Page 1

FIVE DOLLARS

Back to Money Basics Local Businesses Go Green

Romance

at Della Terra Mountain Chateau BUSINESS & BUILDING 2009 :: WWW.STYLEMAGAZINECOLORADO.COM :: EST 1984


Markets keep changing. Your needs and investment opportunities can also change over time. At UBS, we're committed to reviewing each client's portfolio and making adjustments as needed. This can help optimize your portfolio's performance and keep your investments working toward your financial goals. We invite you to have a conversation with us. Clayton Hartman

Brian Sullivan

Wayne Jamerson

Senior Vice President-Investments

Senior Vice President-Investments

Vice President-Investments

970-498-4031

970-498-4038

970-498-4032

clayton.hartman@ubs.com

brian.p.sullivan@ubs.com

wayne.jamerson@ubs.com

3711 John F. Kennedy Parkway, Suite 410 Fort Collins, CO 80525

www.ubs.com/financialservicesinc

You&Us

$ UBS

UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Š2009 UBS Financial Services Inc. All rights reserved. Wealth management services in the U.S. are provided by UBS Financial Services Inc., a registered broker-dealer offering securities, trading, brokerage, and related products and services. Member SIPC. Member FINRA. 31.07_Ad_7.Sx9.74S_RC0623_Ha rc


CHAM ILl~ YOUR Ll FE. YOUR STYLE:

100% of the proceeds from the Chamilia Breast Cancer Bead will be donated to Hope Lives! (now thru August 15, 2009)

LEADING JEWELERS The Diamond Tower 300 East Foothills Parkway • SathersJewelers.com *See store for details


Spine Care of Tomorrow...Today! Conservative Non-operative Spine Care

Fellowship Trained Spine Intervention and Pain Management Procedures under FluoroscopicGuidance Fellow, American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Subspecialty Board Certification in Pain and Sports Medicine Diplomate, American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine Certified, McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis and Treatment of the Spine

1301 Riverside Ave., Suite 2 Fort Collins, CO 80524

(970) 692-5550

Ricardo A. Nieves, M.D.

4

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


THE SHELL DUGGAN PERL GROUP Bill Shell, CFP速 First Vice President Financial Advisor

Gary Perl, CFP速, CIMA速 First Vice President Financial Advisor

Sandra Donley-Duggan Vice President Financial Advisor

Kathleen Sviatko Sr. Reg 'd Client Service Associate

Sharon Brown Client Service Associate

to our group located at:

17116l stAve. , Suite 200 Greeley, CO 80634 970-506-9650 Visit morganstanley.comjindividual.

z

-<

&1

Morgan Stanley Investments and services offered through Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC, member SIPC. 息 2009 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney


Gerry Pedersen & Mark Pedersen

(970)223-3100 4455 S. College Fort Collins, CO

www.pedersentoyota.com


Donna Bendele

Travis Benshoof

Ryan Burr

Dennis Disario

Mike Gerrish

Jeff Gipson

Brady Henderson

Jeremiah Johnson

Todd Jones

Darrell Jorgenson

Ron Lewis

George McLaughlin

Grant Moreno

Jeff Morris

Luis Noriega

Jason Olinger

Mark Pedersen

Dan Rumsey

Steve Spight

Daniel Tchida

Janet Tompkins

Bo Walser

David Allard

Vikkie Bagwell

Mike Croce

Steve Barnes

Come in today and see our huge selection and sweet summer deals!


style media and design, inc. | 970.226.6400 |

w w w. s t y l e m a g a z i n e c o l o r a d o . c o m PUBLISHER Lydia Dody

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Scott Prosser GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lisa Gould

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Angeline Grenz ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVES Jon Ainslie (970) 219-9226 Abby Bloedorn (970) 222-8406 Karen Christensen (970) 679-7593 Lydia Dody (970) 227-6400 Saundra Skrove (970) 217-9932 OFFICE MANAGER Ina Szwec

ACCOUNTING MANAGER Karla Vigil OFFICE ASSISTANT Ronda Huser CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Allie Comeau, Julie Estlick, Lynn M. Dean, Connie Hein, Kay Rios, Jim Sprout, Ina Szwec PHOTOGRAPHER Warren Diggles CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Kevin Bergthold of KB Photography, Lydia Dody, Ina Szwec AFFILIATIONS Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce Loveland Chamber of Commerce Greeley Chamber of Commerce Windsor Chamber of Commerce Home Builders Association of Northern Colorado 2009 STYLE MAGAZINES January-Loveland/Greeley Medical & Wellness Magazine and Directory February-Building & Remodeling March-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness March-Family & Philanthropy April/May Northern Colorado Business & Building May/June-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness June/July-Business & Building July/August-Fort Collins Medical & Wellness Magazine and Directories August-Women In Business September-Building & Remodeling Home Interiors & Entertainment October-Women’s Health & Breast Cancer November-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness November/December Holiday/Winter Style Media and Design, Inc. magazines are free monthly publications direct-mailed to homes and businesses in Northern Colorado. Elsewhere, a one year subscription is $35/year and a two year subscription is $50/year. Free magazines are available in stands at 100 locations throughout Northern Colorado. For ad rates, subscription information, change of address, or correspondence, contact: Style Media and Design Inc., 211 W. Myrtle St., Suite 200, Fort Collins, Colorado 80521. Phone (970) 226-6400. Fax (970) 226-6427 E-Mail: ronda@StyleMedia.com ©2009 Style Media and Design Inc. All rights reserved. The entire contents of Style Magazine is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. Style Media and Design Inc. is not responsible for unsolicited material. All manuscripts, artwork, and photography must be accompanied by a SASE. The views and opinions of any contributing writers are not necessarily those of Style Media & Design Inc.

8

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


"Together, we're building incredible l<ids." This year, nearly 3,000 kids in our community will have

the capital campaign. The result is a Clubhouse worthy of a

an opportunity to learn, have fun and grow in an incredible

mission this important.

environment - thanks to the Boys & Girls Clubs

of Larimer County.

If you'd like to help enrich the lives of thousands of kids every year, call the Boys & Girls Clubs of Larimer County. But if

Each Clubhouse in Loveland, Fort Collins and Wellington

you're looking for a bank that's as strongly committed to our

is much more than just an after-school "rec center."

community as you are, call Home State Bank. 203-61 00

Professional staff members lead structured programs in the arts, sports, computers, and daily school work. Their work has already given us thousands of incredible kids who feel great about themselves, succeed in school, and contribute to our community. When the Boys & Girls Clubs recently needed help

i7

to build a new facility in Loveland, Home State Bank

Home Stale

stepped up with special financing and a contribution to

BANK

~

LENOER

Member FDIC

www.HomeStateBank.com


our clients orating with soluach in collab find the best team appro advisors to consists and their other r management team Bragsenio tions. Our Tom Behr, Cindy Rich orf, ingsd and of Kristi Benn i Thornton, Burns, Dena of FWTB man Chair don, Glory rall, it Sprout, now Collins. “Ove Ball,” says ado in Fort s as well Northern Color rtunity for my client oppo good a was iniates.” ess model as my assoc “The busin sophistiHe continues: services, a gement ional banking mana tradit t s tmen clude mized inves nsurservices and i cated and custo iary and trust a perplatform, fiduc all integrated through relaory lting ance consu nt and advis h manageme sonal wealt Inc. of of FiberLok, tionship.” ms, owner recomBrown Abra t through the came to Sprou business Fort Collins, personal and of a trusted too busy mendation years. “I am ty twen of rstand the relationship try and unde type business to “His my ms, ng Abra runni g with Jim does,” says He is dealin type of work which is about trust. my business, of business . That ed results of the concentrat over thirty years ed hard at for you trust.” FiberLok I have work one facneed some any and manu is why you lock printing comp rmance heat is a specialty a, a high perfo textiles. FiberLok turer of Lextr on over most often track with transfer used development have is on the high ts, fifteen of which they paten U.S. 100 the past year. the Old Town received in moved from at 3003 First Western new location . area to its s 2008 Collin mber Fort Road in Septe East Harmony

ust bank

western tr

advice are management icated wealth k again. ice and sophist ily wealth? Thin h financial serv nerational fam Think top-notc s with multi-ge ster Coa t Eas for reserved only

first banking ::

WONDERFUL RESPONSE

16

Thank you for making First Western a most appreciative bank. We have had a wonderful response to the article in the Northern Colorado Business & Building issue and the photos look fabulous. Thank you for your hard work and all that you do for our community. The Gang at First Western Trust Bank

First Wesatnekrn Trust B ern Colorado

FWTB North

F Dear Lydia, I wanted to let you know how much I have enjoyed receiving Style over the years. It is indeed an informative magazine about Fort Collins and the area and how much of a giving community it is. That message was well communicated in your Family & Philanthropy issue, which focused on non-profit organizations. Keep up the great work on Style. It is certainly an impressive and informative magazine! Charlotte Selenski, Fort Collins

SIZEABLE DONATION Dear Lydia and Ina, Thank you, thank you, thank you for showing the check presentation by the Fort Collins Service League to Foothills Gateway, Inc., in the amount of $50,000 in your Family & Philanthropy issue of Style magazine. As a result of our Kitchen Kaper Home Tour in 2008, we were able to make this sizeable donation based on a one-day event! These dollars help provide valuable therapy, educational equipment, and special programs not otherwise available to the Foothills Gateway Center. We are truly grateful for your support of this worthwhile event. Mary O’Brien, Publicity Karel Applebee, Co-Chairman

GROWING MY CUSTOMER BASE The day after the Building and Remodeling Issue of Style came out I received a phone call from a new client. We will be assisting her with some household updates. Thank you Style for growing my customer base. That is what I wanted to achieve by working with your great magazine. Laurie King Home Detailers

GENEROSITY Lydia, On behalf of our Task Force, I thank you for doing an ad in Style for us. You are most generous! Looking forward to seeing you at the National Day of Prayer breakfast. Betsy Hoff Coordinator, National Day of Prayer

10

n Abrams, left,

clients Brow

sa Abrams.

and wife Melis

ibes et. Wylie descr western mark inating the client: half of the typical FWTB anies in the eastern “The big comp to dealing with old estabe are used nalistic servic the country offer a pater cially and h, (espe h lished wealt ado wealt , and s. But Color to their client first generation comes Colorado) is l capital that in Northern ectua intell entre is created from and CSU. These for a s like UNC are looking out of place professionals head… preneurs and a pat on the ership, not e that financial partn offers smart savvy advic as cially who finan one ssful some be as succe will help them fields.” ng their were investigati athey are in and Olsen When Wylie Northern Color Denver into ssionals expansion from to many industry profe es d By Warren Diggl do, they talke rs in this market. an | Photos to Radm talk to playe Corey By n told us about the says tenth perso “After the had our guy,” about we knew we Jim Sprout, really thinking weren’t even Jim is such a great Wylie. “We he says, “but Warren a signifiet,” son, was mark ado It this another Color ern Colorado. Officer Investment with help from leader in North y.” serves as Chief was forations, a partOlsen. Olsen cant opportunit strategy. He recommend for Maninvestment ehall Asset Based on thosethat will pay dividends in charge of ged ent of IBJ Whit and born merly the presid where he increased mana e t & Associates nership was p . James Sprou Company, merged n, and befor agement Grou many years Trust n to $10 billio of Morgan billio Valley $3 River from assets president Poudre valed and was in 2004. l fund busisophy that FWTB globa that he found philo with nt’s ern’s onWest Manageme “I liked First long-term relati a Stanley Asset York. asize rehensive and s had few pris. We emph ness in New ues a comp i, potential client ing with client Realizing that ns west of the Mississipp ship in work optio of domvate banking set the auspicious goal ers azine FWTB found ’s STYLE Mag

owing bank Fastest gr

(FWTB), Trust Bank irst Western Scott Wy2002 by CEO wealth founded in integrated a private lie, combines solutions on permanagement more a rm with banking platfo -centered approach ected, client Colorado, Arisonally conn successful in very ng that is provi rnia. bank in zona, and Califo To be the best private ? Their vision s. Trust United State later sold the the western founded and FWTB in Denver Wylie, who ado, established Bank of Color

AN INFORMATIVE MAGAZINE

r, works with

s Sprout, cente

Chairman Jame

rds and Larry

bers Paula Edwa

Mem Advisory Board Community Sprout. man James ern Colorado FWTB North Benningsdorf, and Chair President Kristi

Edwards,

are referred clients to FWTB adviGenerally, new or other professional new locaunity clients tly opened active Comm by current two in Western recen also has an Edwards, 2012. First , Arizona, and sors. The bank that includes: Larry in Scottsdale holz, rea.” tions: one  Advisory Board Jim McW illiams, Cliff Buch ley, in California a es les, servic Ange rds, d new the Los Rachel LaVal Paula Edwa recently adde nt for nonKim McDaniels, Also, FWTB geme Rice, son. ey mana Peter Rodn Eric lting, cash and a fullof The onald, and 401K consu businesses, also owner Alistar MacD ations and rds, who is as an profits, found department. Larry Edwa has served remained Fort Collins, says, has in He . er FWTB scale mortgage Cent years five Light ins how member for board CIO Olsen expla banks have found them advisory board to be a good sounding other hs. “Our is them more very solid while ground in recent mont “Our function effort. rship. We give shaky leade d their dered on ’s s consi expan bank selve for the rvabeen a very unity and help ards very conse growth has rs in the comm stand t finge credi . our We’ve kept s on the board reach.” comrds, also serve estab ent on the tive.” Paula Edwa y and I have able ates the sentim re built around ip my famil I’m Wylie reiter cultu “The relationsh bank is so beneficial. If term “We have a the focus on long oppany website: uctions of peolished with nt, and we own by making introd to be able to risk manageme our clients and for our love to repay them the bank, I’d booming, we s both for to are ion result ets know I gnit ple the mark ip naous, but in says. Meriting reco has made erations. When g and cauti their relationsh do that,” she harssive growth a little borin might begin essential out as a safe may seem FWTB’s impre headlines. Business maga New clients nt  review , we stand te Sprout. h manageme regional times like these st growing priva d tional and with a wealt according to tracks the faste ranke process loose ends, bor.” zine, Inc. 500 the review in  tying up In 2008, they report planned in in the U.S. family fibank, and companies The solutions the development of a tive edge g st growing peti plan planfaste oppin h in coM the ssion eye-p sive wealt a succe FWTB as might result tion at an he on comprehen “Our portfolio for loved ones, since incep overlooked, “We focus its growth orf. duciary plan ess (very often investnt. ins Benningsd of a life loan growth 791.2 perce ning,” expla experienced and savvy for one’s busin cy planning in  case Wylie, last year’s by deposit the t comngen t plan for According to ded only managers are als, and our investmen with says), conti ,  an investmen percent, excee percent. The bank possibly ssion try experts was up 85 ment profe changing event financial assets, and rose by 87 rised of indus of and manes, he says. growth, which mittee is comp n in assets management servic millio d .” oxiwe $450 separelate ience Appr , not focused; currently has n in financial assets.  years of exper some banking works as a team “We are client y based and s is assets, billio She continues: “Our staff really Sprout explains. “Our ing fiduciary ages $2.2 are locall dets,” serve million, includ d advisor; we ; we have local mately $250 Colorado. are a truste rate departmen ing approach. We only s. So FWTB in Northern the community vals; we have a are managed ingsdorf, President of engrained in a holistic plann term clients in Fort Collin appro / and ng and loan longWe really ing education ado native Kristi Benn cision maki about 220 n by volume. providing ongo ip based; we ado is a Color try. She s?” ess is not drive e focus on busin client onsh to Northern Color of the banking indus uniqu our relati value ution: we are an we add we are most of all; 25-year veter gy for the instit life planning; ask, how can of mind, and growth strate asset and revenue y explains the provide peace ing ng for stead what we do.” 17 itted to grow “We are looki very good at are also comm 28 locations by 8 to growth. We locations from our current

rado Business

Northern Colo

& Building 2009

Lydia

16

EFFECTIVE ADVERTISING Dear Style team, Thank you Style Media & Design for being such an effective advertising vehicle! The return on investment we’ve experienced with Style Magazine is the best I’ve witnessed in my thirty years of ownership of several businesses. The reason you’re such a good value is, I believe, the dedication to care and quality that you bring to each issue you print and every relationship you forge. These in turn benefit readers, advertisers, and Northern Colorado communities alike. Kudos to your fabulous team! Robert Evans Community Collaboration Director Open Pathways to Learning at Hearthstone

GOOD INFORMATION Lydia, I have wanted to let you know these past few weeks how much I liked your Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness issue. I don’t know how you do it! The magazine was electrified with so much good information; it gave all of us so much hope for good health. There was a captivating movement page to page for positive health and wellbeing. I read every page and congratulate you on another great magazine. Nancy Bloser Fort Collins

25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION – A WONDERFUL EVENING Lydia, Teresa and I thank you very much for a wonderful evening. Your office building is lovely, the food and festivities out back were fun (we made several new acquaintances), and “Pride & Prejudice” was a great way to top off

WE LOVE TO HEAR FROM READERS, SEND YOUR COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS TO: angie@stylemedia.com Phone: 970.226.6400, ext.215 | Fax: 970.226.6427 www.stylemagazinecolorado.com

the evening. As a relatively new firm, Style Magazine has really helped us establish name recognition and credibility. The number of people who say, “I saw you in Style” leads us to believe that our investment was worthwhile and continues to pay dividends. I’m sorry we did not get to meet personally last night. Each time I was going to come over, one of us got called away or was meeting another acquaintance. Plus, I knew you had your hands full making sure everything went smoothly, which it did. I’m sure there will be other opportunities to meet. In the meantime, I wanted you to know how much we enjoyed your hospitality. Congratulations on your 25th anniversary! Kind regards, Paul F. Mueller, CPA Mueller & Associates, CPA, LLC Dear Style Magazine and Abby B., A belated “thank you” for such a nice evening out, celebrating your 25 years of running. The food was wonderful and we thoroughly enjoyed the “Pride and Prejudice” showing. We thank you for publishing such great and informative articles about Fort Collins people and businesses. I always look forward to reading your magazine. Thanks again, Dave and Stephanie Staudacher Home Smart Home, LLC Dear Sondy, Thanks very much for inviting Evan and I to the 25th anniversary celebration. The event was certainly done up “in style” and your office is beautiful. It was nice to see you again and also to meet Ina in person. We appreciate our involvement with Style Magazine and have had such good response to the feature article that you did in the Northern Colorado Medical and Wellness issue. Kim Mueller, Marketing & Events Director Pathways Hospice

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


17

n e e e ly

ais rve So ally

17


2009 :: BUSINESS & BUILDING

16

features

at Della Terra Mountain Chateau 16 Romance This romantic chateau is the perfect Estes Park special occasion getaway. By Kay Rios Peaceful Country Refuge 22 A Mary and Jim McCambridge transform their garden into a refuge for

relaxation and a beautiful background for entertaining. By Lynn M. Dean

to Money Basics 26 Back What the experts say to do with your money right now. By Julie Estlick business

22

Go Green 50 Businesses Import Auto Body and Porter Industries share their strategies and motivation to be sustainable. By Angeline Grenz

building

Flair Abounds in Masonville 40 European Luxury Estate

From concrete slab to the finishing touches, Gibbs Construction builds in style. By Kay Rios

30

to Shutters for Outdoor Living 44 Shades Innovative Openings shares the latest styles and trends in shades, shutters, and awnings. By Allie Comeau

lifestyle

Edge Fashion 30 Cutting Salon owners feature summer’s best looks.

38 Best Patios for People Watching

46

culture

Delivers Message of Faith 46 Film Movie tells the tale of local couple’s Cowboy Ministry. By Connie Hein departments

10 From the Readers 14 Publisher’s Letter Pillars 54 Community Jerry and Marcia Donnan

50

Town 55 About Faces of Triumph • BBB Torch Awards On the cover:

Della Terra Mountain Chateau’s family partnership: Darrel and Pam Amelang, Sandy Garcia, and Marty and Audrey Miller

Cover photo by Warren Diggles

12

www.stylemagazinecolorado.com

Cultivate Hope • National Day of Prayer Weld Stone Soup • 30th PVH Spring Benefit Celebration of Philanthropy • Style’s 25th Anniversary Celebration... and more

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


r ,\n'E,

,ces

[)noeo _____-:::

~1-9

CALL TODAY FOR AFREE ESTIMATE!

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING 1 DECORATIVE PAINTING IRESIDENTIAL & VVIWUYU.. I"lVI,ll...ll. HANDYMAN WORK IWRITIEN WARRANTY FULLY INSURED &BONDED FINANCING AVAILABLE (WAC) INO D;D~~~~~~=-~

Main Office: 970-207-10051 Toll Free: 888-7-PAINT-91 Fax: 970-613-07721 www.mandepainting.com


Publisher’s Letter

W

Twenty-five Years of Publishing

When I tell friends and clients we are celebrating our 25th anniversary of publishing Style Magazine, they can’t believe it. Actually, I can hardly believe it myself until I go browsing through some old issues and start to reminisce. Style Magazine has been a publication for and about the people of Northern Colorado since its inception in 1984. Yes, this year we are celebrating our silver anniversary! I sometimes ask myself, where did all those years go? And, upon reflection, a sea of people, articles, events, photo shoots, funny and challenging times, life experiences, and more flood

14

my memory. Memories such as the time a snake came out of the river and started to slither onto our fashion model’s foot; the time some of the contents of our magazine were printed upside down and we didn’t know it in time to reprint; the time I had the privilege of interviewing the late designer, Mr. Blackwell, and his life partner; the time I struggled over making the decision to spend a huge amount of money to convert the magazine from a black and white to full color; the time my daughter and her high school friends were photographed for the cover eating sushi; the time I interviewed and photographed the late Malcomb Forbes; the time I tearfully shared the news about my breast cancer diagnosis; and so on and so on. It has been a fulfilling and wonderful career publishing Style these 25 years! My daughters have been a part of their mom’s career passion as well, and I thank them for their understanding through the years when at times something pertaining to the magazine had to preempt something they wanted to do. Thank you Meredith and Ali; I love you both so much. A family member who has been a significant part of Style magazine is my sister, Ina Szwec, and I want to publically thank her. She has been with Style for twelve years and has contributed in countless ways to its success. Most people would know her as our society About Town editor, but in the office she is the one who keeps track of all the many pieces that go into each magazine. Thank you, Ina, for your love and your tireless commitment to Style and to our communities. I love you, sis. Without a creative and caring staff, Style Magazine wouldn’t be the publication it is today. Together the synergy of ideas, creative talent, writing, photography, marketing, and administrative

skills come together each time to produce a Style publication. Not only is this team talented; they are a fun family that cares about each other, about Style, about our communities, clients, and readers. It is a lively and energetic team and I appreciate and value each member’s contribution! As time moved on and our communities have grown, we have evolved Style Magazine to serve our region better. When we began in 1984, Style was a fashion magazine. Over time, it transformed into a lifestyle magazine. As we saw the need, we added niche publications to serve the building community, the business sector, and then the fast-growing medical and wellness area. We have kept our noses to the proverbial grindstone and remained focused on our mission and on servicing our readers and customers. Thank you for continuing to support and read Style. We appreciate the loyalty of our advertisers and readers. We commit to you that we will continue working hard to deserve your support! This issue brings you interesting and fun features I hope you enjoy. Get acquainted with the romantic chateau, Della Terra, in Estes Park. Take a peak at an exquisite home in Masonville and enjoy the color and design of Mary and Jim McCambridge’s garden. “Back to Money Basics” will provide you some useful financial guidance, while “Cutting Edge Fashion” will show off trendy fashions modeled by local hair stylists. Enjoy these and more in this issue of Style. With gratitude,

lydia@stylemedia.com

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


KICH~~~~ Jrfl.

Lighting for

~r~

CZ)

Mountain Choteau Designed by Jeanne Godinez, Senior Lighting Consultant ~~~, Photo by Verge Photography

ITuELIGHTCENTER

Online catalog at www.lightcenterinc.com

Business & Building 2009

Your Local Lighting Experts

I

(970) 226-3430

I

2725 S. College Ave, Fort Collins

15


R

omance By Kay Rios | Photos by Warren Diggles

at Della Terra Mountain Chateau


Photo courtesy of KB Photography

T

The road curves gently through the trees when suddenly a building rises majestically, as if lifting from the earth. Living up to its name, which in Italian translates loosely to “of the earth,” the Della Terra Mountain Chateau gently blends with its background. The exterior features stone from local quarries on the building’s face and surrounding retaining walls. Pathways leading to and from the facility are stone and decorative tile, with thoughtfully chosen landscaping designed to complement the surrounding environment.

This tribute to nature is entirely the point, says co-owner and wedding site coordinator Pam Amelang. “This was originally a campground and we wanted to keep as true as possible to what already existed. We also wanted it to look brand new but still look like it had grown out of the mountainside.” Located five miles past Estes Park on Fall River Road and opposite Rocky Mountain National Park’s (RMNP) Gateway Visitor Center, Della Terra is perched at the top of its 13 heavily wooded acres. It is surrounded by RMNP property, which the vision for Della Terra capitalizes upon mightily. Amazingly, the 22,000-plus square foot building only took out three trees, Amelang says, adding that was also by design. “We’re all tree huggers,” she says of her partners, husband Darell, sister Sandy Garcia, and brother and sister-in-law Marty and Audrey Miller. They are all Colorado natives, so preservation was especially important to them, she says. Parking areas are scattered around the original campsites so that no more trees would be lost. Golf carts pick up guests and transport them from parking areas to the facility. Designed with romance in mind, Della Terra caters to special occasions – weddings, anniversaries, and honeymoons – offering an Old World feel with a new world sense of environmental sustainability. “It was important to be as green and energy efficient as possible,” Amelang says. “The solar system on the south side heats our domestic water and also the radiant floors that run throughout the building. We’ve used efficient equipment and LED lighting everywhere in the building except for the Celebration room. For air conditioning, we installed ductless mini-splits.” In addition to the environmental focus, the group wanted to contribute to the local economy. “We tried to stay local as much as possible. For example, the Rosetta stone for the retaining wall came from Signature Stone in Greeley. We used Capco Tile and Stone and Florida Tile from Fort Collins for the interior work.” She rolls off a long list of local businesses, including Jordan Marble and Granite,

Business & Building 2009

that were involved in the creation of the Chateau. In fact, the list of local suppliers takes up two full printed pages. Every area of Della Terra is a showcase of what those suppliers can provide. The interior of the building is as stunning as the exterior. Visitors are first greeted by a twostory, three-sided stone fireplace and accompanying waterfall. Wandering through the hallways, discoveries are made at every turn: the spa treatment room, styling salon, and dry sauna; the small library featuring books on what to do in Colorado; the artist’s alcove where artists display their work for six months at a time; the intimate breakfast area; the reading niches. Then, of course, there are the rooms. Della Terra offers 14 luxury suites, each with its own sitting nook, fireplace, walkthrough jetted shower, private hot tub, and balcony. Each suite is distinctly different with artistry displayed in one-of-a-kind tiling (there is 35,000 square feet of tile in the building) and themed furnishings. Themes run through each of the suites with the lower level focusing on the earth elements. The idea is to celebrate and embrace an aspect of nature in each suite, Amelang says. “On the main level, we have the seasons: sun in the summer room, blossoms in the spring room, color for the autumn room, and snow in the holiday winter suite.” The second level spotlights the sky with rooms designed for dawn, dusk, illumination, and the horizon. Two night skies frolic in the attic suites: moon dance and star dance. Everything is about the many phases of love, she adds. “We were after romance and our events focus on weddings, honeymoons, and anniversaries. All the way through, we made it as romantic as possible.” For those special celebrations, a number of options are available beginning with an area for the bridal party to dress and prepare, and a theatre for the groom and friends to watch sports, have a beer, and wait for their turn at pictures. The ceremony can be held outside at the Devotion Place, a ceremonial circle that capi-

17


A grand three-sided stone fireplace greets visitors as they enter Della Terra Mountain Chateau.

Sandy Garcia and Pam Amelang run the day-today operations at Della Terra Mountain Chateau.

Photo courtesy of KB Photography

talizes on a spectacular backdrop of surrounding mountains with leveled stone seating. The indoor Celebration Place accommodates up to 200 guests and features a raised platform, dance floor, and full service bar. The entertainment area offers both sound and lighting systems for a DJ or an area for a live band. The commercial kitchen is available for use by the selected caterer. An intimate indoor Gathering Place features balconies and two large fireplaces that can be used for a celebration toast and appetizers

The Romance suite features a granite waterfall and luxurious spa bath.

after the ceremony. “We want to make each event special,” says Amelang, adding that they only host one wedding at a time to ensure an exclusive, intimate experience. Rooms not used by guests for the special event are open to the general public. Also open to the public are the original cabins scattered around the mountainside below the Chateau. “While we were waiting for all of the permits on the main house, we renovated the motel and the cabins.” The cozy log-sided cabins feature fireplaces, hot tubs, full size kitchens and baths, and vary in size from the smallest for two people to the largest which can hold up to ten. In all, the site was perfect for what Della Terra’s owners had been planning for some time. “We created the dream together,” Amelang says. In 2005, they found the perfect location. “It had been a campground since the 1950s. We saw it and knew this was it. We said, ‘this is what we’ve been looking for.’” It has been a family affair from the beginning. Since her brother Marty and husband Darell are partners in their Fort Collins Business, Hill Country Custom Homes, the building expertise was already in place. Garcia and Amelang were also working at Hill Country as designers, so they created the visual and Garcia put that on paper and into the actual plans. They finally received the building permit in 2008. The Chateau took 14 months to complete and, on June 1 of this year, they officially opened Della Terra. It will continue to be a family affair. Amelang is the wedding site coordinator. Garcia handles reservations and accounting functions. The Millers will manage the event bars and kitchen, while Darell Amelang will continue with Hill Country. “When we had our open house, people were surprised that this is locally owned and operated,” Amelang says.

Each suite is uniquely decorated to represent an aspect of nature. This one-of-a-kind sitting room is part of the Moon Dance suite.

18

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Mountain Chateau


20

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STYLE Magazine


L&L Acoustical Inc. has been Northern Colorado’s leading drywall contractor for over 36 years. We take pride in providing first class quality and service for both contractors and individuals. Visit our website at llacoustical.com to view samples of custom hand textures for the personal touch in your home.

401 N. Link Lane, Ft Collins, CO 80524 • 221-3139 • www.llacoustical.com

Della Terra Mountain Chateau embraces the natural landscape with an exterior of locally quarried rock.

In addition to the siblings and their spouses, a staff of 24 people will keep Della Terra running smoothly day-to-day as they create an internal community designed to make every stay memorable. It is that sense of community that made the Chateau a reality. “The craftsmen we had on our job were unbelievable. I was amazed at how invested they were in their work. They did everything they could do to make it perfect.” And it shows in the end result.

For more information, visit the Website at:

www.dellaterramountainchateau.com Kay Rios, Ph.D., is a freelance writer based in Fort Collins. Estes Park has been one of her favorite haunts since she was a kid.

Business & Building 2009

21


By Lynn M. Dean | Photos by Lydia Dody

B


B

Jim and Mary McCambridge enjoy the fresh vegetables from their garden.

As Vice President of Marketing for Home State Bank, Mary McCambridge’s weekdays are never quiet or boring. “Sometimes I feel like I have 15 balls in the air at a time,” she explains. “I’m on the phone, I’m online, I’m meeting with people in the office and out of the office, or I’m off to a photo shoot. Sometimes the days are long days.”

ut when she leaves the office, she leaves that hectic world behind and exchanges it for a more peaceful one. “As soon as I come home I change into my shorts and then I’m out back in the garden. It’s like an outdoor room for me.” The garden “room” is her respite, her refuge, especially on the weekends. It’s the place where she recharges so that she can face another chaotic workweek. “I guess the whole thing is just an escape into something other than the everyday,” she says. “On Saturday mornings I’m usually out there at 6:00 a.m.– when the light is just beautiful – with coffee in hand. You’ve got to grab the dew when you can find it!” Mary and her husband, Jim, traded city life for a sprawling spread in an isolated subdivision just southeast of Fort Collins. “We like the space. It’s quiet and peaceful and ‘country like,’” she says. “We always wanted an east-facing back yard so that we could enjoy the afternoon without being baked. Then, later, we could switch over to the front porch and watch the sun setting behind

Business & Building 2009

the panoramic view of the mountains.” However, bordered to the east by farmland, the yard was mostly grass and bindweed when Jim and Mary moved in. Lots and lots of bindweed. Mary was not dissuaded. Like an artist, over the past three years she has sculpted the land in her yard to create her peaceful refuge. “I’m not a master gardener, I just love gardening,” she explains. “I had a plan in my head and started creating it section by section. Realizing that we’re on dry land and that the bindweed is rampant, I took out big sections of the grass and laid down more than 100 yards of fabric. Then I started planting.” “This is Mary’s project,” Jim acknowledges. “She just thinks of these things. She wakes up in the middle of the night and says ‘I think I’d like to . . .’” “I can’t put it to paper, but I can certainly make things happen out there,” Mary says proudly. “I do all the planting and I’ve hauled tons of rock out there over the years. Of course, Jim has an interest too. He loves the color and the way it looks, and he’s been a good sport about doing anything I ask.”

Mary anchored the back garden with a very special tree. “Dad’s tree was the first thing I planted. We put it in the ground that first spring and then we built the garden around it.” The tree did not belong to her father, but rather, was given to her as a living memory of him at his death in 2005. “Blue spruce was what I chose,” she relates. “We were living somewhere else at the time and when we left a year later, I dug it up and brought it with me. And it has thrived here. It’s doubled in size in the last couple of years.” Mary sheepishly admits that she does talk to the tree and touches it lovingly. “It’s like my dad is with me. I think of him whenever I’m out in the garden.” After she planted the tree, it was time to define the space for the garden. She and Jim hauled in two dump truck loads of dirt and created berms to add height and interest to the garden. Then she planted a variety of perennials incorporating a strong color palette into the design. “I love reds because I love hummingbirds,” she says. “Different kinds of reds draw hummingbirds, especially weigelia.” Mary also incorporated purple into her gar-

23


den by planting coneflowers, butterfly bushes (which attract more garden visitors), and lavender. She accented the purple by adding a sprinkling of yellow throughout. She then planted a variety of greens to provide a contrasting backdrop for her flowers and blooming bushes. “I planted a really nice ribbon grass that grows on the Western Slope,” she explains. “It’s a variegated green. It adds a beautiful texture to the garden.” One focal point in the garden is the small arbor that leads visitors in. A second is a small bridge under which Mary planted purple-blue veronica. “I made it look like a stream coming down,” she explains. “When it’s in bloom it’s really kind of cool. It looks like flowing water.” Color floods the garden practically all year long. In the spring, tulips, daffodils, and grape hyacinths pierce the frozen ground and bring the promise of what is to come. In June, when the summer heat seems to wilt all but the most drought-tolerant of flowers, Iris rise triumphantly in purple and yellow glory as wild roses bloom fleetingly. And in the fall, when neighboring plants have all but gone to seed, the autumn sedum, yarrow, and mums take over. Unlike her dad’s tree, Mary doesn’t baby the other plants in her garden. “I don’t amend the soil like I probably should,” you can’t grow most of them. That’s why we chose honey locust. They’re fast growing and they have small leaves so you don’t have to do a lot of raking in the fall. And you get a good canopy.” Shade is one of the final elements Mary needed for her outdoor refuge as well as a few fun items to add whimsy and interest to the garden. “I love toads and frogs. I have real and decorative ones,” she says smiling. “I even had a toad house, although I have yet to find a toad in it.” The most important element in their garden is something that has always been there, at least as long as Mary and Jim have owned the house. It is a swing set. Together Mary and Jim have five children and five grandchildren that visit often. If you ask her, Mary would say that in a heartbeat she would trade the calmness of her garden for the chaos those children bring with them as they burst into her quiet refuge, race across that little bridge, and lunge at those swings. She’ll take that kind of pandemonium any day of the week.

Mary McCambridge has slowly transformed the grounds around her Fort Collins home into an outdoor oasis.

she admits. “I just decided that if they don’t make it on their own, they won’t make it in this climate.” Most of the time she just plants them, gives them a little fertilizer, and hopes for the best. That said, she does try to choose hardy plants that will survive in the dry clay soil. “I have a good friend who is a master gardener in Grand Junction,” she explains. “She and I are always testing seeds and plants that will adapt to the dry climate out here. The fun part is trying different seeds.” Mary even grows some vegetables and she has discovered another successful strategy to ensure the plants will grow. She trades with her neighbors. That first year, the McCambridges also planted plenty of other trees on the property. Mary explains that, while Jim was raised in Ault and is used to the wide-open spaces, she grew up back East and misses the lushness of that area. “I come from Illinois where trees and timber are abundant. The only thing I don’t like about Colorado is that it’s not full of timber.” In addition to planting a variety of trees around the perimeter of the property to define their yard, Mary also wanted to create shade in the back. “I really wanted a tree canopy back here,” she says. “But unless you’re right around a waterway,

24

Lynn M. Dean is a freelance writer living in Northern Colorado.


• Free Portfolio Review • IRA Rollover • Annuities • Stocks & Bonds • Mutual Funds Located at:

i2 ~~~eState 3227 Timberline Road Ft. Collins, CO 80525

Denise Martz Investment Representative

970-292-0115 Investment Centers of America, Inc. (ICA), member FINRA, SIP(, is not affiliated with Home State Bonk. Securities, and insurance products offered through ICA and affiliated insurance agencies are • not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency • not a deposit or other obligation of or guaranteed by any bank or its affiliates • subject to risks including the possible loss of principal amount invested. Olfe5776-0410-49791

20°/o OFF

Window Cleaning Not valid with any other offers. $75.00 minimum service for 20% off. Expires 12/31 /2009

LET US HELP YOU WITH: • Carpet/Upholstery Cleaning • Residential Cleaning Service • Hard Surface Floor Refinishing & Reconditioning • Water Damage Restoration • Move In/Out Cleans ·Tile/Wood Restoration

IJl =

2007 Torch Award For

Business Ethics

Porter Industries is IMAGE Certified By Homeland Security

Business & Building 2009

25


back to

money

basics By Julie Estlick

“For 20 years, Americans have lived beyond their means and tried to ‘keep up with the Joneses,’” says Dunnigan, a financial planner with Investment Centers of America located at Home State Bank in Loveland. “This year it’s more in style to discuss saving and investing than spending. This crisis has people rethinking their financial life.” Bankers and financial planners in the region agree that it took a recession, the near-collapse of the financial system, and the shuttering of many companies for people to realize one important truth: we are not saving enough money. According to Dunnigan, the average 50-year-old has less than $50,000 saved and that is a huge problem. In his estimation, if you make $50,000 a year, you should be saving between $5,000 to $10,000 a year if you ever want to stop working. “Companies are dropping pensions, cutting hours, and benefits,” he says. “If you don’t save and just rely on a company or the government to fund your retirement you’re going to be pretty disappointed.”

The Basics Once you are ready to start spending less and saving more, what are the best strategies for safely putting your hard-earned cash away? How much of your income should you keep available for emergencies? How can you be sure the government insures your savings account if yet another bank goes under? The key is to start setting money aside immediately in a FDIC-insured bank, says Suzanne Pullen, Vice President of Private Banking for Loveland-based Home State Bank. Not next month or in six months, but today. “We all need to create a safety net for ourselves and, because of compounding interest and the value of time when it comes to money, it’s best to start now.” “Compounding interest” is essentially the interest on your original investment earning additional interest. After the first day, as the interest compounds it accelerates the growth. For example, $100 deposited in a savings account at

When Kevin Dunnigan walks into a cocktail party these days, he’s surprised by what he hears. The conversation is no longer about fancy trips or luxury purchases and that suits Dunnigan, a Certified Financial Planner, just fine. 10 percent compounded interest would yield $10 in interest during the first year (10 percent of $100). During the second year, the account would yield $11 – that is 10 percent of the sum of the $100 principal plus $10 in accumulated interest, or $110. At that point your account balance would be $121. A good safety net is at least six months’ income (some financial experts now say 12 months) in checking or savings accounts, municipal bonds, or Certificates of Deposit (CDs). These are vehicles that you can easily withdraw funds from without penalties in the event of an emergency, reduced income, or job loss. It’s all about getting back to the fundamentals of saving. Create a realistic budget, writing down everything you buy so you know exactly where your money is going. Then insert a line item for savings, Pullen says. Even if you start making deposits today into a savings account and stop in five years, in 20 years when you’re ready to retire you’ll have more money saved than your neighbor who opened an account a decade after you but is still making contributions. (See chart on page 35.) Next, shop around to find the bank that fits your family’s needs best. Harry Devereaux, President of Home State Bank, offers these steps to ensure your money is safe and sound in a secure bank: 1. Be sure your bank is FDIC-insured and know the insurance limit for each account type. Today, the FDIC will insure some account types up to $250,000. With careful structuring of your accounts, it’s possible to maintain far more than $250,000 in FDIC-insured deposits in a single bank – a fact that many television financial experts regularly get wrong. 2. Check the bank’s Website and ask to speak to management – they should be willing to sit down with you. Get a feel for the bank’s management style and philosophies. Is the bank involved in the local community? 3. Check the bank’s financials on its Website to determine its growth rate. You want to deposit your money in a bank with moderate, controlled growth (less than 15 percent each year). If a bank is growing at 20 to 30 percent each year, that could be a red flag. 4. Ask about the bank’s loan-to-deposit ratio. You want

Kevin Dunnigan, financial planner with Investment Centers of America

26

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


“Because of compounding interest and the value of time when it comes to saving money, it’s best to start now.” Suzanne Pullen, Vice-President, Private Banking, Home State Bank

“With over $550 million in assets, we offer the strength of the largest locally-owned bank in Larimer County.” Harry Devereaux, President, Home State Bank

a bank that has some liquidity, i.e. not all of its funds are tied up in loans. Home State Bank’s ratio is 80 percent. 5. Ask if the bank is heavily involved in the brokered CD market or participated in sub-prime lending. Both can be signs of higher risk-taking by bank management. An institution’s capitalization is also worth examining. A well-capitalized bank has sufficient capital to survive hard times. Make sure a bank’s risk-based capital ratio is above 10 percent, Devereaux advises. “Home State Bank has served the needs of our neighbors in Larimer County for almost 60 years,” says Devereaux, a state banking leader who represents Colorado at the national level meeting with key decisionmakers to discuss the economy, community banks, and regulatory issues. “Today, with over $550 million in assets, we offer the strength of the largest locally-owned bank in Larimer County,” he continues. “The safety of your money remains our priority. We ensure funds are secure through our conservative approach and regular reviews by the FDIC, the Colorado State Bank Commissioner, the Federal Reserve Bank, auditors, and our Board of Directors.” To untangle some of the confusion over the Stimulus Plan and what’s happening in banking, Home State Bank has harnessed the power of the Internet to provide extensive information for consumers. The bank’s comprehensive Community Banking Help Center at www.homestatebank.com answers consumers’ questions and offers several suggestions on how to wisely save funds and create a budget. There is even a large glossary of terms. The site has earned rave reviews among bank executives who have praised it’s emphasis on insight and value over promoting it’s own products like many Wall Street bank sites. (See article on page 29.) Once you find a bank you can trust, look for the right types of accounts that earn you the most interest with few, if any, fees. Be sensitive to service charges and always read the fine print, Pullen cautions. “Anytime you can earn interest on an account that follows your current habits, get it,” she says. For example, a Rewards high-yield checking account like the one offered by Home State Bank is a free checking ac-

count with 3.21 percent interest (up to $25K) and no minimum balance. The rules? You receive only e-statements, you must use your debit card a certain number of times per month, and you need either a monthly automatic payment or deposit on the account. Some higher-interest savings accounts and money market accounts have minimum deposits or balances; comparison shopping pays off.

Long-term Investing Now that you have your checking and savings tools in order, it’s time to think about the long-term through retirement savings, college funds, or other savings options. If you’re offered a 401(k) retirement account through your work, set one up with automatic deposits, advises Denise Martz, investment representative with Investment Centers of America at Home State Bank. These are pre-tax dollars that you probably won’t miss because you don’t see the money each paycheck. “Always put in the maximum amount that your employer will match; just get in that habit,” she says. “Some companies match anywhere from two percent to 10 percent of what you contribute. Then when you get a raise or bonus, increase your contribution by one or two percent. Even if your employer has suspended the matching program, keep putting money into your 401(k) each month. It’s critical that you consistently save for retirement.” Financial planners like Martz and Dunnigan can look at your entire financial picture and help you reach your goals. Both men and women should choose a financial planner they are comfortable with. Look at their licenses, experience, and knowledge base; ask about their education and any continuing education courses they are taking, Martz advises. “Communication is key so you understand the information a financial planner gives you,” she says. “If a planner is talking over your head or you don’t feel a connection, then that’s not the right person for you.” Martz has noticed a shift in women taking more of an interest in their financial future and their family’s life planning. She encourages women to “get a handle on where the family’s accounts are located, how the money is invested, and how the market works. This way you won’t make those quick, emotional responses if something suddenly happens to your significant other.” Despite the stock market’s woes of late, Martz is still confident that her clients are better off investing there than in something safe that only guarantees a low return. “I feel the U.S. economy is moving in the right direction and we are ahead of the global economy because we’re taking proactive steps to improve things in the stock market,” she says. “History shows us it will take much longer to make back what you lost by investing in a 1 or 1.5 percent CD rather than if you had stayed in the market.” In fact, Martz is convinced that 2009 is the perfect time to buy into the stock market, especially for young people. “Right now everything in the market is on sale and you can buy more shares. It’s surprising how young investors tend to invest too conservatively starting out.” If you have reached mid-life, you may want outside CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

Denise Martz, investment representative with Investment Centers of America

Business & Building 2009

27


DID YOU KNOW ((Trust and experience go a long way when dealing with people's hard earned moneY:' Kevin Dunnigan, MBA, CFP®

that one of the Top 50 Investment Representatives in the United States is right here in northern Colorado? Kevin Dunnigan, a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER'" with Investment Centers of America, Inc., has been recognized by Bank Investment Consultant magazine, a leading financial industry publication, as one of the nation's top 50 representatives based in financial institutions. He was featured in the publication's December 2008 issue. With more than 25 years of experience in the financial services industry, Kevin has helped countless clients with their investments throughout a constantly changing economy.

*These testimonials may not be representative of the experience of other clients and are no guarantee of future performance or success.

Contact Kevin today:

970-622-2366

or e-mail: kevin.dunnigan@investmentcenters.com

www.helpwithmyinvestments.com NVESTMENT CENTERS Locatedat: OF AMERICA, INC. Home State Bank

.'>

!

We know rhe rerrirory.

300 East 29th St. Loveland, CO 80538

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. owns the certification marks CFP•, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER- and ~which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board's initial and ongoing certification requirements. Investment Centers of America, Inc.(ICA), member FINRA/SIPC, is not affiliated with Home State Bank. Securities and insurance products offered through ICA and affiliated insurance agencies are • not insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency • not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by any bank or its affiliates • subject to risks including the possible loss of principal amount invested. Olcu7225-0411-55074

28

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Community Banking

Help Center a Big Hit Home State Bank recently launched a Community Banking Help Center at its Website (www. homestatebank.com) that is full of questions individuals and businesses face everyday, along with easy-to-understand answers written in plain language. “Several months ago, we began gathering information from employees about the questions they were receiving from their customers,” says Mary McCambridge, Vice President of Marketing for Home State Bank. That feedback was incorporated into the Help Center, resulting in a Website that contains in-depth, straightforward responses to business questions like “How can I get help making payroll and keeping up with other operating expenses?” and queries from individuals such as “How can I better organize my family finances?” A user-friendly guide to difficult banking terms and clear explanations of FDIC is also a highlight. The site has been well received. “People have really started to read our Website and have found it to be very helpful, including the glossary of terms, information on investing, and insight for small business owners,” continues McCambridge. “Though it was designed with our clients in mind, it is something anyone can use and, from what we’ve seen, it contains more information than the Websites of many larger banks.” Don Childears, President/CEO of the Colorado Bankers Association, says, “Home State Bank’s Community Banking Help Center is a true resource for the entire Colorado community. Information that’s even remotely similar to this would be found on the Website of a large global bank. To think that a community bank in Loveland, Colorado, has created a Help Center of this depth is proof of Home State’s sincere commitment to its community.” Barbara Walker, Executive Director of the Independent Bankers of Colorado, adds: “This is one of the best sites I have seen. It provides easy-to-read fundamentals that each of us needs to manage our daily finances. This site is all about helping customers and non-customers alike with insights full of real value.” For more information, visit:

www.homestatebank.com.

Business & Building 2009

29


C Fa Ed ut shio ge o ting n f On location at these salons:

4019 S. Mason St. #1, Fort Collins

204 W. Maple St., Suite 101, Fort Collins

600 S. Mason St., Fort Collins

3600 Mitchell Dr., Suite 60, Fort Collins

30

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STYLE Magazine


n

Meghan MacDonald HeadTurners, Stylist and Make-up Artist Meghan and her significant other, Eric Pagel, love to be active and spontaneous; “life’s too short!” She enjoys fashion, photography, four-wheeling, and traveling. Meghan enjoyed the creative process from hair and make-up to the photo shoot. “Everyone seemed very passionate. It is great to be around positive people. I am usually the one telling the model what to do and how to do it. This was a nice change of pace.” The outfit was another plus. “Cloz is very unique. I think we need to have more boutiques with that type of diversity.”

Meghan makes a dramatic statement in the twin set by Dantelle (tank, $22, and jacket, $32) and white cuffed capris with a lower rise by Christopher Blue, $92. Heavy silver jewelry completes the look: silver necklace with black medallion, $24, silver spiral cuff bracelet, $40, and silver hoop earrings, $27. Courtesy of Cloz, Loveland.

Photos by Warren Diggles Art Direction by Lydia Dody

Salons Sport Summer Style Local salons show off the latest fashion from area boutiques.


This elegant and sophisticated ruffle top (below) of iridescent berry by Samuel Dong, $99, looks great over flattering black stretch slacks with crossover waistband, Clara S., $80. Courtesy of BeanBlossom, Estes Park.

Sandra Holter Buzz & Bliss, Owner and Stylist As owner of Buzz & Bliss salon, Sandra’s hobbies surround the salon and spa industry. “One of my favorite pastimes is attending trade shows and educational events.” In addition, Sandra loves traveling, spending time with family, and playing with her two poodles, Illy and Mylie. Thanks to her staff members Raquel and Laura, Sandra had a fabulous time getting ready for the fashion shoot. “It is always fun to get made up . . . you feel like a pampered princess. It was fun to be the one getting to model instead. I am usually the one on the production side of things.” Sandra is ready for fun in this basic white long tank (above) by Last Tango, $36, under a salmon silk shirt jacket with muted floral pattern by Ryan Michael, $120, and white cotton stretch capris with button detailing at bottom, Renuar Collection, $60. Courtesy of Running River, Estes Park.

32


Shauna Troxell C&S Workshop, Owner and Stylist Shauna refers to herself as a “designer of hair and life.” She owns C&S Workshop with her husband, Clayton. Her children are step-daughter, Chloe, nine years old, and daughter, Isabel, one and a half. In her spare time, Shauna enjoys running, hiking with family, knitting, fashion coordination, and “quality time with dear ones.” Shauna says the clothes provided by Designs were “darling, stylish, and contemporary” and calls Designs’ owners, Michelle and Linda, “marvelous women at the top of their field.” The modeling experience was very enjoyable. “Warren is great; his work is top-notch. And Lydia is a master director. She could be a dance instructor. Or even President!” Shauna laughs.

Maddy Kalin C&S Workshop, Receptionist and “Social Secretary” Maddy is married to Ed Kalin and they have a daughter, Ivy. When not coordinating the social activities and stylists at C&S Workshop, Maddy enjoys skiing, walking, reading, volunteering, and spending time with family. Maddy enjoyed the fashion shoot. “The ladies at Designs are just wonderful and my outfit was great. This was more fun than I ever thought it would be. It is also work! Lydia is great and I enjoyed working with Warren, the photographer.”

Fashions Shauna (above, left) looks sleek in this turquoise top with mirror detailing and silver mock closure by Joseph Ribkoff, $148, over slim ankle length black slacks by Margaret M, $96. Bracelet by Brighton, $59. Bold is the word for Maddy’s ensemble (above, right) of black Pima cotton tank by Charmedlife, $49, under a vivid butterfly sleeve tunic, Alberto Makali, $86, and Spanx leggings, $68. Jewelry is a four-strand necklace of genuine turquoise, $400, and earrings, $18, by Judy Barber. Shauna’s romantic classic white trench dress (left) with wide brown leather belt is by Finley, $306. Gold link necklace, $250, and two-tone bracelet by Brighton, $59. All fashions courtesy of Designs, Fort Collins.

33


Staci Stejer le Salon, Owner and Stylist Staci is the proud mother of two boys, James and Sean Hennessy. On her days away from the busy salon, Staci spends time with her pug, Lola, who was recently certified through Colorado State University as a therapy dog. Staci and Lola will be visiting sick children at Poudre Valley Hospital. “I had a lot of fun working with Lydia and Warren Diggles, the photographer. I loved the way Warren captured us at our best and we really liked the clothes. They were so cute, we want to buy them!” Staci is playful in this body-skimming flirty black and white dress with handkerchief hem and lace inset by Roser, $124, and topaz smoked glass necklace, $82, and drop earrings, $20. Courtesy of Cloz, Loveland.

Diane Krier le Salon, Stylist Diane enjoys the busy atmosphere at le Salon, “I have so much fun everyday.” In her free time, she enjoys working out and heads outdoors with her Yorkie, Riley, and her family and friends. “I really love relaxing with them in the summer.” Diane adds, “It was a lot of fun working with Lydia and Warren; they both made the experience very comfortable and relaxed. The clothes were so cute and fun . . . the jeans from Running River fit perfectly!” Diane looks fresh in this black stretch top with cap sleeves, by Renuar Collection, $45, over mid-rise relaxed fit denim in stonewash with pocket detail by Adiktd, $80. Distressed black leather belt with silver accents and Zuni-set turquoise by Tony Lama, $83, and cube turquoise, sterling silver, and Austrian crystal necklace by Jasper, $185, adds pizzaz. Courtesy of Running River, Estes Park.

34


Reality Check... The Price of Procrastination

the JONESEs VS. the SMITHS Can you afford to wait? The Joneses and the Smiths both had a goal to accumulate $500,000 in their 401(k) by the time they retired. Mr. and Ms. Jones began saving at age 36, investing $5,000 a year for 20 years. At age 55, they retired and decided to spend that $5,000 each year on an annual vacation, rather than investing it in their 401(k). Meanwhile, their investments kept growing . . . The Smiths, with the same goal, waited until age 46 to begin saving. They invested

AGE

JONES’ Cumulative Investment

Value at 8% Average Annual Return

the same amount every year as the Joneses ($5,000) and invested for the same time period, 20 years. By 65, the Joneses 401(k) had grown to $533,502. The Smiths, on the other hand, had grown to only $247,115, falling far short of their goal. (Figures based on a hypothetical 8% average annual total return.) The Smiths paid quite a price for postponing their retirement plan savings for 10 years.

AGE

SMITHS’ Cumulative Investment

Value at 8% Average Annual Return

36

$5,000

$5,400

37

$10,000

$11,232

38

$15,000

$17,531

39

$20,000

$24,333

40

$25,000

$31,680

41

$30,000

$39,614

42

$35,000

$48,183

43

$40,000

$57,438

44

$45,000

$67,433

45

$50,000

$78,227

46

$55,000

$89,886

46

$5,000

$5,400

47

$60,000

$102,476

47

$10,000

$11,232

48

$65,000

$116,075

48

$15,000

$17,531

49

$70,000

$130,761

49

$20,000

$24,333

50

$75,000

$146,621

50

$25,000

$31,680

51

$80,000

$163,751

51

$30,000

$39,614

52

$85,000

$182,251

52

$35,000

$48,183

53

$90,000

$202,231

53

$40,000

$57,438

54

$95,000

$223,810

54

$45,000

$67,433

55

$100,000

$247,115

55

$50,000

$78,227

56

$266,884

56

$55,000

$89,886

57

$288,234

57

$60,000

$102,476

58

$311,293

58

$65,000

$116,075

59

$336,197

59

$70,000

$130,761

60

$363,092

60

$75,000

$146,621

61

$392,140

61

$80,000

$163,751

62

$423,511

62

$85,000

$182,251

63

$457,392

63

$90,000

$202,231

64

$493,983

64

$95,000

$223,810

65

$533,502

65

$100,000

$247,115

$100,000

$247,115

Ending Value

$100,000

$533,502

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27

funds invested somewhere other than a 401(k). This way, if you need money before age 59½, you can get it without the 10 percent early withdrawal penalty, Martz advises. As you get older, of course, you want your money in more buckets. Diversifying with different types of accounts, like brokerage accounts, is a good choice stocks, bonds, and mutual funds that you can cash in without IRS penalties, Martz says. For those who want more security now, bonds may be a good investment. She also suggests fixed annuities, a tax-deferred tool with a guaranteed return, but you have to be 59½ to take the money out without penalty. “You really want to look at your goals and plans for retirement and determine how much money you need,” Martz says. “A good financial planner will help you put the steps in place so you know when you need to get more conservative with your money as you get closer to retirement age.” Saving for your children’s college years is also essential for most families facing the skyrocketing cost of tuition. Right now the best bet is the 529 plan, a federal plan that offers either prepaid tuition that you lock in at certain institutions, or a college savings plan that can be used anywhere. “The 529 plan is the best route because you have all the investment options, the money grows tax free and comes out tax free, plus you get a state tax deduction for your contribution,” Dunnigan says. The tax deduction works this way: if your son’s grandmother decides to put $20,000 in a 529 college fund for him, she can then take a five percent tax deduction, so she is saving $1,000 on her tax bill while also helping plan for her grandson’s future. In fact, it’s a good idea to consult a tax professional regardless to utilize other possible tax savings. If you have a line of credit secured by your home, for instance, the interest could be tax deductible. Now let’s turn to your home. If you haven’t already locked in a low, fixed-rate mortgage consider refinancing, Devereaux advises. The interest rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage recently went up, but at 5.25 percent it is still lower than last year. The best financial advice right now is: don’t panic. “The government has created many programs over the last six months to help the economy,” Devereaux says. “They’ve guaranteed bank deposits and some money market funds to help stabilize liquidity for banks and to boost consumer confidence.” In the end, it’s all about controlling our own spending and saving prudently. “It helps us all become more empowered if we feel that we have choices and can maintain a sense of control over our money in strapped economic times,” says Pullen. “If we each hold the line and don’t overact to the bad news, we’ll get through it.” Julie Estlick is a freelance writer and editor. She lives in Fort Collins with her husband and young son.

Source: Invesco Aim

Business & Building 2009

35


Lumber • Large & Small Jobs

Floor Coverings • Carpet • Ceramic • Stone • Hardwood

Kitchen Displays • Cabinetry • Countertops Loaded with Features

Millwork • Doors • Windows • Mouldings • Stair Rails

Plumbing • Faucets • Tubs • Toilets

Lighting • Ceiling Lights • Fans

Hardware • Bath & Cabinet


Sutherlands Lumber & Design Gallery offers services to both home owners and builders. Services include design, installation, in-home estimates, eco-friendly products, and turn-key building services. Whether you need to replace an old faucet, remodel a kitchen, or are involved in new construction, our products can accomodate any budget and our experts can help you every step of the way.

Design It!

Remodel Build It!

It!


Patios • Family • Friends • Happy Hour • Conversation • Dining • Patios • Family • Friends

Aspen Leaf Grille 1480 Cascade Avenue, Loveland 80538 At Fountains of Loveland Open 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (970) 622-8008 | www.aspenleafgrille.com Enjoy outdoor dining with a backdrop like no other. Aspen Leaf Grille’s patio setting features brilliant flowers surrounding an eight-foot water fountain on the Tiffany Courtyard, crowned by a panoramic view of the Rocky Mountains. Sunset dining has never been more spectacular. Join Aspen Leaf Grille for their “Saturday Night Sizzle,” an evening of live music on the courtyard. The full bar and dining menu is available on the patio. Try one of their outstanding drink specials, such as the Pinot Grigio White Sangria with citrus and a hint of cinnamon, the Chocolatecovered Cherry Martini, or Coconut-loco Lime Martini. Their grill serves fresh Colorado cuisine including prime rib, seafood, and chicken prepared to order. Steaks are hand-cut on the premises. Enjoy Aspen Leaf Grille’s gourmet food in a casual atmosphere at a casual price.

Bent Fork the grill 5971 Sky Pond Drive, Loveland 80538 In The Promenade Shops at Centerra (Across from Dick’s Sporting Goods) Open 11:00 a.m. daily (970) 613-9333 | www.bentforkgrill.com Bent Fork Grill has one of the best patios around. Their Centerra location is ideal for alfresco dining and great people watching. The upscale casual restaurant features two patios, both surrounded by beautiful stone water fountains, a play fountain for the kids, and a view of the mountains. Nearby is Chapungu Sculpture Park, which along with summer concerts, give the patios an extra appeal. Covered patio dining areas, umbrellas, and heaters to control the climate are additional benefits. On the bar patio, enjoy a daily happy hour with half-price appetizers, $3 house wines and draft beers, and $5 premium martinis. Keep cool with one of their specialty drinks, such as the Pineapple Mojito and or a refreshing Sangria. For lunch or dinner, Bent Fork Grill provides a diverse offering of traditional dishes that are inventive, fresh, and flavorful in a distinctive environment of casual sophistication.

38

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine

P


s

Patios • Family • Friends • Happy Hour • Conversation • Dining • Patios • Family • Friends

East Moon Asian Bistro & Hibachi 2400 East Harmony Road #102 Fort Collins 80528 (970) 223-0666 | (970) 223-5311 Open 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily

East Moon Asian Bistro

1624 South Lemay Avenue Fort Collins 80525 | (970) 416-8333 Open 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily Enjoy East Moon Asian Bistro’s delicious fare while basking in the balmy summer weather on their outdoor patio. The patio features a great view of the mountains, the perfect setting for a beautiful summer sunset with dinner. With the comforting sounds of the flowing fountain nearby, nothing is better than the cool breeze with a plate of sushi and a nice bottle of Mason Sauvignon Blanc or a frozen drink from the bar. On the patio, you can enjoy East Moon’s signature great service, unique flavors, and modern, sophisticated décor with plenty of comfortable seating. Service is fast, they have a convenient location, and their great food comes at a reasonable price. On those summer days when the weather just won’t cooperate, enjoy the special treat of the hibachi room inside.

Rodizio Grill

200 Jefferson Street | Fort Collins 80524 Open for lunch Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Open for dinner daily at 5:00 p.m. (970) 482-3103 | www.rodiziogrill.com Uniquely tucked out of the way, Rodizio Grill’s patio allows you to retreat from the hectic week. Considered one of the most private patios in town, you will enjoy the shade trees, umbrellas, and water fountains outside without being bothered by passing traffic. Nothing goes better than a refreshing drink with outdoor dining. Try Rodizio’s Brazilian Caipirinha, a version of the mojito made with fresh limes and Cachaca, a Brazilian rum distilled from sugar cane. Or try Rodizio’s special Brazilian lemonade made from limes instead of lemons. Dining on the patio is always a hit at Rodizio. Brazilian gauchos bring endless amounts of meats and grill items, mouthwatering and fresh off the rotisserie grill. The patio can be reserved for your next business luncheon or rehearsal dinner and can be decorated to enhance for your next fun-filled party.

Business & Building 2009

39


European Flair Abounds in Masonville Luxury Estate

By Kay Rios | Photos by Warren Diggles

When Jim Gibbs, Vice President of Gibbs Construction, took on the Buckhorn Ranch house for Tim and Glenda Nash, he had a preconceived notion of what was involved and how the house would look upon completion. That, however, was not exactly the reality.

Tim and Glenda Nashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home in Masonville was completed in May 2009 by Gibbs Construction.

40

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STYLE Magazine


The 500-acre parcel already held a remodeled 2,200 square foot guesthouse, a barn, and the foundation for the 9,000 square foot main house when Gibbs was brought in to replace the previous contractor. “We were contracted in the beginning just to frame the house but it became more than that. I started doing some scheduling and design work and ended up the construction manager,” Gibbs says. He stepped into it easily and gladly took on more work. That’s usually what happens, he adds. “We usually give more than we ever receive. We take a lot of pride in what we do and we want to make sure our customers are really content. We build houses like we would want to move into them ourselves.” In this case, Gibbs had one view of the finished product and the owners had another. “It started out like any large house project. I figured we’d put the casings, windows, and doors in, do a couple of stair railings, then the baseboards, and a few other simple things. But they went above and beyond anything in my imagination.”

Business & Building 2009

41


2

1

3

1. The mahogany baby grand piano is the focal point that inspired the other furnishings in this room. 2. The kitchen is bright and open and features cabinets built on-site by S&W Showcase. 3. Luxurious details abound in the downstairs bar, such as marble and stone for countertops and floors and the rich wood accents.

Gibbs originally thought, given the area, it would be a rustic home. The property is, in fact, somewhat historic. The site is the place where J.R. Mason (after whom Masonville was named) homesteaded in the late 1800s and built his ranch. His barn served as an overnight stop for Wells Fargo drivers on the way to Denver. He later sold the property to Arnold Friend who held it for about 40 years before he sold it to the Nash family. “I first thought, being in Masonville, it would be rustic. As I got to know Glenda, I quickly learned she wanted something more elegant and with a European feel. I thought she was a little eccentric at first but then I realized this lady had some great ideas.” The Nashes had come from Marietta, California, moving into the guesthouse on November 13, 2007, until the main house was complete. From that vantage point, Nash could impart her vision and Gibbs quickly learned what that meant. The result is an eye-catching, car-stopping piece of architecture. Beginning with a stone exterior that speaks to the sturdiness of the structure and moving through the 300-year-old Italian mahogany front door from a castle in Northern Italy, every piece of this home holds a “wow” factor. Stepping inside, the viewer’s eye is immediately drawn to a mahogany baby grand piano. Nash says she used the piano as the anchor point and

42

then chose other pieces and materials accordingly. Hickory engineered flooring and the onyx base and copper tile around the fireplace play easily off the room’s rich colors. The tongue and groove barrel ceiling over the fireplace finishes the look. Each room was carefully designed and decorated, building the feel of what Nash terms “old European with a touch of Tuscany.” Every twist and turn in the house, every room entered – each presents itself in large grandeur. Throughout the house, natural stone, marble, onyx, and granite flow from room to room, growing the common theme into individual pieces: six bedrooms, a bonus room, eight bathrooms, a breakfast turret room, and a sunroom featuring an Italian grove cedar ceiling. “There’s nothing fake here,” Nash says. While she found most material in other states, Nash did use Cherokee boulder from The Rock Garden in Fort Collins and the cabinets in the kitchen and downstairs bar were built on-site by Skip Whinney, from S & W Showcase in the Big Thompson Canyon. The home is built to weather any storm, Gibbs says. “These are all two by six exterior walls and foam insulation packed solid. It can blow 110 miles an hour outside and they can’t hear a thing in here.” The framing only took 90 days, he says, and

that was completed in 2007. But the real vision was a little longer in coming to fruition. It wasn’t until the Nash family moved into the main house in May of this year that the parts came together. But, Nash says, she’s still not done. “I still have furniture to move in and some other pieces to find. Like the chandelier for over the piano. I haven’t come across that yet. It’s all in my head. I just need a little more time and a little more money.” Her ideas come to her in several ways. “Sometimes I think of them late at night or early in the morning. I usually start with one piece and then figure out what I’m going to do with the rest of the room.” It takes time and patience, she adds. “You have to go to a lot of stores. That’s how everything comes together. Sometimes you have to travel to find what you are looking for, so we plan our trips around that. Or we might see something we could use on the next project. I get in the stores and get crazy thinking of the things I could do with different pieces.” For this project, she did, however, see the bigger picture before she started on the house. “I knew what I wanted. Most of the guys on our project thought this was going to be a plain-Jane house. But about halfway through, they figured out this was anything but a regular house.” She attributes the final result to teamwork and gives Gibbs and her husband, Tim, a large portion

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Custom cabinetry and faux painting warm up the downstairs bar.

of the credit. She also believes it is important to include the people working on the project. “I always asked for their opinion,” she says. “That’s how all my projects are run, even the ones I’ve done in California. Since these guys all do a lot of work and see a lot of different approaches, I want their input. I learn and take my cues from them.” Gibbs laughs and says, Nash, however, did veto his idea of clown carpet for the theatre room. Although Nash is still putting the finishing touches on the house, she’s already thinking about her next project. “We’re opening up a satellite office in California (for their company TimCo Trucking) and I might do a 2,500 square foot office in a Spanish theme. That should keep me busy for a bit.” Gibbs and his brother Chuck, who is the founder and president of the company, are also moving on to new things including their spec housing project, the Buckhorn Ranch Estates. But this is a project he won’t forget, he says, adding that he really enjoyed the process. “It was a great project and I feel like I not only have a great client, I have two good friends in Tim and Glenda.” Kay Rios, Ph.D., spent many summer days during her high school years hanging out at the Masonville Store, which then had a bar and pool table.

Business & Building 2009

43


Shades to

Shutters for Outdoor Living Nothing beats relaxing on the patio or porch in the summertime, enjoying the fantastic Colorado weather and gorgeous mountain views. But because the sun is strong at a mile high, shade and UV protection are a must. That is where shades, shutters, and awnings come in.

R

etractable patio awnings are typically used for open patios that lack shade coverage. Solar screen patio shades work well on existing wood porch frames where you want shade but don’t want to block the view. Shutters provide protection from sun, wind, and even offer a measure of home security. Window coverings and shading solutions have been Innovative Openings primary concern for 29 years. Co-owner Rick Pease gave Style the low-down on exterior awnings, shades, and shutters. “We specialize in these types of products,” he says. “It is a full-time job to keep up to speed on the window covering and shading industry so we can offer the best service and products to our customers.” Innovative Openings manufactures and installs outdoor patio awnings and shades, in addition to a full range of window coverings. Awnings allow you to use your patio or deck all summer long, even under the intense midday sun. In addition to providing comfortable shade

44

By Allie Comeau

outdoors, retractable patio awnings can also add a colorful touch to your backyard and outside space. “We have hundreds of different acrylics and fabrics to choose from,” says Pease. Awnings extend and retract with an easy turn of a crank or push of a button. Innovative Openings also specializes in retractable solar screen patio shades, which work well on existing wood porch frames where you want shade but don’t want to block the view. “We have such gorgeous western views in Colorado,” says Pease. “Solar screen patio shades block 97 percent of the heat and glare without blocking the view.” They also provide a measure of privacy from nearby neighbors. Manufactured at the facility in Louisville, Innovative Openings’ own brand of solar shades, Insolroll, are sold throughout North America and provide full UV protection. Another option for patios and windows are Sunsafe rolling patio shutters and European rolling shutters. Rolling shutters are heavy-duty slotted shades that provide protection from the sun, wind, and even home invasion. “Traditionally, roll-

ing shutters were used in Europe for home security and in places like Florida for protection from tornados,” says Pease. “They’re also useful here for high winds and home security.” The shutters can close-off entire areas of the patio, protecting outdoor furniture and decorations during inclement weather. Today’s shades and awnings have come a long way. New trends in the industry involve automation. “The biggest trend in shades and awnings is motorization,” says Pease. “There have been significant advancements in different motor types that make it easier to install remote control systems. By using radio receivers, we no longer have to retrofit the home. There’s a lot less hardwiring required now.” In areas known for sudden high winds, wind sensors that bring shades down automatically during a windstorm can be installed. Awnings or shades can also be set on a timer to provide shade when you want it, whether you’re home or not. Besides UV protection, another big benefit to installing solar shades, shutters, and awnings is increased energy efficiency; 97 percent of the

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


heat from outside is blocked, making your home cooler and decreasing the need for air conditioning. “Our most energy efficient products are the exterior solar screen shades and rolling shutters,” says Pease. “Window shades and patio awnings also decrease the amount of heat inside the home.” After a free in-home consultation, Innovative Openings can customize the perfect type of shade or awning for you. “We encourage clients to visit one of our three Colorado showrooms in Fort Collins, Centennial, or Boulder. But it’s also necessary for us to visit each client’s home to get an idea of their space, to take measurements, and provide recommendations,” says Pease. “We have a dedicated design and installation team who will make sure you’re choosing the best option for your particular home.” Innovative Openings prides itself on standing out among the competition. “We do all our own installation,” says Pease. “We don’t contract out the installation work like most other companies. We also have two full-time employees dedicated to performing repairs on both our products and our competitor’s products along the Front Range and in Summit County.” With manufacturer warranties and a one-year labor warranty, customers can rest assured they will be getting not only the best products around, but the best service, too. “We’re very customer service oriented,” says Pease. “At the end of the day, the most important thing to us is that we have happy customers.” Allie Comeau is a freelance writer, copywriter, and blogger living in Fort Collins. Email her at alliecomeau@gmail.com.

Business & Building 2009

45


By Connie Hein

West try’s Code of the

GunnPoint Minis

andy Gunn’s career and ministry as an inspirational country gospel singer and cowboy preacher was foreshadowed at the age of five with the first song he ever sang in church entitled “Christian Cowboy.” He says he knew at a very young age that God was calling him into His service.

46

is his sacred Bond A Cowboy’s word th a handshake wi Bargains sealed nts than legal docume are more binding brand the d an ss Bo the Be loyal to ur job Be thankful for yo necessary if life ur yo wn Lay do pation cu oc ur yo Be proud of ful Be cheer ance Grant quick assist gers in need to friends and stran g without complainin Endure hardships s use exc ke ma Don’t n the other fella Try to be better tha er with a fellow work n ow u yo Share anything s ng ali de are Demand squ rds Never tolerate cowa d money an life ur yo th Be generous wi ies lad e lik Treat women ong ing are evil and wr Stealing and rustl st be ur Do yo Never quit n’t take it If it’s not yours, do n’t say it do If it’s not true, n’t do it do ht, rig t no If it’s

Heidi Gunn also knew she was being called by God at an early age. Her mission, and prayer, was to take Christ outside the church and to the people. The calling of this Fort Collins couple reached fruition through their ministry and band, GunnPoint, which performs across the country. But neither of them dreamed that starting GunnPoint ministries would eventually lead them to Hollywood where they would take their message to millions through a major motion picture. In an interview with the Gunns, along with screenwriter George Flynn, they talked about their upcoming film, “Set Apart,” their ministry, and how it all came about.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


In one of the ministry promotions Randy says, “The cowboy life seems simple to many. They are often looked upon as heroes, but we forget cowboys and cowgirls cope with the same struggles as everyone else. Like all of us, they need Jesus.” It began with their participation in the Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association (CMSA), which enabled them to see and understand the struggles of hundreds of cowboys and cowgirls. In response to those needs they started GunnPoint Ministries, an inspirational country group of musicians, media people, and assistants who travel to CMSA events and other rodeos to positively influence lives by exposing others to the story of Jesus. Randy became involved in the CMSA after reading about it in a horseman magazine. “I attended a championship event in Arizona and immediately loved it,” he says. He met Heidi shortly afterward and they eventually married and both began competing in the sport. In 2001, Randy attended an event held by a new CMSA chapter in Craig, Colorado. “On Sunday morning we were all on our horses in the arena and the National President and Chairman were there to introduce the new chapter. One of them said they understood they had a preacher with them that morning and asked me to say a prayer. I had no idea anyone even knew who I was.” Shortly thereafter, Randy participated in an event in Pueblo and, as he was getting ready to compete, the announcer said, “This is Randy Gunn, the Cowboy Preacher, and he is going to do our Cowboy Church for us on Sunday morning.” Randy says the announcer had been at the event in which Randy had been referred to as a preacher. When he saw that Randy was surprised by the announcement, the announcer asked, “You don’t mind, do you?” Randy told him he didn’t even know they had a cowboy church. The announcer said, “We don’t, but we will now, if you will do it Sunday.” The ministry has grown from serving a handful of people to holding services that bring in thousands. The Gunn’s also sponsor and perform at their own GunnPoint Extreme Rodeo events, which feature shooting, comedy, and music, as well as concerts across the country. Randy and Heidi hold five CMSA titles, four national and one world. Randy says having those titles and competing with the cowboys help them connect. “They see us competing and watch us in action and can relate to us in a way that someone who is not competing with them could not. We are now the official pastors of CMSA, ministering not only at Cowboy Church but throughout the events.” Heidi says, “It is so rewarding to have people come to us during events and share their stories with us and ask us to pray for them, their families, and sometimes even their horses.” How did ministering to cowboys and cowgirls lead to the Gunns starring in a major motion picture in Hollywood? Producer Brad Wilson, who ran Robert Duvall’s Hollywood production company for 11 years and co-produced films such as “Lonesome Dove” and “Days of Thunder,” saw the GunnPoint Band at Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium performing at the Inspirational Country Music Awards and became interested in the Gunns and their ministry. He followed the band for several months without anyone knowing, and after seeing their popularity and positive effect as they interacted with the cowboys, he decided their lives would make a

Business & Building 2009

47


great movie. “We were doing an event in Texas and Wilson connected with our manager, Steve Kuivenhoven, and told him he was interested in making a movie about our ministry,” says Randy. “What? Now, who are you? You want to make a movie about us?” was Heidi’s reaction to the question. Three producers soon flew to Colorado to see the Gunns with a story already in mind, recalls Randy. “They wanted to do a movie about inner city kids who discover the power to rise above the destructive influences of drugs and violence in their lives by spending a summer traveling with us and learning the ‘Cowboy Way.’” Randy says when the producers started talking about inner city kids he immediately thought of his brother John Gunn and sister-in-law, Michele, who have a successful inner city ministry that helps thousands of kids each week in Pontiac, Michigan. “It seemed natural for my brother and his wife and their inner city kids to be in the movie.” The producers agreed and loved the idea of combining the stories of the two brothers. Flynn, screenwriter and producer of the movie, is also the media and graphic design specialist for the Gunn’s ministry. Originally, producers had planned to use their own screenwriters for the film, but Heidi says she and Randy suggested Flynn because he was already familiar with their work. “After they looked at his award-winning screenplays and other work,” Heidi says, “they instantly agreed that he was qualified and would be perfect for the job.” The movie is entitled “Set Apart” and will be released September 2009 by Provident Films (a division of Sony Pictures). The movie stars the Gunn’s as themselves, Richard Roundtree (“JT”), John Schneider (John Gunn), and Jennifer O’Neill (Michele Gunn). It was filmed in six weeks on location in Los Angeles and South Dakota in June 2007. Flynn says the movie begins with the GunnPoint Team visiting Randy’s brother and wife and taking four inner city kids back with them to visit the ‘wonders’ of the West. “There are lots of laughs as

48

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


the street-wise kids try to become cowboys.” The four inner city characters in the story were written as an amalgam of many real-life children that John and Michele have helped through their ministry. “Through the adventures of these kids,” Flynn says, “the story delivers the message that we can all rise above the forces that pull us down in life when we reach out to help each other.” Despite a few additions or changes the trio would have made to the film, overall they are happy with the finished product. Flynn says, “We think the movie delivers a great message and that was the goal. It seems from the reactions of the audience at the pre-release screenings that the message is getting through and touching people.” Heidi says there were 225 people at the local pre-release screening of the movie at the Fort Collins Drake Center in May 2009. “It was so exciting to see the reaction of the audience.” She said it was amazing to watch as the audience laughed at all the funny parts and were obviously moved, some to tears, during other scenes. “It was very rewarding when the movie ended and was given an immediate standing ovation before the lights even came back on.” Randy said there was a great cross-section of people represented at the pre-screening. “The audience was a local group of esteemed Christian and non-Christian people of all ages and walks of life. Many came up to us afterward with tears, men and women, and said how it touched them. We hope and pray that the message the movie delivers will reach and touch millions more in a positive way.” A second screening is planned at the Evans Community Center on August 2, 2009. Tickets to the screening and information about the movie and GunnPoint Ministries are available at www. gunnpoint.us or www.setapartthemovie.com.

Connie Hein is a freelance writer from Windsor and the author of the Toliver in Time children’s books.

Business & Building 2009

49


businesses

green

By Angeline Grenz Photos by Warren Diggles

B

usinesses all over Northern Colorado are joining the green revolution and embracing the social push to incorporate sustainable and eco-minded programs into their day-to-day functioning. For small businesses, however, this desire is greatly tempered by the impact it makes in dollars and cents.

Two local businesses have found that going green takes some ingenuity, plenty of patience, and a little sacrifice on their part. In the end, they come away with a good deal of pride in their business, goodwill towards customers and community, and the addictive desire to do more. Import Auto Body and Porter Industries, Inc., have answered the call. Their stories provide great motivation for all to search for their individual ways to go green. IMPORT AUTO BODY

“We are leading the pack. If there were other ways to reduce wastes and recycle materials we would do it. It is just the right thing to do.” Pete Weeks, Owner, Import Auto Body

50

Import Auto Body’s journey to becoming green was based on sound business planning. Owner Pete Weeks analyzed both industry trends and marketing strategies, which led him to conclude that taking a sustainable approach to collision repair would be good for his business despite the potential cost. Weeks recognized in the future his industry may be required, on a national scale, to switch from more pollutant solvent-based paint to waterborne paint,

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


as is the case in California since January 2009. While California’s mandated change was still a rumor in spring 2008, Weeks decided he would like to be on top of the trend. “We are a treehugging state,” jokes Weeks before continuing soberly, “and the Front Range has absolutely had their share of emissions problems through the years.” Recognizing the change from widely-used solvent-based paint to waterborne would have a significant impact on his business, Weeks took a deliberate approach to investigating the process. He and his painter of three years, Troy Nauman, made a trip to southern California to meet with several collision repair shops, visiting some who had made the conversion months ago and some in the middle of the transition. “I didn’t want to just do this cold turkey. I wanted to know the issues and problems they ran into, from both a technical and cost management standpoint.” As they visited several shops, Weeks would talk to the owner or manager and Nauman would head to the paint shop. It was vital to have one of his employees along for the ride, said Weeks, because the transition would be one they would have to embrace in order for it to be successful. “By the time we came back, I was convinced I should make the transition. I knew this was a better product than what we were using,” continues Weeks. Within a month and a half, Import Auto Body did just that. Beginning in May 2008, they made the switch. A year later, they have no regrets, says Weeks. Though waterborne paint is more costly,

Helping you climb the path to financial success • Business & Individual Tax Services & Planning • Business Start Up • Bookkeeping, Payroll & Quickbooks Consulting • Auditing & Financial Statement Preparation

Pete Weeks, owner of Import Auto Body

Business & Building 2009

FORT COLLINS 301 East Olive Street Fort Collins, CO 80524 970.493.6869

www.rlrcpas.com GREELEY 4631 W. 20th St Rd, Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634 970.304.9420

WINDSOR 825 Main Street Windsor, CO 80550 970.493.6869

CHEYENNE PO Box 483 Cheyenne, WY 82003 370.631.5598

51


Weeks found the benefits outweighed the expense. First of all, his shop’s volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were reduced by 50 percent. VOCs from paint are the single biggest waste product that Import produces in their shop. “This is our biggest ‘mess,’” says Weeks. Approximately five years ago, Import became one of the first auto body shops to recycle their solvents and turn them into cleaning materials. At that time, they cut their waste from four 55-gallon drums a quarter to one 55-gallon drum of solvent waste product a year. Despite this reduction, Weeks still felt compelled to transition to waterborne paint. A second benefit of waterborne paint is that it takes fewer coats of paint to adequately cover

a vehicle and the paint dries faster. Even better, many manufacturers have changed to waterborne paint in their factories and Import has an easier time matching paint now that they have made the switch. Waterborne paint is available for primers and base paint, not for clear coat. Clear coats, says Weeks, are still solvent-based but new technology has greatly reduced the amount of VOCs they produce. Import Auto Body has switched their clear coats to the low-VOC variety. Weeks will continue to look for ways to reduce wastes and recycle materials, but in his industry, this change was major. “We are leading the pack. If there were anything else out there, we would use it. It is just the right thing to do.”

PORTER INDUSTRIES, INC.

For Porter Industries, the desire to go green sprang from the owners’, Bob and Marilyn Stone, personal philosophy. Implementation, however, developed naturally over time, beginning when they moved to their current location in Loveland in 1997. The vision culminated in a U.S. Green Building Council Gold LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for an Existing Building (EB) and a new approach to commercial and residential cleaning. As the Stones took possession of the company and moved into their Granite Street location, they polled employees about what features they would like to see in the new building. “They said they wanted things like control of the lighting and changing rooms so they could bike to work. All of that was already designed into the building before we even thought to pursue a LEED certification,” says Ken Sargent, Support Services Administrator for Porter Industries. Early on, Porter Industries had taken other steps

Ken Sargent, Support Services Administrator for Porter Industries and LEED accredited professional, helped the company switch to more sustainable cleaning products.

52

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


but we keep trying.” The minor retro-fitting to their building included repainting, recarpeting, and adding energy efficient fixtures. In 2006, Porter Industries became the first for-profit company in Colorado and the first cleaning business in the nation to receive the LEED-EB Gold certification. Porter’s administrator, Michelle Sargent, transmuted the green programs for commercial cleaning into their residential cleaning division, MaidClean!, with very positive results. “People really responded when we told them that we do not use anything in our residential cleaning that would affect them, their pets, or their children.” Porter’s commercial customers are often less impressed by green cleaning than they are by the bottom line, says Hendrickson. However, Porter In-

dustries has been able to remain very competitive throughout their switch. He says that as a company, much of the changes made in equipment required an up-front cost, but on-going expenses have largely leveled out. Porter Industries look at their efforts as an investment, hoping one day these practices will be the norm in their industry. In the meantime, they are proud of their accomplishments in the green revolution: “Once we realized there was a better way, we knew we should be doing it,” says Sargent, “There is only so much we can do [as a company] but we are willing to do our part.” Angeline Grenz is Contributing Editor for Style Magazine.

The Porter Industries, Inc., team: Ken Sargent, Michelle Sargent, Bob Stone, Marilyn Stone, Steve Hendrickson, and Veronica Vargas. that would unwittingly aid them in their quest for a green designation. The backpack-style Pro Team vacuum cleaners they had purchased years ago as an ergonomic choice for their employees ended up being the same sort of vacuum recommended by the LEED standards. While the owners have long been advocates of energy-efficiency in their personal lives, it was in 2004 that they began to bring that philosophy into their business on a formal scale. It was their supplier that informed them about the availability of more sustainable cleaning products and introduced them to the LEED process. The Stones found that a good portion of the points needed for certification involved green cleaning programs. “That sounded like a good fit for us,” says president and CEO Steve Hendrickson. They immediately made the switch to hydrogen peroxide-based cleaning products sold in recyclable containers and mixed on-site sourcing local water. They also tossed old cloth mops and sponges in favor of more efficient microfiber. Green quickly became a mission for Porter Industries, in part to raise appreciation for their industry. “This is not the most glamorous industry, but we feel we bring a tremendous service to people,” says Hendrickson. “We, as an industry, generate six billion pounds of chemicals a year, most of which are of a very poor quality. We recognized that we could do things in a way that was safer for our employees and customers and that would help us be better custodians to our earth.” At the same time, Sargent began taking classes at Colorado State University to become a LEED accredited professional. The retrofitting that was necessary for their office building to become LEED certified was largely accomplished by Porter’s staff. “We decided it would be the best way to learn what all was involved,” says Sargent. Now, Porter is able to pass on what they learned to other businesses interested in becoming more environmentally conscious. “We have switched the entire company, as much as possible, to a green cleaning approach,” continues Sargent. “We may never reach 100%,

Business & Building 2009

53


COMMUNITY PILLARS JERRY AND MARCIA DONNAN By Jim Sprout

“Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.” –Warren Buffet Jerry and Marcia Donnan measure success in life beyond material achievements. Rather, it is the qualities that fit who they want to be and how they want to spend their lives together and with family that are important to them. For them, this simply means being happy and content each day in all their circumstances, caring for others, and having a sense of gratitude for life’s gifts, particularly a close family. In essence, it is the integration of family, friends, and community as well as a successful family business that has defined their life’s experiences.

A

Although Jerry and Marcia were both born and raised in the same town, Council Bluffs, Iowa, they did not really get acquainted until after Jerry returned from a three-year tour in the Army where he served in a Special Forces unit known as the Green Berets. Marcia recalls it was Jerry’s attitude about dealing with the challenges in life that prompted their decision to leave Council Bluffs and pursue a career in the financial services industry with Avco Financial Services, Inc. After ten years with Avco, which included living in seven cities in six different states and many promotions which ultimately required supervising over sixty offices, Jerry had had enough of five day work weeks spent on the road and being away from family. With Marcia’s experience in her family’s credit union business, they decided to start their own family business in a similar industry and, in 1985, Factual Data Corporation was founded. Although their initial capital investment by today’s standards might not be considered large, it was to them. They pooled all of their savings, cash value from their insurance, and proceeds from the sale of their home, essentially all of their personal resources, and opened an 8 foot by 10 foot office, with Jerry on one side of the desk and Marcia on the other, in an executive suite at Parklane Towers. Initially, the business was started as a two-person mortgage credit-reporting agency, but Jerry had a national vision in mind. In fact, when asked why Fort Collins, Jerry commented that in addition to the quality of life, schools, and all the things people normally look for in a community, the geographical location was good for eventual business expansion. They grew and expanded the business working together, and in 2003, with 58 locations nationally and over 400 employees, sold the business to Kroll Inc. Jerry formally retired in 2004 and Marcia followed in 2005. Along the way, Jerry and Marcia took their family business public in 1998 and today are particularly proud that their sons are at the helm of the company they started, as well as many senior management team members with over fifteen years of service. When asked what are some of the lessons in life and business that they have learned, Jerry comments “trust your instincts, remain positive, keep faith in your team, and once they have some experience, let them run with their own ideas.” Marcia recalls that

54

Jerry and Marcia Donnan

it was Jerry’s willingness to give people the opportunity to grow and learn that helped make their business a success. They enjoy the opportunity to give back to the community and especially favor programs like Project Self-Sufficiency that give a “helping hand up.” Marcia feels, in all the places they have lived, none is more caring than Fort Collins. She stated, “people are always willing to step up and, if they see a problem or need, they do something about it.” Their community service is extensive and currently they co-chair the Alexis de Tocqueville Society for United Way of Larimer County. They are also very active in RAMSTRONG, which supports cancer patients in Northern Colorado. Jerry has served on the Project Self-Sufficiency and Boys and Girls Clubs of Larimer County boards while Marcia is a life-sustaining member of Junior League of Fort Collins and a member of WomenGive, a partnership with United Way of Larimer County and The Women’s Foundation of Colorado. Marcia also has a special interest in the Mother Bear project that provides comfort and hope through crocheted and knit bears to children affected with HIV/AIDS in emerging nations. They are both active as Colorado State Ram Legacy Club members, supporting athletes through their scholarship programs. Additionally, they have their own private charitable foundation that focuses on helping families in Northern Colorado. Along with their charitable objectives, Jerry and Marcia feel one of the most important issues facing our community, and globally, is teaching people how to become more self-reliant, self-sufficient, and able to provide for themselves and their families. For this next stage of life, Jerry and Marcia plan to continue to focus on the things they value most: spending time with their family and three grandchildren as well as staying connected to the community through special events at their home and service and volunteerism in the projects and agencies they support. Northern Colorado is extremely fortunate for successful business owners like Jerry and Marcia who have channeled their energy and resources into giving back to the community. Jim Sprout is the Chairman of First Western Trust Bank, Northern Colorado, and a regular columnist for Style Magazine.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


A P P R E C I AT I O N D I N N E R - FA C E S O F T R I U M P H April 17 Hilton :: Fort Collins This 12th Annual Appreciation Dinner, sponsored by the members of Realities for Children and the Department of Human Services, helped to unite an entire child protection community together, recognizing business members, child protection workers, youth agencies and law enforcement. Multiple award presentations were made, including four youths who received the Triumph Award for overcoming the adversities of childhood abuse to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;triumphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; socially, academically, and personally. The children received $18,000 in collegiate scholarships and alternative education grants. Photo courtesy of Craig Vollmer Photography.

Front row: Sean Dougherty, Johnathan Benjamin, Isabella Marie Stanford, Demitry Swartz, Jessica Morman Back row: Kyle Villers, Ki Johnson, Mike Radcliff, Bill Friedrichsen, Lew Gaiter III

Business & Building 2009

55


B B B T O R C H AWA R D S April 23 Marriott :: Fort Collins Mountain States Better Business Bureau honored and awarded several diverse businesses from Northern Colorado the Torch Award at this 11th annual event. All the honored companies demonstrated exemplary management practices, upheld high standards in relationships with customers, suppliers and shareholders, showed honesty and integrity in marketing and advertising, and gave back to their communities. Photography courtesy of Ben Bradley Photography.

Dennis Holman, Ray Ulibarri, Scott Young

Mike & Lori Shoop

Betti Seay, Rick Allnutt

Mike & Calie Pierce

Laurie & Kelly Steele

Charles Tomlinson, Bonnie Dean

C U LT I VAT E H O P E B E N E F I T May 7 Hilton Garden Inn :: Fort Collins Over 150 guests came to celebrate spring and enjoy a festive garden-themed evening featuring a silent auction of flowerpots and other garden art created by local artists. One lucky guest won a Grand Junction wine tour after accurately estimating the number of wine corks contained in three crystal punchbowls. The $10,000 raised will help the Matthews House continue to help youths with little family support successfully transition to living on their own. Photos courtesy of Craig Vollmer Photography.

Laura Gippert, Sam Denunzio

56

Debbie Guinn, Holli Milenski, Jerry Kennell, Jerri Howe, Craig Secher

Rhonda & Randy Cary

Lori Freese, Maurice Shenk

Fred & Ardith Kerst

Amy Madden Copp, Christopher McLaughlin, Josh Emrich

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STYLE Magazine


N AT I O N A L D AY O F P R AY E R May 7 Hilton :: Fort Collins In observance of a resolution signed by President Truman in 1952 declaring a National Day of Prayer, over 100 of our local leaders and community members attended the observance of the 58th Annual National Day of Prayer and the 8th Annual Fort Collins National Day of Prayer Breakfast. A cross section of leaders were present at the breakfast morning and many of the well-known community members led the breakfast attendees in a concert of prayer.

Dary Northrup

Terri & Mike Fassi

Jennifer Niswender, Major, CAP, Betsy & Dick Hoff

Major Doug Hutchinson

Rex Smithgall

Karla Vigil, Lydia Dody, Ken Sargent, Rhonda Walmer

WELD STONE SOUP May 9 Pelican Lakes Country Club :: Windsor Succulent prime rib, fantastic vistas, and incredible entertainment headlined the evening for Weld Food Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7th annual event. Held at the picturesque Island at Pelican Lakes, more than 150 guests dined, enjoyed spirited bidding at the silent auction, and danced well into the evening to the live electrifying music from Jurassicasters, a local band. Evening proceeds went to benefit Weld Food Bank and their fight against hunger in Weld County. Carrie & Ruben Flores

David & Holly Wainscott

Business & Building 2009

Kay Underwood, Nick Barryman

Dathel Nimmo, Greg McIntosh

Sheriff John Cooke, Amy Oliver

Leona Martens

57


30TH ANNIVERSARY PVH SPRING BENEFIT May 9 Embassy Suites :: Loveland Nearly 1,000 guests experienced glitz and glamour as the red carpet was rolled out for an evening of Old Hollywood Elegance. The night was a true cause for celebration: the 30th annual PVH Spring Benefit. To celebrate in style, the event was held at the brand new Embassy Suites. Guests enjoyed a champagne opening toast, a delicious dinner, both silent and live auctions, and plenty of dancing. The paddle raiser raised $50,000 for the PVH Foundation cancer center campaign, while the entire event raised $300,000 for PVH Foundation Health Trust Fund. Special acknowledgement went to First National Bank, who has partnered with PVH Foundation and been a Spring Benefit sponsor for all 30 years.

Stacey & Kevin Unger

Larry & Wendy Dolgin

Vikki Wagner, Annie Brunsell

Jill & Roger Besile

JoAnn Lovins, Katherine Kirkpatrick, Ericka Dickson, Audrey Heaton

Tim Effinger, Laurie Tuka

Diane & Jim Brannan

Randell & Angela Johnson

Bill & Barbara Schneider

58

Mark Driscoll & First National Bank Family

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STYLE Magazine


C E L E B R AT I O N O F P H I L A N T H R O P Y May 14 Hilton :: Fort Collins A $2 million bequest by the late Doyle and Luvesta Jones of Berthoud was announced at the Community Foundation of Northern Colorado’s Annual Celebration of Philanthropy. The event’s 550 guests celebrated generosity and civic engagement in Northern Colorado. The Community Foundation also announced $130,640 in grants to local non-profits, awarded by its Fort Collins Community Fund Committee. Featured speaker and former four-term Indianapolis mayor, William H. Hudnut, III, inspired attendees to strengthen our local communities through charitable giving, innovative planning, and civic engagement. The event’s Lead Sponsor was the Bruce and Muriel Hach Family Fund, a fund of the Community Foundation. More than 50 event and table sponsors provided additional financial support.

Muriel Hach, William H. Hudnut III, Bryce Hach, Bruce Hach

Wyne Odell, Connie Dohn

Paula & Dave Edwards

Rep. John Kefalas, Spiro Palmer

Rathna & Krishna Murthy

Berthoud Mayor Tom Patterson, Carol Patterson

Becky Cramer, Pat Stryker

Mike & Mary Dellenbach

Business & Building 2009

Troy Peterson, Lis & Earl Sethre, Sherri Herndon, Kirk Wiebusch, Glorie Magrum, Dick & Ann Hanson

59


St yleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25t h Anniversary Celebrat ion Friends, clients, readers, and


Open House, June 11t h supporters came to celebrate!


FIRE HYDRANT 5 May 9 Edora Park :: Fort Collins Perfect weather greeted more than 450 runners, walkers, volunteers, and pet fair vendors and 200 tail waggin’ canines at this 19th annual signature event. The 5K Race, 3K Walk/Fun Run, and Pet Fair provided sniff and greet time for pets and a just plain doggone good time for participants. Canine contests, demonstrations, fido photos, breed rescue groups, and more helped to entertain and educate, while raising more than $29,000 for Larimer Humane Society and their work to help domestic, exotic, barnyard, and wild animals in Northern Colorado. Photos courtesy of Heidi Muller Photography

Leone Coryell with Chelsea & Chance, Carole Egger, Violette Gorell with Audry, Julianne Cooper with Teddy

Cheryl Kolus & Jax (Best Trick Winner)

Karen Evans & Maddie (Smallest Dog Winner)

Chantelle Dron & Zachery (Overall Female Winner)

Cindy Lee & Baxter

Ron Lipka & Sandy (Overall Male Winner)

PINK ROCKS! May 14 Marriott :: Fort Collins The Women’s Resource Center presented the 3rd annual Pink Rocks Awards to five individuals/ medical providers/companies that have made a difference in Larimer County in the arena of breast and reproductive cancers by donating their time, services, and resources. More than 200 attendees in the healthcare arena, women’s health advocates, cancer survivors, and business and civic leaders came to honor these guests who led the fight and whose generosity has made it possible for the Women’s Resource Center to connect 600 low-income women to medical services. Photos courtesy of imagecatcherman.com

62

Angela Penland, Janet Bills (Outstanding Survivor Advocate Honoree), Susan Stockton, Connie & Doug Dohn (Dohn Construction CompanyOutstanding Community Service Honoree), Kathy Randall (Outstanding Women’s Health Advocate Honoree), Vicki Fisbeck, Annette Zacharias

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


© Silpada Designs, Inc. © Silpada Designs, Inc.

© Silpada Designs, Inc. fine .925 sterling silver jewelry

Retiring Items Now On Sale New 09-2010 Jewelry Available Late July

Mark & Kacey Doner with Harpo

Call Tracie for a free catalog.

Tracie Amem independent representative

mysilpada.com/tracie.amen

970.506.1205 • 970.324.3371 Heidi Lukowski with Gretchen, Jennifer Wagner with Ellie

Karla Loken, Kenneth Stack, Elizabeth Lowell

(McKee Center for Women’s Health-Outstanding Medical Providers)

Business & Building 2009

63


COMMUNITY CLASSIC BIKE TOUR May 17 McKee Medical Center :: Loveland Four different routes, starting at McKee and traveling through Loveland and Fort Collins, provided more than 1,200 cyclists a morning of family fun, a challenging ride, and gorgeous scenery. Riders from all parts of Colorado and surrounding states were taken care of by the scores of volunteers who provided safety and helped the riders maintain their endurance. More than $62,000 was raised to benefit the Banner Simulation System at McKee, increasing patient safety and care.

Shirley & Ron Hogan

Chris Johnson, Christopher Cornue

Gene Haffner & Julie Johnson Haffner

Paula & Dave Edwards

Johnna & Art Bavoso

Paul Matthews, Mary Gullikson

JUNIOR LEAGUE TERRACE & GARDEN TOUR June 20 Seven area homes :: Fort Collins Perfect temperatures greeted over 1,100 gardeners at this 27th annual signature event. The self-guided tour of seven homes in southwestern Fort Collins showcased uniquely landscaped gardens and water features, and provided plenty of color and great backyard ideas for the attendees. Proceeds will benefit many local programs including ABLEWomen, The Career Closet, Kids in the Kitchen, and the Imagination Series for Children.

Gene & Khursheed Steffey with Truman

64

Amy Hanbert, Ardith Kerst

Linda Schaefer, Geri Stern, Jodi Needy

Kendall Payne, Courtney Loflin

Kathleen Hodges with Bella, Jonathan Hodges with Lucy

Alison Stoven, Phyllis Kane, Amanda Miller

Bob & Patty Cannon wtih Ellie

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STYLE Magazine


Hot savings coupons in STYLE!

Health & Beauty Automotive Painting Hot savings with Style!


Health & Beauty Home Furnishing

15% Discount

on total purchase

Health & Beauty

Expires August 29,2009

Hot savings coupons in STYLE!

Hot savings with Style!


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

DENVER, CO PERMIT NO. 5377

www.stylemagazinecolorado.com 211 W. Myrtle St., Suite 200 Fort Collins, CO 80521

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

2009-06 Lydia's Style Magazine  

June - Business & Building This key issue emphasizes timely articles on business and building that contributes to our quality of life in th...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you