5/8 × 14 1/8 in) 19


Georgie Hopton

Gary Hume

Harlequin (Self-portrait)

Flemish Bride

Chromogenic print, 1999

Pen on paper, UV Perspex and gloss paint, 2011

61 × 51 cm (24 1/8 × 20 1/8 in)

110 × 91 cm (43 1/4 × 35 7/8 in)

20


21


Gary Hume Destroyed School Charcoal and pastel on paper, 2018 74.7 Ă— 54.7 cm (29 3/8 Ă— 21 1/2 in) 22


Georgie Hopton Faded Blooms Archival inkjet print on fibre paper, 2009 30.5 Ă— 40.5 cm (12 1/8 Ă— 16 in) 23


Georgie Hopton Strawberries and Flowers Acrylic on wrapping paper, 2011 70 × 50 cm (27 1/2 × 19 3/4 in) 24


Gary Hume Flora Pastel on paper, 2016 41 × 31.5 cm (16 1/8 × 12 3/8 in) 25


Georgie Hopton Dreamcatcher (ii)

Gary Hume

Wool, sticks and feathers on painted

Figures

paper, 2018

Charcoal on brown paper, 2016

70 × 49.7 cm (27 1/2 × 19 5/8 in)

55 × 37 cm (21 5/8 × 14 5/8 in)

26


Georgie Hopton Verse (i) Wool and bean on paper, 2019 76.2 × 55.9 cm (30 × 22 1/8 in) 27


Georgie Hopton

Gary Hume

Medium Size Veg Print (i)

Hair Slide

Acrylic on newsprint, 2008

Pen on paper, UV perspex and gloss paint, 2010

60 × 46 cm (23 5/8 × 18 1/8 in)

96.5 × 76 cm (38 × 29 7/8 in)

28


29


Georgie Hopton & Gary Hume Love on the Patio Charcoal, collage and plastic jewel on paper, 2012 75 Ă— 55 cm (29 1/2 Ă— 21 5/8 in) 30



Gary Hume Figure Charcoal on paper, 2004 32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in) 32


Georgie Hopton Verse (iv) Wool and bean on paper, 2018 76.2 × 55.9 cm (30 × 22 1/8 in) 33


Gary Hume The Sister Troop The complete portfolio of 10 screenprints in colours, 2009 H. 81.5 cm (variable widths) 34


Gary Hume The Sister Troop

Georgie Hopton

From the complete portfolio of 10 screenprints

Mammoth in the Lap

in colours, 2009 (left)

Archival inkjet print on fibre paper, 2007

H. 81.5 cm (variable widths)

20.8 Ă— 15.8 cm (8 1/4 Ă— 6 1/4 in)


Georgie Hopton The Long Gourd Archival inkjet print on fibre paper, 2009 13.5 Ă— 20.2 cm (5 1/4 Ă— 8 in) 36


Gary Hume The Queue Charcoal on paper, 2009 59.5 × 42 cm (23 3/8 × 16 1/2 in) 37


Georgie Hopton After the Deluge

Gary Hume

Wool, leaves and mixed media

Untitled

on painted paper, 2019

Pastel on paper, 2019

59 × 88 cm (23 1/4 × 34 5/8 in)

70 × 50 cm (27 1/2 × 19 3/4 in)

38



Georgie Hopton

Gary Hume

Untitled

Blue Plaster

Wool and painted paper, 2018

Gloss paint on paper, 2015

45 × 47.5 cm (17 3/4 × 18 3/4 in)

101 × 75 cm (39 3/4 × 29 1/2 in)

40



Georgie Hopton Gary Hume

An Audible Sign

Flora

Wool, acrylic, leaf, sticks & bean on painted

Pastel on paper, 2016

paper, 2019

44 × 35.5 cm (17 3/8 × 14 in)

70 × 49.7 cm (27 1/2 × 19 5/8 in)

42


43


Gary Hume Torso and Arms Charcoal on paper, 2019 75 × 55 cm (29 1/2 × 21 5/8 in) 44


Georgie Hopton Legs In The Grass Archival inkjet print on fibre paper, 2015 Each: 27.4 Ă— 27.4 cm (10 3/4 Ă— 10 3/4 in) 45


Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Yellow Crookneck Zucchini

Jarrahdale Jockey

Archival inkjet print on fibre paper, 2006

Archival inkjet on fibre paper, 2015

15.2 × 20.2 cm (6 × 8 in)

30.5 × 40 cm (12 1/8 × 15 3/4 in)


Gary Hume Saddle Charcoal on paper, 2010 74.7 × 54.7 cm (29 3/8 × 21 1/2 in)


Gary Hume Figure Charcoal on 90 gsm Ingres Celeste paper, 2016 32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in) 48


Georgie Hopton Bound by Garlic Scapes Archival inkjet print on fibre paper, 2009 13.5 Ă— 20.2 cm (5 1/4 Ă— 8 in) 49


Gary Hume Roses Pastel and charcoal on card, 2016 82 × 108 cm (32 1/4 × 42 1/2 in) 50





Georgie Hopton The Prize Photogravure, 2013 50.5 × 39.5 cm (19 7/8 × 15 1/2 in) 54


55


GE ORGI E HOP TON

Georgie Hopton (born 1967, North

through explorations into abstraction

Yorkshire) lives between London and

and pattern. Like her heroes of the

Upstate New York. Since graduating

Wiener Werkstaette and the Arts

from St. Martins in 1989, she has

and Crafts movement, Hopton's heart

continued to expand her use of varied

lies in creativity with no boundaries;

media, all of which are underpinned by

the melding of art and life.

her affinity for the natural world. Hopton's work is housed in several Hopton works across photography,

permanent collections including the

collage, printmaking, sculpture and

Arts Council collection and Tate. Public

textile, often combining these within

commissions can be seen at the Home

one work. Most recently, she has

Office and Royal London Hospital.

applied her unique aesthetic to wall-

Hopton was nominated for the Max

paper, fabric and rugs. Classical themes

Mara prize in 2007. That same year the

of still life, self-portraits and studies of

Guardian named her as one of 'the next

flowers are consistent threads, woven

generation of cutting-edge artists.’

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57


58


GARY HUME

Gary Hume is known for figurative

and the Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria,

and abstract paintings on aluminum

in 2004, and Modern Art Oxford

panels, which often feature startling

mounted a survey show of his Door

colour combinations made with paints

paintings in 2008. In 2013, Tate Britain

purchased premixed from a hardware

presented a focused survey spanning

store. Born 1962, he attended Gold-

Hume’s career. Since 2017 he has

smith's College in London. He rep-

opened exhibitions of new work in

resented Britain at the Venice Biennale

London, New York, Berlin, Los Angeles

in 1999 and the Bienal de São Paulo in

and Seoul. In March 2020 a new

1996, the same year he was nominated

exhibition: 'Gary Hume: Destroyed

for the Turner Prize. His work was the

School Paintings' opens at Museum

subject of a one-person exhibition at

Dhondt Dhaenens in Ghent, Belgium.

Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, in 1999, and in 2001 he was elected to

Hume is represented by Matthew

the Royal Academy. Monographic

Marks Gallery in the USA and Sprüth

shows of Hume's work were organized

Magers across Europe. He lives and

at the Kestnergesellschaft, Hannover,

works in London and Accord, New York.

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WORKS LI ST

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

In the Marrow (ii)

Yellow Crookneck Zucchini

Harlequin (Self-portrait)

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Chromogenic print, 1999.

paper, 2006.

paper, 2006.

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

the edition of 8, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

61 × 51 cm (24 1/8 × 20 1/8 in)

13.5 × 20.3 cm (5 1/4 × 8 in)

15.2 × 20.2 cm (6 × 8 in)

60


Georgie Hopton Cinderella Pumpkin Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Archival inkjet print on fibre

White Cyclamen (ii)

White Cyclamen (v)

paper, 2007.

String drawing, 2006.

String drawing, 2006.

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

29.5 × 36 cm (11 5/8 × 14 1/8 in)

36 × 29.5 cm (14 1/8 × 11 5/8 in)

15.2 × 20.2 cm (6 × 8 in)

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Mammoth in the Lap

Still Life With Lemon Cucumber

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Georgie Hopton

paper, 2007.

paper, 2007.

Medium Size Veg Print (i)

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

Acrylic on newsprint, 2008.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

Signed verso.

20.8 x 15.8 cm (8 1/4 x 6 1/4 in)

15.2 x 20.2 cm (6 x 8 in)

60 × 46 cm (23 5/8 × 18 1/8 in)

61


Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

The Juggler

Almost Blown

Bound by Garlic Scapes

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Archival inkjet print on fibre

paper, 2008.

paper, 2009.

paper, 2009.

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

13.5 × 20.2 cm (5 1/4 × 8 in)

40.5 × 30.5 cm (16 × 12 1/8 in)

13.5 × 20.2 cm (5 1/4 × 8 in)

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Hand In Glove

House Plant

Georgie Hopton

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Faded Blooms

paper, 2009

paper, 2009.

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

paper, 2009.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

30.5 × 40.5 cm (12 1/8 × 16 in)

13.6 x 20.3 cm (5 3/8 x 8 in)

40.5 × 30.5 cm (16 × 12 1/8 in)

62


Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Sunflowers (i)

The Long Gourd

Georgie Hopton

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Untitled

paper, 2009.

paper, 2009.

Collage on photograph, 2009.

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

40.5 × 30.5 cm (16 × 12 1/8 in)

13.5 × 20.2 cm (5 1/4 × 8 in)

30.5 × 40.5 cm (12 1/8 × 16 in)

Georgie Hopton Horizontal Composition Georgie Hopton

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Georgie Hopton

A Wet Season's Veg Print (vii)

paper, 2011.

Strawberries and Flowers

Acrylic on newsprint, 2011.

Signed verso and numbered from

Acrylic on wrapping paper, 2011.

Signed verso.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

Signed verso.

112 × 77 cm (44 1/8 × 30 1/4 in)

30.5 × 40.5 cm (12 1/8 × 16 in)

70 × 50 cm (27 1/2 × 19 3/4 in)

63


Georgie Hopton Tulips in a Bag (i)

Georgie Hopton

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Georgie Hopton

Siren

paper, 2011.

Little Dorrit

Photogravure, 2013.

Signed verso and numbered from

Wool and collage on paper, 2012.

Signed and numbered from the

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

Signed verso.

edition of 40.

40.5 × 30.5 cm (16 × 12 1/8 in)

65 × 52.5 cm (25 5/8 × 20 5/8 in)

38.8 × 54.5 cm (15 1/4 × 21 1/2 in)

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Tulips In A Striped Jug (i)

Temple (ii)

The Prize

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Wool and sticks on painted

Photogravure, 2013.

paper, 2013.

paper, 2013.

Signed and numbered from the

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso.

edition of 25.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

50 × 70 cm (19 3/4 × 27 1/2 in)

50.5 × 39.5 cm (19 7/8 × 15 1/2 in)

27.4 × 27.4 cm (10 3/4 × 10 3/4 in)

Georgie Hopton

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Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Tulips In A Striped Jug (ii)

Georgie Hopton

Legs In The Grass

Archival inkjet print on fibre

Jarrahdale Jockey

Archival inkjet print on fibre

paper, 2013.

Archival inkjet on fibre paper, 2015.

paper, 2015.

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

Signed verso and numbered from

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 4, with 2 artist proofs.

the edition of 2, with 1 artist proof.

27.4 × 27.4 cm (10 3/4 × 10 3/4 in)

30.5 × 40 cm (12 1/8 × 15 3/4 in)

27.4 × 27.4 cm (10 3/4 × 10 3/4 in)

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

The Weather Inside

Stromboli

A Season of Hope (iv)

Acrylic, leaf, sticks and collage

Wool rug, hand-knotted and hand-

Signed verso.

on paper, 2016.

spun, 2017.

Acrylic, leaf, sticks and collage

Signed verso.

Courtesy Christopher Farr Rugs.

on paper, 2018.

70 x 49 cm (27 1/2 x 19 1/4 in)

172 × 240 cm (67 3/4 × 94 1/2 in)

76.2 x 55.9 cm (30 x 22.01 in)

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Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Dreamcatcher (ii)

Temple (i)

Georgie Hopton

Wool, sticks and feathers on

Signed in verso.

Untitled

painted paper, 2018.

Acrylic, stick and wool on painted

Wool and painted paper, 2018.

Signed verso.

paper, 2018.

Signed verso.

70 × 49.7 cm (27 1/2 × 19 5/8 in)

70 × 49.7 cm (27 1/2 × 19 5/8 in)

45 × 47.5 cm (17 3/4 × 18 3/4 in)

Untitled

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Wool, collage and painted

Verse (iv)

Verse (v)

paper, 2018.

Wool and bean on paper, 2018.

Wool and beans on paper, 2018.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

45.5 × 52.5 cm (17 7/8 × 20 5/8 in)

76.2 × 55.9 cm (30 × 22 1/8 in)

76.2 × 55.9 cm (30 × 22 1/8 in)

Georgie Hopton

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Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton

After the Deluge

An Audible Sign

Verse (x)

Wool, leaves and mixed media

Wool, acrylic, leaf, sticks and bean

Wool and sticks on paper, 2018.

on painted paper, 2019.

on painted paper, 2019.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

76.2 × 55.9 cm (30 × 22 1/8 in)

59 × 88 cm (23 1/4 × 34 5/8 in)

70 × 49.7 cm (27 1/2 × 19 5/8 in)

Georgie Hopton

Georgie Hopton & Gary Hume

Levity

Georgie Hopton

Love on the Patio

Acrylic, leaves, sticks and beans

Verse (i)

Charcoal, collage and plastic jewel

on paper, 2019.

Wool and bean on paper, 2019.

on paper, 2012.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

76.2 × 57 cm (30 × 22 1/2 in)

76.2 × 55.9 cm (30 × 22 1/8 in)

75 × 55 cm (29 1/2 × 21 5/8 in)

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Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Sky Carpet

Plant

Figure

Woven wool, 1997.

Charcoal on paper, 2000.

Charcoal on paper, 2004.

From an edition of 10.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

200 × 300 cm (78 3/4 × 118 1/8 in)

70 × 50 cm (27 1/2 × 19 3/4 in)

32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in)

Gary Hume Here's Flowers

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

The complete portfolio of 8 linocuts

Bloom

Untitled

printed in colours, 2006.

Charcoal and pastel on paper with

Charcoal on paper, 2004.

Signed and numbered from

painted perspex, 2008.

Signed in pencil.

the edition of 68.

Signed in pencil.

70.5 × 50 cm (27 3/4 × 19 3/4 in)

80.5 × 61 cm (31 3/4 × 24 1/8 in)

82.5 × 63 cm (32 1/2 × 24 3/4 in)

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Gary Hume The Sister Troop

Gary Hume

The complete portfolio of 10

Gary Hume

Hair Slide

screenprints in colours, 2009.

The Queue

Pen on paper, UV perspex and

Each print signed and numbered

Charcoal on paper, 2009.

gloss paint, 2010.

from the edition of 60.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

H. 81.5 cm (variable widths)

59.5 × 42 cm (23 3/8 x 16 1/2 in)

96.5 × 76 cm (38 × 29 7/8 in)

Gary Hume Gary Hume

Flemish Bride

Gary Hume

Saddle

Pen on paper, UV perspex and

Blue Plaster

Charcoal on paper, 2010.

gloss paint, 2011.

Gloss paint on paper, 2015.

Signed in pencil.

Signed verso.

Signed verso.

74.7 × 54.7 cm (29 3/8 × 21 1/2 in)

110 × 91 cm (43 1/4 × 35 7/8 in)

101 × 75 cm (39 3/4 × 29 1/2 in)

69


Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Figure

Figure

Boat Neck

Charcoal on 90 gsm Ingres

Charcoal on 90 gsm Ingres

Gloss paint on paper, 2015.

Celeste paper, 2016.

Celeste paper, 2016.

Signed verso.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

54 × 48 cm (21 1/4 × 18 7/8 in)

32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in)

32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in)

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Figure

Figure

Figure

Charcoal on 90 gsm Ingres

Charcoal on 90 gsm Ingres

Charcoal on 90 gsm Ingres

Celeste paper, 2016.

Celeste paper, 2016.

Celeste paper, 2016.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in)

32 × 24 cm (12 5/8 × 9 1/2 in)

44.5 × 36 cm (17 1/2 × 14 1/8 in)

70


Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Figures

Flora

Flora

Charcoal on brown paper, 2016.

Pastel on paper, 2016.

Pastel on paper, 2016.

Signed in pencil.

Signed verso.

Signed in pencil.

55 × 37 cm (21 5/8 × 14 5/8 in)

44 × 35.5 cm (17 3/8 × 14 in)

45.5 × 35.5 cm (17 7/8 × 14 in)

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Flora

Flora

Flora

Pastel on paper, 2016.

Pastel on paper, 2016.

Pastel on paper, 2016.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

21.2 × 17.4 cm (8 3/8 × 6 7/8 in)

44 × 35.5 cm (17 3/8 × 14 in)

44 × 35.5 cm (17 3/8 × 14 in)

71


Gary Hume Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Keeping Mum

Flora

Roses

Screenprint with woodcut, 2017.

Pastel on paper, 2016.

Pastel and charcoal on card, 2016.

Signed in pencil and numbered

Signed verso.

Signed in pencil.

from the edition of 40.

41 × 31.5 cm (16 1/8 × 12 3/8 in)

82 × 108 cm (32 1/4 × 42 1/2 in)

69 × 52 cm (27 1/8 × 20 1/2 in)

Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Ticket

Yellow Slip

Gary Hume

Screenprint with woodcut, 2017.

Screenprint and woodcut printed

Destroyed School

Signed in pencil and numbered

in colours, 2017.

Charcoal and pastel on paper, 2018.

11 from the edition of 40.

Signed verso.

Signed in pencil.

72 × 54 cm (28 3/8 × 21 1/4 in)

72 × 50 cm (28 3/8 × 19 3/4 in)

74.7 × 54.7 cm (29 3/8 × 21 1/2 in)

72


Gary Hume

Gary Hume

Destroyed School

Torso and Arms

Gary Hume

Charcoal and pastel on paper, 2018.

Charcoal on paper, 2019.

Untitled

Signed in pencil.

Signed in pencil.

Pastel on paper, 2019.

100 × 70 cm (39 3/8 × 27 1/2 in)

75 × 55 cm (29 1/2 × 21 5/8 in)

70 × 50 cm (27 1/2 × 19 3/4 in)

73




Published by Lyndsey Ingram 20 Bourdon Street London W1K 3PL T. +44 (0)20 7629 8849 E. info@lyndseyingram.com W. lyndseyingram.com

Designed by Lucy Harbut Printed by Dayfold Image credits: Title page: Georgie Hopton A Wet Season's Veg Print (vii), 2011 (detail, in black and white) and Gary Hume Flora, 2016 (detail, in black and white) P.3 Photograph by Georgie Hopton, NY, 2008 P. 4 Georgie Hopton & Gary Hume Love on the Patio, 2012 (detail) P.7 Georgie Hopton Harlequin (Self Portrait), 1999 (detail) P.11 Gary Hume Flemish Bride, 2011 (detail) P.14 – 15 Georgie Hopton Little Dorrit, 2012 (detail) P.52 – 53 Gary Hume Roses, 2016 (detail) P.57 Photograph by Georgie Hopton P.58 Photograph of Gary Hume, by Georgie Hopton P.74 Photograph by Georgie Hopton, NY, 2009 Installation photographs by Lucy Emms, London All Georgie Hopton images: © 2020 Georgie Hopton Courtesy of the artist and Lyndsey Ingram All Gary Hume images: © 2020 Gary Hume Courtesy of the artist, Sprüth Magers and Matthew Marks Gallery