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LAS VEGASCLARK COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework


A special thanks to the Board of Trustees of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Sheila Moulton, Chair Felipe A. Ortiz, Vice Chair Elizabeth Foyt, Secretary Robin Wadley-Munier, Treasurer Kelly D. Benavidez, Trustee Shannon Bilbray-Axelrod, Trustee Marilyn Francis Drake, Trustee JosĂŠ L. MelĂŠndrez, Trustee Gene Withelder, Trustee Ydoleena Yturralde, Trustee Dr. Ronald R. Heezen, Executive Director


Table of Contents

4

Executive Summary

7

Introduction and Project Background

17

Demographic Analysis

34

Field Verification and Building Maintenance Condition Assessment

40

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

64

Costing Future Branch Improvements

79

Financial Analysis

90

Decision-Making Framework

108

Appendices Project Team Acknowledgements

113

01

Demographic Analysis

207

02

Service Model Integration into Branch Building Programs

298

03

2019-2039 Facilities Assessment and Maintenance Renewal Plan

339

04

Financial Analysis

371

05

Community Needs Assessment


Executive Summary

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

4


Executive Summary The purpose of this Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework is to give the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District (Library District) a tool to assess and execute capital investment strategies during a rapidly evolving technology and operating environment for public libraries. The strategy contemplated herein is forward-thinking and should allow the Library District to remain ahead of the curve in terms of changes in the economy, demographics, consumer behavior, information distribution, technology, physical buildings, and other factors in the public facilities ecosystem.

• • •

In the past, Library District facility planning was:

In today’s planning context, the Library District must balance the need to preserve and grow the value of existing facility assets as well as meet the need of an expanding population with potentially new facilities. The current carrying cost of these facility assets is $264 million, and current replacement value is estimated at approximately $350 million (based on current construction costs of an average of $500 per square foot). While the Library District’s facilities have been well maintained and remain in good physical condition, many are starting to show their age and will require increasing investment in the decades ahead. In addition, the needs of the community going forward will be different than the needs of the past.

• • •

framed by building needs, including physical materials; customer transactions; access to public computers; and library meeting, event, performance, and study room spaces; funded by escalating tax revenue increases and political support for bond financing; and focused on the need to build new facilities to keep pace with rapid urban growth.

Today, the Library District is responding to a new environment whereby planning for future capital projects must consider new market realities, including: • •

capped (or legislatively limited) growth in tax revenues limited to no appetite (or capacity) for public bond issues

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

• • •

a slower pace of urban growth an escalating construction cost environment a focus on the needs of the community, such as new, dynamic spaces for interactive learning; increased access to new technologies and the Internet; and a welcoming, inviting retail and café vibe ongoing changes in customer expectations and behaviors new communications and building infrastructure technologies immense community educational, economic, and social challenges.

Decisions on facility investments today are complex. They must consider new building purposes and components to keep libraries relevant, refreshed, and ready for service innovations Executive Summary

5


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Executive Summary

and continuous adaptation to changing customer and community needs. Not only do future fiscal requirements need to address the impact of capital projects, but they must also be thoughtful and consider the financial consequences of staffing, technology, marketing, and other indirect implications.

The findings of this document inform a proposed new annual capital project decision-making framework and process to ensure that every capital project decision is relevant, necessary, and leveraged for maximum return on investment and public value. The forward-thinking planning process is driven by the Board of Trustees, who are engaged and involved at every step as new capital projects are identified, prioritized, approved, and funded with adoption of the Library District’s Annual Budget.

As a result, planning for library facilities today requires a multilayered capital project investment analysis. Each capital project decision can have significant effects, particularly given the strains on available public revenues as service and staffing models change, operational costs rise, and the Library District service area continues to expand. This is particularly true with the Library District’s fiscally responsible “pay-as-you-go” capital project approach. Pay-as-you-go funding requires diligence and a long-term view as capital project funds become available as operational efficiencies and reserving for future needs can provide the necessary capital for future investments; this process is not unlike how many families in the community operate today. This Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework document proposes a new approach for library facility planning by looking at five criteria: • • • • •

community need; urban growth and demographic change over the next 20 years; service model adaptation related to the Library District’s strategic plan, Vision 2020 (v.2020), and subsequent strategic plans of the Library District; renovation and maintenance needs of aging facilities and building infrastructure; and the availability of fiscal resources for capital requirements in the near- to mid-term (the next five to fifteen years).

6

Adoption of the decision framework puts the Library District at the forefront of new national change management processes for facility development and sustainability, while maintaining a laser focus on local investments that impact community conditions. The Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework assures that facilities will be optimally designed for flexibility as market conditions and community needs evolve in the future. The framework also requires full operational costs to be evaluated alongside the project budgets for renovation or new facility construction so that ultimately, the Library District is able to achieve the maximum return on facility investments. In this framework, the definition of maximum return on investment and building success is: maximum public use of all parts of the building at all times of day by all types of people to create the maximum positive individual and community impact. The decision framework itself is designed to be a flexible tool for the Board of Trustees as they have the ability to refine the decision framework as conditions change or new decision criteria are developed.


Introduction and Project Background

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

7


Introduction Rapid change is the new context for planning. The world is changing quickly. Top stories in the news include Blockbuster video rental stores closing, continued disruption of media and retail industries by digital content and online sales, recordbreaking adoption of mobile technologies, and job automation. In the context of rapid and disruptive change, public libraries are being challenged to anticipate what comes next, adapt to new customer expectations, rethink service strategies, and deliver relevant services of value to an increasingly diverse array of community populations.

21ST CENTURY SKILLSETS

New literacies, skills, and opportunities reshape library land. A 2008 report from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, “21st Century Learning Skills,” notes that, “At a time when increasingly advanced skills are required for success in life and work, people of all ages are seeking a diverse range of learning experiences to inspire, guide, and enhance their personal and professional lives...Public libraries are poised to play a leading role in helping individuals and communities adapt to a changing world…linking individuals to information and learning opportunities, driving development and innovation, and serving as community connectors.” The most effective strategy to accomplish this is to align library services with community goals. When libraries build on their success in traditional literacy with robust investments in infrastructure for new literacies, communications, and technology, they build the skill sets Americans need in the 21st century.

Critical Thinking • Project Management • Independent Work Visual Literacy • Financial Literacy • Working Creatively with Others • Communication • Environmental Literacy • Media Analysis Problem Solving • Innovation Implementation • Conversations Creativity & Innovation • Using Systems Thinking • Making Judgements • Global Awareness • Accessing & Evaluating Information • Creating Media Products • Collaboration • Health Literacy • Communicating Clearly • Media Literacy • Adapting to Change • Cross Disciplinary Thinking • Flexibility & Adaptability • Goal & Time Management • Self-Direction • Effective Technology Application • Producing Results • Leadership & Responsibility

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Introduction and Project Background

8


Introduction and Project Background

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

9

The Aspen Institute’s 2015 report, “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries,�1 further details the emerging roles and opportunities for public libraries as PEOPLE, PLACE, and PLATFORM. People

Place

Platform

Public libraries are hubs of civic engagement, fostering new relationships and contributing to human development in communities. Libraries and librarians connect individuals to a vast array of local and national resources and serve as conveners to foster learning, earning, and health for people of all ages.

Public libraries are welcoming places for a wide range of purposes: reading, communicating, learning, playing, meeting, and getting business done. The design of libraries today recognizes that people are not merely consumers of content, but creators and citizens as well. Libraries are powerful public places that catalyze economic development and neighborhood revitalization, and strengthen social bonds and community identity. They are also virtual places where individuals can gain access to an incredible array of web-based resources and experiences.

The public library is an interactive customer- and communitycentered platform. Both physically and virtually, the library provides opportunities for individuals and community organizations to access a variety of information, tools, trainings, programs, and spaces to learn, create, and share. The library as platform facilitates and leverages a wide variety of civic assets and activities to advance the goals and dreams of individuals, organizations, and communities.

1

https://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/documents/AspenLibrariesReport.pdf


National trends in service model adaptation. As the business of public libraries shifts from transactions and things to activities and experiences, library operations are also shifting from past models, accommodating new environments, activities, and measures of success.

Libraries are changing profoundly in this time of rapid disruption. Planning for the future requires new and flexible approaches, thinking, tools, and decision-making frameworks and processes.

Passive to interactive.

Outputs to outcomes.

Makerspaces, early learning activity centers, job centers, hackathons, streaming courses, and conferences that engage residents in learning experiences are a growing part of library activity today. Libraries are a “third place� for people to visit, gather, and interact, in contrast to the past where reading, studying, and other more passive, solitary activities dominated.

Information to learning. The traditional information and reference roles of librarians have shifted to roles related to learning: facilitator, convener, partner, and connector.

Physical to virtual. As libraries shift from managing things to orchestrating experiences, the measures of success are also shifting. New outcome measures around improvement in skills, knowledge, attitudes, and aptitudes are replacing the traditional output measures of circulation, visits, program attendance, and computer sessions. Emerging library outcome measures look at library contributions to community challenges and individual advancement.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Library services are both physical and virtual. Libraries are not disappearing because of the Internet; they are compatible and symbiotic. While libraries continue to circulate physical books, they are also seeing an exponential rise in customer use of downloadable and online materials and learning platforms. The virtual service realm is exploding, with access to all types of downloadable media and ever-increasing apps and online service tools.

Static plans to flexible decision frameworks. With ubiquitous change comes uncertainty about the future. Strategic, technology, and facilities plans were traditionally static and long-term. They are now giving way to shorterterm, more customized decision frameworks that decisionmakers are able to use to consider new information, changing conditions, and trade-offs between community need, organizational assets and capacity, and partner alignment to make critical decisions about services, buildings, and technologies.

Introduction and Project Background

10


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Introduction and Project Background

11

Project Background Library District customer- and community-centric service model adaptation. The Library District has a long history and strong reputation as a national leader in the shift to customerdriven and community-centric service strategies as new technologies, commerce, communication, and information literacies change the world of learning, work, and entertainment. •

The Library District broke away from the national model of cookie-cutter branch facilities at the end of the 1980s when they began to construct branches with performance, lecture, museum, and multipurpose activity areas and places for local residents to enjoy creative and active civic life. In 2003, the Library District was named Library of the Year by Library Journal for revamping collections to meet the public demand for more popular and culturally diverse materials; for the District’s outreach service innovations, including the establishment of the Computer Assisted Literacy in Libraries (CALL) program, which brought free technology classes to the neighborhoods in mobile computer labs; the Web on Wheels (WOW) mobile outreach to local students to demonstrate new online study and homework help resources; and online customer services to grow the use of library digital e-resources which were just emerging in the market.

The Library District has a long history of responding to customer needs to access new technologies that are reshaping the world of work, entertainment, information, and government services: first with public access computers, now with laptops, iPads, tech and DJ labs, hotspots, and expanded offerings of technology instruction and training for all ages. In 2013, the Library District began adding teen tech centers in an effort to bridge the digital divide and ready youth for the jobs of the future.

On the operations side, the Library District was a frontrunner in investing in and adopting RFID and automated materials handling systems in the late 2000s, making library operations more efficient. Staff are freed up to take on new customer service roles and to facilitate new programs, activities, and partnerships. Efficiency savings have been deployed to accommodate new capital projects, ongoing facility maintenance and renovation, new public access technologies, and implementation of new service models.

The Library District developed and adopted customer intelligence tools in 2010, helping the organization make a shift to customer-driven planning. CommunityConnect, a dynamic online planning platform accessible to every staff member, has rich demographic and market segment data on


customers, core customers, and untapped customer markets in Las Vegas and Clark County. This data is integrated into all Library District planning efforts and decision-making processes to tailor branch services to the needs, interests, life stages, and lifestyles of specific branch service area populations. •

In 2014, the Library District received the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ National Medal of Excellence. The award came in recognition of the Library District’s quick response to plummeting tax revenues to both stabilize the organization and deliver peak levels of service to a community devastated by unemployment, mortgage defaults, bankruptcies, and food insecurity. Collection, computer use, and program innovations spiked to help people gain new skills, apply for jobs online, and access government services online that were no longer available in person. In 2015, a 30-member cross-organizational team met to craft v.2020, adopted by the Library District Board of Trustees in early 2016. The plan is community-centric. It aligns resources and service strategies to significantly and positively impact critical community challenges around educational attainment, workforce readiness, business activation, economic diversification, and stronger social service safety nets. It recasts the mission to focus on the library’s contribution to the educational, economic, and social well-being of individuals and communities in Las Vegas and Clark County. The plan’s four pillars align with critical community issues: limitless learning, business and career success, access to government and social services, and community and culture. To further advance the integration of library and community agendas, the Library District was reorganized in 2016 to grow

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

market share, build new capacity for community engagement, expand visibility, reposition the brand, and elevate the public value of libraries and library services for our residents and Southern Nevada communities. Flexibility, adaptability, service prototyping, and sustainability are the unifying principles that now guide implementation of Library District plans. Over the past few years, to make space for new learning experiences, technologies, partnerships, and to grow robust community use of the branches, the Library District has realigned existing assets on many fronts: •

Branches are adopting new retail and “third place” environments. Branch furniture and public spaces are used flexibly to accommodate afternoon homework help, more interactive play and parent engagement, instruction and personal use in computer labs, new teen tech/adult learning labs, co-located partner services like One-Stop Career Centers, and performance and art events. The model for v.2020 services has been activated in Mesquite with great enthusiasm from the public.

As branches reduce shelf space to accommodate new spaces for interactive learning, the Library District has deployed nimble and flexible collection distribution techniques, such as use of the Distribution Center, floating collections, web-based reservations, and convenient materials pick up.

The Library District’s Technology Plan and IT Department maintain, upgrade, and manage public access computer, laptop, and WiFi equipment and infrastructure. They support innovative new public access technologies for maker spaces, digital media labs, online learning, databases, and WiFi hotspots.

Introduction and Project Background

12


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

The website and social media channels have been upgraded and activated to facilitate greater customer reach via integration with major web browsers; greater customer voice and engagement; greater promotion of events, programs, and e-resources; and broader media coverage of the library as a favored local place for learning, arts, and culture.

The Library District and Library District Foundation have been able to attract new sources of revenue, such as New Markets Tax Credits and grants, to support the library’s roles and contributions related to local and regional ecosystems for educational, economic, and social well-being; neighborhood vitality; and community advancement.

The need to shift from facilities master plan to framework. The context of rapid change and service adaptation described above is impacting the way we think about Library District facilities today. The development of this Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework looks much different from past facilities master plans because it is designed for flexibility, opportunity, creativity, and customization. It is based on factors such as access, community need, customer interests, and use preferences rather than traditional library building and collection design standards. The impetus for this shift to master planning came in early 2014, when Library District executives began to design facilities improvements with medium-term bond funds left over from the Windmill Library and Service Center. That construction project came in $18 million under projections, due to the extraordinary construction conditions of the Great Recession.

Introduction and Project Background

13

With the remaining capital project bond funds and additional savings once the bond debt payments were reserved, Library District leaders began moving forward on small branch improvements, finishing a renovation of the children’s area of the Sunrise Library in 2015 and designing facility improvements to the Rainbow branch. It soon became clear that branch renovation projects were more extensive and expensive than a piecemeal approach could sustain. It also became clear that new decision-making tools were needed to help the Board prioritize facility improvements on a go-forward basis. Facilities master plan framework scope and goals. In May 2017, the Board of Trustees approved the engagement of the project consultant team comprised of Simpson Coulter | STUDIO, Margaret Sullivan Studio, and Applied Analysis. The question “What are library buildings for?” was the starting point, to get clarity on how many buildings are needed and where they should be located as the Vegas valley grows over time, as well as how to design facilities to accommodate adaptation as times, populations, and service needs change. The question was also posed to get clarity on how buildings need to activate and function in the context of implementing the Library District’s current v.2020 strategic service model and getting maximum utilization of library facility assets. This planning effort followed a collaborative, iterative, and interactive process. Over the past year, from June 2017 through August 2018, the consultant team worked with library executives to complete the scope of work and project goals (next page).


PROJECT SCOPE and GOALS.

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

1

Field verification of library branch floor plans, generated in building information modeling (BIM) software. It should be noted that the consultant scope was limited to 13 of the Library District’s 25 facilities. While the focus is on Laughlin and 12 urban branches in this document, the Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework is designed to inform decisions relating to future improvements for the smaller rural branch facilities in the decades ahead.

2

Development of 20-year population and growth pattern forecasts and demographic analyses of the urban Las Vegas Valley to determine the need for new buildings and/or adequacy of the existing facility footprint.

3

Creation of a facilities vision based on District-wide strategic goals and evaluation of the capacity for existing Library District branch facilities to adapt to the 21st century library service model described in v.2020, including the development of specific branch schematic plans.

4

Identification and evaluation of capital project funding strategies based on the Library District’s current financial conditions and evaluation of the magnitude and viability of alternative funding options to finance future capital projects.

5

Synthesis of all preceding data and analysis components into a Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework to clearly articulate, define, and incorporate the multiple factors involved in capital project decisions. Introduction and Project Background

14


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Introduction and Project Background

At critical milestones of the project, staff throughout the Library District were engaged for input and information, including branch managers, department managers, and cross-organizational workshop teams. Input and feedback on the general direction of Library District service strategies and facility use were also solicited from 26 community leaders at a meeting in March 2018.

and site systems and maintenance technologies, including green building technologies. In this way, the project cost estimates will be current, accurate, and relevant.

To contain consultant costs, it was decided that the focus of the existing branch analyses would be on 13 facilities: Centennial Hills, Clark County, Enterprise, Laughlin, Rainbow, Sahara West, Spring Valley, Summerlin, Sunrise, West Charleston, Whitney, Windmill, and West Las Vegas. East Las Vegas and Mesquite are new libraries, already designed for v.2020 and Las Vegas is omitted as it will be closed when the new East Las Vegas library opens in spring 2019. It should be noted that this report uses existing branch boundaries to calculate demographic and market segment characteristics. As East Las Vegas opens, branch boundaries will be adjusted, with changes to Sunrise, West Las Vegas, and Clark County branch boundaries. The Library District will monitor and adjust branch boundaries over time as data in CommunityConnect is periodically updated. Another cost containment decision was to conduct an inhouse inventory of site and facility conditions, included in this document as Appendix 3, 2019-2039 Facilities Assessment and Maintenance Renewal Plan. Other sections of this report also provide additional information on site and building conditions that impact community access or constrain full customer- and community-centric service model implementation. As the Board approves future capital projects, more extensive site and facility assessments will be developed, including electrical, data, and technology upgrades, to be responsive to advances in building

15

Structure of this report. The following sections of the body of this report will summarize and highlight the inquiry process and findings for the major areas of planning framework development: • • • • •

Las Vegas Valley demographics and growth patterns in the future changes in the service model and impact on branch facility design and use; summary of current sites and facilities conditions; costing future branch improvements; and analysis of financial resources available to the Library District for capital project design and construction for the next 10 years.

More detailed data on these component investigations are attached in report appendices compiled by members of the consultant team: Demographic Analysis (Applied Analysis), Service Model Integration into Branch Building Programs (Margaret Sullivan Studio), 2019-2039 Facilities Assessment and Maintenance Renewal Plan (LVCCLD General Services Department), and Financial Analysis (Applied Analysis). The report culminates in a recommended Library Facilities Master Planning Decision Framework that gives the Board of Trustees tools to evaluate project options and move projects forward in an opportunistic and sustainable way. The proposed framework is designed to meet the demands of a constantly evolving planning environment and changing purposes of Library District buildings as well as to aid the Board in tough decisions with a process that considers new capital projects within the context of a number of criteria:


• • • • •

community conditions and need customer preferences and behaviors service model optimization fiscal resources needed to complete capital projects resources needed to sustain library facility assets over time

A facilities planning framework that is holistic, sustainable, and responsive. The component of sustainability is extremely important. Given the lessons learned in staff’s earlier attempts to piecemeal branch renovation projects, this document proposes a facility decision framework that is holistic. In the context of this report holistic means that projects will be defined by looking at all costs of building construction, lease, renovation, or modification, including operations costs for staffing, technology, and upgrades to building and operational infrastructure. With the passage of a successful $10 million bond for library construction in 1984 in anticipation of the establishment of the Library District in 1985, the successful $80 million bond in 1991 ($70 million for buildings and $10 million for collections), and the buildings financed with available cash (Centennial Hills, Mesquite, and East Las Vegas) and medium term bonds (Windmill), the Library District has successfully established a system of 25 branches, 14 in the urban Vegas valley and 11 in rural Clark County communities, with staffing, collections, and technology keeping pace with new branch development. Of the 14 urban branches, only Meadows and Las Vegas are not wholly owned. Of the 11 rural branches, six are not wholly owned, including Blue Diamond, Bunkerville, Indian Springs, Moapa Town, Sandy Valley, and Searchlight. Over the past three years, all smaller rural branches have received facility updates.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Branches have been built in compliance with Nevada State Regulations (NRS) that require all capital funds to be identified and reserved prior to project approval. When opening a new building, the Library District must also identify and save appropriate resources for staff, collections, and technology as part of a capital project cost estimate. The importance of this holistic facilities funding practice cannot be understated. Had the Library District executives not taken a holistic project budgeting approach, with adequate savings for new staff, technology, collections, and other operations costs associated with the Windmill branch construction project, the Library District would not have been able to open Windmill to the public in 2011, when it simultaneously had to quickly and substantially cut overall Library District operations and capital budgets to weather the sudden and sustained drop in tax revenues in the Great Recession. As tax caps restrain the growth of tax revenues in the future, it will be even more important to follow a holistic budgeting practice in the years to come. Building construction, leasing, and renovation project options must consider all anticipated costs and organizational fiscal impacts associated with improving existing facilities and/or bringing new facilities online.

Introduction and Project Background

16


Demographic Analysis

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

17


Urban Clark County Growth Patterns and Demographics The demographic and population growth outlook was developed by the team at Applied Analysis, including Jeremy Aguero, Brian Gordon, and Chris Drury. A more detailed analysis of Library District and branch demographics, as well as source citations for this section of the report, can be referenced in Appendix 1, Demographic Analysis.

To address the Library District’s objectives, Applied Analysis led the following activities: 1.

Establish a baseline expectation of future growth (i.e., how many potential consumers may impact demand for library services?)

The planning team launched the demographic analyses with following questions:

2.

Project where future growth is likely to take place (i.e., what areas are likely to generate future demand for library services?)

3.

Identify any notable demographic changes within the Library District service areas (i.e., are there any material shifts in the demographic profile expected within each library branch’s service area?)

Is the Library District facility footprint adequate for current and future Vegas Valley growth in the coming decades?

If not, where should the Library District prepare to site new facilities?

How will the demographics of the Vegas Valley change between now and 2040?

How will changing demographics impact facility location, design, and use?

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Demographic Analysis

18


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

Demographic and growth forecast methodology and data sources. To evaluate demographic conditions and provide insights for planning, Applied Analysis used a stepwise approach to understand the current baseline economic conditions from which future growth will be measured and the trajectory at which the community is expected to expand. This population growth data is sourced to proprietary projections developed by Applied Analysis which are benchmarked against, and generally align with, known third-party demographers, including the State of Nevada and the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

The analysis and assessment of the demographic characteristics of residents within each of the Library District’s various service areas segments population by key attributes including age, household size, number of children by age group, race/ethnicity, and household income, as well as by market segment.

A number of analyses to develop forecasts on the location and intensity of growth within the urban Las Vegas Valley were considered, including: 1. evaluating residential permitting activity 2. considering development potential within major master planned communities 3. identifying vacant lands suitable for residential development activity 4. assessing land ownership, land uses and zoning for appropriateness of future development 5. assessing the likelihood of development given surrounding land uses 6. considering historical build-out patterns in the urban Las Vegas Valley 7. other market-based factors The forecast utilizes a ground-up approach starting with the parcel-level data, while using the broader Southern Nevada growth expectations as a control total for the broader community.

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Historical overview of population growth in Southern Nevada. The Southern Nevada economy has been one of the fastest growing communities in the nation, and the prospects for future growth remain positive. The local population stands at 2.2 million (with 1.5 million located within the LVCCLD urban service area). There are a number of attributes that provide strong fundamentals for continued expansion. The Las Vegas area cost of living remains attractive and ranks on par with national averages. Additionally, the business tax climate ranks fifth in the country, providing businesses with a low-cost operating environment. There are a number of other fundamentals that support continued growth, including but not limited to: • • • • •

easy access to regional markets no corporate or personal income tax a diversifying economy competitive real estate costs high quality of life

Future expansion is also in response to broader migration to the west, an aging population, and planned investments in the local economy.


Slower rates of growth and some demographic shifts expected in the next two decades. While the pace of population growth has been relatively impressive over the course of the past several decades, the rate of growth (in percentage terms) is likely to slow. The service areas in the urban Las Vegas valley are anticipated to expand at an annual average rate of approximately 1.0% through 2040. This growth will result in nearly two million residents throughout the LVCCLD urban service areas, or an additional 468,300 residents from 2015.

Modest changes are also anticipated in terms of the demographic characteristics of residents throughout the urban Las Vegas valley. Notably, the share of households with children is expected to decline slightly (from 29.1% presently to 28.3% in 2040), and the share of the population over 55 years of age will likely increase (from 23.7% presently to 24.2% in 2040). Branches likely to see a rise in households with children include Centennial Hills, Rainbow, Summerlin, and Sahara West. Branches that anticipate growth in senior populations include Laughlin, West Las Vegas, and Clark County.

LVCCLD and Clark County Population LVCCLD Population Non-LVCCLD Population

2,035,572

2,171,054

2,327,066

2,478,500

2,601,492

2,725,421

1,526,446

1,608,987

1,681,387

1,780,095

1,890,779

1,994,719

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

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The analysis also assumes the share of Latino households will increase over the course of the next several decades, from 23.6% presently to 25.4% in 2040. In 2040, it is projected that the branches with the highest percentage of Latino households will include Sunrise (46.2%), West Las Vegas (36.6%), West Charleston (36.2%), Clark County (34.0%), and Whitney (34.0%).

Finally, there is a general expectation that incomes will continue to rise, with the median income estimated to expand by approximately 64.1% through 2040.

Summary of Demographic Outlook within the Urban Service Area 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

%Growth

Change in Share

Population

1,476,337

100.0%

1,928,867

100.0%

452,530

30.7%

0.0%

Population under 18

350,311

23.7%

444,568

23.0%

94,257

26.9%

-0.7%

Population 18 to 54

776,343

52.6%

1,017,335

52.7%

240,992

31.0%

0.2%

Population 55 + above

349,683

23.7%

466,964

24.2%

117,281

33.5%

0.5%

No. of households

529,749

100.0%

685,278

100.0%

155,529

29.4%

0.0%

Households w/children

154,253

29.1%

193,995

28.3%

39,742

25.8%

-0.8%

With children under 6

34,400

6.5%

41,298

6.0%

6,898

20.1%

-0.5%

With children 6 to 17

85,450

16.1%

108,069

15.8%

22,619

26.5%

-0.4%

With both aged child.

34,403

6.5%

44,624

6.5%

10,220

29.7%

0.0%

Households w/out children

375,496

70.9%

491,283

71.7%

115,787

30.8%

0.8%

Latino households

125,000

23.6%

174,000

25.4%

48,999

39.2%

1.8%

African American households

58,311

11.0%

99,051

14.5%

40,740

69.9%

3.4%

Asian households

49,651

9.4%

100,759

14.7%

51,109

102.9%

5.3%

Multi-race households

12,640

2.4%

25,712

3.8%

8,032

103.4%

1.4%

Household median income

$56,187

-

$92,181

-

$35,994

64.1%

-


263,907

2015 and 2040 Branch Service Area Population

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

2040 Branch Population

Demographic Analysis

7,855 8,597 Laughlin

22,030 21,839 West Las Vegas

Las Vegas

45,318 45,116

153,945 65,225 Summerlin

76,137 77,245 Spring Valley

100,446 111,565 Whitney

115,728 115,367 West Charleston

115,221

122,970 124,691 Clark County

Enterprise

129,232 Centennial Hills

182,787

205,458

210,756 139,769 Windmill

150,069 156,865

2015 Branch Population

Rainbow

176,513 Sahara West

Sunrise

215,615 257,264

A more detailed review of demographic conditions within each of the Library District’s existing branch service areas shows that the Sunrise branch has the largest current service population, with nearly 216,000 residents presently. The population in the area is expected to expand to over 257,000 by the year 2040. By 2040, the largest service area is modeled to be Sahara West followed by Sunrise, Windmill, Centennial Hills, Enterprise, and Summerlin.

22


Demographic Analysis

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

23

The largest percentage population growth gains are expected for Summerlin, Centennial Hills, Enterprise, Windmill, and Sahara West service areas. The following graph illustrates future branch growth and ranking by branch service area.

136.0%

Population Percentage Change Between 2015 and 2040 59.0%

58.6% 50.8%

49.5%

19.3%

-0.3%

-0.4%

-0.9%

West Charleston

Las Vegas

West Las Vegas

1.4%

Clark County

1.5%

Spring Valley

4.5%

Rainbow

9.4%

Laughlin

Whitney

Sunrise

Sahara West

Windmill

Enterprise

Centennial Hills

Summerlin

11.1%


The following maps depict the general location and intensity of residential development activity in the future.

Residential Development by 2030

Residential Development by 2040

Residential Development Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

24


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

25

Southern Nevada 2015-2040 Growth

The map to the right summarizes the Las Vegas Valley growth patterns from 2015 through 2040, with areas in gray anticipated to grow in population, areas in light orange projected to remain stable, and areas in dark orange projected to lose population. According to these growth projections, the number of housing units is expected to increase from 815,184 in 2020 to 1,004,064 in 2030, and to 1,099,137 in 2040, bringing an estimated half million more people to the service area.

Population Loss

50-250

Controlled Site

Stable Population

250-1,000

Existing Branch

Over 1,000

Other System Libraries


Analysis of the Library District’s facilities footprint. As is apparent from the preceding map, the majority of future growth is expected to be focused in the western portions of the urban Las Vegas Valley - particularly the southwest and northwest; however, this growth is expected to take years to expand. Over the next decade, the Library District has an opportunity to build out the expansion areas in the existing Centennial Hills and Windmill branch facilities to accommodate near- to -mid-term increases in demand. This also gives the Library District a chance to better understand how shifts in library services, programs, and materials utilization will impact demand for the physical buildings in the future, a topic that will be explored further in the next section of this report.

2040 Population

Skye Canyon (Kyle Canyon Road) Location

Less than 1,000 1,000 - 2,000

Centennial Hills

2,000 - 3,000 3,000 - 4,000 Over 4,000

Summerlin

Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Rainbow

Cactus Pointe (Cactus and Jones) Location Spring Valley

The Library District has identified two potential future sites. One, in the far northwest part of the Las Vegas Valley in the Centennial Hills service area along Kyle Canyon Road, referred to as Skye Canyon, is a potential Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lease site controlled by the City of Las Vegas. The other, located in the southwest part of the Las Vegas Valley near the intersection of Cactus Avenue and Jones Boulevard, referred to as Cactus Pointe, is an undeveloped BLM site with a lease term that expires in 2035. The two expansion sites were secured to accommodate future demand in their surrounding service areas but are generally bordered by mountainous terrain that would potentially limit residential densities, and potentially, the use of the facilities. The sites are identified with purple squares on the maps. Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Sahara West

Clark County

Windmill

Enterprise

Demographic Analysis

26


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

The decision to build new facilities should also consider sites located along major thoroughfares that remain in close proximity to future development activity and residential expansion. For example, the Library District may consider alternative locations along the western segments of the Interstate 215 Beltway. Specifically, locations should be considered around the Beltway north of Cheyenne Avenue (northwest) and south of Tropicana Avenue (southwest). Additionally, the existing population combined with future growth may support another branch in the eastern portion of the Vegas valley (in the Sunrise service area).

Demographic Analysis

27

Southern Nevada 2040 Population with Potential New Site Locations Less than 1,000

2,000 - 3,000

Controlled Site

1,000 - 2,000

3,000 - 4,000

Existing Branch

Over 4,000

Other System Libraries


To further explore customer access and convenience factors for new facility site decisions, Applied Analysis produced the following maps which illustrate distance and drive times to existing facilities.

Drive Time Within 10 Minutes Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

28


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Drive Time Within 15 Minutes

Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Demographic Analysis

29


3-Mile Radius

Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

30


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

4-Mile Radius

Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Demographic Analysis

31


5-Mile Radius

Controlled Site Existing Branch Other System Libraries

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Demographic Analysis

32


Demographic Analysis

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

MAJOR FINDINGS.

33

1

Population within the urban Las Vegas Valley, including the Library District’s service area, is expected to continue to grow, although not at the extraordinary rates of the past half century.

2

Between now and 2040, the Library District can anticipate a slight decrease in the share of households with families as the overall population continues to age. The Latino demographic is expected to expand as a share of all households. Individual branches may see more dramatic shifts in population characteristics.

3

At present, the Library District footprint is well distributed throughout its service area and appears well positioned to service future population growth in the near- to midterm.

4

The eastern portion of the Library District’s service area appears to have some potential gaps. However, the April 2019 opening of the East Las Vegas library is expected to serve residents in the area.


Field Verification and Building Maintenance Condition Assessment

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

34


Laying the foundation In March 2017, Simpson Coulter | STUDIO began coordination of field verification and building integrated modeling (BIM) for each of the 13 library branch facilities within the Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework scope of work, including: 1. creation of accurate floor plan documents to be used in the facility schematics created by Margaret Sullivan Studio; 2. location and dimensions of walls, windows, doors, openings room naming, and other facility features; 3. provision of updated and accurate floor plans and diagrams of all urban branches to the Library District for future development of branch capital projects; and 4. provision of updated and accurate floor plans and diagrams to the Library District General Services Department for use in maintenance efforts. Current and future building maintenance conditions and cost estimates. In June and July 2018, the Library District’s General Services Department completed a comprehensive Facility Condition Assessment (FCA) of 17 Library Districtowned buildings (comprised of 708,646 square feet of building space) to accurately identify and quantify the Library District’s current and future capital renewal needs. This FCA will be used to assess and prioritize facility maintenance and capital renewal needs throughout the Library District and to make recommendations regarding projected financial outlays needed to address short and long-term facility maintenance needs Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

as well as capital renewal projects. Details from this General Services assessment are available in Appendix 3, 2019-2039 Facilities Assessment and Maintenance Renewal Plan. The FCA assessed various building systems, including foundation systems, structural systems, roofing systems, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. For each of the 17 facilities, Library District General Services Staff assessed the following: 1. current and forecasted building conditions 2. current site infrastructure needs 3. remaining service life of major building systems, including building envelope, architectural finishes, roofs, electrical, plumbing, and HVAC systems 4. rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for building system renewal and site infrastructure repairs 5. forecasted facility renewal requirements based on lifecycle analysis of existing systems over the span of the next 20 years 6. Facility Condition Index (FCI) measurements to illustrate the relative condition of all facilities The average age of the Library District’s 17 owned facilities is 22.5 years, with a range of 3 months (Mesquite) to 31 years (Moapa Valley, Mt. Charleston, and Sunrise).

Executive Summary

35


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

The current replacement value (CRV), or the cost to construct a replacement building in today’s dollars, was calculated at $354,323,000, based on an estimated current construction cost of similar structures of $500 per square foot (featured in chart to the right). Capital Renewal costs representing previous or future repairs or replacements paid from the Capital Fund budget were calculated using recent hard bid numbers, when available, or estimates. Current costs were extended based on the remaining useful life to the building systems to establish the future replacement cost, combined with a 2% inflation rate compounded annually. Expected life cycles for buildings systems were based on the Building Operators and Managers of America (BOMA) recommendations, manufacturer’s suggested useful life, and material life based on historical records. Because the Library District’s General Service Department has kept up with all maintenance issues, the five year FCI score by location is excellent for all 17 buildings that were assessed (featured in chart on the next page). The 20-year FCI by location shows that nine of the 17 facilities rank “Fair,” and the remaining 8 buildings are rated “Good.” Specific capital renewal costs were estimated for each of the 17 facilities at a total of $32,257,417. These cost estimates were also provided by year over 20 years (2019 – 2039). The cost estimates are also broken out by building system categories, with the greatest anticipated costs in the categories of HVAC ($9.7 million), parking lot ($4.9 million), roofing ($3.6 million), and flooring ($3.6 million).

Executive Summary

36

Current Estimated CRV by Location Library

Square Footage

CRV

Centennial Hills

45,555

$22,777,500

Clark County

120,000

$66,000,000

Enterprise

26,300

$13,150,000

Laughlin

15,562

$7,781,000

Mesquite Library

13,313

$6,656,500

Mesquite Library Learning Center

5,464

$2,732,000

Moapa Valley

4,700

$2,350,000

Mt. Charleston

2,800

$1,400,000

Rainbow

26,800

$13,400,000

Sahara West

122,000

$61,000,000

Spring Valley

26,645

$13,322,500

Summerlin

40,165

$20,082,500

Sunrise

23,000

$11,500,000

West Charleston

38,900

$19,450,000

West Las Vegas

30,693

$15,346,500

Whitney

24,600

$12,300,000

Windmill Library and S.C.

142,149

$71,074,500

Total

708,646

$354,323,000


5-Year FCI Score by Location Library

Square Footage

CRV

Renewal Costs

FCI%

FCI Score

Centennial Hills

45,555

$22,777,500

$54,459

0.24

Excellent

Clark County

120,000

$66,000,000

$161,027

0.27

Excellent

Enterprise

26,300

$13,150,000

$637,825

4.85

Excellent

Laughlin

15,562

$7,781,000

$279,702

3.59

Excellent

Mesquite Library

13,313

$6,656,500

$0

0.00

Excellent

Mesquite Library Learning Center

5,464

$2,732,000

$78,030

2.86

Excellent

Moapa Valley

4,700

$2,350,000

$5,000

0.21

Excellent

Mt. Charleston

2,800

$1,400,000

$55,204

3.94

Excellent

Rainbow

26,800

$13,400,000

$556,074

4.22

Excellent

Sahara West

122,000

$61,000,000

$2,100,685

3.44

Excellent

Spring Valley

26,645

$13,322,500

$443,926

3.33

Excellent

Summerlin

40,165

$20,082,500

$563,336

2.81

Excellent

Sunrise

23,000

$11,500,000

$228,493

1.99

Excellent

West Charleston

38,900

$19,450,000

$632,740

3.25

Excellent

West Las Vegas

30,693

$15,346,500

$97,147

0.63

Excellent

Whitney

24,600

$12,300,000

$194,031

1.58

Excellent

Windmill Library and S.C.

142,149

$71,074,500

$438,159

0.62

Excellent

Average FCI Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

2.23 Executive Summary

37


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Executive Summary

38

20-Year Maintenance Renewal Cost Estimates More specific building renewal costs are broken out by branch in Appendix 3.

By Location

By Year

By Category

Library

Renewal Cost

Year

Estimated Cost

Year

Estimated Cost

Centennial Hills

$2,659,599

2019

$1,030,792

Concrete

$117,664

Clark County

$5,059,559

2020

$2,825,856

Construction

$150,000

Enterprise

$1,531,698

2021

$837,738

Doors

$546,443

Laughlin

$1,378,940

2022

$330,910

Electrical

$952,428

Mesquite Library

$204,061

2023

$1,510,541

Elevators

$350,000

Mesquite Library Learning Center

$505,706

2024

$3,134,130

Fire

$1,539,562

Moapa Valley

$335,011

2025

$1,579,726

Flooring

$3,631,455

Mt. Charleston

$194,480

2026

$1,612,656

Fuel

$20,698

Rainbow

$2,113,877

2027

$1,623,942

HVAC

$9,737,444

Sahara West

$3,891,586

2028

$1,472,359

Landscaping

$478,514

Spring Valley

$1,048,717

2029

$3,060,428

Lighting

$1,560,733

Summerlin

$2,963,783

2030

$1,853,247

Painting

$2,849,147

Sunrise

$841,395

2031

$2,380,741

Parking lot

$4,935,108

West Charleston

$2,047,309

2032

$231,894

Roofing

$3,677,688

West Las Vegas

$1,496,022

2033

$1,771,673

Security

$248,675

Whitney

$1,572,946

2034

$560,011

Theater

$1,461,858

Windmill Library and S.C.

$4,412,726

2035

$671,751

Total

$32,257,417

Total

$32,257,417

2036

$1,672,544

2037

$694,687

2038

$2,446,433

2039

$955,359

Total

$32,257,417


MAJOR FINDINGS.

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

1

In the short-term (2019-2023), Library District facilities are in good condition, requiring approximately $6.5 million in building renewal investments in the five-year renewal plan (2019-2023) and $32.2 million in anticipated maintenance costs over the next 20 years (2019 – 2039).

2

Long-term maintenance costs will be managed with continuous, multi-faceted maintenance of building systems by the Library District’s General Services Department. Maintenance issues will be accomplished using a work order system and regularly scheduled building inspections.

3

Continuous implementation of energy conservation and sustainability systems, not only for new buildings, but also for retrofitting energy-efficient technologies into existing facilities, such as LED lamp conversion, zone scheduling, night/ unoccupied settings, and after-hours overrides that allow temporary changes to comfort settings when buildings are not in use, among other similar tools.

Field Verification and Current Conditions

39


Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

40


Investing in Community Branches

What are the buildings for? The question, “What are the library buildings for?” was the focus of the analyses described in this section of the Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework. In particular, this section explores how Library District branch facilities are changing to adopt service priorities articulated in v.2020 as well as how existing facilities can maximize their role as it relates to the Library District mission to nurture the social, economic, and educational well-being of communities and Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

build communities of people who come together to pursue their individual and group aspirations. As mentioned previously, the 13 branches assessed in this section are the Library District’s urban branches: Centennial Hills, Clark County, Enterprise, Laughlin, Rainbow, Sahara West, Spring Valley, Summerlin, Sunrise, West Charleston, Whitney, Windmill, and West Las Vegas. East Las Vegas, which is opening in spring 2019, and the newlyVision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

opened Mesquite branch are designed to implement the new v.2020 service model. Las Vegas is omitted as it will be closed when the new East Las Vegas library opens. The table on the next page provides details on square footage and age of the buildings reviewed. There is also information on special spaces associated with the buildings, if any, and relevant square footage dimensions.

41


Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

42

Branch

Total SF: Library

Year Opened

Special Spaces

Special Spaces SF

Centennial Hills

45,555

2009

Expansion/distribution center

13,267

Clark County

120,000

1994

399-seat theater, black box theater, multipurpose room

30,662

Enterprise

26,300

1996

Laughlin

15,562

1994

Rainbow

26,800

1994

Amphitheater stage and backstage

4,000

Sahara West

122,000

1997

The Galleries Foundation book warehouse, upstairs board room

22,136

Spring Valley

26,645

1988

Summerlin

40,165

1993

287-seat theater

13,181

Sunrise

23,000

1987

West Charleston

38,900

1993

276-seat lecture hall

4,380

West Las Vegas

30,696

1989

298-seat theater

14,285

Whitney

24,600

1994

198-seat concert hall

4,290

Windmill

52,890

2011

299-seat theater auditorium expansion space

15,877


Measuring Branch Performance What do the numbers say? Currently, the practice is to measure building success by collection use, gate count, holds, and program attendance. These are traditional output measures that indicate some levels of branch activity but do not reflect virtual use of libraries or new roles and purposes of the buildings.

Currently, we are not able to track e-resource use by branch customer. However, year-end totals indicate that e-resource circulation is on the rise. Use of downloadable materials totaled 1,965,572 in fiscal year 2018, up from 1,670,494 in fiscal year (FY) 2017.

The chart on the following page tracks the following measures from July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018: the type of materials and volume of materials checked out, holds that were picked up, gate count, attendance at youth and adult programs, and computer session counts for all branches in this study.

The following sections of this chapter describe:

It is clear that the library is still a robust place for transactions of things, with media and print materials circulating in a roughly 50-50 split as well as an active place for visits, public access computer use, and programs.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

• • • •

the assessment methodology assessment findings that articulate how the roles and purposes of the buildings are changing today ways the buildings can be redesigned for the next generation of services a redefinition of building success that relates to maximum use of the buildings.

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

43


Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Total Total Holds Media Circulation Picked Up Materials

Gate Count

44

Youth Adult Computer Program Program Sessions Attendance Attendance

Branch

Total Print Materials

Centennial Hills

439,428

212,149

670,605

87,264

399,976

14,868

3,504

56,491

Clark County

198,944

426,950

644,704

110,915

591,522

44,908

77,361

103,055

Enterprise

234,841

207,915

455,435

95,486

377,218

9,916

7,888

33,059

Laughlin

43,053

87,472

132,433

21,571

166,580

3,771

4,055

21,990

Rainbow

315,329

305,345

635,298

100,754

442,328

22,081

11,393

53,791

Sahara West

470,064

284,695

733,136

78,185

536,592

15,874

24,500

61,805

Spring Valley

231,591

309,298

551,298

85,791

412,583

17,737

7,659

83,879

Summerlin

261,165

125,483

398,787

131,091

289,842

16,084

45,883

24,611

Sunrise

260,626

338,564

610,195

69,403

352,402

12,942

9,641

71,285

West Charleston

192,116

264,487

465,373

67,660

379,214

6,473

11,399

47,498

West Las Vegas

63,734

139,167

205,541

98,616

298,519

5,130

26,632

60,069

Whitney

198,788

308,159

516,945

25,387

601,576

21,010

15,549

51,779

Windmill

466,444

200,266

686,463

81,500

359,391

15,586

23,969

61,545

TOTAL

3,376,123

3,209,950

6,586,073

1,053,623

5,207,743

196,201

245,464

730,857


Planning activities and methodology. Margaret Sullivan Studio led the assessment of each branch facility’s capacity to fully implement and adapt to the v.2020 service model. They worked with staff at many levels of the organization as well as 16 community groups, some of which are already in active partnerships with the Library District. The methodology was iterative, starting with conversations about how the Library District can fully utilize each branch facility in alignment with a wide range of lifestyles and learning preferences of increasingly diverse Clark County residents. This culminated in discussions about how library services and resources connect to larger community challenges and impact initiatives.

Several kinds of planning assessments were carried out, with a variety of perspectives, as follows: •

A cross-generational group of executive, department, and branch leaders met in June 2017 to conduct workshops to review and understand a Community Needs Assessment crafted from data pulled out of the Library District’s planning platform, CommunityConnect. The assessment uses market segmentation data to help staff and library leadership understand the diversity of households that make up the total urban service area as well as branch service areas. The workshops were led by Marc Futterman of CIVICTechnologies, Inc. Library District and branch staff gained a deep and detailed understanding of residents’ interests, preferences, channels of information, life stages, and lifestyles.

Branch manager surveys and workshops were conducted in June 2017. Summary data from these activities provided valuable information on branch assets and conditions, including the “distinguishable character” of the branch and its customers, community needs in the branch service area, the “destination feature and flavor” of the branch (branch learning culture), and current and priority future branch service mix.

Also in June 2017, Margaret Sullivan Studio led three workshops with the Library Operations team, the Community Engagement team, and the Branding and Marketing team. Library Operations conversations explored the needs of specific branch populations based on market segment and demographic data and identified the most important qualities of the customer experience as being welcoming, friendly, adaptable, and flexible. Community Engagement conversations explored the District-wide challenge of growing

Facilities Master Planning

Questionnaire My Department is:

T ell us about your Department!

What are the goals of the Department? Why was this Department created?

What are the primary outcome goals that you are envisioning for your customers today?

How have the goals of Vision 2020 impacted your approach to services?

How do you determine what services and programs you create?

*Please feel free to continue any answers on the back of this sheet.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

45


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

the Library District audience base and the qualities of the library that are attractive, such as safety, learning, internet access, and cultural programs. The work session with the Branding and Marketing team identified the need to update the perception of libraries among local residents and to tailor marketing strategies to the various branch and District-wide service populations. •

Cross-organizational input: In August 2017, Library District and branch leadership met to generate draft “recipes” for each branch based on community populations and need along with v.2020 strategic service goals and priorities. Branch leaders created branch taglines, identified service priorities and customer service touchpoints, and explored the customer’s experience. Again, the theme of a welcoming environment and proactive customer engagement emerged as a key to optimal building activation and full utilization. A final workshop with this group in May 2018 explored the customer experience to understand how to activate a welcoming environment resulting in positive and enjoyable library experiences, whether in the buildings, at work, at home, or out in the community. In March 2018, the Library District Foundation hosted a Community Engagement meeting with 26 representatives from 16 organizations attending (see Acknowledgements for the full list of participants). Margaret Sullivan reviewed the v.2020 strategic plan and spoke generally about the changing business of public libraries and roles of library buildings. Organizations provided information on their mission, service priorities, and top three community challenges. Organizational leaders characterized the lives of Las Vegas Valley residents on a spectrum ranging from hard and indentured servitude to resilient and resourceful.

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

46

When asked to comment on the value of public libraries to the community, responses converged around the notion that we are all working on the same issues: a brighter future for the region; experimentation with service models that reach the whole family; and solutions that are accessible, affordable, and scaled to the magnitude of community challenges. There was a strong, collaborative spirit in the room - excitement about what the library is doing and excitement about working together, aligning resources, and making a difference. Identified challenges fell into major themes of communication, transportation, language (Spanish), and capacity-building. Notably, the group of community organizations expressed gratitude and appreciation for the library gathering and asked to meet again. Many community organization CEOs view and endorse the library as a place that fosters and makes possible deep, impactful partnerships and alliances within the community.

The Executive Director and Executive Council met repeatedly to: − better understand how v.2020 service strategies impact facility design and use; − identify what it takes to invest in existing facilities in ways that strengthen community and advance the well-being of residents; − understand what resources, in addition to capital project funding, are needed to sustain a successful model; and − position the library as a relevant, valuable, and essential public institution.

This array of activities, perspectives, and feedback created a vision for Library District branches transforming into hubs of civic activity and hives for talent and skill development in the years and decades ahead.


Need and opportunity for customer- and community-centric building programs. This iterative process developed and tested customer-driven and community-centric building activation concepts. It revealed great alignment between how Library District staff envision building use and how local community organizations view library facilities as assets in terms of people, place, and platform: •

PEOPLE. Despite a slight drop in both circulation of physical materials and gate count in FY 2017-2018, the Library District hosted significant foot traffic at six million visits a year and use of books, CDs, and DVDs at 12 million items per year. Partners find the Library District attractive not only because of this volume of use but also because the Library District sees residents of all ages and from all walks of life, diverse cultural backgrounds, and a broad array of lifestyles and life stages. They affirmed that the Library District has a unique strength as a public institution in the Las Vegas Valley in that it is used by the whole family.

PLACE. The Library District has a good distribution of facilities across the urban Las Vegas Valley, mostly located on bus routes, serving as hubs of civic life, nested within other civic institutions, or in residential neighborhoods. In comparison to other library districts which often have one large branch and many small branches, this library district has substantial buildings that have major public performance and community gathering spaces, facility assets not found in other library systems of similar size and urban character. There has been enthusiastic public response to new interactive program spaces like the Best Buy Teen Tech Center at Clark County Library, which has had 8,500 visits from youth since it opened in January 2018. The new partnership with Workforce Connections immensely

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

expands that organization’s service outlets while bringing new expertise and connections to employment and social services into the Library District without hiring specialized new staff. •

PLATFORM. The most profound changes in Library District services over the past five years have been the tremendous growth in customer use of new devices and technology; rapid adoption of virtual services including downloadable books, movies, music, and magazines; and the use of library technology platforms. For example, when the Southern Nevada Health District shut down physical services during the recession, residents turned to the library public access computers and printers to get their health cards. Job seekers come to the library to search for employment and apply online. In the future, the Library as Platform model will go beyond the virtual, incorporating more impactful and intentional use of library facilities as platforms for partnerships, instructional experiences, innovation lab environments, business, and cultural exchanges as well as the public distribution of valuable internet-based services and information.

As Margaret Sullivan Studio synthesized the data from this variety of building program ideation and development activities, it became evident that there is tremendous support inside the library and out in the community for creating components that are local and aligned with customer and community characteristics and conditions rather than continuing with traditional components that rely on industry standards or national benchmarks. Who are we designing for and why? To understand the question “Who are we designing for?” Library District and branch staff reviewed market-wide and branch-specific predictive market segmentation data in the Community Needs Assessment, which Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

47


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

aggregated and overlaid household characteristics by Library District and branch boundaries with customer checkout activity for the year 2015 (Community Needs Assessment document found in Appendix 5).

To make sense of this complexity, the Library District grouped the top 30 segments (core customer groups) into three “super groups�: Families with Children; Seniors (households with people over 55 years old); and Professionals, Couples/Singles (households with no children, under the age of 55).

48

The following pages feature charts that summarize the populations, customers, and material checkout activity of these super groups and illustrate the variety of household types within each super group. The maps indicate the geographic distribution of household types. This data provides extremely detailed information on who is served, customers and core customers, District-wide as well as in each branch service area. Further details about the ESRI Tapestry segment definitions can be found in the demographic data provided at the end of Appendix 1.

826 Valencia Tenderloin Center; San Francisco, CA

That data tells us that the Las Vegas Valley metropolitan area is extremely fragmented, with a wide variety of household types and market segments (out of 65 national household types in the commercial segmentation database, the Library District serves 54 types).


Super Group: Families with Children

Super Group: Professionals, Couples/Singles

Super Group: Seniors

Up-and-Coming Families Aspiring Young Families Industrious Urban Fringe Inner City Tenants Milk and Cookies NeWest Residents Sophisticated Squires Boomburbs Main Street USA Crossroads City Dimensions

Enterprising Professionals Old and Newcomers Young and Restless In Style Exurbanites Cozy and Comfortable Midlife Junction

Social Security Set Prosperous Empty Nesters Silver and Gold Retirement Communities Senior Sun Seekers Simple Living

Super Group Statistical Summary Super Group

Population

Customers

NonCustomers

Checkouts

Market Share

Market Potential

Customer Growth Potential

Families with Children

942,595

345,074

597,521

21,922,455

36.6%

63.4%

290.0

Professionals, Couples/Singles

138,902

44,445

94,457

3,303,122

32.0%

68.0%

6.8

Seniors

312,165

109,840

202,325

7,243,457

35.2%

64.8%

32.5

Total Super Group Population

1,393,662

499,359

894,303

32,469,034

35.6%

64.2%

-

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

49


Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

50

Super Groups by Population, Customer, and Checkout Share Population Share Customer Share Checkout Share

80%

70%

68%

69%

68%

60%

50%

40%

30% 22%

22%

22%

20% 10%

10%

9%

0%

Families with Children

Professionals, Couples/Singles

Seniors

10%


These graphs and maps illustrate that even within broad categories of “Families,” “Seniors,” and “Professionals, Couples/Singles,” there is great variety of household types by lifestyle and life stage. The “Who are we designing for?” question is answered in great detail, allowing for customization and certainty in designing building programs and activity components since the maps also show us where various types of households tend to reside. This data becomes a powerful tool for aligning branch destination features and activities with customer preferences and cultures, answering the question of why various customers would be interested in library resources or activities and why the Library District has value to the community.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Segments in “Families with Children” Super Group City Dimensions Main Street USA NeWest Residents Sophisticated Squires Boomburbs Inner City Tenants Milk and Cookies Up and Coming Families Aspiring Young Families Crossroads Industrious Urban Fringe Service Areas

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

52

Segments in “Seniors� Super Group

Simple Living Senior Sun Seekers Prosperous Empty Nesters Social Security Set Retirement Communities Silver and Gold Service Areas


Segments in “Seniors� Super Group Exurbanites Cozy and Comfortable Midlife Junction Old and Newcomers Young and Restless In Style Enterprising Professionals Service Areas

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

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Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Non-patrons

Patrons

200,000 180,000 160,000

Families with Children

140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 Bunkerville

Centennial Hills

Clark County

Enterprise Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley Las Vegas

Laughlin

Meadows

Mesquite

Moapa Town

Moapa Valley

Mount Charleston

Rainbow

Sahara West

Searchlight

Spring Valley

Summerlin

Sunrise

West Charleston

West Las Vegas

Whitney

Windmill

Centennial Hills

Clark County

Enterprise Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley Las Vegas

Laughlin

Meadows

Mesquite

Moapa Town

Moapa Valley

Mount Charleston

Rainbow

Sahara West

Searchlight

Spring Valley

Summerlin

Sunrise

West Charleston

West Las Vegas

Whitney

Windmill

0

Bunkerville

Market segmentation analysis and customer intelligence also becomes a decisionmaking tool that helps the Library District and individual branches understand the relative size and importance of market segments in library service areas. The Community Needs Assessment data not only clarifies the primary service populations for each branch by super group and by market segments but also provides invaluable information about how to grow the Library District’s market share. The graphs to the right illustrate the variety of super group customers by branch (by Senior and Family super groups, respectively), with existing customers in blue and untapped customer markets in purple.

54

40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000

Seniors

20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0


LIMITLESS LEARNING

GOVERNMENT & SOCIAL SERVICES

BUSINESS & CAREER

COMMUNITY & CULTURE

New building program components activate buildings with flexible spaces that can serve overlapping strategic goals and/ or dedicated spaces that foster 21st century learning and social environments. The new program elements maximize building use by the community as they are designed to be active and interactive public spaces where people can socialize, play, and learn. They create opportunities for social connections and facilitated learning by dedicating more building square footage to human-centered activities with flexible and adaptable spaces, furniture, and collections, as described in the next few pages.

CAREER SERVICES

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

PROJECT - BASED LEARNING

How can the current set of library buildings adapt? Margaret Sullivan Studio synthesized customer and community data coming out of the Community Need Assessment workshops and the v.2020 strategic service priorities articulated in branch manager surveys, from which a constellation of new building program components emerged. Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

FAMILY LEARNING

SCHOOL SUPPORT

55


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

56

based on

01 INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM The Intergenerational Living Room activates connection, convening, and gathering for families and community members of all ages and interests. The Intergenerational Living Room experience celebrates community, family, and diverse cultures. It is the “Third Place” meetup space as well as a space for enjoying art, music, and literature. It is the welcoming, comfortable gateway to Business and Career Services, Limitless Learning, and Social and Government Resources. It is Community and Culture and gives the branch a destination “look and feel.”

02 FAMILY LEARNING The areas of the facility intended to activate Family Learning will be designed to make the library the go-to place for early literacy and childhood development, parent engagement, and family-centric health and well-being. These values are central to the Library District’s youth services approach to facilitated learning. Activating the Limitless Learning strategy focus of v.2020, the Family Learning area will be designed to nurture “whole child” and “whole family” development

The Assemblage Nomad; New York, NY

curricula and partnerships that include Mind in the Making, Family Place, PLA’s Every Child Ready to Read, VROOM parenting tips, Read by 3, Grade Level Reading, and partnerships with the Clark County School District, UNR’s Cooperative Extension (i.e., Little Cooks Little Books) and PBS Kids. Spaces will be flexible to allow for parent instruction, STEAM activities, storytime, and family activities. They may be adjacent to outdoor areas, such as the children’s playground in Mesquite. They will be designed with stimulating features: contrasting colors, textures and patterns as well as manipulatives that foster play, discovery, and exploration. There will be seating so that parents, caregivers, and older siblings will also feel like they belong.

ImaginOn, the Joe and Joan Martin Center; Charlotte, NC


03 SCHOOL SUPPORT The areas of the facility intended to activate School Support will be intentionally designed for educational partnerships and the flourishing after-school homework help, tutoring, and STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) programs that ensure all youth have access to resources required for school success. The space will host activities that spark curiosity about college, career, and workforce readiness. The areas will be designed to adapt to a variety of activities: support for homeschooling, group projects and collaboration, youth business incubation, coding and gaming literacy, and small business support when not in use as after-school homework help. Online resources will be promoted, such as BrainFuse, Lynda.com, Gale Courses, Socrates, and Online Career High School.

in this report. Exemplified by the DJ lab launched at Enterprise, the Best Buy Teen Tech Center at Clark County, and the Teens @ space at Sahara West, these spaces can be replicated and refined throughout all Library District buildings for families, youth, and adults. The ProjectBased Learning spaces can accommodate alternative learning models to fill the education gap of students who do not thrive in a school learning environment. Equipment in the spaces will connect people of all ages to technology and maker tools for textile arts, moviemaking, sound recording, music making, video recording, coding, robotics, artificial intelligence, gaming, studio arts, culinary arts, new media, and journalism. They will be club rooms for hobby groups, labs for developing new employment skills, and places for groups to work on projects together. They will be places where adults can learn and experiment with DIY projects for their homes, yards, and vehicles.

04 PROJECT-BASED LEARNING

This building element expands on the Library District’s considerable experience in project-based learning, a proven and successful model for developing 21st century skill sets and literacies mentioned earlier Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Whitby School Makerspace; Greenwich, CT

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

58

05 BUSINESS & CAREER

Business and Career support services are at the core of the Library District’s v.2020 plan and next generation service model. The current hallmark of this building element is the location of the One-Stop Career Center satellites and the CALL Adult Learning Lab spaces that include consultation rooms, study rooms, class rooms, computer labs, and reception areas. Co-working areas for businesses and entrepreneurs to meet and exchange experiences also activate in these spaces, which facilitate partnerships with social service providers who need to connect with vulnerable community populations in trusted environments. Start-up businesses will have ready access to robust databases, employment expertise, business coaches, financial literacy instruction, business courses, non-profit classes, and entrepreneur meet-ups. The Library District will become a critical contributor to Clark County’s workforce, enterprise, and economic development arenas. Customers will have access to a facility intentionally designed to build skills and competencies for financial stability and growth in earning power. Partnerships with UNLV, CSN, and Nevada State College could activate the spaces by streaming classes, conducting industry certification trainings, or hosting FAFSA workshops or job fairs.

Bespoke Co-Working Space; San Francisco, CA


COMMUNITY & CULTURE

LIMITLESS LEARNING

BUSINESS & CAREER

SOCIAL & GOVERNMENT RESOURCES Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Library District and branch recipes for success. In this new library model rollout, each branch has the ability to create a community-centric recipe of space components that serve the major needs of the service area residents, selecting from a menu of traditional and new building program elements. In new branch renovations, it will be important to consider adjacencies of activities in a holistic context of customer need, use, and experience. Each library branch has the opportunity to design welcoming and positive customer environments that reflect their neighborhoods. Margaret Sullivan Studio’s branch assessments found that all existing buildings could successfully develop distinctive branch recipes,

flexibly selected from the building component menu, that activate the v.2020 service model and have distinctive cultural “flavors� and destination features. Two buildings had notable space constraints. Sunrise Library, which has the largest service area population, lacks space for major community gatherings, computer and classroom instruction and trainings. West Las Vegas Library has even more limited square footage for v.2020 in an area of town that has suboptimal economic vitality and great service needs along all four pillars of the v.2020 strategic plan: limitless learning, business and career success, connections to social and government services, and community and culture.

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

60


Library as a campus ecosystem...

District-wide, the branch assessments underscore the Library District’s rich set of building assets that can be positioned to attract new audiences as an integrated District-wide campus ecosystem, not just a set of individual branch libraries. Positioned as an urban library campus, residents will enjoy each branch as a hyper-local civic place and neighborhood anchor, while also being aware of and having access to community and learning activities, programs, and events of interest to broader urban and regional audiences. Capacity enablers like floating collections, the Distribution Center, technology, hardware, software, electronic devices, WiFi, building heating and cooling, outlets, and charging stations, will be planned, implemented, and maintained in a Library District-oriented context. Programs with broad appeal will be marketed on a District-wide, rather than a branch-by-branch, basis.

Library District investment in branch facilities will accomplish modernization of the structures and accommodation of new service models while signaling important investments in neighborhoods and communities. There is a growing body of research that shows that investments in neighborhood assets matter.2 People raised in neighborhoods with civic assets earn more and are more resilient over the long term. As Library District capital projects roll out, the Library District will be working with other community partners to integrate building project objectives with community initiatives and to leverage other public or private investments in the area. Library District investments in buildings will be investments in the community. Renovated branch facilities will not only have a fresh look and feel but they will also facilitate positive encounters, embrace retail best practices, and foster the most successful place and learning outcomes. In this way, the Library District will advance its mission of individual and community transformation.

Branches will reflect their neighborhoods!

UL

2

New York Times, May 4, 2015, “Why the New Research on Mobility Matters: An Economist’s View,” Justin Wolfers holds up the Stanford University study “The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility,” by Raj Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren, among others. Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

Summaries of branch assessments as well as branch space and service priorities for v.2020 service model implementation have been compiled in Appendix 2, Service Model Integration into Branch Building Programs. These summaries reflect the current priorities for branch spaces and service improvements that developed from the extensive set of visioning exercises described earlier. They are thought-starters for developing future branch renovation projects rather than an inventory of projects for approval. It is anticipated that this extensive research on and re-imagination of branch library features and “flavors” will accelerate deeper program planning and broader community engagement as future projects are planned and approved by the Library District Board of Trustees.

New definition of building success and attention to barriers. With the above-described investments in existing facilities, the new measure of building success is redefined as the maximum use of all parts of the building at all times of day by all types of people to create the maximum positive individual and community impact. To ensure building success, attention must be paid to buildingrelated barriers to maximum use of facility assets. The branch assessments document current branch building capacity stresses and/or barriers to maximum use of the building by service area populations. A variety of barriers were observed: • • •

buildings are not designed for contemporary learning, activities, and programs buildings are not designed for electrical outlet demand with current customer electronic device use peak “surges” of use in one part of the day or another (i.e. storytime and homework help) and underutilization of buildings and spaces in other parts of the day

62

some facilities (such as Sunrise and Windmill) are not easily accessible by public transportation the unique local three-shift, 24/7 work environment poses a challenge for ensuring worker and working family access to critical programs, services, trainings, and other buildingbased library resources development of new spaces often requires the investment of other resources, such as staff, technology, partnerships, collections, and marketing support customer convenience features, like holds pick-ups, should be considered in the project design process as well as afterhours access to some programs, like the One-Stop Career Center, the adult learning and English language classes, parent engagement events, community gatherings, cultural events, and performances.

It will be important to pay attention to these barriers and consider resource capacity and constraints as capital projects are identified and pursued in the future.

The new measure of building success is maximum use of all parts of the building at all times of day by all types of people to create the maximum positive individual and community impact.


MAJOR FINDINGS. 1

None of the existing branch facilities assessed in this study are designed to accommodate the v.2020 interactive learning and service model. Presently, branch staff are making piecemeal efforts to adapt and adjust, but there are many building barriers to overcome to achieve full and successful implementation of the model.

2

None of the branches, except Windmill and Centennial Hills, have adequate outlets for present day use of personal electronic devices.

3

Every branch has adequate square feet to activate spaces, activities, and programs that fit the new service model. For the most part, Library District branches are right-sized and in the right locations for community need with the exception of West Las Vegas and Sunrise Libraries, both of which have significant space constraints.

4

Customer experience and community need shape the branch renovation planning process. Traditional and new building program components can be used Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

flexibly to activate v.2020 strategic service priorities in all branches in ways that can be tailored to meet customer and core customer needs, interests, and lifestyles as well as critical community needs.

5

The Library District has the opportunity to attract new audiences and maximize the use of the facilities by positioning them as a District-wide learning campus ecosystem. Residents can enjoy the convenience and comfort of their local branch while the campus is promoted for a variety of services, programs, and events that have broad urban and regional appeal.

6

The Library District will continue development of service strategies on all channels of service, allowing the facilities to realize their highest level of public value while growing resident use of e-resources, virtual services, and outreach channels.

7

Library District investment in existing facilities is an investment in the community. To create and ensure a successful customer experience, the investment in the buildings must be supported by complementary investment in staff skills and talents, collections, technology and special equipment, partnership development, outreach, marketing and brand promotion on all community channels. These and other elements are critical to achieving the new definition of building success: maximum use of all parts of the building at all times of day by all types of people to create the maximum positive individual and community impact. Vision 2020 Service Model Adaptation

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Costing Future Branch Improvements

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

64


Estimating the cost of v.2020 implementation To estimate future branch renovation project costs, Simpson Coulter | STUDIO (SCS) engaged in a dialogue with the Library District’s General Services Department to better understand their processes and methodology. Combined with a structured approach toward v.2020 implementation through a set of core services/programs, SCS proposed a three-level approach that is flexible and scalable, as it is derived from combining estimated project square feet of building space and projected volume of

customer use. SCS developed the cost per square foot estimates based on today’s dollars and markets but note they would need marketbased adjustments as projects come online. The cost levels are defined in the charts that follow. It is also important to note that cost estimation for capital projects is additive, i.e., if there are Level 1 and Level 3 costs associated with a project, they are added together with an additional soft cost (SC) to create estimated project totals.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

01

LEVEL 1: $32/SF

02

LEVEL 2: $40/SF

03

LEVEL 3: $225/SF

SC

SOFT COSTS: 20%

Costing Future Branch Improvements

65


Costing Future Branch Improvements

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

01

LEVEL 1: $32/SF

New furnishings, fixtures, and equipment (FF&E)

02

LEVEL 2: $40/SF

Patch and repair walls and ceilings. Replace floor finish and paint walls. This also includes minor demolition such as adding and/or demolishing partitions.

The set of graphics on the following pages will apply this cost estimating technique in scenarios for select v.2020 building components as well as scenarios for minor and major branch renovation projects at the various levels of renovation.

03

LEVEL 3: $225/SF

Remove existing floor finishes, partition walls, doors, ceilings, light fixtures, electrical conduit, wiring, and HVAC ductwork. Install new flooring, walls, doors, ceilings, lights fixtures, electrical conduit, wiring, and HVAC ductwork. This could also include possible upgrades to restrooms including new floor, wall, and ceiling finishes, new plubming fixtures, and partitions. This also accounts for possible code upgrades.

66

SC

SOFT COSTS: 20%

Projects at all levels require planning, design, and construction document development, estimated at 20% of the total capital project budget. These include professional design fees, design contingency, contractor contingency, insurance, contractor bonds, and contractor and subcontractor insurance.


Costing v.2020 building components by square feet (SF) and volume of customers. Individual v.2020 building components The application of the v.2020 building component cost methodology is illustrated for each of the building program elements in the graphics that follow. You will note that there are varying costs per square foot depending on the volume of customers that is projected to use the space, furniture, equipment, etc.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Costing Future Branch Improvements

67


Costing Future Branch Improvements

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Intergenerational Living Room Scalable Model A 67 people @ 15 SF/person Scalable Model B 100 people @ 15 SF/person Scalable Model C 133 people @ 15 SF/person

A

B

C

Ideal SF

1,000

1,500

2,000

LEVEL I COST

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment

$32,000

$48,000

$64,000

Soft Costs (20%)

$6,400

$9,600

$12,800

Total

$38,400

$57,600

$76,800

LEVEL III COST

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

Full-scale Renovation

$257,000

$385,500

$514,000

Soft Costs (20%)

$51,400

$77,100

$102,800

Total

$308,400

$462,600

$616,800

68


Family Learning

FAMILY LEARNING

Scalable Model A 40 people @ 15 SF/person

SCALABLE MODELS

Scalable Model B 67 people @ 15 SF/person Scalable Model C 100 people @ 15 SF/person

A

B

C

Ideal SF

600

1000

1500

LEVEL I COST

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment

$19,200

$32,000

$48,000

Soft Costs (20%)

$3,840

$9,600

$12,800

Total

$23,040

$38,400

$57,600

LEVEL III COST

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

Full-scale Renovation

$154,200

$257,000

$385,500

Soft Costs (20%)

$30,840

$51,400

$77,100

Total

$185,040

$308,400

$462,600

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

FAMILY LEARNING A

B

C

40 People @ 15 SF/ Person

67 People @ 15 SF/Person

100 People @ 15 SF/Person

IDEAL SF LEVEL I COST Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment

600 $32.00 $19,200.00

1000 $32.00 $32,000.00

1500 $32.00 $48,000.00

Soft Costs (20%)

$23,040.00

$38,400.00

$57,600.00

LEVEL II COST Full Scale Renovation

$257.00 $154,200.00

$257.00 $257,000.00

$257.00 $385,500.00

Soft Costs (20%)

$185,040.00

$308,400.00

$462,600.00

Notes

Costing Future Branch Improvements

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Costing Future Branch Improvements

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Project-Based Learning Scalable Model A 24 people @ 25 SF/person Scalable Model B 40 people @ 25 SF/person Scalable Model C 72 people @ 25 SF/person

A

B

C

Ideal SF

600

1000

1800

LEVEL I COST

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment

$19,200

$32,000

$57,600

Soft Costs (20%)

$3,840

$6,400

$11,520

Total

$23,040

$38,400

$69,120

LEVEL III COST

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

Full-scale Renovation

$154,200

$257,000

$462,600

Soft Costs (20%)

$30,840

$51,400

$92,520

Total

$185,040

$308,400

$555,120

70


School Support Scalable Model A 16 people @ 25 SF/person Scalable Model B 24 people @ 25 SF/person Scalable Model C 40 people @ 25 SF/person

A

B

C

Ideal SF

400

600

1000

LEVEL I COST

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment

$12,800

$19,200

$32,000

Soft Costs (20%)

$2,560

$3,840

$6,400

Total

$15,360

$23,040

$38,400

LEVEL III COST

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

Full-scale Renovation

$102,800

$154,200

$257,000

Soft Costs (20%)

$20,560

$30,840

$51,400

Total

$123,360

$185,040

$308,400

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Costing Future Branch Improvements

71


BUSINESS & CAREER S Costing Future Branch Improvements

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Business & Career Services Scalable Model A 24 people @ 25 SF/person Scalable Model B 48 people @ 25 SF/person Scalable Model C 96 people @ 25 SF/person

SCALABLE MODELS

72

CAREER SERVICES A

B

C

24 People @ 25 SF/Person

48 People @ 25 SF/Person

IDEAL SF LEVEL I COST Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment

600 $32.00 $19,200.00

1200 $32.00 $38,400.00

2400 $32.00 $76,800.0

Soft Costs (20%)

$23,040.00

$46,080.00

$92,160.0

LEVEL II COST Full Scale Renovation

$257.00 $154,200.00

$257.00 $308,400.00

$257.00 $616,800.0

Soft Costs (20%)

$185,040.00

$370,080.00

$740,160.0

Notes

A

B

C

Ideal SF

400

600

1000

LEVEL I COST

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

$32.00/SF

Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment

$19,200

$38,400

$76,800

Soft Costs (20%)

$3,840

$7,680

$15,360

Total

$23,040

$46,080

$92,160

LEVEL III COST

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

$257.00/SF

Full-scale Renovation

$154,200

$308,400

$616,800

Soft Costs (20%)

$30,840

$61,680

$123,360

Total

$185,040

$370,080

$740,160

96 People @ 25 SF/


Costing v.2020 building components by square feet (SF) and volume of customers. Multiple levels of branch renovation The next set of graphics demonstrates how the cost estimate methodology would be applied to branch capital projects that involve multiple levels of branch renovation. There are a number of caveats that should be noted: • • •

The estimates of costs per square foot are current estimates of current average market pricing, subject to change. Because activity adjacencies are important, changing or moving one type of space in a building may require moving other spaces to achieve the adjacencies that make sense. Because of fixed costs in construction, projects with smaller square footage can sometimes have a similar or higher per square foot costs than larger projects with higher square footage.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Nonetheless, the following project cost estimates demonstrate how the next phase of capital project budget development is accomplished for branch projects that may have multiple levels of renovation and a number of projects combined to achieve the total branch make-over.

Costing Future Branch Improvements

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Costing Future Branch Improvements

74

Application: Centennial Hills LEVEL 1 Intergenerational Living Room

2000 SF @ $32/SF

Family Learning

1000 SF @ $32/SF

School Support

1000 SF @ $32/SF

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

$64,000

$32,000

$32,000

Project-Based Learning

1500 SF @ $257/SF

Career Services

900 SF @ $257/SF

$385,500 $231,300

RENOVATION COST

$744,800

SOFT COSTS (20%)

$148,960

TOTAL COST

$893,760


Application: Enterprise LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

Intergenerational Living Room

1200 SF @ $72/SF

Family Learning

1000 SF @ $72/SF

School Support

$86,400 $72,000

400 SF @ $32/SF

$12,800

Project-Based Learning

1800 SF @ $72/SF

$129,600

1200 SF @ $257/SF

Career Services

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

LEVEL 3

$308,400

RENOVATION COST

$609,200

SOFT COSTS (20%)

$121,840

TOTAL COST

$731,040

Costing Future Branch Improvements

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Costing Future Branch Improvements

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Holistic cost estimating

A great part of sustaining any new library facility will be the ongoing operating costs. As indicated in the worksheet samples previously, this decision framework is implemented by understanding and anticipating all the resources necessary to make the facility sustainable and effective, which includes staffing, technology, supplies, and collections.

On average, 62 to 65 percent of the Library District’s operating budget is devoted to salaries and benefits. The chart on the next page gives the Board of Trustees an idea of the range of staffing support currently provided to Library District branch facilities.


Branch Salaries and Benefits Actual

Budgeted

Branch

FY ‘09

FY ‘10

FY ‘11

FY ‘12

FY ‘13

FY ‘14

FY ‘15

FY ‘16

FY ‘17

FY ‘18

FY ‘19

Centennial Hills

651,809

1,431,499

1,142,766

1,448,883

1,446,187

1,522,225

1,631,434

1,743,236

1,781,726

1,834,354

1,970,255

Clark County

2,459,514

2,489,041

2,058,386

2,065,611

1,926,446

1,990,257

1,992,299

2,126,828

2,184,111

2,254,718

2,510,321

Enterprise

1,166,658

1,211,874

1,353,123

1,326,030

1,161,099

1,186,844

1,230,437

1,306,847

1,327,298

1,362,599

1,436,943

Las Vegas

1,752,948

1,719,763

1,416,925

1,304,223

1,251,176

1,236,537

1,280,510

1,337,125

1,365,970

1,392,754

1,664,555

Rainbow

1,766,833

1,832,167

1,390,039

1,334,193

1,346,856

1,404,962

1,492,772

1,689,790

1,651,867

1,702,719

1,778,656

Sahara West

2,090,443

2,238,802

1,927,907

1,941,727

1,820,852

2,010,044

2,040,133

2,166,880

2,183,825

2,280,799

2,346,791

Spring Valley

1,268,667

1,303,471

1,428,275

1,381,651

1,369,258

1,414,289

1,392,402

1,484,290

1,486,942

1,491,299

1,659,307

Summerlin

1,146,755

1,235,992

1,316,605

1,328,349

1,192,420

1,225,960

1,292,775

1,363,488

1,383,412

1,390,059

1,478,914

Sunrise

1,012,845

1,034,928

1,140,772

1,124,308

1,106,338

1,175,017

1,209,949

1,311,642

1,360,715

1,357,279

1,421,719

West Charleston

1,605,169

1,722,704

1,446,132

1,461,566

1,287,103

1,345,023

1,390,870

1,472,872

1,507,907

1,465,910

1,655,595

West Las Vegas

1,140,774

1,274,656

1,301,395

1,296,202

1,160,704

1,199,652

1,263,786

1,338,837

1,365,603

1,375,296

1,466,803

Whitney

1,061,347

1,281,276

1,144,184

1,174,604

1,106,985

1,186,723

1,201,037

1,292,063

1,355,950

1,351,260

1,446,623

Windmill

-

-

430,144

1,311,513

1,407,192

1,427,073

1,455,578

1,457,844

1,808,335

1,655,874

1,665,866

Blue Diamond

53,934

55,095

56,284

58,399

56,949

59,922

61,046

65,457

67,272

67,686

75,087

Bunkerville

60,963

61,129

62,351

64,583

63,507

65,939

67,318

71,980

72,101

73,290

77,165

Goodsprings

24,762

31,581

35,083

37,636

35,367

36,739

40,681

41,730

44,855

69,136

88,041

Indian Springs

74,799

122,422

62,486

64,428

71,063

66,927

72,662

84,417

87,739

91,688

110,799

Laughlin

488,363

513,599

561,026

575,462

577,118

579,507

569,358

617,922

663,325

585,432

813,871

Mesquite

277,362

296,865

321,805

259,962

333,557

379,005

406,523

431,858

453,838

586,087

986,858

Moapa Town

66,921

64,150

64,340

63,498

64,478

65,259

68,012

69,476

71,471

71,024

73,897

Moapa Valley

219,907

339,674

212,361

214,618

219,105

218,345

252,154

283,752

303,251

268,713

280,460

Mt. Charleston

73,517

73,660

75,527

76,939

59,597

58,886

62,872

54,731

59,065

61,891

66,001

Sandy Valley

54,417

53,501

49,464

43,148

45,384

60,103

69,102

74,040

59,352

79,811

83,420

Searchlight

61,516

63,353

56,867

50,194

50,500

40,963

54,991

53,319

55,337

47,165

50,084

Total

18,580,223 20,451,202 19,054,247 20,007,727 19,159,241 19,956,201 20,598,701 21,940,424 22,701,267 22,916,843 25,208,031

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Costing Future Branch Improvements

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Costing Future Branch Improvements

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MAJOR FINDINGS. 1

This section provides a model of project estimation by levels of renovation required. The cost per square foot estimates will need to be adjusted to market conditions at the time of project approval.

2

There is a need for holistic project cost development that identifies appropriate resources for staff, collections, technology, and special equipment. Holistic planning for capital projects ensures that implementation of service model innovations will be sustained and that investments in buildings will be maintained.


Financial Analysis

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Existing and alternative resources for capital projects A final major area of investigation in this planning effort is to assess availability and adequacy of financial resources. The Applied Analysis team took the lead on this element, first identifying the financial resources available to the Library District for capital project design and construction for the next 15 years, from fiscal year (FY) 2019 through 2034. An analysis of revenues, expenditures and recurring capital costs was conducted to estimate available funding. A scenario-based approach to the analysis was employed (details are provided in Appendix 4, Financial Analysis).

Revenues. Revenues for the Library District are largely comprised of property taxes, consolidated tax (sales tax), and other sources of revenues (e.g., charges for services). Property taxes account for roughly 60% of revenues and consolidated taxes represent another 33% of revenues. It is important to note that property tax revenues are impacted by statutory limitations on the amount that a property taxpayer’s annual tax bill can rise.

have the potential to fluctuate in any given year, the long-range forecast is designed to provide an order of magnitude estimate. The base forecast assumes that property taxes will grow at 4.6% to 5.1% per year through the period largely as a result of the property tax abatement cap. Although the assessed values of property within the state may not grow at this rate, there is still a significant amount of value of Las Vegas property tax funding that is abated. Under the abatement cap, residential property is generally capped at 3% growth in taxes each year, other property types grow at 8%, and both have an alternative minimum cap that equals the greater of double the CPI inflation index growth or the 10-year average annual assessed value change for homes. In addition, new developments will not have abated value to begin with and will pay full assessed value on the first year of taxes. Given this context, a 4.6% to 5.1% growth rate over the next 15 years in property taxes is a reasonable expectation.

For revenue modeling purposes, a range of forecasts scenarios were developed: a low (conservative) scenario, a base-case scenario, and high (aggressive) scenario. While revenues

Consolidated taxes are anticipated to grow in the 3.3% to 3.9% range over the 15-year forecast horizon. Consolidated taxes are largely a result of the 1.75% portion of the statewide sales tax dedicated to supplemental city-county tax relief. This supplement is gathered at the state level and distributed based on a complex population formula to each county, city, and special district in the state, including the Library District. In general, the consolidated

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Financial Analysis

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Financial Analysis

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

81

tax is estimated to grow at roughly the same pace as the overall economy plus inflation growth during this time. Finally, other revenues, including charges for services, are estimated to grow at a rate of 4.2% to 4.6% per year. In total, annual revenues are anticipated to increase from $69.4 million in FY 2020 to $129.9 million in FY 2034.

Base Case Revenues by Type Property Tax Consolidated Tax Other

$69.4M

$72.4M

FY ‘20

FY ‘21

$75.7M

$79.1M

FY ‘22

FY ‘23

$82.8M

FY ‘24

$86.6M

FY ‘25

$90.6M

FY ‘26

$94.8M

FY ‘27

$99.2M

FY ‘28

$103.7M

FY ‘29

$108.5M

FY ‘30

$113.5M

FY ‘31

$118.7M

FY ‘32

$124.2M

FY ‘33

$129.9M

FY ‘34


Expenditures. Expenditures within the general fund primarily consist of labor; salaries, wages, and benefits, which account for 70% of the Library District’s operating expenditures. The remaining portion of the budget goes towards funding library materials, other services and supplies, and administrative costs. The expenditure side of the general fund model follows the same general trend lines in revenues. The expenditure forecast models rely on information about union contracts, expected operating costs, and other factors sourced to Library District staff. The growth in labor expenditures is estimated to be 4.0% through FY 2021, after which the growth rate increases to 4.7% through FY 2034. The growth in services and supplies is anticipated to grow 1.5% through FY 2021 and 2.0% through FY 2034. Finally, library materials are anticipated

to grow at the average growth of the other two categories throughout the period. Further details on escalation assumptions can be found in Appendix 4, Financial Analysis. It is important to note that despite conservative budgeting, the Library District’s expenditures have typically run lower than budget projections. Cost savings can occur for any number of reasons. For example, if a position remains vacant longer than expected, there may be salary and benefit savings. In sum, the projections show net expenditures are anticipated to grow from $63.7 million in FY 2020 to $111.1 million in FY 2034.

Expenditures by Category

Salaries & Wages Benefits Supplies & Services Total Expenditures After Savings

$65.9M

$68.5M

$71.3M

$74.2M

$63.7M

FY ‘20

FY ‘21

FY ‘22

FY ‘23

FY ‘24

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

$77.2M

$80.4M

FY ‘25

FY ‘26

$83.6M

$87.1M

FY ‘27

FY ‘28

$90.7M

FY ‘29

Financial Analysis

$94.4M

FY ‘30

$98.3M

FY ‘31

$102.4M

FY ‘32

$106.7M

FY ‘33

$111.1M

FY ‘34

82


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Financial Analysis

83

Capital funding. The Library District’s Capital Fund is created by transferring year-end savings from operations to the Capital Fund. As the year’s budget is reconciled at year end, the amount available to the Capital Fund is calculated. Each year the General Fund reserves are modeled to diminish to approximately 10% to 12% of expenditures, a reasonable target and prudent financial management strategy. The difference between the revenues minus expenditures plus the General Fund reserves are the funds that are available for capital projects. These funds are modeled to transfer annually to the Capital Fund.

FY 2020); general maintenance of existing facilities; repair and replacement of building systems, vehicles, and other capital equipment; and repair and replacement of information technology systems and equipment. The base-case expenditure projections developed by Applied Analysis and the Library District Financial Services department assume that these Capital Fund reserve accounts will require $5.8 million in FY 2020 (finishing out East Las Vegas), drop to $2.75 million in FY 2021, and then incrementally grow to $4.0 million by FY 2029.

Funds that transfer to the Capital Fund first are disbursed to existing Capital Fund reserve funds established for finishing current capital projects (i.e. the East Las Vegas Library in

Capital Fund Expenditures and Transfers-in by Year Range of Transfers-in (High to Low)

Transfers-in (Base Scenario)

Existing Capital Fund Expenditures

$45.0M $40.0M

+$19.9M

$35.0M $30.0M $25.0M $20.0M

$18.3M

$15.0M $10.0M $5.0M -$17.5M

$0.0M FY ‘20

FY ‘21

FY ‘22

FY ‘23

FY ‘24

FY ‘25

FY ‘26

FY ‘27

FY ‘28

FY ‘29

FY ‘30

FY ‘31

FY ‘32

FY ‘33

FY ‘34


The grey section of the previous graph indicates that there is a range of possible transfers to the Capital Fund. To remain within the projections, it will be important to keep General Fund and other Capital Fund expenditures within the parameters described in the base-case scenario.

Budget decisions every year will either positively or negatively impact the viability of the base-case projection. Net revenues for the Capital Project Fund are identified after all the incoming transfers from the General Fund and annual Capital Fund reserve fund expenditures are totaled. The projected growth of net Capital Fund revenues for new capital projects in the base-case scenario are shown on the following graph.

Net Capital Fund Growth by Year (Base Scenario) $14.3M $13.1M $11.9M

$11.3M

$10.8M

$3.6M

FY ‘20

FY ‘21

$4.2M

FY ‘22

$4.9M

FY ‘23

$5.8M

FY ‘24

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

$6.4M

FY ‘25

$7.3M

FY ‘26

$7.7M

FY ‘27

$8.6M

$8.8M

FY ‘28

FY ‘29

Financial Analysis

$9.7M

FY ‘30

FY ‘31

FY ‘32

FY ‘33

FY ‘34

84


Financial Analysis

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

85

Over a 15 year base-case scenario, total available Capital Project Fund net revenues accumulate, as illustrated in the graph below. In sum, the base-case, pay-as-you-go scenario projects that there will be approximately $40.3 million available by FY 2024, growing to approximately $79.0 million by FY 2029, and $138.8 million by FY 2034. The scenario assumes a total of $21.9 million in the Capital Project Fund in FY 2020 and represents projected total cash available each year.

Forecasted Range of Capital Fund Availability Range (High to Low)

Base

$300.0M +$128.4M

$250.0M $200.0M $150.0M

$138.8M

$100.0M $50.0M

$79.0M $40.3M $21.9M

-$116.9M

$0.0M FY ‘20

FY ‘21

FY ‘22

FY ‘23

FY ‘24

FY ‘25

FY ‘26

FY ‘27

FY ‘28

FY ‘29

FY ‘30

FY ‘31

FY ‘32

FY ‘33

FY ‘34


In short, the Library District could potentially generate $68.0 million by issuing a long-term bond (20 years) or $47.5 million by taking a short-term bond (10 years) in FY 2020.

Alternative funding strategies. An evaluation of alternative sources of funding for capital investments in Library District facilities looked at long- and medium-term bond financing, a tax rate increase, and the possibility of generating new taxes from a variety of other state and county tax sources.

FY ‘23

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

FY ‘28

FY ‘29

Financial Analysis

FY ‘30

FY ‘31

FY ‘32

FY ‘33

$138.8M

$131.1M

$130.6M

$124.5M

$111.4M

$111.2M

$99.5M

$8.7M

$81.0M

$79.0M

$71.3M

$79.0M

$86.0M

FY ‘27

$71.3M

$61.6M

$81.4M

FY ‘26

$61.9M

$53.9M

$77.7M

FY ‘25

$58.2M

$46.6M

$74.4M

FY ‘24

$55.0M

$40.3M

$72.1M $52.6M

$50.8M

FY ‘22

$34.5M

$50.0M

FY ‘21

$29.6M

$49.8M $25.5M

$21.9M

$70.3M

$69.4M

$69.3M

$68.0M $47.5M FY ‘20

$90.8M

Pay-As-You-Go

$96.5M

Medium-Term Bond

$91.8M

$103.3M

Long-Term Bond

$103.7M

Capital Fund: End of Year Balance Scenarios

$120.3M

Bond financing. Two bond options were estimated by the Library District’s financial advisors, Hobbs, Ong & Associates, Inc. and PFML one for a medium-term 10-year bond and one for a longer-term bond of 20 years. The ramifications of both these bonds on the available capital project fund of the Capital Fund are illustrated below.

$116.8M

As noted, a financing transaction would come at the expense of future available capital revenues. It is worth noting that the long term bond continues to have debt obligations of $4.0 million each year through 2039, which are not reflected in the forecast period.

FY ‘34

86


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Financial Analysis

With principal and interest debt service payments accounted for, by 2034, the Capital Fund balance would total $130.6 million for the long-term bond option and $131.1 million for the mediumterm bond scenario, less than the $138.8 million available for pay-as-you-go financed projects.

Tax rate increases. Tax increases were also considered as a possible source for funding future Library District capital projects. Currently, as described above, the majority of Library District revenues are sourced to property tax and a share of the consolidated tax. Both revenues present unique difficulties in enacting and raising significant new revenues.

The utility of bond financing seems a viable option only if the Library District needs access to capital funding sooner than pay-as-you-go funding allows. This would be in circumstances where the Library District Board of Trustees choose to provide expanded services to the community quicker, potentially limit construction cost escalation exposure, and/or fulfill the needs of larger, more capital-intensive projects.

87

Property tax increases, as previously discussed, are significantly capped. Currently, at least 95% of all property value in Clark County falls under the property tax cap. Additionally, revenue is also capped (abated) in redevelopment areas, where incremental revenues do not inure to the Library District but rather to the redevelopment agency. This applies to roughly 4.3% of all value in Clark County. Applying both limitations to potential Library District property tax rate increases suggests that doubling the property tax rate in the District would result in an increase of just $2.1 million of revenue in FY 2020, 4.9% over existing revenues.

Additional Property Taxes Raised by Doubling the Rate $2.1 M

$2.2 M

FY ‘20

FY ‘21

$2.3 M

FY ‘22

$2.4 M

FY ‘23

$2.6 M

FY ‘24

$2.7 M

FY ‘25

$2.8 M

FY ‘26

$3.0 M

FY ‘27

$3.1 M

FY ‘28

$3.3 M

FY ‘29

$3.4 M

FY ‘30

$3.6 M

FY ‘31

$3.8 M

FY ‘32

$4.0 M

FY ‘33

$4.2 M

FY ‘34


The viability and utility of such a property tax increase has been deemed politically infeasible for purposes of this analysis, given the current context of taxpayer resistance and competing interests. Consolidated taxes are also difficult to raise, as their distribution is the result of a complex, statewide statutory formula based on population. Short of increasing the underlying basic and supplemental city-county relief component of the sales tax, cigarette tax, liquor tax, real estate transfer tax, or government service tax statewide. Incremental tax revenues sourced to the implementation of new taxes. Applied Analysis also considered a number of incremental revenues given the existing tax framework across the state of Nevada. The analysis considers nearly every government revenue stream in the state and Clark County, it’s current rates, the incremental rate change, and the anticipated revenue generation from a rate change for the next two fixcal years for the state or county. These sources of revenue are not considered to be readily available to the Library District and would require significant political effort to enact but are included as a hypothetical of what revenues libraries county- or state-wide could see from the additional tax change.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Financial Analysis

88


Financial Analysis

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

MAJOR FINDINGS.

89

1

A number of funding scenarios were considered, including medium- and long-term bond financing. A financing transaction would come at the expense of future available cash flows. By FY 2034, the capital fund balance would be $130.6 million for the long-term bond option and $131.1 million for the medium-term bond scenario, both of which are less than the $138.8 million available to pay-as-you-go financed projects.

2

The utility of bond financing would be a viable option if the Library District needs access to capital funding sooner than pay-as-you-go funding allows, such as circumstances where the Library District Board of Trustees choose to provide expanded services to the community quicker, potentially limit construction cost escalation exposure, and/or fulfill the needs of larger, more capital-intensive projects.

3

Both a tax rate increase and new taxes were ranked as remote possibilities given an expectation of limited public and political support and technical hurdles that would be challenging to overcome.

4

If Library District expenditures stay in the realm of the basecase scenario and the district utilizes a pay-as-you-go option, it is anticipated that there will be an approximate $40.3 million available for new capital projects by FY 2024; $79.0 million available by FY 2029; and a cumulative total of $138.8 million available by FY 2034.


Decision-Making Framework

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Decision-making framework for library facility projects All decisions to move forward on capital projects will be made by the Library District Board of Trustees. This chapter starts by recommending an annual process for making capital project decisions. It also clarifies a data-driven decision-making process for Library District capital projects that is based on five criteria: 1. community need 2. urban growth and demographic change over the next 20 years 3. service model adaptation related to the Library District’s strategic plan, v.2020, or subsequent strategic plans of the Library District 4. renovation and maintenance needs of aging facilities and building infrastructure 5. the availability of fiscal resources for capital requirements in the near- to mid-term (the next five to 15 years)

Recommended annual capital project decision-making process. This Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework proposes a new annual process for decision-making that is flexible, adaptable, and delivers projects ready for annual budget approval. Projects can be submitted by Trustees or staff at any time; however, an annual decision-making cycle ensures that projects that are approved by the Trustees have identified all the resources necessary to make the project successful and to deliver long-term return on investment. The process each year is as follows: 1. A cross-organizational strategy team will review the progress on the Library District strategic plan, identifying service gaps due to building constraints and project priorities for strategy implementation improvements. 2. From these findings, Library Operations, Community Engagement, General Services, and Development & Planning staff will develop project options inclusive of ongoing operational costs or other fiscal impacts related to the projects. 3. The CFO will receive confirmation of tax revenues for the following year and share information with the Executive Council.

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Decision-Making Framework

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

4. The project options will then be further refined by the Executive Council and presented to the Board of Trustees for consideration and approval. 5. The Board of Trustees will review and prioritize projects. 6. The Board will vote on projects to move forward in the next Annual Budget with approval decisions on projects as part of the Capital Fund budget in April (draft budget review) and May (final budget approval). See next page. Executive Council and Library District staff will continuously refine project options, scopes, and budgets to fully comply with Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) that requires that all capital project funds be identified and reserved prior to project approval by the Board. This decision-making process will be fast-tracked in 2018 to facilitate Board of Trustee discussions on capital projects at the Board’s October meeting, with capital project decisions scheduled for action at the December Board meeting and Annual Budget approval in the spring of 2019.

Decision-Making Framework

92


Who?

Jan. - Mar.

Strategic Plan Team

Review strategic plan progress to date. Identify what is working/missing and prioritize needs.

Library Operations Refine Board-approved project scope and Comm. Engagement budget for annual General Services budget project Dev. & Planning financing approval.

Apr. - Jun.

Jul. - Sep.

Oct. - Dec.

Identify and prioritize potential capital projects.

Executive Council

Once state tax revenues are confirmed, Ready capital projects Prioritize and refine include approved for annual budget projects for Board projects in the Capital approval. review and approval. Project Fund of the Annual Budget.

Present capital project options to Board.

Board of Trustees

Vote to approve capital projects as part of annual budget approval.

Prioritize projects in October workshop. Approve projects in December.

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Decision-Making Framework

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Decision-Making Framework

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Decision criteria Community need, population growth & demographic change, and v.2020 implementation This Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework does not generate definitive recommendations for specific capital projects. Rather, it provides criteria and tools to assist decision-makers as they identify and analyze capital project priorities and options, current capacity, and future needs, and as they ultimately identify and authorize capital projects to move forward. With a limited amount of capital funding available over the next fifteen years, it will be important for the Board of Trustees to take a data-driven “decision criteria� approach to ensure that every investment is impactful as it relates and responds to: 1. community need 2. urban growth and demographic changes 3. renovations needed to fully activate v.2020 and future strategic plan goals

With finite capital project funding, every capital project decision is critical. It is very unlikely that the kind of public funding that created the existing facilities, i.e., bonds and bountiful tax revenues of the growth era before tax caps, will return. Every future decision needs to effectively and efficiently preserve and build the public value of Library District facilities. Library District buildings are valuable assets, and powerful enablers of library success. Facility development and maintenance decisions are key to accomplishing the Library District’s long-term mission (educational, economic, and social wellbeing of individuals and communities) and short-term strategic directions. Every facility development and/or adaptive reuse decision must achieve best value, best performance, and best return on investment of public dollars. The decision framework is a response to the complexity of facility decisions today. In the past, facility development focused primarily on project development and management costs of buildings. The new Library District facility development approach looks at facility function and components, as well as curation and management of library experiences. The new approach


is about designing and delivering multi-faceted, hour by hour experiences that have positive impacts on many people and many communities. The new approach is also like ecosystems – every part is interrelated. The Library District is a campus, as well as 25 successful individual branch facilities that are neighborhood and community catalysts for advancement. Today’s library project design considers both the journey and destination, the fusion of space, information, services, and how they come together, tailored to resonate with residents to support a variety of human endeavors effectively. Today’s facility project decisions and outcomes are also informed by lessons learned in other sectors. From a manufacturing perspective, decisions take a look at how much of the library space adds public value or boosts productive, positive public experiences. From a retail lens, investments look at how library environments impact customer browsing or borrowing habits, keep customers coming back, improve customer loyalty, create a strong sense of place, or enhance the brand image. From an entertainment viewpoint, libraries now host experiences that are active—self-driven, self-created, and interactively shared—rather than passive. This section of the report defines the three decision criteria proposed for the Library District’s facilities decision framework and illustrates how to use the three criteria to identify and prioritize the capital projects that move forward.

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Decision-Making Framework

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Community need. This facilities decision framework suggests that capital project priorities should be determined with community need as a primary criteria for consideration. Community need can be gauged in many ways and is often a mix of many factors – local levels of education, earning power, employment opportunities, partnership and collaboration opportunities, and barriers to success such as language, transportation, and child care. As the Board of Trustees considers various branches for renovation and investment, the issues and context of community need should be considered, so that Library District investments are leveraged for the greatest community good. Economic need. The median income map below shows neighborhoods with high economic need and limited resources. Branches that fall under the average household median annual income of $51,575, include West Las Vegas ($33.6 K), Clark County ($39.3 K), Sunrise ($42.3 K), Whitney ($42.6 K), West Charleston ($46.5 K), and Laughlin ($34.3 K – not pictured on map). In terms of neighborhood revitalization and/or stabilization, library investment

Decision-Making Framework

96

Median Household Income Less than $30,000

$50,000 - $74,999

Controlled Site

$30,000 - $49,999

$75,000 - $100,000

Existing Branch

Over $100,000

Other System Libraries


may have a significant impact in some of the oldest library branch facilities, not only to refresh the environment and outfit the building for critical new technologies, literacies, and learning experiences, but to also signal public investment in and attention to keeping older neighborhoods of the service area vital and active, i.e., Sunrise (opened 1987), Spring Valley (opened 1988), and West Las Vegas (opened 1989).

parents in these households lack high school educations and are mostly employed in low-wage occupations of hospitality, gaming, construction, and retail. These branches may require spaces, collections, and equipment that support family learning, school success, and greater workforce engagement, including workforce readiness, adult education, employment training, and business development services and spaces.

Education need: low-performing schools. Locations of low household education levels correlate strongly to locations of lowperforming schools. To help close the education gap, the Library District should prioritize renovations to branches proximate to low-performing schools. Vibrant and welcoming pre-K, family learning, school support, and project-based learning spaces may be critical in these locations: Clark County, Rainbow, Sunrise, West Charleston, and Whitney.

Education need: NeWest households. Another dimension of literacy and employment need is English language proficiency. Neighborhoods of predominantly “NeWest” households are also generally home to young families with young children living with extended family that have moved to the U.S. in the past 10 years. These are characterized by low income, low levels of education (no high school diploma), and low English language proficiency. Sunrise, Clark County, and the new East Las Vegas Library are proximate to these NeWest populations that may need English language instruction, social service support, school support to ensure their children’s school success, and community and culture spaces to mix with neighbors and celebrate family and culture.

Education need: high-challenge adult literacy areas. If need is defined by workforce readiness, employment skills, small business development, and better earnings opportunities, there are certain high challenge adult literacy hotspots in the greater Las Vegas Valley. Branches proximate to these low adult literacy households are Clark County, Spring Valley, Sunrise, West Charleston, West Las Vegas, and Whitney. Adult education; business, workforce, and career services and trainings; social service supports; and project-based learning opportunities may be key space components at these branches. Education need: industrious urban fringe households. The location of high challenge adult literacy areas correlates closely with the location of “Industrious Urban Fringe” market segment households. These residents are families with young parents and young children earning an average annual household income of $40,000 per year. For the most part, Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

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98

Latino Households in the Las Vegas Valley

Other local literacy challenges. Local challenges with English language proficiency may grow as area Latino populations grow. The following map depicts the current patterns of Latino household locations in the greater Las Vegas Valley, as illustrated in the map to the right.

Less than 10%

15% - 25%

Controlled Site

10% - 15%

5% - 40%

Existing Branch

Over 40%

Other System Libraries


Community opportunities. Community need decision criteria can also include consideration of opportunities. For example, the proposed expansion of the Nursing School at the College of Southern Nevada is taking place in response to growing healthcare needs and employment opportunities in the community. This gives the West Charleston branch an opportunity to consider its relationship to college students and programs as renovation plans are developed, in addition to the needs of the surrounding neighborhoods and residents. Community need opportunities can also activate with partnerships and community collaboration. The catalyst for siting Workforce Connection’s One-Stop Career Center locations in libraries was the Library District’s v.2020 strategy for Business and Career Success. The partnership is rolling out in two rural and three geographically disbursed urban locations (West Las Vegas, Clark County, and East Las Vegas) to ensure convenient public access to critical employment, education, and training resources, as many agencies work together to diversify the workforce and adapt to regional economic change. West Charleston is a potential site for a future One-Stop Career Center. Another example of community opportunity relates to the West Las Vegas Library, where future renovations should consider the synergistic investment of the City of Las Vegas in the Doolittle Community Center next door, staying flexible to build comprehensive support for families and student achievement now, while keeping an eye on the needs, interests, and lifestyles of the area’s growing aging population, predicted in the decades ahead.

capital projects, such as New Markets Tax Credits, Opportunity Zones, and other economic development tools, are structured to invest in areas of low income, low housing values, and low educational levels to achieve Community Reinvestment Act goals of neighborhood revitalization and workforce engagement. Similarly, most grants are tied to community need related to economic, education, health, and social well-being—the recent Best Buy Teen Tech Center grant award to the Clark County Library is an example. The grant award criteria looked at impact in areas of low youth achievement and high youth risk, grounded in the belief that youth need resources to succeed in the next generation of technology-based commerce and communications. Many capital project grant funders also require projects to be “shovel ready,” i.e., demonstrate adequate project funding, provide details on schematic design, and construction and utility approvals, so that the funder is certain the project will move forward on budget and on schedule. Growth and demographic change. A second major criteria for capital project selection is population growth and demographic change. As illustrated in the earlier chapter on growth and demographic change, population and residential unit growth is anticipated in the northwest, southwest, south, and east side, including Enterprise, Windmill, Sahara West, Summerlin, Centennial Hills and Sunrise library service areas. Also mentioned previously, the impact is most significant at 2030 and beyond, with the exception of Sunrise which is undersized for the current population of working families in the service area.

Opportunities for alternative funding. Often, opportunities for alternative sources of revenue for capital projects and equipment are tied to community need. Many of the new financial tools for

Board of Trustee decisions to open new facilities or significantly expand public access spaces in existing facilities will need to anticipate new on-going operational expenses, such as staff, technology, security, janitorial, and courier services.

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Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

As noted in the previous Financial Analysis section, significant increases in new operations costs will decrease the year-end fund balance available to transfer into the Capital Fund, and thus, fewer dollars are available for new capital projects. One of the strategies for maximizing existing resources while new residential developments come online is to use the expansion space available at Centennial Hills and Windmill libraries. Margaret Sullivan Studio mocked up a potential renovation scope and budget to demonstrate how the Centennial Hills expansion space (now used as a Distribution Center) could be repurposed for public use. The preliminary rough estimate of $7 million for the capital construction project is only part of the total fiscal impact of this extensive renovation project. Moving into Centennial Hills’ expansion space will also require more staff, technology, and other ongoing operating costs. It may also involve the relocation of the Distribution Center, if offsite book and material distribution is still needed at that time. See next two pages.

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Application: Centennial Hills REGIONAL PARK OUTDOOR ACTIVITY AREA

YOUTH MAKER SPACE

LARGE MEETING ROOM

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY SPACE

MEDIUM MEETING ROOM SMALL MEETING ROOMS

HOMEWORK & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES/ CO-WORK SPACE

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

GALLERY/ CAFÉ DIGITAL LAB

WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE

SMALL MEETING ROOMS

ADULT MAKER SPACE

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED

L Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

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Application: Centennial Hills Space Types

Full Plan

CafĂŠ

x

Gallery

fine art

Intergenerational Living Room

x

Youth Story & Activity

x

Homework Help

x

Teen Area

x

Makerspace

do-it-yourself

Business/Career Services

x

Study Rooms

add

Meeting Rooms

x

Computer Center

x

Outdoor Activity Space

x

Bookstore

x

Sq. Footage

L1 Cost/SF

Enclosed & Ancillary Spaces

14,216

$32.00

Open Spaces

31,339

$32.00

Total SF

45,555

L2 Cost/SF $32.00

L3 Cost/SF

Soft Costs

2018 Cost

$225.00

20%

$4,384,214.40

20%

$2,707,689.60 $7,091,904.00


v.2020 strategic goals. The third criteria relates to strategic organizational goals. It has been noted that all branches that are part of this study have a need for renovations that accelerate their ability to fully implement new v.2020 interactive learning spaces and grow customer use or market share in their branch service area. In the course of this Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework work, there has been significant “visioning” at the branch level to match new building capabilities to the needs, interests, and lifestyles of branch and Library District populations. Specifically, every branch needs one or more new spaces, including a welcoming and comfortable intergenerational living room and café vibe. Depending on the service population, a branch may also need improved family learning areas, as well as spaces for school support, project-based learning, business and career services, and/or more versatile places for community and culture events and gatherings. The next iteration of branch buildings will combine these new elements with traditional elements, such as collections and public access technology, while adapting over time to changes in communications, technologies, and service area populations. An important part of the v.2020 implementation and service approach requires special attention to adjacencies. Branches that have service populations dominated by families may have different adjacencies than branches that have a mix of family, senior, and singles/couples households. Similarly, some branches may accommodate an easy space makeover because adjacencies are already correct, while others may require significant shuffling of all branch spaces to get the adjacencies right. Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

More detailed first draft branch vision plans are included in Appendix 2, Service Model Integration into Branch Building Programs, with branch bubble diagrams to indicate the priority programs, services, and space components and adjacencies. These plans are illustrative, with preliminary ideas of how branch investments can increase long-term library relevance and attract new customers. Using the decision framework on a go-forward basis. This Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework represents a new way to generate capital project ideas, review and consider alternatives, and decide on capital projects that will have lasting value and move the Library District forward even in the midst of rapid change. The future of libraries focuses on people and their behaviors, not just the buildings. Creating the right experiences requires a transition from looking narrowly at building components to a broader view of orchestrating experiences with staff and technology as well as buildings. Making decisions about facilities investments requires understanding the full cost and benefits of each investment. Using criteria to guide capital project decisions ensures that existing and new building investments have clarity about goals, that the Board of Trustees has a framework for evaluating alternatives, and that the Library District has adequately scoped and budgeted for each project that is approved by the Board of Trustees. The framework should function to get things right in the planning phase at the front end of project development, and create adequate budgets for maximum project impact and success. Appendix 2 contains a number of capital project development worksheets that staff and the Board of Trustees can use to propel projects using the decision framework’s criteria. Decision-Making Framework

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Decision-Making Framework

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The following 5-Year scenario, for example, illustrates how top priority v.2020 components could be added to every existing branch for a total projected budget of $40,000,000.

5-Year Investment: $40,000,000 Turn Concepts Into Components ($0 - $32) Master Facilities Space Planning Furniture & Equipment Renovation Plan A. Reuse Existing Furniture & Equipment B. New Furniture & Equipment 593,000 SF $19,000,000

Invest in the Communities/Introduce v.2020 ($32 - $40)

Focus on v.2020 Strategic Focus Areas ($40 - $225)

Intergenerational Living Room

Project-Based Learning

Café Vibe Popular Materials Community Living Room Informal Learning Lab

Business/Career

A. New Furniture & Equipment B. Level 2 Renovation 4,000 SF 52,000 SF $2,080,000

Develop Community “Specialties” Destination features & flavors!

Family Learning School Support 4,000 SF 52,000 SF $11,700,000

Total: $32,780,000 + Soft cost (20%): $39,336,000 Community Engagement ∙ Staff Development ∙ Partnership Development Reposition the Library Brand ∙ All Communities Get an Investment in Their Library Continuation of v.2020 Development


10-Year Budget Allocation: $78,965,020 Space Types

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Unit Cost/SF

$32.00

$40.00

$225.00

Possible SF

593,485

593,485

102,547.84

Cost

$18,991,520

$23,739,400

$23,073,263.33

Soft Cost (20%)

$3,798,304

$4,747,880

$4,614,652.67

Total Cost

$22,789,824

$28,487,280

$27,687,916

Total Funds

$78,965,020

$78,965,020

$78,965,020

Remaining Funds

$56,175,196

$27,687,916

$0.00

Another scenario mocks up a sample mix of renovation project budgets based on per square foot costs for Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 branch renovations pursued over 10 years for total projected costs of $79,000,000.

More detailed exhibits in Appendix 4, Financial Analysis, provide additional details on assumptions and scenarios for potential District-wide and branch level facility projects that can be pursued in the next five to ten years based on best current estimates of revenues expected.

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In addition to costing scenarios, Appendix 2 has sample project development worksheets and schedules based on decision criteria, as shown in this example of a ten-year project schedule.

Example of a 5-10 Year Project Schedule Library District-wide Prioritization Community Need

1 - 4 Years

5 - 6 Years

7 - 10 Years

Demographic Growth

v.2020 Services/Growth

Clark County Spring Valley Sunrise West Las Vegas Whitney

Centennial Hills Windmill Enterprise Summerlin

Laughlin Rainbow West Charleston Sahara West


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As the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District innovates, adapts, and refreshes the business of public libraries for 21st Century learning experiences and community needs, facility decisions will be driven by the changing nature of the economic environment, organizational strategies, rapid progress in technology, and a wide variety of social conditions. This framework helps decision-makers think clearly about all the pieces that come together for facility success.

Creating the next generation of library experiences will require decision-makers to ensure that facilities are fully utilized and adaptable to new uses, new technology, and broader customer enjoyment. Revisions to the framework over time

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

As societal and local conditions change, the decision framework will need to be refined and improved. Annual Board of Trustee input on the process and value of decision framework criteria is essential to approving capital projects that are responsive to change and that create lasting public value. Decision-Making Framework

107


LAS VEGASCLARK COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT Appendices LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

108


Project Team Simpson Coulter | STUDIO

Margaret Sullivan Studio

Simpson Coulter | STUDIO (SCS) is an award-winning full-service architecture firm, designing substantial projects throughout Southern Nevada since 1968. This longevity has established the firm’s close relationship with the Las Vegas community as well as helped to hone their expertise in a broad range of architectural services, from pre-design to construction administration. As the team’s expertise has grown, so have services and staff; SCS is currently a team of 34 that collaborates daily to produce the highest quality results through full-service architectural consulting. While master planning is one of the firm’s main services, the team’s project experience spans a wide range of project types and scales. Throughout their 50-year history, SCS have established themselves as experts in the expansive field of library and education design. Having worked on 20 of 25 LVCCLD libraries (starting with Sunrise Library in 1989), the team understands the complexity, excitement, and possibilities inherent to this type of architecture. The SCS approach to design and planning is one rooted in user-centric methods. With an understanding that architecture is meant to be experienced—not just occupied—the SCS team approaches each new project as an opportunity to learn about the end users and, in turn, use this information to generate design solutions that are holistic, responsive, and lasting.

Margaret Sullivan Studio (MSS) is a full service design firm with a focus on civic and cultural institutions, more specifically the vision, programming, and design of 21st century libraries. MSS works with the most innovative librarians in the country to redefine the public library typology. A leader in the usercentric approach, MSS couples customer-based service design principles with the institution’s strategic goals when addressing a design prompt. This allows for the creative development of programs and interior design concepts that consequently create the physical conditions required for a community of library users to flourish. MSS’ approach is holistic, considering all aspects of public library service design. Through this approach, MSS seamlessly fuses client needs with the design team’s creative response through every phase of design.

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Project Team and Acknowledgements

In 2014, Margaret Sullivan founded Margaret Sullivan Studio and has quickly become a national leader in the visioning, programming, and interior design of the future public library. Margaret has been a featured speaker at library conferences, most recently at Public Library Association 2016 Conference leading the interactive pre-conference session “Designed for Experience: Re-imagining Spaces and Services,” NEXT Library Conference 2015 in Denmark with “Library as Studio,” and American Library Association with “Teen Spaces 201.” Margaret 109


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Project Team and Acknowledgements

also served on the Future of Teen Libraries Task Force and has conducted a series of webinars for the American Library Association on this topic. This variety of experiences ensures that her design approach explores all possible variations and solutions.

accurate and comprehensive. Their quarterly market reports provide building-by-building data on more than nearly 10,000 projects and include statistics on inventory, vacancy, absorption, lease rates and new development. Similarly, their tracking of vacant land availability also positions AA to successfully address the objective at hand.

Applied Analysis Applied Analysis (AA) is a Nevada-based market research and analysis firm with specific experience in Nevada’s economy, its real estate markets, and demographic profile. Since 1997, AA has been conducting recurring economic, real estate, and demographic analyses that are recognized as the standard for market research. An example of a publicly available report includes the Las Vegas Quarterly Market Report series that discusses broad-based market information on a number of sectors, including the office, industrial, retail, apartment, and vacant land markets. Additionally, AA owns a residential tracking and analysis firm, SalesTraq, which is one of the preeminent residential research firms in Las Vegas. AA also has been producing the high-profile Las Vegas Perspective publication for more than a decade; the report contains a wide range of information about Southern Nevada, including proprietary demographic datasets at the zip code level. Understanding the existing and potential balance between supply and demand is a critical consideration in any development, expansion, or policy decision. Using the best available market information, AA provides insight into economic factors that may impact the success or failure of clients’ projects. To support their efforts, AA maintains some of the region’s most comprehensive real estate databases. Each quarter, they survey the office, industrial, and retail markets. With over 20 years of historical data, our commercial real estate databases are

110


Acknowledgements A special thank you to the following people for their participation in the creation of this Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework: Dr. Ronald R. Heezen James Bean Fred James Matt McNally

Executive Director

LVCCLD

Human Resources Director

LVCCLD

Deputy Director/CFO

LVCCLD

Community Engagement

LVCCLD

Director

Danielle Milam

Development & Planning

LVCCLD

Director

Al Prendergast Steve Rice Jennifer Schember

IT Director/CIO

LVCCLD

General Services Director

LVCCLD

Library Operations

LVCCLD

Leah Ciminelli Scott Clonan Tammy Gieseking Florence Jakus Ann Lagumina Marie Nicholl-Lynam Theron Nissen Lorinda Soto Sam Kushner Megan Nykodym

Director

Betsy Ward

Branding & Marketing

John Vino

LVCCLD

Director

Carlotta Dickerson

Regional Library Regional Library

Shana Harrington Gwen Glantz Jill Hersha Glenda Billingsley

LVCCLD

Operations Manager

Leo Segura

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Acting Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Teen Services Department

LVCCLD

Youth Services Manager

LVCCLD

Youth Services Assistant

LVCCLD

Library Services Manager

LVCCLD

Outreach Services

LVCCLD

Gallery Services Manager

LVCCLD

Programming and Venues

LVCCLD

Manager

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

LVCCLD

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

LVCCLD

Manager

Darren Johnson Ryan Neely

Operations Manager

Tam Anderson Salvador Avila Tanya Brown-Wirth Greg Carr

LVCCLD

Branch Manager

Head LVCCLD

Director Assistant General Services

Branch Manager

Anna Allred Kristen KennedyLarsen Suzanne Scott

Scheduling Specialist

LVCCLD

Scheduling Specialist

LVCCLD

Performing Arts Center

LVCCLD

Coordinator Project Team and Acknowledgements

111


Project Team and Acknowledgements

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Sherry Walker

Development Office

LVCCLD

Warren Evnas

Director

LVCCLD

Monica Ford Mirna Mejia

President/CEO

Nevada Partners, Inc.

Consumer Education

Las Vegas Urban League

Manager

Jennifer Weitz

Adult Programming

Brian Zawistowski Allison Boyer Lynn Lucuara Denise Lewis Sean Coulter, AIA Aracely Rascon, NCIDQ Smiki Savicic Margaret Sullivan Jade Esplin Lindsay McComas Jeremy Aguero Brian Gordon Chris Drury Irene Bustamante Adams George Gault Lindy Glanz

Technician

LVCCLD

Executive Assistant

LVCCLD

Administrative Assistant

LVCCLD

Administrative Assistant

LVCCLD

Principal

Simpson Coulter | STUDIO

Interior Designer

Simpson Coulter | STUDIO

Graphic Designer

Simpson Coulter | STUDIO

Principal

Margaret Sullivan Studio

Designer

Margaret Sullivan Studio

Studio Manager

Margaret Sullivan Studio

Principal

Applied Analysis

Principal

Applied Analysis

Project Manager

Applied Analysis

Chief Strategy Officer

Workforce Connections

Dorian Stonebarger Cheryl Adler Davis

Program Director

Three Square Food Bank

Director

Clark County School District

Chris Way Kim Amato Ally Haynes-Hamblen

General Manager

KNTV

Executive Director

Baby’s Bounty

Director

City of Las Vegas Office of

Supervisor

Stephanie Robinson Bella YourgulesScholes Bobbie Ann Howell

CCR&R Supervisor

Las Vegas Urban League

Crime Prevention

LVMPD

Program Wrangler

Nevada Humanities

Mary Regan

Child Care Resource &

Las Vegas Urban League -

Referral Manager

Early Childhood Connection

Stephen Sawyer Brian Kendall

Chair

Mesquite Works

Family Outreach Specialist

Clark County School District

United Way of Southern Nevada

Assistant Professor

UNLV & Lincy Institute

Outreach Coordinator

NPHY

Cultural Supervisor

City of Las Vegas Office of

Executive Director

Deaf Centers of Nevada

Assistant Reseach Analyst

Nevada Institute for

Ready to Learn Project

Vegas PBS

Facilitator

Jaime Cruz Shelby Henderson

Executive Director

Workforce Connections

School Readiness Policy

Children’s Advocacy Alliance

Manager

Robert Jones

Coordinator, K-12 Library

Clark County School District

Services

Amber Lopez Lasater Dyana Thurgood Laura Christian

Cultural Affairs Social Innovation

SCORE

Children’s Research & Policy

FACES

VP Collective Impact and

Specialist

Cultural Affairs

Kevin Carter M. Amaris Knight Mayte Heredia

FACES

Magdalena Martinez Rico Ocampo

Las Vegas Urban League Early Childhood Connection

Supervisor

Elaina Mule

112

Cindy Fox Michael Johnston

Chief of Staff

Nevada State College

Operations/HR Manager

Deaf Centers of Nevada

Assistant Director of

Discovery Children’s

Learning Experiences

Museum Nevada Ballet Theatre

Chapter Chair

Las Vegas SCORE


Demographic Analysis

01

By Applied Analysis

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

113


Demographic Analysis Executive Summary


Table of Contents Executive Summary: Demographic Analysis .......................................................................................................................... 1 Overview of the Approach and Methodology ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1  Economic Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2  Projected Demographics ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2  Future Expansion of the District’s Footprint .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 6  Demographic Analysis of the District ..................................................................................................................................... 8  General Approach and Methodology ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 8  A Proven Track Record of Strong Historical Population Growth ................................................................................................................................................................................... 9  Employment Impacts Are Critical to the Long-Term Outlook ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 11  Economic Development and Diversity is Important ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14  Residential Market Has Regained Its Footing ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 15  Economic Considerations for the Future ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 17  Key Factors in Determining the Location of Future Population Growth ...................................................................................................................................................................... 19  Demographic Rankings and Expected Performances by Service Area ...................................................................................................................................................................... 25  Demographics by Service Area................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36  Potential Future Sites (Under District Control) ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 78  Tapestry Segment Definitions and Statistics ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 81 


Executive Summary: Demographic Analysis Library services continue to evolve in the 21st century, particularly as technology advances and teaching methods adapt to new market realities. This progression has been outlined in the Vision 2020 plan previously developed for the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District (“LVCCLD” or the “District”), along with other strategies outlined in this facilities master plan assessment. A key component of the overall analysis considers the demographics of the Southern Nevada1 community and how that potentially impacts both physical building requirements and overall programming needs. The demographic analysis of the facilities master plan is designed to address a few critical components on behalf of the LVCCLD, including: 1. Establish a baseline expectation of future growth (i.e., how many potential consumers may impact demand for library services); 2. Project where future growth is likely to take place (i.e., what areas are likely to generate future demand for library services); and 3. Identify any notable demographic changes within the LVCCLD urban Las Vegas service area (i.e., are any material shifts in the demographic profile expected within each library branch’s service area).

Overview of the Approach and Methodology The framework to evaluate demographic conditions and provide insight on a go-forward basis employed on a stepwise approach. Initially, developing an understanding of broader economic conditions is necessary to evaluate the baseline from which future growth will be measure and evaluate the trajectory at which the community will expand. Broader population growth is sourced to proprietary projections developed by Applied Analysis and benchmarked against known third-party demographers, including the State of Nevada and the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Generally speaking, the broader forecast trends are relatively well aligned with one another. The next element focused on determining the location and intensity of growth within the urban Las Vegas valley. To develop these forecasts, a number of analyses were conducted including: (1) evaluating residential permitting activity; (2) considering development potential with major master planned communities; (3) identifying vacant lands suitable for residential development activity; (4) assessing land ownership, land uses and zoning for appropriateness of future development; (5) assessing the likelihood of development given surrounding land uses; (6) considering historical build-out patterns in the urban Las Vegas valley; (7) and other market-based factors. The forecast utilized a ground-up approach starting with the parcel-level data, while using the broader Southern Nevada growth expectations as a control total for the broader community. The final element of the analysis focused on an assessment of the demographic profile of residents within each of the LVCCLD’s various service areas. The output segmented population by key attributes, including age, household size, number of children by age group, race/ethnicity and household income. For additional information about the approach to the analysis, refer to the General Approach and Methodology section.

1

Southern Nevada generally refers to Clark County and/or the urban Las Vegas valley.

Applied Analysis | Page 1


Economic Overview The Southern Nevada economy has been one of the fastest growing communities in the nation, and the prospects for future growth remain positive. The local population stands at 2.2 million (with 1.5 million located within the LVCCLD urban service area). There are a number of attributes that provide strong fundamentals for continued expansion. The Las Vegas area cost of living remains attractive and ranks on par with national averages.2 Additionally, the business tax climate ranks fifth in the country, providing businesses with a low-cost operating environment.3 There are a number of other fundamentals that support continued growth, including but not limited to: easy access to regional markets; no corporate or personal income tax; a diversifying economy; competitive real estate costs and a high quality of life. Future expansion is also in response to broader migration to the west, an aging population and planned investments in the local economy. This analysis considered key demographic data in five-year increments from 2015 to 2040.

Projected Demographics While the pace of growth has been relatively impressive over the course of the past several decades, the rate of growth (in percentage terms) is likely to slow. The service areas in the urban Las Vegas valley are anticipated to expand at an annual average rate of approximately 1.0% through 2040. This growth will result in nearly two million residents throughout the LVCCLD urban service areas, or an additional 468,300 residents from 2015.

LVCCLD and Clark County Population

2,035,572

2,171,054

2,327,066

3

2,725,421

1,608,987

1,681,387

1,780,095

1,890,779

1,994,719

1,526,446

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

LVCCLD Population

2

2,478,500

2,601,492

The Cost of Living Index for Las Vegas is 102.5 versus the national average (100.0); source: C2ER Source: 2018 State Business Tax Climate Index; source: Tax Foundation.

Non-LVCCLD Population

Applied Analysis | Page 2


Additionally, there will likely be a shift in terms of the demographic profile of residents throughout the urban Las Vegas valley. Notably, the share of households with children will likely decline in a number of areas as the share of the population over 55 years of age will likely increase at a faster pace. The analysis also assumes the share of Hispanic/Latino households will also increase over the course of the next several decades. Finally, there is a general expectation that incomes will continue to rise, with the median income estimated to expand by approximately 64.1% through 2040. Summary of Demographic Outlook within the Urban Service Area

Population Population Under 18 Population 18 to 54 Population 55 and above No. of Households Households With Children With Children Under 6 With Children 6 to 17 With Both Aged Children Households Without Children Hispanic/Latino Households African American Households Asian Households Multi-Race Households Household Median Income

2015 Number 1,476,337 350,311 776,343 349,683 529,749 154,253 34,400 85,450 34,403 375,496 125,000 58,311 49,651 12,640 $56,187

Share 100.0% 23.7% 52.6% 23.7% 100.0% 29.1% 6.5% 16.1% 6.5% 70.9% 23.6% 11.0% 9.4% 2.4% -

2040 Number 1,928,867 444,568 1,017,335 466,964 685,278 193,995 41,298 108,069 44,624 491,283 174,000 99,051 100,759 25,712 $92,181

Share 100.0% 23.0% 52.7% 24.2% 100.0% 28.3% 6.0% 15.8% 6.5% 71.7% 25.4% 14.5% 14.7% 3.8% -

Growth 452,530 94,257 240,992 117,281 155,529 39,742 6,898 22,619 10,220 115,787 48,999 40,740 51,109 8,032 $35,994

2015-2040 % Growth 30.7% 26.9% 31.0% 33.5% 29.4% 25.8% 20.1% 26.5% 29.7% 30.8% 39.2% 69.9% 102.9% 103.4% 64.1%

Chg. in Share 0.0% -0.7% 0.2% 0.5% 0.0% -0.8% -0.5% -0.4% 0.0% 0.8% 1.8% 3.4% 5.3% 1.4% -

While the District-wide projections are an integral part of the overall analysis, the demographic assessment includes a more detailed review of demographic conditions within each of LVCCLD’s existing service areas.4 At present, the Sunrise service area encompasses largest population within the District with nearly 216,000 residents; the population in the area is expected to expand to over 257,000 by the year 2040. The next largest services areas include Sahara West, Rainbow, Windmill and Centennial Hills. In terms of absolution growth, the largest gains are expected in the Summerlin, Sahara West, Centennial Hills, Windmill and Enterprise service areas. When computed in terms of percentage growth during the study, the largest gains are in the Summerlin, Centennial Hills, Enterprise, Windmill and Sahara West service areas. The following depicts areas of future growth and ranking by service area.

4

Note, the defined services areas were established by the District. It is likely these boundaries will shift over time as the population shifts.

Applied Analysis | Page 3


Southern Nevada 2015 – 2040 Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 4


Sahara West

Rainbow

Windmill

Centennial Hills

West Enterprise Charleston

Whitney

2040

Summerlin Las Vegas

8,597

7,855

21,839

22,030

45,116

45,318

153,945 Spring Valley

65,225

77,245

76,137

111,565

100,446

115,221

115,367

182,787 Clark County

115,728

124,691

122,970

129,232

205,458

210,756 139,769

156,865

150,069

263,907 176,513

257,264

215,615

Sunrise

2015

2015 and 2040 Service Area Population

West Las Vegas

Laughlin

-0.4%

-0.9%

Population Percentage Change Between 2015 and 2040 136.0%

59.0%

58.6%

50.8%

49.5% 19.3%

11.1%

9.4%

4.5%

1.5%

1.4% -0.3%

Summerlin Centennial Enterprise Hills

Windmill

Sahara West

Sunrise

Whitney

Laughlin

Rainbow

Spring Valley

Clark County

West Las Vegas Charleston

West Las Vegas

Applied Analysis | Page 5


Future Expansion of the District’s Footprint In addition to the review of the existing service areas, the District has two future sites that is owns and/or controls. One property lies in the northwest portion of the urban Las Vegas valley in the Centennial Hills service area along Kyle Canyon Road; the site also referred to as the Skye Canyon location. The second location is in the southwest portion of the valley and is currently located near the intersection of Cactus Avenue and Jones Boulevard in the Windmill service area; the site is also referred to as the Cactus Pointe location. The two expansion sites are well positioned to help capture and alleviate future demand in their surrounding service areas but are generally bordered by mountainous terrain that would potentially limit residential densities, and potentially, the use of the facilities. The sites are identified with the purple stars on the accompanying maps. The Windmill and Centennial Hills libraries are currently serving the 4th and 5th largest populations in the District. By 2040, the population in their respective and immediately surrounding service areas (including Sahara West, Summerlin, and Enterprise) are anticipated to increase dramatically. While the majority of future growth is expected to be focused in the western portions of the urban Las Vegas valley - particularly the southwest and northwest - both the Centennial Hills and Windmill libraries were originally designed with potential expansion opportunities within the buildings. This provides an opportunity to allow these particular buildings to grow along with the population within these portions of the valley to alleviate near- to -mid-term increases in demand. It will be important to better understand how services, programming and utilization will impact demand for the physical buildings in the future; other segments of this facilities master plan provide insight into the changes expected on a go-forward basis. Skye Canyon (Kyle Canyon Road) Location

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

Cactus Pointe (Cactus and Jones) Location

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 6


Based on forecasted growth trends, expansion opportunities for the District should also be considered along major thoroughfares that remain in close proximity to future development activity and residential expansion. As such, the District may consider alternative locations along the western segments of Interstate 215 Beltway. Specifically, locations around the Beltway north of Cheyenne Avenue (northwest) and south of Tropicana Avenue (southwest). Additionally, the existing population combined with future growth may support another branch in the eastern portion of the urban Las Vegas valley (in the Sunrise service area). Southern Nevada 2040 Population with Site Identification

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

Existing Branch ▌Branch Boundary Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 7


Demographic Analysis of the District The following sections provide a summary of the approach of the analysis, followed by the background research and attributes considered in the overall analysis.

General Approach and Methodology The general approach to the projection analysis was relatively straightforward. Utilizing known population within the urban Las Vegas valley, various assumptions and modeling techniques were utilized. The initial effort required a top-down approach for the entire urban valley to ensure that the sum of the parts was not greater than the whole. This broader forecast was also benchmarked against known third-party forecasts to ensure they were fairly consistent with those reported within the community. Adjustments were made where necessary and appropriate. The next step of the analysis required a review of the geographic region specifically served within the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District (LVCCLD) service areas. This analysis excluded areas such as City of Henderson and City of North Las Vegas. Taking the analysis a step further, the allocation of future population growth and shifts was based on a number of factors, including: Identifying vacant lands within the region to identify as a baseline where potential future growth may occur; Based on historical development trends and vacant lands suitable for development activity, identify areas with the greatest growth potential within the urban Las Vegas valley of LVCCLD’s jurisdiction; Utilize known residential permitting activity to inform the projections in the near-term phases of the forecast; Utilize known land ownership and zoning information to identify near- to mid-term phases of future residential development activity; Utilizing historical development patterns as an indicator of future growth potential to identify long-range forecasts and potential areas for future expansion; Consider current and planned investments to gauge the extent and timing of the ripple effect of those investments, where practicable; and In addition to the location of expected growth patterns the analysis considered changes in overall demographic profiles based on historical trends. The focus of the analysis centered around households with children (by major age brackets), age distributions, key ethnicity demographics and overall household incomes. The allocation of future growth was performed at the ground-up level, utilizing known factors by census tract. The forecast includes a summary of future trends based on the District’s current defined service areas. It is likely that the service area boundaries will change in the future. The information used in, and arising from, this analysis is based upon assumptions that are subject to uncertainty and variation. As a result, the estimates do not represent results that will be achieved in the future. There will usually be differences between projected and actual results as events and circumstances frequently do not occur as expected; the differences may be material. This report, the findings contained herein, and the analysis underlying the findings have been prepared to demonstrate the possible effect of future hypothetical occurrences. These occurrences are deemed reasonable based on the assumptions and underlying analyses contained herein at the time it was prepared. Applied Analysis | Page 8


A Proven Track Record of Strong Historical Population Growth Las Vegas has long been considered one of the United States’ premier tourist destinations. Prior to the most recent recessionary period, Southern Nevada had grown by leaps and bounds within and beyond the tourism industry. For those looking in from the outside, it is difficult to understand what decades of 5.0%-plus annual growth has meant. Just 30 years ago, the Las Vegas market was home to just over 560,000 full-time residents; that number has increased nearly four-fold, as Las Vegas currently maintains a population base of approximately 2.2 million people. Population and Annual Growth Comparison: United States vs. Clark County, Nevada United States Year '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 '13 '14 ‘15 ‘16

Population 249,623,000 252,981,000 256,514,000 259,919,000 263,126,000 266,278,000 269,394,000 272,657,000 275,854,000 279,040,000 282,162,411 284,968,955 287,625,193 290,107,933 292,805,298 295,516,599 298,379,912 301,231,207 304,093,966 306,771,529 309,346,863 311,718,857 314,102,623 316,427,395 318,907,401 321,418,820 323,298,417

Clark County, NV Growth 1.3% 1.4% 1.3% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.1% 1.0% 0.9% 0.9% 0.9% 0.9% 1.0% 1.0% 1.0% 0.9% 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% 0.7% 0.8% 0.8% 0.7%

Population 770,280 835,080 873,730 916,837 990,564 1,055,435 1,119,052 1,193,388 1,261,150 1,327,145 1,394,440 1,457,233 1,516,805 1,577,154 1,650,234 1,715,052 1,783,781 1,847,087 1,898,119 1,933,315 1,959,491 1,967,722 1,988,195 2,031,723 2,069,450 2,118,353 2,166,181

Growth 8.4% 4.6% 4.9% 8.0% 6.5% 6.0% 6.6% 5.7% 5.2% 5.1% 4.5% 4.1% 4.0% 4.6% 3.9% 4.0% 3.5% 2.8% 1.9% 1.4% 0.4% 1.0% 2.2% 1.9% 2.4% 2.3%

Variance in Growth Rate 7.1% 3.2% 3.6% 6.8% 5.3% 4.8% 5.4% 4.5% 4.0% 4.0% 3.5% 3.2% 3.1% 3.7% 3.0% 3.0% 2.5% 1.8% 1.0% 0.6% -0.4% 0.2% 1.5% 1.1% 1.6% 1.6%

Sources: World Bank, U.S. Census Bureau and Nevada State Demographer. Applied Analysis | Page 9


Other primary reasons for business relocations and expansions into the urban Las Vegas valley have included Southern Nevada’s favorable tax climate, relative housing affordability, quality of life considerations and financial benefits associated with business activity. The valley remains a desirable location in which to do business and live, as over 42 million annual visitors5 carry a significant portion of the tax burden. Las Vegas’ reputation as a prime location for business has been recognized by a number of publications. For example, the Tax Foundation ranked Nevada as having the fifth-best tax climate for business in 2018. 2018 State Business Tax Climate Index

5

Source: Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority.

Applied Analysis | Page 10


Employment Impacts Are Critical to the Long-Term Outlook Employment growth in Nevada and Southern Nevada has also been remarkable during the past several decades. In May 1980, establishment-based employment in Nevada was 399,400. By December 2017, that number had increased to 1.4 million, growing at a compound annual rate of 3.4%. Clark County, which accounted for approximately 55% of statewide employment in 1980, had seen its share increase to about 73% by 2017. During that period, Clark County’s establishment-based employment grew from 217,700 to 998,800, or at a compound growth rate of approximately 4.3%. In 2017, overall employment in Southern Nevada reached an all-time high.6 Despite the devastating impacts of the Great Recession, Southern Nevada’s economy has been experiencing strong and steady growth. Unemployment for the Las Vegas metropolitan area reached 4.9% in December 2017. The number of jobseekers in Southern Nevada stands at 53,400 as of 2017. Unemployment Rate Comparison 16.0%

US Nevada Las Vegas MSA

14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0% '00

'01

'02

'03

'04

'05

'06

'07

'08

'09

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14

'15

'16

'17

Source: Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (“DETR”) and United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Establishment-based employment in the Las Vegas Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) increased by 29,900 positions (+3.1%) year-over-year in December 2017. Overall, the market has reported over six years of year-over-year growth in employment. Notable contributors in Southern Nevada during the past 12 months include construction (+10,800 jobs); government (+5,500 jobs); professional and business services (+5,300 jobs); education and health services (+4,400 jobs); trade, transportation and utilities (+1,900 jobs); and financial activities (+1,400 jobs). 6

Las Vegas-specific employment and unemployment data sourced to Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation.

Applied Analysis | Page 11


Employment Growth by Sector

Construction

10,800

Government

5,500

Professional & Business Services

5,300

Education & Health Services

4,400

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1,900

Financial Activities

1,400

Other Services

800

Manufacturing

500

Natural Resources & Mining Information Leisure & Hospitality (2,000)

100 -200 -600 -

2,000

4,000

6,000

8,000

10,000

12,000

Source: DETR.

Other key indicators worth mentioning are average weekly hours worked and average weekly wages. The number of average weekly hours worked by private sector employees was 33.9 in December 2017. On a trailing 12-month basis, hours worked are up 2.1%. Average weekly wages also appear to be reporting increased stability and improvement. By December 2017, the average weekly wage reached $776, which was 4.6% ahead of the prior year on a trailing 12-month basis. At present, the fastest growing sector in both absolute and percentage terms is construction. The construction sector reported average weekly wages of $1,038 during the 12-months ended December 2017, which reflected a 6.7% increase from 2016. On an annualized basis, this equates to average salary of nearly $54,000. While construction jobs are leading the way in current job growth in the area, the level of construction-related employment remains a fraction of where it once stood. As such, concerns regarding the sustainability of the sector are less pressing. In 2017, construction-related positioned remained 41.4% below prior peak levels of 2006. Importantly, construction jobs account for just under 7% of total employment, while that figure stood at over 11% at the height of the market. A key element of the construction activity taking place are the projects that are currently being development. See the list of approximately $18 billion in notable developments in the pipeline later in this section. Once these projects complete construction, they will be required to hire thousands of permanent positions. For example, projects like Resorts World Las Vegas will require an estimated 10,000 permanent positions at build-out.

Applied Analysis | Page 12


When the ripple effect of those positions (indirect and induced) are accounted for, total employment reaches to approximately 15,000.7 The following provides a historical perspective of the absolute number of construction positions in Southern Nevada. Construction-Related Employment (Annual Averages), Las Vegas MSA

120,000

108,633

100,000 80,000 63,675

60,000 37,383

40,000 20,000 0 '01

'02

'03

'04

'05

'06

'07

'08

'09

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14

'15

'16

'17

Source: DETR.

The outlook for overall employment remains positive. According to DETR, future annual employment growth prospects are expected to average approximately 2.3% during the 10year period ending in 2024 (latest available).8 According to the United States Conference of Mayors, Las Vegas employment is estimated to expand at 2.9% in 2018 and another 2.5% in 2019 and 2020.9 Las Vegas also projected to be the third-fastest employment growth market in the country at 2.7 per year during the 2017 to 2020 timeframe.10 The also report noted that Las Vegas employment is expected to increase by 50% by 2046.11 Additionally, AA surveyed five local economists, suggesting a consensus average growth rate forecast of 2.2% in 2018.12

Source: Economic impact analysis report of Resorts World Las Vegas. See http://nevadaworkforce.com/Projections. 9 See U.S. Metro Economies: Past and Future Employment Levels, May 2017 (http://www.usmayors.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Metro-Economies-Past-and-Future-Employment-12.pdf), page 13. 10 Id. Page 5. 11 Id. Page 54. 12 On behalf of the 2018 Las Vegas Perspective. 7 8

Applied Analysis | Page 13


Economic Development and Diversity is Important Key to economic development policy is the question of why businesses choose to relocate to one location over another. Analyses have shown that appropriate labor pools, access to markets, infrastructure, operating costs, quality of life and tax burden are all important considerations. Labor and labor-related issues (e.g., costs and skill level) tend to be the most important factors in site selection decisions. They are followed by overall operating costs, infrastructure issues and regulatory environment. Economic development-related incentives are important to businesses’ relocation decisions; although, they have historically placed relatively low on businesses’ list of relocation or expansion criteria. One observer noted, “Relocating companies look at incentives as tie-breakers more than decision makers.”13 With Southern Nevada ranking relatively high on most key metrics of reasons for relocating businesses, economic development is likely to continue over the next several decades. Companies and individuals alike appreciate Southern Nevada’s low-tax and pro-business operating environment. Below are a number of factors to consider a move or relocation to the region.14 No State Corporate Income Tax No Personal Income Tax Availability of State Incentives Expanding Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Competitive Energy Logistical Hub of 11 Western State Region McCarran International Airport Ranked Among the Top 10 Foreign Trade Zone #89 While Southern Nevada’s economy is more diversified today than it was 10 or 15 years ago, it remains one of the narrowest economies in the United States given its relative dependence on tourism. Diversity may be a double-edged sword in some cases (e.g., the stability of the tax base), but this ongoing evolution provides a more stable economic base in the long run. While there are various ways to analyze diversification, a commonly-used approach is the Hachman Index (the “Index”). The Index assumes the national economy reflects broad diversity, while measuring the aggregate variance in diversification of a subject economy. In this instance, the relative shares of the Southern Nevada economy are compared with those of the nation to identify the variances of each employment sector, also known as the location quotient. The aggregate impacts are summarized in the diversity index; a score value of 100 reflects a diversified economy comparable to the nation, while a score of 0 reflects a narrow economy.15 The following graphic demonstrates the increased diversification in recent years.

The Brookings Institution, Business Location Decision-Making and the Crisis: Bringing Companies Back, N. Cohen. Source: Las Vegas Perspective. 15 Source: Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation and Applied Analysis. 13 14

Applied Analysis | Page 14


Diversity (Hachman) Index (Higher Value Indicates Higher Diversity) 77 72 67 62 57 52 '01

'02

'03

'04

'05

'06

'07

'08

'09

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14

'15

'16

'17

Source: Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation; United States Bureau of Labor Statistics and Applied Analysis.

Residential Market Has Regained Its Footing Volatility has been the hallmark of Southern Nevada’s housing market during the past two decades, with early cycle increases in the early 2000s fueled by strong population and employment growth, record-low interest rates and significant residential market speculation followed by ensuing declines sourced to significant overbuilding, tight credit markets, declining consumer confidence and a strong national recession. There is no question the market posted unsustainable growth in residential sales volumes and pricing during the 2004 to 2006 timeframe. The sharp increases in sales volumes combined with above-average price appreciation resulted in an environment whereby market demand was being driven by acquisitions that were not based on sound fundamentals. Speculation within the marketplace created a wave of transactions that pulled nearly every speculator into participation. Once local and national fundamentals slowed, demand for these incremental units turned negative and homeowners, acting as investors, attempted to realize their profits. With a fever to sell units, supply quickly outpaced demand and pricing was the release valve. As a result of the correction that was required, depreciation turned quicker than the pricing run ups, with market average pricing plummeting rapidly to preboom levels.

Applied Analysis | Page 15


At the low point, the median price of a new home fell to $188,000, which was 45.3% below the pre-recession peak of $343,937. Declines in resale median home prices were even more pronounced, falling 65.5% from $290,000 to $100,000. Foreclosures skyrocketed, peaking in the 2008/2009 timeframe, while nearly three in four homeowners were underwater (owed more than their house was worth). At present, foreclosure volumes (and bank-owned assets) have become a negligible component of the overall housing supply equation.16 Residential Foreclosures, Las Vegas Valley 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 '07

'08

'09

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14

'15

'16

'17

Source: SalesTraq.

The Southern Nevada housing market has rebounded in the past several years with strong price appreciation and increased stability. New home prices reached an all-time high of $379,990 in December 2017, while resale prices have rebounded to $238,000 as of year-end.17 Distressed homes have generally worked their way through the system, and the latest activity is more reflective of a “normalized� market than one facing disaster. Approximately 92.8% of all resale closings in 2017 were considered non-distressed, as auction sales, bank-owned sales and short sales accounted for a combined 7.2% of activity.

16 17

Housing statistics sourced to SalesTraq. SalesTraq.

Applied Analysis | Page 16


Mix of Resale Transactions (Annually), Las Vegas Valley Distressed

100%

Non-Distressed

90% 80% 70% 60%

27.2% 72.8%

38.1% 61.9%

50% 40%

63.0%

30%

37.0%

20%

76.5% 23.5%

10%

83.9% 16.1%

0% '11

'12

'13

'14

'15

87.7% 12.3%

'16

92.8% 7.2%

'17

Source: SalesTraq.

Economic Considerations for the Future Comparatively speaking, Southern Nevada’s economic structure is not terribly complex. The leisure and hospitality sector directly accounts for 285,900 of the region’s 998,800 jobs, or about 29% of the workforce.18 The relative contribution of largely tourism-related employment is greater than any other comparable economy in the United States. Conventional wisdom purports that the continued recovery of Southern Nevada’s broader economy would follow improvements within the core leisure and hospitality sector. Arguments have also been made that a recovery within the Las Vegas tourism market must be preceded by consistent improvements in the nation’s economy. This sequence of events appears to have materialized as anticipated. From a national perspective, GDP growth has been positive, the unemployment rate is falling and the stock market and personal income levels are rising. Moreover, consumers and businesses are beginning to spend and invest again, and the U.S. index of leading economic indicators continues to favor expansion. As anticipated, Southern Nevada visitor metrics have remained elevated. McCarran International Airport has reported record passenger volumes in 2017 (48.5 million),19 while average daily auto traffic on Interstate 15 at the NevadaCalifornia border20 is near an all-time high. Perhaps most importantly, approximately $18 billion21 of under construction and planned projects remain in the development pipeline throughout the valley, with more than half sourced to projects within the resort, convention and gaming industries. While the timing and extent of these projects are likely to evolve over time, the employment implications, particularly within the construction industry, are substantial. DETR. McCarran International Airport. 20 Nevada Department of Transportation and Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. 21 Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, media reports and AA. 18 19

Applied Analysis | Page 17


Southern Nevada’s broader economy is clearly seeing improvements as well. In the past 12 months, Southern Nevada’s construction sector has added 10,800 positions22 as a result of increased investment activity and residential construction. The number of residential units permitted is at its highest level since 2009 (although a fraction of where they were during the early- to mid-2000s), while resale home prices have been reporting year-over-year gains since mid-2012. In addition, the industrial market vacancy rate has fallen to a level last seen prior to the last the recession, and the retail market vacancy rate has been below 10.0% for about three years. While Southern Nevada continues to struggle in some areas, including an office market vacancy rate that has been gaining momentum, the broader economy appears to be benefitting from an improving national economy and tourism sector. Notable Current and Planned Developments in Southern Nevada Project Resorts World Las Vegas Jackie Robinson Arena and Hotel Project Las Vegas Stadium (65,000 Seats) Wynn Paradise Park Convention Center District Expansion Union Village Switch Project Neon Vegas Extreme Park (The Edge) Palms Renovation Park MGM (former Monte Carlo) Caesars Convention Center Palace Station Remodel and Expansion ARIA Resort & Casino Convention Center Expansion Clark County Park Upgrades Las Vegas 51s Baseball Stadium MGM Resorts Convention Center Expansion Moulin Rouge Las Vegas Las Vegas Monorail Extension to Mandalay Bay UNLV New Medical Education Building The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas Room Upgrades Henderson West Flamingo Remodel UNLV U District Apartments Phase 2 (The Degree) UNLV New Hospitality Hall for the College of Hotel Administration Aristocrat Technologies Corporate Campus CIM Downtown Grand Third Tower Fremont Street Experience Canopy and Mall Reconstruction UNLV New Engineering Building UNLV Engineering Academic and Research Building Fertitta Football Complex Southern Hills Hospital Behavioral Health Center USL at Cashman Stadium Improvements Wynn Plaza Fly LINQ Zip Lines 22

DETR.

Cost $4,000,000,000 $2,700,000,000 $1,900,000,000 $1,500,000,000 $1,200,000,000 $1,200,000,000 $1,000,000,000 $900,000,000 $800,000,000 $485,000,000 $450,000,000 $375,000,000 $191,000,000 $154,000,000 $150,000,000 $150,000,000 $130,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $95,000,000 $90,000,000 $76,000,000 $57,000,000 $45,000,000 $45,000,000 $35,000,000 $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $28,500,000 $26,000,000 $25,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000

Status Under Construction Planned Under Construction Planned Planned Under Construction Under Construction Under Construction Planned Under Construction Under Construction Planned Under Construction Under Construction Planned Planned Under Construction Planned Planned Planned Under Construction Planned Under Construction Under Construction Under Construction Under Construction Planned Planned Planned Planned Under Construction Under Construction Planned Under Construction Planned

Applied Analysis | Page 18


Project UNLV University Gateway Development Phase II Starwood Hotel (near Las Vegas Motor Speedway) MountainView Hospital Emergency Room The Mob Museum Expansion and Renovation Northgate Distribution Center (Building 5 and 9) UNLV University Village UNLV Harry Reid Research and Technology Park Bldg. 3 UNLV New Business College Building Sands/Madison Square Garden Performance Venue TownePlace Suites Home2 Suites Project Blue Total Sources: Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority; third-party media sources and Applied Analysis. Note: Status as of January 24, 2018. DND = Did Not Disclose.

Cost $18,000,000 $18,000,000 $10,000,000 $6,500,000 DND DND DND DND DND DND DND DND $18,370,000,000

Status Planned Planned Under Construction Planned Under Construction Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned

Key Factors in Determining the Location of Future Population Growth The following graphics, data and analysis were considered in the evaluation of the location of future population projections.

Applied Analysis | Page 19


Historical Build-out of the Urban Las Vegas Valley

Applied Analysis | Page 20


Location of Actively Selling Subdivisions

Existing Branch

Applied Analysis | Page 21


Major Master Planned Communities Actively Selling Homes

Existing Branch Applied Analysis | Page 22


Vacant Land Suitable for Residential Development

Existing Branch Applied Analysis | Page 23


Approximate Locations of Future Growth Through 2040

Existing Branch Applied Analysis | Page 24


Demographic Rankings and Expected Performances by Service Area

2015 and 2040 Service Area Population

Sahara West

Rainbow

Windmill

Centennial Clark County West Hills Charleston

Enterprise

Whitney

Spring Valley Summerlin

Las Vegas

21,839

22,030

45,116

45,318

65,225

77,245

76,137

111,565

100,446

153,945

182,787 115,221

115,367

115,728

124,691

129,232

205,458

210,756 139,769

156,865

176,513

150,069

122,970

257,264 215,615 Sunrise

2040

263,907

2015

West Las Vegas

Applied Analysis | Page 25


Population Growth Between 2015 and 2040 100,000 90,000 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 -10,000

88,720

87,394 76,226

70,987

67,566

41,649

11,119

6,796

1,721

1,108

267 -191

Summerlin

Sahara West

Centennial Windmill Enterprise Hills

Sunrise

Whitney

Rainbow

Clark County

Spring Valley

Laughlin

-202

-361

West Las Las Vegas West Vegas Charleston

Population Percentage Change Between 2015 and 2040 136.0%

59.0%

58.6%

50.8%

49.5% 19.3%

11.1%

9.4%

4.5%

1.5%

1.4% -0.3%

Summerlin Centennial Enterprise Hills

Windmill

Sahara West

Sunrise

Whitney

Laughlin

Rainbow

Spring Valley

Clark County

-0.4%

West Las Vegas Charleston

-0.9% West Las Vegas

Applied Analysis | Page 26


Applied Analysis | Page 27


Southern Nevada 2015 Population

2015 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 28


Southern Nevada 2015 Density

2015 Persons Per Acre Less than 5 5 – 10

10 – 20 20 – 40 Over 40

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 29


Southern Nevada 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 30


Southern Nevada 2040 Density

2040 Persons Per Acre Less than 5 5 – 10

10 – 20 20 – 40 Over 40

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 31


Southern Nevada 2015 Residential Vacancy Rate

2015 Vacancy Rate More than 10.0% 7.5% – 10.0%

5.0% – 7.5% 2.5% – 5.0% Under 2.5%

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 32


Southern Nevada 2017 Low-Performing Schools23

2015 Low Performing Schools + Elementary Schools (2 or Less Stars) + Middle Schools (2 or Less Stars) + High Schools (Index Score Less than 40) 23

Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries

â–ŒBranch Boundary

While an evaluation of school performance was beyond the scope of this project; the data above has been included at the request of LVCCLD staff.

Applied Analysis | Page 33


Southern Nevada Community Centers24

Community Centers Community Center Existing Branch 24

Controlled Site

â–ŒBranch Boundary

Other System Libraries

While an evaluation of community centers was beyond the scope of this project; the data above has been included at the request of LVCCLD staff.

Applied Analysis | Page 34


Southern Nevada Land Owned by Federal Government/BLM

Land owned by BLM 5 acres or less ... Existing Branch

20 acres or more Controlled Site

Other System Libraries

â–ŒBranch Boundary Applied Analysis | Page 35


Demographics by Service Area Centennial Hills The Centennial Hills Library service area currently has a population of 129,232. Through 2040, this area is anticipated to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 1.9% per year, with the much of the growth occurring between 2025 and 2035. The long-range growth forecast ranks first in percentage terms across all service areas. By 2040, the population in the area is anticipated to grow by over 76,000 residents. Critically, the potential Skye Canyon library site controlled by the LVCCLD (that is located within the boundaries of the service area) could potentially prove an invaluable expansion resource as much of the new population is focused in that general direction, though it is located at a fringe edge of growth in the urban valley. Of the current population, the largest tapestry segments are Up and Coming Families (63.1%) and Sophisticated Squires (11.7%). With a relatively consistent level of income and a large increase in growth of all types. It is likely that Up and Coming Families will remain the dominant tapestry segment for the area for the foreseeable future. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

129,232

100.0%

205,458

100.0%

76,226

59.0%

0.0%

Population Under 18

34,639

26.8%

55,465

27.0%

20,826

60.1%

0.2%

Population 18 to 54

66,582

51.5%

108,398

52.8%

41,816

62.8%

1.2%

Population 55 and above

28,011

21.7%

41,595

20.2%

13,584

48.5%

-1.4%

No. of Households

44,518

100.0%

70,182

100.0%

25,664

57.6%

0.0%

Households With Children

16,135

36.2%

24,911

35.5%

8,776

54.4%

-0.7%

With Children Under 6

3,829

8.6%

5,998

8.5%

2,169

56.7%

-0.1%

With Children 6 to 17

9,484

21.3%

14,402

20.5%

4,918

51.9%

-0.8%

With Both Aged Children

2,820

6.3%

4,504

6.4%

1,685

59.8%

0.1%

Households Without Children

28,382

63.8%

45,271

64.5%

16,888

59.5%

0.7%

Hispanic/Latino Households

5,735

12.9%

11,848

16.9%

6,113

106.6%

4.0%

$77,246

-

$126,730

-

$49,484

64.1%

-

Population

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 36


Centennial Hills 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 37


Centennial Hills 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 38


Clark County Currently, the Clark County Library service area has a population of 122,970. Given the library’s central location, population growth in this relatively mature area is anticipated to be negligible. Notably, change will be a slow demographical shift, with the childhood population falling by 5.4%, the working adult population falling slightly by 0.5% and a rise in the senior demographic of 10.3%. In addition, the Hispanic/Latino demographic is expected to increase by 14.6% overall, ending the study period at 34.0% of the total population in the area. Of the current population, the largest tapestry segments are Inner City Tenants (25.6%) and the Social Security Set (11.0%). With the 2.3 percentage point increase in the share of the elderly population, the Social Security Set and Retirement Communities tapestries can be anticipated to grow within the Clark County branch service area. 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

122,970

100.0%

124,691

100.0%

1,721

1.4%

0.0%

Population Under 18

24,074

19.6%

22,763

18.3%

-1,311

-5.4%

-1.3%

Population 18 to 54

66,489

54.1%

66,172

53.1%

-317

-0.5%

-1.0%

Population 55 and above

32,407

26.4%

35,756

28.7%

3,349

10.3%

2.3%

No. of Households

50,026

100.0%

51,149

100.0%

1,123

2.2%

0.0%

Households With Children

10,129

20.2%

8,940

17.5%

-1,189

-11.7%

-2.8%

With Children Under 6

2,226

4.5%

1,689

3.3%

-538

-24.2%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

5,458

10.9%

4,993

9.8%

-465

-8.5%

-1.1%

With Both Aged Children

2,444

4.9%

2,258

4.4%

-186

-7.6%

-0.5%

Households Without Children

39,897

79.8%

42,209

82.5%

2,312

5.8%

2.8%

Hispanic/Latino Households

15,184

30.4%

17,401

34.0%

2,217

14.6%

3.7%

Household Median Income

$39,386

-

$64,618

-

$25,231

64.1%

-

Population

Applied Analysis | Page 39


Clark County 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 40


Clark County 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 41


Enterprise The Enterprise service area is currently home to 115,221 residents. Population in the area is expected to grow at 1.9% annually, with most of the population growth occurring before 2030. As with most areas across the urban Las Vegas valley, the largest demographic switch will be the decreasing share of households with children. The percentage of households with children will decrease from 28.9% to 24.9%, a 4.0 percentage point reduction in share. Meanwhile, the Hispanic/Latino demographic is expected to nearly double in size, it will account for approximately 20.2% of the total (up from 17.2%). Currently, the largest demographic tapestry in the Enterprise service area are Enterprising Professionals (21.0%) and Up and Coming Families (18.4%). The Enterprising Professionals tapestry of young adults is anticipated to grow only slightly slower than the 55-plus demographic. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

115,221

100.0%

182,787

100.0%

67,566

58.6%

0.0%

Population Under 18

25,571

22.2%

36,209

19.8%

10,638

41.6%

-2.4%

Population 18 to 54

65,140

56.5%

99,739

54.6%

34,599

53.1%

-2.0%

Population 55 and above

24,510

21.3%

46,838

25.6%

22,328

91.1%

4.4%

No. of Households

43,906

100.0%

70,649

100.0%

26,743

60.9%

0.0%

Households With Children

12,711

28.9%

17,564

24.9%

4,853

38.2%

-4.1%

With Children Under 6

2,753

6.3%

3,312

4.7%

559

20.3%

-1.6%

With Children 6 to 17

7,709

17.6%

10,790

15.3%

3,081

40.0%

-2.3%

With Both Aged Children

2,250

5.1%

3,464

4.9%

1,214

54.0%

-0.2%

Households Without Children

31,196

71.1%

53,085

75.1%

21,890

70.2%

4.1%

Hispanic/Latino Households

7,545

17.2%

14,243

20.2%

6,697

88.8%

3.0%

$64,933

-

$106,530

-

$41,596

64.1%

-

Population

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 42


Enterprise 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 43


Enterprise 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 44


Las Vegas The Las Vegas service area currently has a population of 45,318 residents. Through 2040, the population is not anticipated to change at a substantial rate and is projected to level out at 45,116. The slower pace of growth is largely attributable to its relatively mature neighborhood profile. Notably, the population under 18 is expected to remain relatively flat; consequently, the percentage of households with children is not anticipated to change dramatically over this timeframe. The largest change will be the growth in the senior population and the shrinking of the working adult aged population. The largest tapestry served by the Las Vegas branch are NeWest Residents (29.2%) and the Social Security Set (26.0%). With a growing subset of Hispanic/Latino households and a growing retirement population, both tapestries are anticipated to increase their market share through 2040. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

Population

45,318

100.0%

45,116

100.0%

-202

-0.4%

0.0%

Population Under 18

10,826

23.9%

10,173

22.5%

-653

-6.0%

-1.3%

Population 18 to 54

24,359

53.8%

23,947

53.1%

-412

-1.7%

-0.7%

Population 55 and above

10,133

22.4%

10,997

24.4%

864

8.5%

2.0%

No. of Households

16,216

100.0%

16,256

100.0%

40

0.2%

0.0%

3,991

24.6%

3,594

22.1%

-398

-10.0%

-2.5%

722

4.5%

542

3.3%

-180

-24.9%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

2,136

13.2%

1,977

12.2%

-159

-7.4%

-1.0%

With Both Aged Children

1,133

7.0%

1,074

6.6%

-59

-5.2%

-0.4%

Households Without Children

12,225

75.4%

12,662

77.9%

438

3.6%

2.5%

Hispanic/Latino Households

6,824

42.1%

7,490

46.1%

666

9.8%

4.0%

$26,070

-

$42,770

-

$16,700

64.1%

-

Households With Children With Children Under 6

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 45


Las Vegas Library 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 46


Las Vegas Library 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 47


Rainbow At present, the Rainbow service area has a population of 150,069, and it is expected to grow at a rate of 0.2% per year through 2040 (reaching 156,865 residents). Notably, households with children are expected to decline by 3.3%, or a 2.2 percentage point reduction in share while Hispanic or Latino Households are anticipated to grow by 25.7%, or a 3.4 percentage point increase in share. The largest tapestry segments in the service area are Aspiring Young Families (23.2%) and Up and Coming Families (15.2%). As the demographics in the Rainbow area have a relatively consistent level of households with children (relative to the broader market) and are not anticipated to see any dramatic changes in share, it is anticipated that these two tapestries will remain dominant in the area through 2040. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

150,069

100.0%

156,865

100.0%

6,796

4.5%

0.0%

Population Under 18

35,177

23.4%

34,751

22.2%

-426

-1.2%

-1.3%

Population 18 to 54

77,124

51.4%

79,397

50.6%

2,273

2.9%

-0.8%

Population 55 and above

37,768

25.2%

42,717

27.2%

4,949

13.1%

2.1%

No. of Households

54,446

100.0%

57,008

100.0%

2,562

4.7%

0.0%

Households With Children

15,469

28.4%

14,958

26.2%

-511

-3.3%

-2.2%

With Children Under 6

3,167

5.8%

2,676

4.7%

-491

-15.5%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

8,840

16.2%

8,848

15.5%

8

0.1%

-0.7%

With Both Aged Children

3,461

6.4%

3,433

6.0%

-28

-0.8%

-0.3%

Households Without Children

38,977

71.6%

42,049

73.8%

3,073

7.9%

2.2%

Hispanic/Latino Households

10,246

18.8%

12,881

22.6%

2,635

25.7%

3.8%

Household Median Income

$57,939

-

$95,055

-

$37,116

64.1%

-

Population

Applied Analysis | Page 48


Rainbow 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 49


Rainbow 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 50


Sahara West Sahara West currently serves a population of 176,513. This geographically large service area covers much of the growing western fringes of the urban Las Vegas valley, and as such, is anticipated to see 1.6% growth on average each year through 2040. As a result, this service area will grow by 87,000 residents to nearly 264,000. As currently delineated, Sahara West is expected to report the second largest number of new residents over the study period, with neighboring Summerlin library reporting the largest number of new residents. It is likely that a re-drawing of the service area will be required, particularly among those residents to the southern portion of the service area. Up and Coming Families (23.4%) and Enterprising Professionals (18.6%) are the largest tapestries served by the library at Sahara West. With much of the development occurring in areas suitable for working young families, it is anticipated that growth will be fastest in the childhood and working-age adult populations. It is expected that these two dominant tapestries will grow in share as a result of these demographic shifts.    2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

176,513

100.0%

263,907

100.0%

87,394

49.5%

0.0%

Population Under 18

37,229

21.1%

58,012

22.0%

20,783

55.8%

0.9%

Population 18 to 54

91,521

51.8%

135,750

51.4%

44,229

48.3%

-0.4%

Population 55 and above

47,763

27.1%

70,145

26.6%

22,382

46.9%

-0.5%

No. of Households

67,959

100.0%

98,389

100.0%

30,430

44.8%

0.0%

Households With Children

17,866

26.3%

25,615

26.0%

7,749

43.4%

-0.3%

With Children Under 6

4,435

6.5%

6,830

6.9%

2,395

54.0%

0.4%

With Children 6 to 17

9,492

14.0%

12,155

12.4%

2,663

28.1%

-1.6%

With Both Aged Children

3,941

5.8%

6,634

6.7%

2,693

68.3%

0.9%

Households Without Children

50,093

73.7%

72,774

74.0%

22,681

45.3%

0.3%

Hispanic/Latino Households

8,258

12.2%

16,310

16.6%

8,053

97.5%

4.4%

$70,511

-

$115,681

-

$45,170

64.1%

-

Population

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 51


Sahara West 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 52


Sahara West 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 53


Spring Valley Spring Valley’s service area has a population of 76,137 residents. By the close of 2040, the population is anticipated to grow by 0.1% per year to 77,245 residents. The area is largely built out (with relatively little vacant lands remaining), so the biggest change will be sourced to demographic shifts rather than growth. As the population ages, an increasing share of households without children will emerge. Currently, the largest tapestries are Inner City Tenants (21.1%) and Milk and Cookies (20.0%) households. Within the area, the number of households with children is anticipated to decrease by 10.3% through 2040, resulting in a 2.5 percentage point change in share. This shift will most significantly impact the Milk and Cookies tapestry, which should decrease in dominance over that timeframe.    2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

Population

76,137

100.0%

77,245

100.0%

1,108

1.5%

0.0%

Population Under 18

13,879

18.2%

13,209

17.1%

-670

-4.8%

-1.1%

Population 18 to 54

40,379

53.0%

40,066

51.9%

-313

-0.8%

-1.2%

Population 55 and above

21,879

28.7%

23,971

31.0%

2,092

9.6%

2.3%

No. of Households

30,332

100.0%

30,733

100.0%

401

1.3%

0.0%

Households With Children

6,463

21.3%

5,796

18.9%

-668

-10.3%

-2.5%

With Children Under 6

1,682

5.5%

1,363

4.4%

-319

-19.0%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

3,489

11.5%

3,242

10.5%

-247

-7.1%

-1.0%

With Both Aged Children

1,292

4.3%

1,190

3.9%

-102

-7.9%

-0.4%

Households Without Children

23,869

78.7%

24,938

81.1%

1,069

4.5%

2.5%

Hispanic/Latino Households

7,367

24.3%

8,674

28.2%

1,308

17.8%

3.9%

$43,600

-

$71,530

-

$27,930

64.1%

-

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 54


Spring Valley 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 55


Spring Valley 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 56


Summerlin Summerlin currently services a population of 65,225 residents. Through 2040 that population is anticipated to grow at a valley-leading pace, increasing by 88,720 residents. East of the 215 Beltway, there are few buildable plots of land left for development. The most significant developments for this area are the large plots to the west of the 215 Beltway and Summerlin Parkway intersection. Development here will add the bulk of new households during this timeframe. In terms of tapestries, the largest segments are Boomburbs (24.9%) and Up and Coming Families (23.8%) in the service area. As the area continues to grow and attract families, it is likely that the number of households with children will also grow, resulting in an upswing in market share attributable to these tapestry segments. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

Population

65,225

100.0%

153,945

100.0%

88,720

136.0%

0.0%

Population Under 18

12,843

19.7%

40,459

26.3%

27,616

215.0%

6.6%

Population 18 to 54

26,693

40.9%

71,492

46.4%

44,799

167.8%

5.5%

Population 55 and above

25,689

39.4%

41,995

27.3%

16,306

63.5%

-12.1%

No. of Households

26,752

100.0%

54,568

100.0%

27,816

104.0%

0.0%

6,390

23.9%

18,447

33.8%

12,058

188.7%

9.9%

821

3.1%

2,493

4.6%

1,672

203.6%

1.5%

With Children 6 to 17

4,246

15.9%

12,038

22.1%

7,792

183.5%

6.2%

With Both Aged Children

1,325

5.0%

3,919

7.2%

2,594

195.8%

2.2%

Households Without Children

20,362

76.1%

36,120

66.2%

15,758

77.4%

-9.9%

Hispanic/Latino Households

2,406

9.0%

6,317

11.6%

3,911

162.5%

2.6%

$79,515

-

$130,453

-

$50,938

64.1%

-

Households With Children With Children Under 6

Household Median Income Â

Applied Analysis | Page 57


Summerlin 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 58


Summerlin 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 59


Sunrise Currently, the population of the Sunrise service area is 215,615 residents, and this population is anticipated to grow by 0.7% per year to 257,264. The area has a number of vacant plots, particularly to the east of the library that are anticipated to be built on and host new households. While modest losses are expected in selected census tracts within the service area, the overall population is likely to expand further. The largest tapestry segments for the area are Industrious Urban Fringe (28.9%) and Milk and Cookies (16.0%). The Sunrise service area is not likely to see a major shift in these tapestries, though there is a notable dip in the share of households with children expected through 2040 (decreasing 2.0 percentage points). Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

215,615

100.0%

257,264

100.0%

41,649

19.3%

0.0%

Population Under 18

64,450

29.9%

67,527

26.2%

3,077

4.8%

-3.6%

Population 18 to 54

113,929

52.8%

146,379

56.9%

32,450

28.5%

4.1%

Population 55 and above

37,236

17.3%

43,358

16.9%

6,122

16.4%

-0.4%

No. of Households

63,522

100.0%

75,226

100.0%

11,704

18.4%

0.0%

Households With Children

25,168

39.6%

28,298

37.6%

3,129

12.4%

-2.0%

With Children Under 6

4,277

6.7%

4,741

6.3%

464

10.9%

-0.4%

With Children 6 to 17

14,189

22.3%

15,926

21.2%

1,737

12.2%

-1.2%

6,704

10.6%

7,631

10.1%

928

13.8%

-0.4%

Households Without Children

38,353

60.4%

46,928

62.4%

8,575

22.4%

2.0%

Hispanic/Latino Households

28,387

44.7%

34,737

46.2%

6,350

22.4%

1.5%

Household Median Income

$42,333

-

$69,452

-

$27,119

64.1%

-

Population

With Both Aged Children

Applied Analysis | Page 60


Sunrise 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 61


Sunrise 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 62


West Charleston The West Charleston service area currently has 115,728 residents and is anticipated to remain population stable, losing about 361 residents through 2040 due to demographic shifts. Not unlike other mature portions of the urban Las Vegas valley, there is an expectation for fewer households with children and more seniors. Currently, the largest tapestry segments are the Industrious Urban Fringe (20.0%) and Inner City Tenants (16.2%). These tapestries are not likely to change much as a result of shifting demographics of the area. The largest change will be a rise in Hispanic/Latino households in the West Charleston service area, which have be 36.2% of the area’s households by 2040 (versus 32.2% at present).   2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

115,728

100.0%

115,367

100.0%

-361

-0.3%

0.0%

Population Under 18

29,140

25.2%

27,404

23.8%

-1,736

-6.0%

-1.4%

Population 18 to 54

58,646

50.7%

57,600

49.9%

-1,046

-1.8%

-0.7%

Population 55 and above

27,942

24.1%

30,363

26.3%

2,421

8.7%

2.2%

No. of Households

39,144

100.0%

39,276

100.0%

132

0.3%

0.0%

Households With Children

11,346

29.0%

10,401

26.5%

-945

-8.3%

-2.5%

With Children Under 6

2,464

6.3%

2,033

5.2%

-430

-17.5%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

5,826

14.9%

5,451

13.9%

-374

-6.4%

-1.0%

With Both Aged Children

3,056

7.8%

2,915

7.4%

-141

-4.6%

-0.4%

Households Without Children

27,798

71.0%

28,876

73.5%

1,077

3.9%

2.5%

Hispanic/Latino Households

12,609

32.2%

14,221

36.2%

1,613

12.8%

4.0%

Household Median Income

$46,583

-

$76,424

-

$29,841

64.1%

-

Population

Applied Analysis | Page 63


West Charleston 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 64


West Charleston 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 65


West Las Vegas The West Las Vegas service area has a population of 22,030, which is set to decline by a modest 191 residents to 21,839 through 2040. This area, near core of the urban Las Vegas valley, is relatively built-out. Should higher-density redevelopment activities ultimately unfold, there is potential for this service area to outperform current expectations; however, absent such development there is little room from incremental development activity. The largest tapestries of the area include the Industrious Urban Fringe (38.8%) and Modest Income Homes (14.3%). The largest demographic shift will come from these households aging and fewer families with children moving into the area, resulting in a 7.5% drop in families with children (or 171 households through 2040).    2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

22,030

100.0%

21,839

100.0%

-191

-0.9%

0.0%

Population Under 18

6,249

28.4%

5,875

26.9%

-374

-6.0%

-1.5%

Population 18 to 54

11,161

50.7%

10,953

50.2%

-208

-1.9%

-0.5%

Population 55 and above

4,620

21.0%

5,012

22.9%

392

8.5%

2.0%

No. of Households

7,059

100.0%

7,076

100.0%

17

0.2%

0.0%

Households With Children

2,286

32.4%

2,115

29.9%

-171

-7.5%

-2.5%

463

6.6%

385

5.4%

-78

-16.8%

-1.1%

1,182

16.7%

1,114

15.7%

-68

-5.7%

-1.0%

641

9.1%

615

8.7%

-26

-4.0%

-0.4%

Households Without Children

4,773

67.6%

4,960

70.1%

188

3.9%

2.5%

Hispanic/Latino Households

2,298

32.6%

2,589

36.6%

291

12.6%

4.0%

$33,659

-

$55,221

-

$21,562

64.1%

-

Population

With Children Under 6 With Children 6 to 17 With Both Aged Children

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 66


West Las Vegas 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 67


West Las Vegas 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries

▌Branch Boundary

Applied Analysis | Page 68


Whitney Whitney Library service area in southeast Las Vegas currently has a population of 100,446; it is anticipated that its population will grow by 11,119 to 111,565 residents by 2040. The area is largely built out, with some land availability near the fringes of the service area (future development). The largest tapestries served by the Whitney Library are Inner City Tenants (15.2%) and Crossroads (14.5%). The largest demographic shifts of this area, including an increase of Hispanic/Latino households and a decrease in households with children are unlikely to largely impact either of these two tapestries significantly.    2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

100,446

100.0%

111,565

100.0%

11,119

11.1%

0.0%

Population Under 18

22,076

22.0%

23,254

20.8%

1,178

5.3%

-1.1%

Population 18 to 54

52,104

51.9%

57,088

51.2%

4,984

9.6%

-0.7%

Population 55 and above

26,266

26.1%

31,223

28.0%

4,957

18.9%

1.8%

No. of Households

36,234

100.0%

40,048

100.0%

3,814

10.5%

0.0%

Households With Children

9,396

25.9%

9,550

23.8%

154

1.6%

-2.1%

With Children Under 6

2,437

6.7%

2,295

5.7%

-142

-5.8%

-1.0%

With Children 6 to 17

5,075

14.0%

5,318

13.3%

243

4.8%

-0.7%

With Both Aged Children

1,884

5.2%

1,937

4.8%

54

2.8%

-0.4%

Households Without Children

26,837

74.1%

30,497

76.2%

3,660

13.6%

2.1%

Hispanic/Latino Households

10,778

29.7%

13,624

34.0%

2,846

26.4%

4.3%

Household Median Income

$42,679

-

$70,019

-

$27,340

64.1%

-

Population

Applied Analysis | Page 69


Whitney 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 70


Whitney 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 71


Windmill Currently, the Windmill Library service area serves a population of 139,769 residents. The service area is expected to add approximately 71,000 new residents (net), representing a growth rate of 1.7% per year, with the resident base rising to 210,756 by the end of the study period. The influx of new residents suggests that no particular demographic is anticipated to shrink during this timeframe; however, when measured in share there will be fewer households with children and more Hispanic/Latino households emerging. As currently situation, Windmill may draw residents from the west (i.e., Sahara West service area). The largest tapestries are Enterprising Professionals (28.8%) and Aspiring Young Families (27.1%). It is unlikely that either of these tapestry segments will be impacted by more than a percentage point or two in terms of overall market share as a result of the influx of new residents or the gradual change in demographics during the study period. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

139,769

100.0%

210,756

100.0%

70,987

50.8%

0.0%

Population Under 18

33,717

24.1%

49,053

23.3%

15,336

45.5%

-0.8%

Population 18 to 54

81,143

58.1%

119,303

56.6%

38,160

47.0%

-1.4%

Population 55 and above

24,909

17.8%

42,399

20.1%

17,490

70.2%

2.3%

No. of Households

48,450

100.0%

73,533

100.0%

25,083

51.8%

0.0%

Households With Children

16,688

34.4%

23,621

32.1%

6,933

41.5%

-2.3%

With Children Under 6

5,098

10.5%

6,928

9.4%

1,830

35.9%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

8,189

16.9%

11,691

15.9%

3,501

42.8%

-1.0%

With Both Aged Children

3,400

7.0%

5,000

6.8%

1,600

47.1%

-0.2%

Households Without Children

31,762

65.6%

49,911

67.9%

18,150

57.1%

2.3%

Hispanic/Latino Households

6,868

14.2%

13,120

17.8%

6,252

91.0%

3.7%

$69,465

-

$113,964

-

$44,499

64.1%

-

Population

Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 72


Windmill 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 73


Windmill 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 74


Laughlin The Laughlin service area caters to a population of 7,855 residents. The area is anticipated to add 742 residents with an annual compounded growth rate of 0.4%. By far, the fastest growing component of this population will be those aged 55 and above, which is expected to grow at a rate of 0.6% each year. This population segment will make up 56% of the service area by 2040. The largest tapestries are Simple Living (42.7%) and Old and Newcomers (27.9%). Though there will be considerable demographic shifts in the area, these two, along with the Silver and Gold demographic, are tapestries that are likely to expand in the Laughlin service area. Â 2015

2040

2015-2040

Number

Share

Number

Share

Growth

% Growth

Chg. in Share

Population

7,855

100.0%

8,597

100.0%

742

9.4%

0.0%

Population Under 18

1,145

14.6%

1,131

13.2%

-14

-1.3%

-1.4%

Population 18 to 54

2,552

32.5%

2,638

30.7%

86

3.4%

-1.8%

Population 55 and above

4,158

52.9%

4,828

56.2%

670

16.1%

3.2%

No. of Households

3,810

100.0%

4,077

100.0%

267

7.0%

0.0%

Households With Children

517

13.6%

444

10.9%

-73

-14.1%

-2.7%

With Children Under 6

157

4.1%

121

3.0%

-36

-22.8%

-1.1%

With Children 6 to 17

233

6.1%

205

5.0%

-28

-12.0%

-1.1%

With Both Aged Children

127

3.3%

118

2.9%

-9

-7.3%

-0.4%

3,293

86.4%

3,633

89.1%

340

10.3%

2.7%

416

10.9%

602

14.8%

186

44.8%

3.9%

$34,351

-

$56,356

-

$22,005

64.1%

-

Households Without Children Hispanic/Latino Households Household Median Income

Applied Analysis | Page 75


Laughlin 2040 Population

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 76


Laughlin 2015 - 2040 Population Growth

Population Growth Population Loss Stable Population

50 – 250 250 – 1,000 Over 1,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries Applied Analysis | Page 77


Potential Future Sites (Under District Control) There are two sites the District controls that could provide for potential expansion opportunities – they are noted as purple stars in the accompanying maps. One location is located in the far northwest portion of urban Las Vegas valley and the other is in the southwest edges of the market; they are located in the currently defined service areas of Centennial Hills and Windmill, respectively. The Windmill and Centennial Hills libraries are currently serving the 4th and 5th largest populations in the library District. By 2040, the population in their respective and immediately surrounding service areas (including Sahara West, Summerlin and Enterprise) are anticipated to increase dramatically. Windmill and surrounding service areas are anticipated to increase in population by 291,405 residents. Similarly, Centennial Hills and its surrounding branches are anticipated to grow by 134,939 residents. Projected additional residents by 2040 in these service areas would make them the 1st and 5th most populous library service areas today. Additionally, these two sites would also serve the fastest growing portion of the urban Las Vegas valley, save for the Sunrise branch in east Las Vegas. Both sites are well-positioned to capture most of the growth in population in Southern Nevada. However, one criticism of these sites is that they are bordered by mountainous terrain and other development obstacles that would potentially hinder access and result in a lower population immediately surrounding the areas. It may be more appropriate to seek to better utilize or expand services at Centennial Hills and Windmill as regional libraries.

Sunrise

2015

2040

Sahara West

Rainbow

Windmill

Centennial Clark County West Hills Charleston

Enterprise

Whitney

Spring Valley Summerlin

Las Vegas

21,839

22,030

45,116

45,318

153,945 65,225

77,245

76,137

111,565

100,446

115,221

115,367

115,728

124,691

122,970

182,787

205,458 129,232

139,769

156,865

150,069

210,756

263,907 176,513

257,264

215,615

2015 and 2040 Service Area Populations

West Las Vegas

Applied Analysis | Page 78


That said, the following maps offer a look at the Cactus and Jones, Sky Pointe and Southern Nevada populations, with the current planed sites emphasized with a purple star surrounding a yellow dot. Other potential areas to focus on for sites are also identified on the 2040 Southern Nevada map, which highlights areas that may be underserved as a result of population growth, including Sunrise, the southwest valley and northwest. These sites are also relatively distant from existing libraries and are mostly in the center of their communities rather than on a fringe, which may help them to attract a wider patron base than the existing library footprint. They are also along common transit corridors, the 215 Beltway for the northwest and southwest sites and between Nellis Boulevard and Lamb Boulevard for the site near Sunrise Library. Though Sunrise service area is not growing as quickly as the other branch areas are anticipated to, it is already currently the largest branch by population size and will still be the second largest by 2040. With that in mind, it was prudent to include a nearby location for a library to potentially serve the surrounding communities. Skye Canyon (Kyle Canyon Road) Location

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

Cactus Pointe (Cactus and Jones) Location

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries

Applied Analysis | Page 79


Southern Nevada 2040 Population with Site Identification

2040 Population Less than 1,000 1,000 – 2,000

2,000 – 3,000 3,000 – 4,000 Over 4,000

▌Branch Boundary Existing Branch Controlled Site Other System Libraries

Applied Analysis | Page 80


Tapestry Segment Definitions and Statistics The included tapestry segment definitions and statistics are provided by Civic Technologies and are included for information purposes. These are referenced in the report and align the District’s historical evaluations of demographic conditions. Up and Coming Families Demographic Most of the residents in these neighborhoods are young, startup families, married couples with or without children, and single parents. The national average family size of 3.1 people matches the U.S. average. Nationally, approximately two-thirds of the households are families, 27% are single person, and 9% are shared. National annual population growth is 1.13%, higher than the U.S. figure. The national median age is 31.1 years; nearly 20% of the residents are in their 20s. Typical of younger populations, Aspiring Young Families residents are more ethnically diverse than the total U.S. population. Socioeconomic The national median household income is $46,275; wages provide the primary source of income. Nationally, approximately 60% of employed residents work in professional, management, sales, or office/administrative support positions. Overall, nationally, 87% of residents aged 25 years and older have graduated from high school, 58% have attended college, and 24% hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Residential In large, growing southern and western metropolitan areas, the highest concentrations of these neighborhoods are found in California, Florida and Texas. Twenty percent are located in the Midwest. Nationally, tenure is nearly even; 51% of the households rent; 47% own their homes. Residents live in moderately priced apartments, single-family houses and startup townhouses. Nationally, most of the housing was built after 1969. The national average gross rent is comparable to the U.S. average. Preferences Focused on family and home, residents of Aspiring Young Families communities spend most of their discretionary income for baby and children’s products, toys, home furnishings, cameras and video game systems. They go online to look for jobs, play games, and buy personal preference items such as music and computer equipment. These residents would probably go to a theme park while on vacation. They play video games, watch TV, eat out and go to the movies. They also play basketball and go bowling and biking. They listen to urban stations and professional basketball games on the radio and watch sports, news, entertainment and courtroom shows on TV. They eat out at family restaurants such as Chili’s or IHOP and go to Jack in the Box or Sonic for fast food. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

154,894 70,160 6,104,961 84,734 87.01 39.4

10.1% 45.3% 54.7%

Applied Analysis | Page 81


Enterprising Professionals Demographic Young, educated, single, married, working professionals, residents of Enterprising Professionals neighborhoods have a national median age of 32.8 years. Nationally, 43% of the households are singles who live alone or share housing with roommates, and 43% are married couple families. With an annual household growth of 1.95% per year since 2000, the households in this segment comprise approximately 2% of total U.S. households. The diversity of the population is similar to that of the United States. Nationally, most of the residents are white; however, 12.4% are Asian. Socioeconomic National median household income is $63,837. Nationally, 90% of the households earn income from wages and salaries; 39% receive income from investments. This is an educated group: nationally, approximately half of the population aged 25 years and older hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree; more than three in four have attended college. These working professionals are employed in various jobs, especially in management, finance, computer, sales and office/administrative support. Residential Enterprising Professionals residents move frequently to find growth opportunities and better jobs, especially in cities such as Chicago, Atlanta and Seattle. Forty-six% of the households are located in the South, 29% are in the West, and 20% are in the Midwest. They prefer to own instead of rent in newer neighborhoods of townhouses or apartments. Nationally, for those who rent, the average gross rent is 36% higher than the U.S. average. Preferences They are young and mobile with growing consumer clout. Those who rent hold renter’s insurance policies. They rely on cell phones and e-mail to stay in touch. They go online to download videos and music, track their investments and shop for items, including personal computers and software. They own laptops, video game systems and digital camcorders. They love to travel abroad and in the United States often. They play video games, visit theme parks, jog and swim. They read computer, science and technology magazines and listen to alternative, public-all-talk and sports radio. They eat out at Cheesecake Factory and Chili’s Grill and Bar. They shop for groceries at stores such as Publix and Albertson’s. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

97,253 43,707 3,748,464 53,546 85.76 38.5

6.3% 44.9% 55.1%

Applied Analysis | Page 82


Industrious Urban Fringe Demographic Family is central to residents of Industrious Urban Fringe neighborhoods; nationally, slightly more than half of the households have children. Nationally, 54% are married-couple families; 17% are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. The high proportion of children contributes to the relatively low national median age of 29 years. Nationally, Hispanics comprise 61.7% of the residents in these neighborhoods. Nationally, more than one-fourth are foreign born, bringing rich, diverse cultures to these urban outskirts neighborhoods. Socioeconomic The national median household income is $40,400. Nationally, the large average household size of 3.45 lowers the discretionary income available compared to segments with similar income. Residents take advantage of job opportunities offered in nearby cities; most work in the manufacturing, construction, retail trade and service industries. Residential These neighborhoods are located in the West and South; the highest concentrations are in California, Texas and Florida. Nationally, home ownership is at 62%. Single-family housing is dominant in these areas. To find more affordable housing, many live farther out from the city. Preferences Industrious Urban Fringe households balance their budgets carefully. Mortgage payments take priority. They shop at Wal-Mart, Kmart, Target and other major discount stores for baby and children’s products. They dine out less often than average households. Many have no financial investments or retirement savings other than their homes and are less likely than average to carry health insurance. Keeping in touch is important to these residents; they often have a second phone line at home. They watch movies at home and will also see multiple movies at the theater each month. Television and radio are better than newspapers and magazines to reach these residents. They watch TV as much as the average U.S. household, but subscribe to cable less often. They listen frequently to Hispanic, contemporary hit, and urban radio. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

126,529 51,922 3,911,996 74,607 75.34 30.9

8.2% 41.0% 59.0%

Applied Analysis | Page 83


Inner City Tenants Demographic Inner City Tenants residents are a microcosm of urban diversity; their population is represented primarily by white, black and Hispanic cultures. Nationally, three in ten residents are Hispanic. This multicultural market is younger than average, with a national median age of 28.8 years. The household composition also reflects their youth. Nationally, household types are mixed; 34% are singles, 28% are married-couple families, 21% are single parents, and 10% share housing. Turnover is high in these neighborhoods because many are enrolled in nearby colleges and work part-time. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants, with an annual national population growth of 0.6%. Socioeconomic The national median household income is $30,873. Because few own their homes, most of their net worth comes from savings. Nationally, 83% earn income from wages and salaries; 7% receive public assistance. Nationally, 45% of the population aged 25 and older has attended college; 5% hold a graduate or professional degree. Earning a college degree is at the forefront of their goals, so many work part- and full-time to fund their college education. Nationally, approximately half of the employed residents work in white-collar occupations. This national market has twice the U.S. level of residents who work in the accommodation/food services industry. Residential These neighborhoods are located primarily in the South and West. Most Inner City Tenants residents rent economical apartments in mid- or high-rise buildings. Nationally, one-fifth of the housing is owner-occupied. Most of the housing units, nationally, were built in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. For their average commute to work of 25 minutes, many residents drive their vehicle or depend on other modes of transportation. Nationally, 17% of the households do not own a vehicle. Preferences With their busy lifestyle, Inner City Tenants residents frequently eat at fast-food restaurants and shop for groceries at nearby stores such as Albertson’s. They prefer easy-to-prepare frozen and canned foods. Internet access at home is not typical in this market, but those who have no access at home will surf the Internet at school or at the library. Playing games and checking e-mail are typical online activities. Households have recently bought video game systems and baby items such as food, products, furniture and equipment. They prefer to shop at Target and Walgreens. They go to the movies and professional football and basketball games, play football and basketball and go bowling. They read magazines, particularly news and Entertainment Weekly, and listen to urban or contemporary hits radio. Some enjoy the nightlife, visiting bars and going dancing at nightclubs. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

112,901 54,131 4,766,841 58,770 88.06 42.2

7.3% 47.9% 52.1%

Applied Analysis | Page 84


Milk and Cookies Demographic Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies represents young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. The national median age of 34.1 years represents the presence of kids; nearly half of the households include children. Nationally, 1-in-4 householders is between the ages of 45 and 54. The population diversity is comparable to that of the United States, and the proportions of the population by race approximate the U.S. distributions with slightly above-average ratios of black and Hispanic residents. Socioeconomic Nationally, 90% of Milk and Cookies households earn income from wages. The national median household income is $57,170. Nationally, 58% have attended college; more than 20% hold bachelor’s or graduate degrees. Residential Milk and Cookies residents prefer single-family homes in suburban neighborhoods of cities, largely in the South, particularly in Texas. Smaller concentrations of households are located in the West and Midwest. Nationally, housing units are generally 20 to 30 years old. Given the concentration of dual-income families, nationally, 71% of households have at least two vehicles. A family with two or more workers, more than one child and two or more vehicles is the norm for these neighborhoods. Preferences As Milk and Cookies residents settle into their family-oriented lifestyle, they focus on family and the future. They are properly insured, carrying life and accidental death and dismemberment policies. They use a credit union, have overdraft protection and usually have a new car loan. Although they may still own a motorcycle or small car, they prefer larger vehicles. When they move, they rent a U-Haul and move their own belongings. Many households own a dog. The presence of children in Milk and Cookies households drives their large purchases of baby and children’s products including baby food, baby equipment, clothes, shoes, medicine, vitamins, board games, bicycles, toys, video games and children’s DVDs. Most households own one of the latest video game systems and a large-screen TV. To save time in their busy lives, they frequently buy prepared dinners from the grocery store and fast food. They play video games, go bowling and visit theme parks such as Six Flags and Sea World. They watch professional football and basketball games. Favorite cable channels include Cartoon Network, Discovery Channel, National Geographic Channel and BET. They also work on their lawns, tackle interior painting projects, or do minor maintenance on their vehicles. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

106,616 47,785 4,362,333 58,831 91.29 40.9

6.9% 44.8% 55.2%

Applied Analysis | Page 85


Up and Coming Families Demographic With an annual household growth rate of 4.56% nationally, Up and Coming Families represents Tapestry Segmentation’s second highest household growth market. A mix of Generation Xers and Baby Boomers with a national median age of 32.6 years, this segment is the youngest of Tapestry Segmentation’s affluent family markets. Residents of these neighborhoods are young, affluent families with younger children. Nationally, 80% of the households are families. Most of the residents are white; however, diversity is increasing as the segment grows. Socioeconomic Beginning their careers, residents of Up and Coming Families are earning above-average incomes. The national median household income is $69,522, higher than the overall national median. Nationally, nearly two-thirds of the residents aged 25 years and older have attended college; more than one in five holds a bachelor’s degree. Nationally, 91% of households earn income from wages and salaries. Although half of the households have children, they also have working parents. Residential In the suburban outskirts of midsized metropolitan areas with populations higher than 250,000, approximately half of Up and Coming Families neighborhoods are concentrated in the South, the other half in the West and Midwest. Most residents live in new single-family housing; more than half the housing units were built in the last 10 years. Nationally, home ownership is at 80%. Preferences Family and home dictate the products these residents buy. Many are beginning or expanding their families, so baby equipment, children’s clothing and toys are essential purchases. Because many are first-time homeowners, basic household furniture and lawn fertilizer, weed control and insecticide products are important. Car loans and mortgage payments are major household budget items. They are most likely to own or lease an SUV or a minivan. They eat out at family restaurants, especially on the weekends, and buy fast food at the drive-through or for takeout. They play softball, take the kids to the zoo and visit theme parks (generally Sea World or Disney World) where they make good use of their digital camera or camcorder. They rent comedy, family and action/adventure DVDs. Cable station favorites include Country Music Channel, ESPN news, The Learning Channel and the Disney Channel. They listen to country, soft rock and contemporary hit radio. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

238,290 111,813 10,290,732 126,477 92.04 43.2

15.5% 46.9% 53.1%

Applied Analysis | Page 86


Boomburbs (Summerlin Key Segment) Demographic The newest additions to the suburbs, these communities are home to busy, affluent young families. Both the neighborhoods and the families are growing. Boomburbs is the fastestgrowing market in the United States; the population has been growing at a rate of 4.51% annually since 2000. It is also home to one of the highest concentrations of young families with children. The national median age is 36.1 years; one-fifth of Boomburbs residents are between 35 and 44 years of age. There is little ethnic diversity in the population; most of the residents are white. Socioeconomic The Boomburbs market includes one of the highest concentrations of two-income households. Residents are well educated: nationally, more than 50% of the population aged 25 years and older hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. They work primarily in management, professional, and sales occupations. The national median household income is $104,395, more than double that of the U.S. median. More than half of these households receive additional income from interest, dividends and rental property. Residential The newest developments in growing areas, Boomburbs neighborhoods are concentrated in the South, West and Midwest; the highest state concentrations are found in Texas and California. Approximately three-quarters of the housing units in Boomburbs neighborhoods were built after 1989; most are single-family houses. These are the newest developments in growing areas. The home ownership rate is 87%, compared to 64% for the United States. Commuting links these dual-career households with their suburban lifestyle. Many work outside their resident county; 35% cross county lines to work (compared to 23% for the United States). Preferences Residents’ product preferences reflect their suburban lifestyle. Boomburbs is the top segment for buying household furnishings, toys and games, men’s business and casual clothes, big-screen TVs, cars and trees. This is also the top market to own big-screen TVs, DVD players, digital camcorders, video game systems and scanners as well as owning or leasing full-size SUVs. Residents own laptop computers, all kinds of software and two or more cell phones. Nationally, they are well-insured, holding life insurance policies worth $500,000 or more. They go online frequently to buy flowers and tickets to sports events, trade and track their investments, do their banking and make travel plans. Personal computer use by children younger than 18 years is the highest of all the Tapestry segments. Boomburbs residents prefer homes with fireplaces and hot tubs. They tend to employ professional household cleaning services. They will do home improvement projects themselves or hire a contractor for more complicated work. For property maintenance, they hire lawn care and landscaping services, but will also do some lawn care themselves. Family vacations are a top priority; trips to Disney World, Sea World, and other theme parks are popular destinations. For exercise, they play tennis and golf, ski, lift weights and jog. They watch family videos on DVD, attend baseball and basketball games and go to golf tournaments. They will readily spend more than $250 a year on high-end sports equipment and buy family DVDs for their collections. Favorite types of radio programs include alternative, soft contemporary, sports, and all-talk. They read parenting, finance, and business magazines and watch newer sitcoms and dramas on TV. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

27,209 12,532 1,277,535 14,677 101.94 47.0

1.8% 46.1% 53.9%

Applied Analysis | Page 87


NeWest Residents (Las Vegas Key Segment) Demographic Hispanic cultures dominate this family oriented segment; nationally, three-quarters of the population is Hispanic. Nationally, with 4.1 people, the NeWest Residents segment household has the third largest family size of all the Tapestry segments. Families dominate this market. Nationally, children live in 54% of the households, in married-couple or single-parent families. Another 19%, nationally, are married-couple families with no children living at home and other family types. The national median age is 27.3 years. Nationally, dependent children are 36 per¬cent of the population; more than one-third is younger than age 35. Nationally, approximately half of this young population is foreign born, more than half of whom have arrived in the United States in the last 10 years. Nationally, 40% of the residents are white, 40% defined as other races, and 6% are multiracial populations. NeWest Residents is one of the most diverse of the Tapestry segments. Socioeconomic Most NeWest Residents are not only new to the United States, they’re also building their careers and starting their families. They arrived in the country with few funds but have begun to save their hard-earned dollars. Language is a significant barrier for many; this segment has the highest concentration of households who speak a language other than English. Nationally, 49% of residents aged 25 years and older have not completed high school. Lack of education limits their employment options. Most employed residents work in service and skilled labor jobs. Higher-than-average proportions of employed residents work in the construction, manufacturing, accommodation/food services, administrative services, other services, and agricultural industry sectors. Some households receive Supplemental Security Income or public assistance. The national median household income for this segment is $26,983. Residential Most NeWest Residents rent apartments in mid- or high-rise buildings in major cities, chiefly in the West and South. California has the largest concentration of households, followed by Texas. The national average gross rent is 15% below the U.S. level. Nationally, most housing units in these neighborhoods were built before 1980. National home ownership is at 17%. Preferences Putting their children first, NeWest Residents lead a strong, family-oriented lifestyle that emphasizes buying groceries and baby and children’s products. They usually buy only the essentials such as baby food, baby supplies, baby car seats, and children’s clothing. They shop for groceries at Vons and Ralphs but will stop at local convenience stores for milk, juice drinks, and nonprescription drugs. To save money, they prepare meals from scratch at home; however, they still enjoy eating occasionally at fast-food restaurants such as Carl’s Jr. and Del Taco. They pay with cash; few have or use credit cards. Because most of them rent, they don’t garden or buy big-ticket furniture pieces. Few have Internet access; they own one TV set and don’t consider cable TV a necessity. To help their children become more fluent in English, parents will buy word and sound games. In their free time, they read magazines. Soccer is part of their culture; they watch it on TV, play it, and attend matches. They listen to Hispanic radio. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

73,664 29,806 2,411,876 43,858 80.92 32.7

4.8% 40.5% 59.5%

Applied Analysis | Page 88


Senior Sun Seekers (Searchlight & Mesquite Key Segment) Demographic Growing at a rate of 1.7% annually, Senior Sun Seekers neighborhoods are among the fastest growing in the nation. Their national median age is 51.8 years, the third oldest population of the Tapestry segments. Nationally, more than 6 in 10 are aged 55 years or older. Nationally, married couples without children and singles comprise 70% of all households. This segment is not ethnically diverse; approximately 87% are white. Socioeconomic Many Senior Sun Seekers residents are retired or are anticipating retirement. The national median household income is $35,560. More than half of the households, nationally, receive Social Security benefits. Approximately one-third of the national households also receive retirement income. Because a large proportion of the population is older, the education attainment is far lower than the U.S. levels. Residential These neighborhoods are primarily in the South and West; 43% are in Florida. Escaping from cold winter climates, many Senior Sun Seekers residents have permanently relocated to warmer areas; others are “snowbirds� that move south for the winter. This market has the third highest proportion of seasonal housing of all the Tapestry segments. Favorite areas are in Florida, California and Arizona. The national home ownership rate is 77%. Nationally, single-family dwellings comprise almost half of the housing inventory; mobile homes comprise nearly 40% and most housing was built after 1969. Preferences Senior Sun Seekers residents frequently take car trips and prefer to stay in reasonably priced motels or hotels such as Days Inn, Super 8 and Comfort Inn. They eat out frequently at family restaurants and fast-food establishments. They own all kinds of insurance including life, travel, long-term care and personal liability. They consult with a financial advisor about their finances. They invest time and limited funds in home improvement projects such as painting and fencing the yard. Some enjoy gardening and working on their own landscaping projects. Many join veterans’ clubs or fraternal orders and do charity work through these organizations. For health reasons, these seniors control their diet and take a variety of vitamins and dietary supplements. They will stop at nearby Circle K or Citgo Quik Mart convenience stores for a quick purchase. Satellite TV is part of their daily routine; they watch game shows, dramas, news programs, home improvement shows, sitcoms and golf tournaments. Favorite cable channels include CMT, TNT and Turner Classic Movies. They also read fishing and hunting magazines, rent comedies on DVD and occasionally listen to country radio. They also play bingo, visit theme parks, fish and hunt. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

17,758 7,744 875,595 10,014 113.07 49.3

1.2% 43.6% 56.4%

Applied Analysis | Page 89


Simple Living (Laughlin Key Segment) Demographic With a national median age of 39.7 years, this market is slightly older than the U.S. median of 37.2 years. Nationally, approximately one-fifth of Simple Living residents are aged 65 years or older; 12% are aged 75 or older. Nationally half are singles who live alone or share housing; 32% are married-couple families. Young families with children and ethnic cultures are in the minority; most residents are white. This market size is stable with negligible growth. Socioeconomic The national median household income is $27,284. Nationally, nearly 40% of households collect Social Security benefits, 8% receive Supplemental Security Income and 6% receive public assistance. Over the years, residents have built equity in their homes and saved their hard-earned dollars. Most residents who are employed work in the health care, retail trade, manufacturing, educational services and accommodation/food services industry sectors. Nationally, overall, 36.4% of residents aged 25 years and older have graduated from high school. Nationally, only 15% hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Residential Simple Living neighborhoods are in the urban outskirts or suburbs throughout the United States. Residents live in older housing; nationally, 62% were built before 1970. Nationally, more than half of them rent. Nationally, 42% of housing is single-family dwellings and 47% is in multiunit buildings of varying stories. Some seniors live in congregate housing (assisted living). Nationally, 22% of households do not own a vehicle; 45% own only one vehicle. Workers, nationally, benefit from an average commute time to work of 20 minutes. Preferences The lifestyle of these residents is reflected by their ages; younger people go to nightclubs and play musical instruments; seniors refinish furniture and go saltwater fishing. Community activities are also important to the latter; they join fraternal orders and veterans’ clubs. Simple Living households spend wisely on a restricted budget. They buy the essentials at discount stores and occasionally treat themselves to dinner out and a movie. Cable TV is a must for these frequent viewers of family programs, news programs and game shows. They are big fans of daytime TV. Owning a personal computer, cell phone, or DVD player isn’t important. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

17,239 8,179 916,484 9,060 112.05 53.2

1.1% 47.4% 52.6%

Applied Analysis | Page 90


Social Security Set (Meadows Key Segment) Demographic Nationally, four in ten householders are aged 65 years or older; the median age is 44 years. Most of them live alone. Somewhat ethnically diverse, Social Security Set neighborhoods are a blend of different racial groups; however, nationally, half of the residents are white and one-third are black and 18% are Hispanic. Socioeconomic Although Social Security Set residents live on very low fixed incomes, they have accumulated some wealth they can tap into now that they’re retired. Their national median household income is $16,849. Nationally, 8% of households rely on public assistance; 16% receive Supplemental Security Income. The service industry provides more than half of the jobs held by these employed residents. Overall, nationally, more than two-thirds of the residents graduated from high school. Nationally, 37% attended college; 16% hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Residential Located in large U.S. cities, these communities are dispersed among business Districts and around city parks. Most Social Security Set residents rent apartments in low-rent, highrise buildings; a few elderly residents opt to live in congregate housing. Nationally, because more than half of these households do not own a vehicle, many residents rely on easily accessible public transportation. Preferences Limited resources somewhat restrict the activities and purchases of residents in Social Security Set neighborhoods. They shop at discount stores but prefer grocery stores close to home. Many depend on Medicare or Medicaid to pay their health care costs. They bank in person and pay cash when they shop. Many purchase renter’s insurance. Most households subscribe to cable television; residents enjoy their daytime and prime time TV. They watch game shows, a variety of sports and entertainment news shows. This high viewership provides an easy way to reach these residents. Avid newspaper readers, many will read two or more to stay current on sports and the news. Basic Stats Population Patrons Checkouts Market Potential Average Patron Checkouts Average Population Checkouts

32,384 18,536 1,694,977 13,848 91.44 52.3

2.1% 57.2% 42.8%

Applied Analysis | Page 91


Service Model Integration into Branch Building Programs

02

By Margaret Sullivan Studio

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

207


Branch building programs The following pages represent the Library District’s strategic approach of the facilities master plan as applied to the 13 branches in this scope of work. The methodology can also be applied to the libraries that were not a part of this scope. Applying an outcomes-based, community-centric, and customercentered approach to library facility design, each community library is designed in the context of optimizing the role and purpose of the library building with respect to: 1.

community need

2.

demographic context

3.

the community-centric recipe of programs and services that the library is providing across multiple platforms, including outreach, offsite partnerships, virtual services, and future “channels of service”

4.

realigning the current facilities’ physical space to accommodate the primary role and purpose of the buildings based on v.2020 strategic goals.

distribution models of collections, for example, the future facilities can be designed intentionally to foster strategic goals that require activating physical space. Since the library typology is transitioning away from being a static warehouse for collections, the Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework is designed to activate the buildings by playing to their strengths for optimal utilization to result in maximum community impact. Rooted in the work of the Institute of Museum and Library Services around the future of learning, the skill sets critical to the 21st century knowledge economy will be connection, collaboration, creativity, communication, and critical thinking. The Library District has been transforming its range of services within each facility to bring communities together to develop these critical skills requiring physical space activation for success. In expanding the mission to become a hub for economic, social, and educational progress, the Library District’s physical assets will be designed as a flexible framework with the intention of ensuring the success of all programs and services the Library District is performing now and plans to perform in the future.

The role and purpose of the building. Because of the expanding role of technology, outreach, and partnerships as well as the potential for future infrastructure efficiencies of LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

208


LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

209

Methodology

For the purpose of this iteration of the Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework, the program documents are describing these components as program spaces and services. As the programs are developed in the next phase of work, these components may translate into services that may or may not require dedicated physical spaces. This document represents the community need for that program space/service to activate the strategic components of the particular facility. CAFÉ-VIBE GALLERY INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

TEEN AREA

The role and purpose of the buildings are designed around the following five strategic components that have been derived from the v.2020 strategic goals: INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM FAMILY LEARNING SCHOOL SUPPORT PROJECT-BASED LEARNING BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES These strategic components will be defined by the Library District’s learning objectives and experience principles and activated by activities and programs. Each library will have its own customized recipe of program spaces and services based on the following standard list of program spaces and services, derived from the core activities and programs of the Library District.

MAKER SPACES ADULT LEARNING LAB BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES

SOCIAL SERVICES STUDY ROOMS MEETING ROOMS DIGITAL LAB/CLASSROOM OUTDOOR ACTIVITY SPACE

Core program spaces and services of the Library District. The core spaces and services are a regional approach to implementation of the “core” space types and/or services that are applied to each library based on v.2020 and community need. Once applied to the individual libraries, the core spaces/services will potentially evolve into a more specific set of space types to better serve the library’s needs.


Core program spaces and services of the Library District The core spaces and services are a regional approach to implementation of the “core” space types and/or services that are applied to each library based on v.2020 and community need. Once applied to the individual libraries, the core spaces/services will potentially evolve into a more specific set of space types to better serve the library’s needs.

CAFÉ-VIBE

Almere Library; Almere, Netherlands

A place for the community and families to causally meet, converse, and/or have a solitary time to relax in a café-like setting. Vending will be determined for each location and can vary from self-serve and bring your own snacks to a community-driven workforce partner model to a conventional outside vendor.

BOOKSTORE

GALLERY

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

A museum-like open area that gives locals and traveling artists a place to display, giving visitors a new reason to come every time the show changes. This program component is a critical piece to activating the unique cultural programs of the Library District.

An intergenerational gathering space where the entire community and families can meet, relax and be alone/together. It is a vibrant resource where the community can connect with each other and use the library services to meet their needs and aspirations.

POPULAR MATERIALS

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

A dedicated area for browsing the popular collection and offering serendipitous discovery in a store-like atmosphere.

A lively intergenerational space for the entire community to enjoy arts and culture programming and entertainment that inspires and informs.

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

An area where books and other related materials can be sold. This area can be a partnership or can sell goods made by community members.

210


LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

ADULT LEARNING LAB

A series of dedicated areas/spaces that promote early and family literacy through safe and active engagement for babies, toddlers, and school-aged children and their adult caregivers.

211

A series of dedicated areas/spaces that promote life-long learning and provide educational and technological tools for the community to explore interests, develop skills, and access instructional programming.

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES These spaces and areas provide a place for all members of the community to connect with business and career opportunities and are dedicated to collaboration, consultation, technology access, instructional programming, and business transactions like postal, printing, and scanning services.

SOCIAL SERVICES

Vittra Telefonplan; Stockholm, Sweden

HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

A more privatized meeting space for individual or family counseling/ guidance on social and government issues. Social service support will most likely take place in meeting rooms, business and career services, and other library spaces. Social services areas will be dedicated in facilities that require that high level of community support.

STUDY ROOMS

This area will provide informal and instructional tutoring and homework help as well as provide support to homeschool students.

Rooms or spaces with varying types of seating to promote collaboration or solitary studying.

TEEN AREA

MEETING ROOMS

A dedicated area for teens to escape the chaos of younger age groups. It will provide teens a place to hang out, mess around, and geek out.

MAKER SPACES A space of content creation, tinkering, and the central activator for project-based learning. It welcomes youth, adults and families to enjoy maker-focused activities and programs, such as messy projects and digital arts, with easy access to tools and supplies.

Open and closed spaces that can be used for varying types of meetings, both formal and informal. The rooms can be small, medium, or large and will be designed for the ideal quantities of people that the areas need to support the variety of programs that the libraries and their communities will host and produce.

DIGITAL LAB/CLASSROOM A dedicated room that supports digital learning, exploring in groups or individually, and can also facilitate classes.


OUTDOOR ACTIVITY SPACE An area designed for the community, youth, and their families as an extension of the community gathering spaces. The area will utilize the outdoor surroundings for highly activated programming, gardening, play, and recreation.

Standard space diagram. This diagram is used as a toolkit or menu of space types that begin to individualize the buildings during the implementation of the core services/spaces. For example, a makerspace might be applied in all buildings but the character or type of makerspace would be unique to each library. This should be considered during the programming phase of each building project.

Primary Structure by Jacob Dahlgren; Wanas, Sweden

These core services/programs may take on a unique characteristic and/or have multiple types of program spaces when there is community need and the building has sufficient space to accommodate variety, as represented in the standard space diagram.

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

212


LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Core enablers

Core enablers. These core services/programs will be activated by the following tools called core enablers: a set of nimble and flexible tools intended to increase the experience of the core spaces/services. These will be required to support all core spaces/services. The buildings cannot be successful if the core enablers do not reinforce the core spaces/services.

Appendix 2

213


How to use the Facilities Master Plan documents. This is an iterative document to describe a future service vision in a master plan approach and maximizing existing assets. The approach answers the following question: How will the spaces support the activities and programs to foster the feelings and outcomes Las Vegas-Clark County Library District envisions for its community of customers? The following are the program document components:

DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

Provides a synopsis of demographic transformation over the next 20 years to provide recommendations on ideal site location and size that will support demographic changes.

EXISTING SPACES

Documents how the buildings were originally designed and how they are currently functioning in 2018. It can assist in understanding of how future reconfigurations can affect and serve current needs and future aspirations of programs and services.

CURRENT FACILITY LIMITATIONS

Illustrates facility imitations as it relates to programs and services that are critical and enjoyed in the community and how the future facilities should be intentionally designed to support these critical and in demand programs and services.

DESTINATION FEATURE AND FLAVOR

A combination of the interest and passions of the customers, the approach to a learning culture of the individual facilities, and the distinguishing characteristics that represent the strengths of strategic service that impact the community in a positive way. LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Hangzhou Zhongshuge Bookstore; Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China Appendix 2

214


LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

215

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES

The purpose of the priorities is to illustrate the exemplary programs that support v.2020 goals for each unique community. These were used to develop the program spaces and services.

SPACES/SERVICES

A unique recipe of physical program spaces and services that were formed from the standard spaces and services and informed by the exemplary priority programs and services.

PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM

Illustrates a conceptual approach to services needed at each individual facility as well as showing the approach to preliminary adjacencies that represent the facilities unique recipe.

PRIORITY SPACES

Assuming there may be budget limitations to implement a full renovation of the Facilities Master Plan Framework, the priority asterisk shows the priorities to fill the gaps in these communities to have a comprehensive plan for vision v.2020 goals.

CafebrerĂ­a el PĂŠndulo; Mexico City, Mexico

...FEELS LIKE

Conceptual imagery to illustrate the feelings and outcomes that the space can aesthetically evoke based on community identity and facilities vision.

FabLab Fabrication Workshop


E

NSPCA R ES E YMCA TN ENC R I PA PER OUTDOOR EX ACH PROGRAMS S E R ENCE T I LOCAL OU PER SCHOOLS ARY EX LIBR CES W RIEN CULINARY E CHILDCARE N PE KITS CENTERS X

HOMEWORK HELP

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

HOMESCHOOL COALITION

HOMEWORK TUTORS LOCAL PARKS

1. CONNECT COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES

STEAM KITS

3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

Centennial Hills

Active Learning, Active Living, Active Community, Active Play!


Centennial Hills

Active Learning, Active Living, Active Community, Active Play! DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

ESCAPE ESCAPE ROOM ROOM

Existing Spaces Library Distribution Center

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

50 - 250

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

The Centennial Hills Library service area currently has a population of 129,232. Through 2040, this area is anticipated to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 2.3% per year, with much of the growth occurring between 2025 and 2035. The long-range growth forecast ranks first in percentage terms across all service areas. By 2040 the population in the area is anticipated to grow by nearly 100,000 residents. Critically, the potential Skye Canyon library site controlled by the Library District (that is located within the boundaries of the service area) could potentially prove an invaluable expansion resource as much of the new population is focused in that general direction. Of the current population, the largest tapestry segments are Up and Coming Families (63.1%) and Sophisticated Squires (11.7%). With a relatively consistent level of income and a large increase in growth of all types, it is likely that Up and Coming Families will remain the dominant tapestry segment in the area for the next 10 years. As the population grows in the northwest region of the valley, Centennial Hills may expand its public space into the current Distribution Center to accommodate increased service demands. It will remain in the current location.

Proposed Space Breakdown Total

45,555 SF

Library

31,928

Distribution Center

13,267

Public

31,889 SF (70%)

Collection

4,555 SF (10%)

Staff

9,111 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

115

Adult

Desktop Laptop

37 02

Youth

Desktop Laptop

25 20

Staff

Desktop Laptop

26 05

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Centennial Hills

Current Facility Limitations

UNDERSIZED MEETING ROOM: The current meeting room is not big enough to meet the needs of the community for all ages and programs.

QUIET AREAS: There is limited seating for those who desire quiet respite.

STUDY ROOMS: Maximum capacity is six, which often cannot accommodate large study groups. Centennial Hills has a need for more and varied meeting rooms for study and collaboration.

HOMEWORK HELP/TUTORS: 50-90 students per day take advantage of the after-school tutoring program. The current facility cannot accommodate this program adequately.

UNDERSIZED STORYTIME ROOM: There is limited room occupancy, as well as the availability of the meeting room when YPL needs a larger space.

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM: This space/area is critical for family and community connections and does not exist now.


Centennial Hills

Active Learning, Active Living, Active Community, Active Play! DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

SPACES/SERVICES Community & Culture Welcome/Bookstore Gallery

YOUTH ACTIVITY& LEARNING ACTIVITIES

INTERGENERATIONAL GATHERING

ADULT LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Café-Vibe Intergenerational Living Room* Outdoor Activity Space

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Center Teen Area* Maker Space* Digital Lab/Classroom Small Meeting Rooms

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Business & Career

Park Connector

How to Start Your Own Business

Shredding Events

Self Printing Print Shop

Music Programs

Co-Work Space

Outdoor Recreation

Limitless Learning Homework Help/Tutoring Homeschool Center eMedia Resource Support Test Books Proctoring

Government & Social Services Immunization Clinic

3 Critical Programs Early Literacy & Family Literacy School Support DIY Programming for All Ages

Business & Career Medium Meeting Rooms Business & Career Services Adult Maker Space

Government & Social Services Large Meeting Room: Community Events*

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals Increased Outlets/Charging Stations Distribution Center *Priorities


Centennial Hills

Active Learning, Active Living, Active Community, Active Play! PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACES DIAGRAM The program diagram below illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Centennial Hills. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent centrally located intergenerational gathering spaces with distinct areas that focus on youth and adult learning activities. This energetic learning environment for families will be a community hub, activating the connection to school, the park and the YMCA. Do-it-yourself activities and programs will energize the community providing interest-based, passion-based programs for an active recreational and committed community of users!

REGIONAL PARK OUTDOOR ACTIVITY AREA

YOUTH MAKER SPACE

LARGE MEETING ROOM

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY SPACE

MEDIUM MEETING ROOM SMALL MEETING ROOMS

HOMEWORK & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

GALLERY/ CAFÉ

TEEN AREA

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES/ CO-WORK SPACE

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

DIGITAL LAB

WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE

SMALL MEETING ROOMS LEGEND OPEN

ADULT MAKER SPACE

SEMI-OPEN CLOSED

L


Centennial Hills Feels Like...


HEALTH & WELL-BEING SERVICES

E

ER CES N RT IEN A P PER LOCAL H EX C SCHOOLS A RE ENCES T I OU PER ARY EX LIBR CES EWERIEN N P X AT TH PLAC E 1. CONNECT HOMEWORK E COMMUNITY HELP

2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

UNLV DRONE & AUTONOMOUS SYSTEMS LAB

PERFORMING ARTS

Yes, You Can!

WORKFORCE CONNECTIONS UNLV

CIRCULATING HOTSPOTS

WORKFORCE & CAREER DEVELOPMENT

JOB FAIR

COMIC BOOK FESTIVAL

Clark County

THREE SQUARE

CHILDCARE CENTERS SHANNON WEST HOMELESS YOUTH CENTER

ARTS ORGANIZATIONS


Clark County Yes, You Can!

DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

Level 3

Level 2

Basement

Level 1

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Currently, the Clark County Library service area has a population of 122,970. Given the library’s central location, population growth in this relatively mature area is anticipated to be negligible. Notably, change will be a slow demographical shift, with the childhood population falling by 6.1%, the working adult population falling slightly by 2.0%, and a rise in the senior demographic of 8.5%. In addition, the Hispanic/Latino demographic is expected to increase by 13.4% overall, ending the study period at 34.4% of the total population in the area. Of the current population, the largest tapestry segments are Inner City Tenants (25.6%) and the Social Security Set (11.0%). With the 2.2 percentage point increase in the share of the elderly population, the Social Security Set and Retirement Communities tapestries can be anticipated to grow within the Clark County branch service area. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Clark County is to remain its current size and at its current location.

Total

120,000 SF

Public

84,000 SF (70%)

Collection

12,000 SF (10%)

Staff

24,000 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

216

Adult

Desktop Laptop

99 25

Youth

Desktop Laptop

38 06

Staff

Desktop Laptop

39 09

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Clark County

Current Facility Limitations

COMMUNITY LIVING ROOM: Seating is highly utilized with a need for a greater variety and access to more outlets.

COMPUTER USE: This location has a high demand for computers. The number of computers are finite and there is not enough staff to assist, especially for one-on-one instruction.

PERFORMANCE VENUE SPACES: Festivals, like the Comic Book Festival, draw 3,500-3,600 people. The library was not originally designed for this kind of programming, but it has become a hallmark of this branch.

YOUTH SERVICES: The approach to youth services requires a variety of flexible spaces for programs.

THREE SQUARE SERVICES: The free meals after school push the building to capacity. In September 2017, there was an average of almost 2,000 free meals given out to children.

SUPPORT FOR NEW TECHNOLOGY: The addition of new technologies and maker spaces need sufficient support areas/spaces for programming to be successful.


Clark County Yes, You Can!

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES

DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

Community & Culture

HEALTH & WELL-BEING

SKILLS TRAINING LAB

Welcome/Gallery

Intergenerational Arts/Entertainment

Bookstore

Limitless Learning

Café-Vibe

Adult/Children Literacy Play Spaces & Equipment Collaborative Learning

Business & Career One-Stop Career Center Community Work Spaces

Government & Social Services COLLABORATIVE LEARNING LAB

Community & Culture

Third Space/Community Garden

Best Buy Teen Tech Center

INTERGENERATIONAL ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SPACES/SERVICES

Social Services On-Site Wellness Programs Food Distribution/Nutrition Legal & Financial Services Life Skills

3 Critical Programs STEAM Workforce Government & Social Services

Intergenerational Living Room* Meeting Rooms: Conference Meeting Rooms: Quiet Reading Room Performing Arts Center

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Support Teen Area Adult Learning Lab Study Rooms Digital Lab/Classroom

Business & Career Business & Career Services: One-Stop Maker Spaces: Skills Training

Government & Social Services Social Services

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations Increased Access to Technology/Devices *Priorities


Clark County Yes, You Can!

PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram below illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Clark County. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones for community gathering, adult learning, project-based learning for adults and teens as well as a flexible zone for youth story and activity. If the Library District has a “Main” library, Clark County would be it! The center for introducing new services and programs to the Library District, Clark County will continue to evolve with flourishing partnerships and a commitment to offering the highest level of social, government, educational, and family services. With its location adjacent to UNLV, Clark County will adapt its spaces to take advantage of the academic campus and synergistic relationships fostering high-tech innovation and best practices in education and family services.

STUDY ROOMS

STUDY ROOMS

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

FAMILY-CENTERED MAKER SPACE

SOCIAL SERVICES

LEVEL ONE

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

BOOKSTORE

POP-UPS

DIGITAL ADULT LAB LEARNING LAB

ADULT MAKER SPACE

LEVEL TWO

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

TEEN TECH LAB

CAFE

WELCOME/ GALLERY

BOOK STORE TEEN AREA

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Clark County Feels Like...


STEAM ORIENTED ORGANIZATIONS

E

ER CES N GOVERNMENT RT IEN A AGENCIES P PER MCCARRAN H EX C INTERNATIONAL A TECHNOLOGY RE ENCES AIRPORT MANDALAY T INDUSTRIES I U BAY HOUSE R O PE OF BLUES X R Y A R E LIB CES FACES: WIFI FAMILY & EWERIEN HOTSPOTS COMMUNITY N P ENGAGEMENT X SERVICES STEAM AT TH KITS PLAC E ROBOTICS 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY VR

HOMEWORK HELP

2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES

INTERACTIVE CHARGING STATIONS

FAMILY ALL-NIGHTER

3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

Enterprise

Innovation & Experimentation

AARP


Enterprise

Innovation & Experimentation DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

6

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

The Enterprise service area is currently home to 115,221 residents. Population in the area is expected to grow at 2.1% annually, with most of the population growth occurring before 2030. As with most areas across the valley, the largest demographic switch will be the decreasing share of households with children. However, in raw numbers there will still be growth in this particular demographic; their share of the population will decrease from 28.9% to 23.2%, a 5.7 percentage point reduction in share. While the Hispanic/Latino demographic is expected to nearly double in size, it will account for approximately 19.0% of the total (up from 17.2%). Currently, the largest demographic tapestry in the Enterprise area are Enterprising Professionals (21.0%) and Up and Coming Families (18.4%). This Enterprising Professionals tapestry of young adults is anticipated to grow only slightly slower than the senior demographic. Currently, the consultant team recommends that the future Enterprise Library remain its current size and in its current location. Because of projected demographic shifts, the Library District will need to monitor the impact that growth and development are having on the location’s utilization on an annual basis.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

26,300 SF 18,410 SF (70%)

Collection

2,630 SF (10%)

Staff

5,260 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

54

Adult

Desktop Laptop

24 02

Youth

Desktop

09

Staff

Desktop Laptop

16 03

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Enterprise

Current Facility Limitations

ADULT PROGRAMS: This community will enjoy adult programs for enterprising professionals and seniors if the facility could support it.

COMPUTER USE: Computers are in high demand in this location for youth and adults.

STUDY ROOMS: Currently, the study rooms are too small for demand.

HOMEWORK HELP: The current areas dedicated to Homework Help are insufficient for activities, programs and quantities of participants in need of this service.

STORYTIMES: The story room does not accommodate the high capacity of story time or other youth programs. There is a high need for a larger youth programming space.

STEAM/STEM: STEAM/STEM programs are this location’s specialty and future renovations need to be designed for its current and future programs.


Enterprise

Innovation & Experimentation EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES

DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

Community & Culture

DISCOVER

Welcome/Bookstore

TV Broadcast Special Events

Gallery: Community Showcase

Family All-Nighters

Café-Vibe*

DJ Programming

EXPERIMENT

PLAY

Community & Culture

Coffee Shop Gathering

Limitless Learning

INNOVATE

SPACES/SERVICES

Intergenerational Living Room*

Limitless Learning

bit LAB

Youth Story & Activity

STEAM Programming

Homework Help & Homeschool Support

Storytimes

Teen Area

Learning Incubator

Maker Space: DJ Lab*

Drone Flight Simulator

Maker Space: STEAM-Focused*

Virtual Reality

Digital Lab/Classroom*

Business & Career Business: Start-Up Advice

Meeting Room

Business & Career

Teen College and Job Seeking Skills

Business & Career Services*

Technology Access

Study Rooms

Government & Social Services

Government & Social Services

Social Services On-Site

Study Rooms

Pop-Up Care Village

Social Services

3 Critical Programs STEAM Community & Culture Workforce

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations *Priorities


Enterprise

Innovation & Experimentation PROPOSED SPACE/SERVICE DIAGRAM

The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Enterprise. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones that welcome discovery, provide access to resources to develop skills and quality of life, interactive zones for play and school support and a zone for learning incubation and innovation. Enterprise is known throughout the Library District for its innovative approach to programs and workforce development. Building on this, the re-envisioned Enterprise Library will be designed as an Innovative Entrepreneur’s Lab, with a Genius Bar vibe, access to the latest and greatest technologies, and robust business support services for the enterprising professionals and families in this community. It will also be a destination for all in the valley who desire to incubate a technology start-up or prototype a technology invention!

MAKER SPACE

WELCOME/ GALLERY

DJ LAB INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

DIGITAL LAB

CAFÉ/ BOOKSTORE

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

STUDY ROOMS

LEGEND MEETING ROOM

OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Enterprise Feels Like...


AARP

E

CCSD R ES E TN ENC WORKFORCE R I A CONNECTIONS R P PE LOCAL H EX C HEALTH CARE A PROFESSIONALS RE ENCES T I U LOCAL O PER CASINOS X ARY E LIBR CES DIY KITS EWERIEN CITYWIDE N P WIFI X AT TH DEVICE E ADVICE P L AC 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY

Laughlin

Discovery Gateway

HISTORY SERIES/ PARTNERSHIPS LOCAL SCHOOLS

WIFI HOPTSPOTS

2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

CLARK COUNTY SOCIAL SERVICES

COMMUNITY GARDEN


Laughlin

Discovery Gateway DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

The Laughlin Library serves a population of 7,855 residents. The area is anticipated to add nearly 7,000 residents with an annual compounded growth rate of 2.6%. By far, the fastest growing component of this population will be those aged 55 and above, which is expected to grow at a rate of 3.5% each year. This population segment will make up 67% of this service area by 2040.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

The largest tapestries are Simple Living (42.7%) and Old and Newcomers (27.9%). Though there will be considerable demographic shifts in the area, these two, along with Silver and Gold demographic, are tapestries that are likely to expand in Laughlin. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Laughlin remain its current size and at its current location.

15,562 SF 10,893 SF (70%)

Collection

1,556 SF (10%)

Staff

3,113 SF (20%)

Existing Technology Adult

Total

39

Desktop

09

Laptop

01

Children

Desktop

08

Staff

Desktop

19

Laptop

02

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Laughlin

Current Facility Limitations

SENIOR SERVICES: Seniors are one of the largest current and future populations Laughlin serves.

COMPUTER USE: The current computer lab reaches capacity of use frequently.

ARTS & CRAFT PROGRAMMING: There is a high need for a messy art space to support all of the arts and crafts programming.

POPULAR PEAK PROGRAMS: The building design and furnishings need to accommodate flexibility for programs like AARP tax services.

STUDY ROOMS: There are only two available study rooms. Study rooms are in high demand by the community.


Laughlin

Discovery Gateway SPACES/SERVICES

DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

Community & Culture Welcome/Gallery Café-Vibe* Bookstore Intergenerational Living Room*

GROW GROW

MEET

LEARN

Meeting Room: Club Room*

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Support Maker Space: Messy Art Lab* Digital Lab/Classroom* Study Rooms*

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Limitless Learning

Third Place/Community Garden

STEAM/ozobots/Art/Little Bits

Music and Performance/Chair Yoga

Early Literacy Play/Programming

Seasonal/Holiday Programming

Homework Help/Test Prep

Bereavement Support Group

Technology Access

Book Club/Conversation Groups

Parent Education

Tea at 3

City Wide WiFi

Business & Career

Government & Social Services

Business & Career Business & Career Services (One-Stop)

Government & Social Services Meeting Room: Multi-Purpose*

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals

One-Stop Career Center

Social Worker Services/Food Stamps

Increased Access to Outlets/Charging

Business Incubator Services

Health Insurance/Medical Outreach

Stations

VIP (Volunteers in Partnership)

Senior Services Laughlin Constable’s Office

*Priorities


Laughlin

Discovery Gateway PROPOSED SPACE/SERVICE DIAGRAM The program diagram below illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Laughlin. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent a variety of areas for the entire community to meet up, learn and grow. The Laughlin Library will be a welcoming, social spot for an active community of seniors. The re-envisioned Laughlin will have a crafty clubhouse feel, comfortable reading nooks, and host creative community theater. The high-tech Digital Lab will have large screens and equipment designed for an aging population. The lab will also have multi-media mixing software and scanners to digitize family photographs and home movies. WiFi will be fast and reliable!

CAFÉ/ BOOKSTORE

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

WELCOME/ GALLERY MEETING ROOM: CLUB ROOM

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

MEETING ROOM: MULTI-PURPOSE

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES: ONE STOP HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

MAKER SPACE: MESSY ART LAB

DIGITAL LAB LEGEND OPEN

OUTDOOR ACTIVITY AREA

SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Laughlin Feels Like...


AARP

LOCAL SCHOOLS

E

UNLV R ES THREE E N NC SQUARE T R E PA PERI MEDICAL EX ACH S E FACILITIES E TR IENC U POLICE & FIRE O PER DEPARTMENT X R Y A R E LIB CES WIFI EWERIEN HOTPOTS N P X HOMEWORK AT TH HELP E P L AC 1. CONNECT E MOVIES COMMUNITY UNDER THE STAR

2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES

GAME LIBRARY

3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

Rainbow

Family & Community Connections

CLARK COUNTY ELECTION DEPARTMENT


Rainbow

Family & Community Connections DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

At present, the Rainbow service area has a population of 150,069, and it is expected to grow at a rate of 0.9% per year through 2040 (reaching 185,733 residents). Notably, the number of households with children is anticipated to grow at 0.7%, in the same ballpark of growth as households without children (0.9%). The pace of growth in the Hispanic/Latino demographic is expected to track fairly well with the broader area over the course of the study period (40.1% vs. 41.8%). The largest tapestry segments in the service area are Aspiring Young Families (23.2%) and Up and Coming Families (15.2%). As the demographics in the area have a relatively consistent level of households with children and are not anticipated to see any dramatic changes in share, it is anticipated that these two tapestries will remain dominant in the area through 2040. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Rainbow is to remain its current size and at its current location.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

26,800 SF 18,760 SF (70%)

Collection

2,680 SF (10%)

Staff

5,360 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

92

Adult

Desktop Laptop

41 02

Youth

Desktop Laptop

11 10

Desktop 24 Laptop 04 *Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF Staff


Rainbow

Current Facility Limitations

COMMUNITY LIVING ROOM: The general seating areas fill up very quickly, especially seating with outlets. Increased access to outlets and a variety of seating should be considered.

COMPUTER USE: This is a family library that needs many more children’s computers. Computer use among youth and families reaches capacity quickly.

SEASONAL PROGRAMS: Seasonal programs such as tax assistance and voting are in high demand.

TEEN AREA & MAKER SPACE: Families, youth, teens and family-centric maker activities are in high demand. The Homework Help program is a recent success and needs intentional space design.

EARLY LEARNING: Early learning programs are well attended and reach capacity due to the design of the current children’s area.

BUSINESS & CAREER CENTER: There is a demand and need for business and career services and associated meeting and study rooms.


Rainbow

Family & Community Connections SPACES/SERVICES

DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

Community & Culture Welcome/Bookstore Café-Vibe Gallery Intergenerational Living Room*

EARLY & FAMILY LITERACY

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

CAREER CONNECTIONS

Performing Arts Center: Amphitheater

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity* Homework Help & Homeschool Support* Teen Area Maker Space: Family* Digital Lab: Gaming

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Study Rooms

Business & Career

Music/Seasonal Festivals

Postal/Self-Service Printing

Morning Yoga

Small Business Seminars

Craft Fairs

Online Business Seminars

Movies Under The Stars

Job Fairs

Limitless Learning

Government & Social Services

Computer Skills

Polling Place

Adult Maker Space/Kids Maker Space

AARP Tax Aide

Family Literacy/Early Literacy Self-Directed Learning Homework Help

3 Critical Programs Early Literacy & Family Literacy School Support Family Maker Space

Business & Career Business & Career Services*

Government & Social Services Meeting Room: Club Room

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations *Priorities


Rainbow

Family & Community Connections PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM

The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Rainbow. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones for family literacy, teens, intergenerational gathering and business and career success.

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES

HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

STUDY ROOMS

Rainbow will be a family incubator, offering programs, services, and support to foster a healthy family life. 21st century library services designed for all styles of learning, creating, and sharing will be celebrated. Students of all ages will have homework support with a range of spaces for school projects. Interests and passions will flourish in the Maker Space and Digital Gaming Lab! Cultural programming will be brought to life with seasonal use of the existing outdoor amphitheater in the fall and the large meeting room throughout the year. Maker Spaces and DIY activities will foster family life throughout the facility. The Business & Career Services will be family-friendly providing support for parents and caregivers who bring in children.

OUTDOOR ACTIVITY: PLAY & PERFORMANCE

MAKER SPACE: FAMILY

AMPHITHEATER

CAFÉ/ GALLERY OF THE ARTS

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

TEEN AREA

DIGITAL LAB: GAMING LAB

LARGE MEETING ROOM & PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

MEDIUM MEETING ROOM: CLUB ROOM

LEGEND WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE

OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Rainbow Feels Like...


SOCIAL

E

SERVICES ER CES N RT IEN A P PER FARMERS EX ACH MARKET S E E R ENC T I OU PER ARY EX LIBR CES EWERIEN N P X AT TH PLAC E 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

VISUAL ARTS COMMUNITY

NV HEALTH DEPARTMENT

LEGAL AID OF SOUTHERN NEVADA

CULTURE ASSOCIATIONS DOWNTOWN SUMMERLIN

ANIME FESTIVAL

SCORE THE STUDIO BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES GAME & TOY LIBRARY

ARTIST-INRESIDENCY PROGRAM

Sahara West

Arts & Entertainment

RED ROCK CASINO


Sahara West

Arts & Entertainment DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

50 - 250

Sahara West currently serves a population of 176,513. This geographically large service area covers much of the growing western fringes of the valley, and as such, is anticipated to see 2.2% growth on average each year through 2040. As a result, this service area will grow by 125,591 residents to just over 300,000. As currently delineated, Sahara West is expected to report the largest number of new residents over the study period. It is likely that a re-drawing of the service area will be required, particularly among those residents to the southern portion of the service area. Up and Coming Families (23.4%) and Enterprising Professionals (18.6%) are the largest tapestries served by the library at Sahara West. As the demographic below 55 will shrink in share relative, it is likely these two tapestries will shrink while others like Old and Newcomers (currently 12.2%) will grow in market share. The anticipated population growth of the area suggests that though these tapestries will diminish in relative share, they will not diminish in overall numbers. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Sahara West remains its current size and in its current location. Given the growth in this part of the Las Vegas valley, it is anticipated the current warehouse areas may be converted to public use.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total

122,000 SF

Library

99,864

Special Spaces

22,136

Public

85,400 SF

Collection

12,200 SF (10%)

Staff

24,400 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

120

Adult

Desktop Laptop

53 02

Youth

Desktop Laptop

13 06

Staff

Desktop Laptop

30 16

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Sahara West

Current Facility Limitations

ADULT SERVICES: There is a need for larger/flexible adult programming space as well as the need to align and expand literacy classrooms and workforce.

COMPUTER USE: There is a need for a re-alignment of the technology area.

STUDY ROOMS: The eight study rooms are booked throughout the day.

SCHEDULING AND PROGRAMMING SERVICES: Voting, live performances, festivals and fairs all stretch the capacity of the building.

STORYTIMES: Youth and parents are frequently turned away because the storyroom can not accommodate them. A larger/flexible storyroom is a need for this community.

TEEN SERVICES: The teen center and programs are exceptionally popular and often exceed space capacity.


Sahara West

Arts & Entertainment DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

CONTENT CREATION LAB

COMMUNITY LIVING ROOM

Welcome/Bookstore

Performance Programming

Gallery

Conversation Language Group

Café-Vibe*

Cultural Programs/Fairs

Intergenerational Living Room*

Adulting 101

Maker Space: Demonstration Kitchen

Adult STEAM Lab (Content Creation) Family Maker Space

Business & Career

STEAM SUCCESS

Community & Culture

Urban Garden

Limitless Learning

FAMILY CLUBHOUSE

SPACES/SERVICES

Performing Arts Center

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity* Homework Help & Homeschool Support*

Co-work Spaces

Teen Area

Business Services

Maker Space*

Financial Literacy

Adult Learning Lab*

Government & Social Services Passport Services Non-Profit Meeting Hub Three Square Legal Advice Health Department for Screenings

3 Critical Programs

Digital Lab/Classroom* Study Rooms

Business & Career Business & Career Services: One-Stop*

Government & Social Services Meeting Room

Tools/Enablers

STEAM

Collections/New Collections

Small Business Development

Reference/Periodicals

Government & Social Services

Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations On-Site Resources for Programming Parking

*Priorities


Sahara West

STUDY ROOMS

CAFÉ/ GALLERY

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

ARTIST STUDIO

Arts & Entertainment PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM

GALLERY & PERFORMING ARTS CENTER The program diagram below illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Sahara West. It is not intended MAKER to be a literal DIGITAL program diagram but to TEEN MEETING Sahara West Library be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. approach AREA LAB that represent SPACEto adjacencies ROOM The diagram shows a preliminary

zones for project-based learning, community gathering, and co-working as well as zones for family and early learning.

BUSINESS

ADULT

& CAREER LEARNING The community at Sahara West enjoys convenient services and will experience fast growth. This highly educated community will enjoy a creative community SERVICES LAB WELCOME/ LEVEL ONE space for a mix of busy families and professionals. It will continue to be a destinationBOOKSTORE for art lovers, youth gatherings, and business meet-ups. The reenvisioned Sahara West will transform its abundance of space into an economic development engine; a “We Work” like co-working space and career service center! Families will enjoy school support and maker activities. Sahara West will be the site of the Library District’s Artist-in-Residence program. DEMONSTRATION CAFÉ/ GALLERY

& CAREER SERVICES

WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE

STUDIO

DEMONSTRATION KITCHEN CAFÉ/ GALLERY

MEETING

ROOM INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

ARTIST STUDIO

MEETING ROOM

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM

ADULT LEARNING LAB ARTIST

GALLERY & PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

STUDY ROOMS

BUSINESS Sahara West Library

TEEN AREA ATRIUM/ CAFÉ

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED

DIGITAL MAKER LAB SPACE HOMEWORK & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

LEVEL ONE

GALLERY & PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

TEEN AREA

MAKER SPACE

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

DIGITAL LAB

FAMILY & CAREER STUDIO

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN

Sahara West Library

LEVEL ONE

STUDY ROOMS

KITCHEN

ahara West Library

CLOSED

LEVEL TWO

LEGEND OPEN

ATRIUM/

HOMEWORK & HOMESCHOOL


Sahara West Feels Like...


SOCIAL

E

R SERVICES VETERANS NE CES T R PA ERIEN WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT P EX ACHES CCSD E R NC THREE T IE U SQUARE R O PE CHILDCARE FACILITIES ARY R EX B I L CES HOMEWORK W E ERIEN TUTORS N P X GOODWILL INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIES AT TH STEAM PLAC E COLLECTION MATERIALS BUSINESS 1. CONNECT E INCUBATOR COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES

TOY COLLECTION HOSPITALS

3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

AARP JOB FAIR

Spring Valley World’s Café


Spring Valley World’s Café

DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

Spring Valley’s service area has a population of 76,137 residents. By the close of 2040, the population is anticipated to grow by 0.1% per year to 78,276 residents. The area is largely built out (with relatively little vacant lands remaining), so the biggest change will be sourced to demographic shifts rather than growth. As the population ages, an increasing share of households without children will emerge. Currently, the largest tapestries are Inner City Tenants (21.1%) and Milk and Cookies (20.0%) households. Within the area, the number of households with children is anticipated to decrease by 9.7% through 2040, resulting in a 2.8 percentage point change in share. This will be largely impact the Milk and Cookies tapestry, which should decrease in dominance over that time frame. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Spring Valley is to remain its current size and at its current location.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

26,645 SF 17,952 SF (70%)

Collection

2,565 SF (10%)

Staff

5,129 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

76

Adult

Desktop Laptop

41 02

Youth

Desktop

14

Staff

Desktop Laptop

15 04

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Spring Valley

Current Facility Limitations

ADULT LITERACY SERVICES: Adult Literacy Services requiring classroom spaces and access to technology will continue to grow at this location and spaces will need to be intentionally designed for success.

WIFI: There is high demand on “bridging the digital divide”in this location. WiFi access and a variety of seating is a critical need.

YOUTH COMPUTERS: With only 11 PCs, youth and teens are often turned away from computers after school.

HOMEWORK HELP/TUTORS: Homework Help services are critical and popular. The building limits the potential of this program.

STEAM PROGRAMS: There is a need to have storage and flexible space to increase project-based programming.

THREE SQUARE SERVICES: Evaluate space and parking needs to support this valuable program.


Spring Valley World’s Café

DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

ACCESS

LEARNING

Bookstore

World’s Café

Gallery

Limitless Learning STEAM Programming Homework Help/Tutoring Adult Education ESL Classes

Business & Career

BUSINESS INCUBATOR

CULTURAL EXCHANGE

Community & Culture

Cultural Programs

Early Literacy Programs

COMMUNITY

SPACES/SERVICES

Café-Vibe Intergenerational Living Room*

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Support* Teen Area Maker Space: STEAM-Focused

Job Fair/Workforce Connections

Classroom: Adult Learning Lab*

Small Business Incubation

Digital Lab/Classroom*

Higher Education Partnering

Government & Social Services Pop-Up Care Village Classes for Staff on Mental Health DMV Services

Business & Career Business & Career Services Study Rooms

Government & Social Services

Immigration Services

Social Services

Homelessness

Tools/Enablers

Families, Crisis, Food Insecurity Medical Shot Clinic

3 Critical Programs Workforce School Support Government & Social Services

Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations Storage Parking

*Priorities


Spring Valley World’s Café

PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM

The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Spring Valley. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones for the community to casually meet, relax and be alone/together, as well as zones for collaboration, access to educational resources and support for both youth and adults, and a centrally accessible zone for project-based learning. Spring Valley is highly utilized by hardworking families, singles, couples, and seniors with modest incomes. This location will thrive as a community hub, providing stability and access to a brighter future through continued school support, adult learning, access to technology for all, and collections that support education and entertainment.

HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

STUDY ROOMS

TEEN AREA

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY MAKER SPACE

DIGITAL LAB

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES

GALLERY

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

ADULT LEARNING LAB LEGEND STUDY ROOMS

SOCIAL SERVICES

WELCOME/CAFE/ BOOKSTORE

OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Spring Valley Feels Like...


E

ARTS ER ES ORGANIZATIONS N RT ENC RED ROCK A P ERI NATIONAL CONSERVATION P AREA EX ACHES E SUPERMARKETS TR IENC U HOME O PER IMPROVEMENT STORES ARY EX LIBR CES SCHOOLS EWERIEN CAFÉ/ N P BOOKSTORE X AT TH ADULT UNLV DIY E P L A C 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

LEARNING WORKSHOPS

STEAM KIT

CHILD CARE FACILITIES

HOMEWORK HELP COMMUNITY EVENTS PERFORMING ARTS

Summerlin

Create, Learn, Share


Summerlin

Create, Learn, Share DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

Summerlin currently services a population of 65,225 residents. Through 2040 that population is anticipated to grow at a modest pace, increasing by just 1,433 residents. It is worth bearing in mind that the forecast only takes into account lands currently available for development and thus is subject to further refinement in the future, particularly in the vacant lands west of the 215 beltway. Should land ownership/control change in the future, forecasted growth would likely be impacted. East of the 215, there are few buildable plots of land left for development. In terms of tapestries, the largest segments are Boomburbs (24.9%) and Up and Coming Families (23.8%) in the service area. As the number of households with children decreases in the area, it is likely that both of these will fall slightly in share compared to other tapestries; however both will likely remain the key demographics of the neighborhood. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Summerlin is to remain its current size and at its current location.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

40,165 SF 28,116 SF (70%)

Collection

4,017 SF (10%)

Staff

8,033 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

74

Adult

Desktop Laptop

19 02

Youth

Desktop Laptop

09 20

Staff

Desktop Laptop

18 06

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Summerlin

Current Facility Limitations

VIBRANT CAFÉ/BOOKSTORE: This community will enjoy an active and vibrant social space.

COLLABORATION SPACE: There is a need to have a space for larger groups that has entrepreneurial capabilities for activities and co-working.

STUDY ROOMS: Study rooms are in high use at this branch. There is a need for more small and large study rooms with plug-and-play technology capabilities.

HOMEWORK HELP: Demand for tutors stresses the building. Improved design will ideally accommodate a flexible space with furniture suitable for homework help programs.

EARLY LEARNING: There is a need to expand and increase flexibility in children’s activity areas to support programming needs.

COMMUNITY LIVING ROOM: This community will enjoy an active, vibrant intergenerational living room with a variety of seating, outlets and charging stations.


Summerlin

Create, Learn, Share DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

CREATE

Welcome/Bookstore

Chess Club

Café-Vibe*

Cooking for Adults

Gallery

Art Meet Up/Family Game Afternoon

Intergenerational Living Room*

Entertainment Events

Performing Arts Center

STEAM Programming Early Literacy/Storytimes

Meeting Room: Club Room Meeting Room

Limitless Learning

Multi-Media Classes for Adults

Youth Story & Activity*

DIY Workshops

Homework Help & Homeschool Support*

Gardening Classes

Teen Area*

Acting/Filmmaking Classes

Maker Space: STEAM-Focused*

Teen Volunteers/Reading Buddies

Adult Learning Lab

Business & Career SCORE Classes Career Workshops

SHARE

Community & Culture

Cultural Programming

Limitless Learning

LEARN

SPACES/SERVICES

Digital Lab/Classroom Study Rooms

Business & Career

Business Center

Meeting Room: Collaboration Space

Passport Services

Business & Career Services

Government & Social Services

Tools/Enablers

Blood Drive

Collections/New Collections

Tax Forms

Reference/Periodicals

3 Critical Programs Early Literacy & Family Literacy STEAM Programming Adult Programming

Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations Increased Access to Technology/ Devices

*Priorities


Summerlin

Create, Learn, Share PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Summerlin. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones for the community to gather and socialize, as well as zones for business development and co-working, and zones dedicated to family play and project-based learning. Summerlin will be a neighborhood plaza for busy families! The Intergenerational Living Room will be a community connector for every member of the family to enjoy each other and then enjoy “their” library, by connecting children’s play areas, school support areas, technology labs, Maker Spaces, the Meeting Room and the Club Room.

CLUB ROOM

MEETING ROOM STUDY ROOMS

BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

CAFÉ/ GALLERY INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE

TEEN AREA

LEGEND MAKER SPACE

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Summerlin Feels Like...


SNAP

E

LVMPD ER ES N RT ENC A P ERI THREE SQUARE P CHARTER EX ACHES E SCHOOLS R C VETERANS T IEN U ORGANIZATIONS R O PE ARY EX IMMIGRANT LIBR CES ORGANIZATIONS EWERIEN N P X EDUCATIONAL/ DDHS AT TH STEAM TOYS PLAC E 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

WIFI HOTSPOTS

HOMEWORK HELP

CHILDCARE CENTERS

ELL CLASSES

CCSD

Sunrise

Families Rise and Shine


Sunrise

Families Rise and Shine DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN RECEIVING & WORK ROOM

LOCKER ROOM

ELECTRICAL ROOM

WOMEN MECHANICAL ROOM

TUTOR HELP STORAGE

STAFF

7

MEN JAN. OFFICE

MEDIA CENTER

UP

MANAGER OFFICE

5 PROGRAM SPACE

TEEN MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM

2

KITCHEN

BOOK STACKS

ENTRY FOYER JAN. BOYS OUTDOOR COURTYARD VESTIBULE GIRLS

WOMEN

MEN STUDY STACKS

STUDY

STUDY

Existing Spaces

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

Currently, the population of the Sunrise service area is 215,615 residents, and this population is anticipated to grow by 1.0% per year to 278,034. The area has a number of vacant plots, particularly to the east of the library that are anticipated to be built on and host new households. While modest losses are expected in selected census tracts within the service area, the overall population is likely to expand further. The largest tapestry segments for the area are Industrious Urban Fringe (28.9%) and Milk and Cookies (16.0%). The area is not likely to see a major shift in these tapestries, though there is a notable anticipated change in the share of Hispanic/Latino households (increasing 5.7 percentage points over the time period) and a slight dip in the share of households with children (decreasing 1.5 percentage points). The current location and floor plan of the facility limits its ability to serve this community effectively. The consultant team recommends that the Library District consider relocating Sunrise to a location that has access to a main transportation artery and bus route and that is designed to be highly flexible to foster family, youth and career services.

Proposed Space Breakdown Total

23,000 SF

Public

16,100 SF

Collection

2,300 SF (10%)

Staff

4,600 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

92

Adult

Desktop Laptop

26 08

Youth

Desktop Laptop

23 12

Staff

Desktop Laptop

20 03

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Sunrise

Current Facility Limitations

ADULT SERVICES: Adult programs are limited by the amount of space in the building. Adult activities may need to consider a family-friendly design.

COMPUTER USE: Computer access is limited but in high demand. Increased access to technology is needed.

STUDY ROOMS: Currently, there are only three study rooms and they are booked with reservations throughout the day.

HOMEWORK HELP/TUTORS: Tutors are at capacity with 25-30 students in a typical day with 2-4 tutors per session.

SUMMER READING PROGRAMS: Summer reading programs are at capacity because the building can not accommodate the need and interest. Programming is done in the stacks because it exceeds story room capacity.

THREE SQUARE SERVICES: The Three Square Services is one of the best attended programs with 125 kids at each event and a heavily attended produce give away in the parking lot. Consider how to design for this and similar services in the future.


Sunrise

Families Rise and Shine DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

SPACES/SERVICES Community & Culture Welcome/Bookstore

GATHER

Café-Vibe* Gallery

LEARN

SUPPORT

Intergenerational Living Room*

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Support* Teen Area*

PLAY

DEVELOP

Digital Lab/Classroom Study Rooms

Business & Career Small Business Services

PRIORITY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Business & Career

Targeted Outreach

Workforce Training and Job Search

Latino Culture Programming

Tinker Lab

Crafting/Creative Programming

Teen Job Fair

Limitless Learning

Government & Social Services

Adult Learning Programs

Coffee with a Cop

English Conversation

Three Square

STEAM Programming

WIC/SNAP

Free Homework Help

3 Critical Programs School Support STEAM Workforce

Employment Services STEAM-Focused Programs* Study Rooms

Government & Social Services Small Community Gatherings

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals Parking Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations *Priorities


Sunrise

Families Rise and Shine PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Sunrise. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represents a centrally located zone for the community to connect, interact and exchange experiences, as well as zones for play, project-based learning and school support, and areas for the community to connect with career opportunities, consultation and technology access. Sunrise will be a “big tent,” an intergenerational living room connecting hard-working families to essential services to raise healthy families. It will be a community incubator, fostering multi-generational, project-based learning and career support at every stage of life. Youth will enjoy STEAM programs in labs intentionally designed for self-directed learning, teens will enjoy support and guidance in a place designed just for them, and adult learners and job seekers will have supportive spaces and supportive staff when they come into the library with their entire family, which is often three generations. Sunrise’s re-invention will allow it to flourish as a Library District model for an incubation library facility, with a lab atmosphere for all ages and stages. Whether you want to play and learn, need homework support, want to check out the latest technologies like hot spots, or tinker for fun with friends and family, Sunrise will provide an active, facilitated environment for family fun and community advancement!

*Although it is recommended to be re-located, the future vision and space diagram can be applied both to the existing facility and a future facility.

MAKER SPACE MAKER SPACE

TEEN AREA TEEN AREA

MEETING ROOM MEETING ROOM

YOUTH STORY INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM & ACTIVITY YOUTH STORY INTERGENERATIONAL (COLLECTIONS) LIVING ROOM & ACTIVITY (COLLECTIONS)

HOMEWORK HELP HOMEWORK WELCOME/ & HELP BOOKSTORE WELCOME/ HOMESCHOOL & BOOKSTORE SUPPORT HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

DIGITAL LAB DIGITAL LAB

CAFÉ/ GALLERY CAFÉ/ GALLERY

STUDY ROOMS STUDY ROOMS

BUSINESS &BUSINESS CAREER SERVICES & CAREER SERVICES

STUDY ROOMS STUDY ROOMS LEGEND LEGEND

OPEN OPEN SEMI-OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED CLOSED


Sunrise

Feels Like...


E

WORKFORCE R S E CONNECTION TN NCE R MENTAL PA ERIE HEALTH P CENTER COLLEGE EX ACHES CAMPUS/ E TR IENC STUDENTS U R LOCAL O PE HEALTH X L” E DEPARTMENT A U T E S IR RIENC HOTSPOTS V “ PE X INTERACTIVE AT TH HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES PLAC E 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES

STEAM MUSIC

ELL CLASSES

3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

West Charleston Hot Spot for Learning!

CHILDREN’S CABINET

CLARK COUTY SCHOOL DISTRICT


West Charleston Hot Spot for Learning! DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

50 - 250

The West Charleston service area currently has 115,728 residents and is anticipated to grow by just over 1,000 residents through 2040 as the area is largely developed to-date. Not unlike other mature portions of the valley, there is an expectation for fewer households with children and more seniors.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

Currently, the largest tapestry segments are the Industrious Urban Fringe (20.0%) and Inner City Tenants (16.2%). These tapestries are not likely to change much as a result of shifting demographics of the area. The largest change will be a rise in Hispanic/Latino households in the area, which will be 36% of the area’s households by 2040 (versus 32.2% at present). Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future West Charleston is to remain its current size and at its current location.

38,900 SF 27,230 SF (70%)

Collection

3,890 SF (10%)

Staff

7,780 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

68

Adult

Desktop Laptop

30 02

Youth

Desktop

09

Staff

Desktop Laptop

21 06

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


West Charleston

Current Facility Limitations

ADULT LITERACY: Demand for adult literacy instruction is high.

YOUTH COMPUTERS: Tweens, teens, and college students need access to computers at this location.

TECH LOUNGE: Create an inviting, cool and trendy bistro space in the lecture hall that can be used for events and as a student lounge.

WORKFORCE & COMPUTER LAB: The facility needs to be designed to provide access to technology and programs for adults seeking employment and career services.

TEEN AREA: Teen space is currently limited. Teens need a place to hangout and do homework.

FAMILY SPACE: There is a need for a family space that is fun and friendly with games and interactives for youth and furniture for adults.


West Charleston Hot Spot for Learning! DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

ACCESS TO COMMUNITY

Welcome/Bookstore

Student Lounge

Gallery

Entertainment

Café-Vibe

Adult Education and English Classes Homework Help/Tutors

Intergenerational Living Room* Performing Arts Center: Bistro Lounge*

Limitless Learning

STEAM Programming/Maker Space

Youth Story & Activity

Parenting Class

Homework Help & Homeschool Support

Family Place Area (early childhood)

Teen Area*

Business & Career

Adult Learning Lab*

Business Owner Advice/Programs

Digital Lab/Classroom*

Resume/Applications

Study Rooms

Job readiness

Government & Social Services Mental Health Programs

FAMILY SUPPORT

Community & Culture

Health & Wellness/Cultural Programs

Limitless Learning

CAREER & SCHOOL SUPPORT

SPACES/SERVICES

Resources for Homeless DMV Kiosk/Utilities Tax Help

3 Critical Programs

Business & Career Digital Lab/Classroom: Tech Lounge*

Government & Social Services Social Services

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals

School Support

Increased Access to Technology/

Workforce

Devices

Government & Social Services *Priorities


West Charleston Hot Spot for Learning!

PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at West Charleston. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones for intergenerational gathering, career resources and educational connections and development, as well as zones for early and family literacy. The adjacencies are also zoned to have a vibrant relationship with the college campus to offer students a place to gather, collaborate, and socialize. The vibe of West Charleston will be comfy and cool; the neighborhood and campus hot spot for learning. The lecture hall will be a technology lounge by day and training classroom, bistro stage, or home to a Film Festival by night. The One-Stop Career Center and strong connections to the neighboring nursing and medical schools will activate programs, collections and community events.

STUDY ROOMS ADULT LEARNING LAB

DIGITAL LAB BUSINESS & CAREER SERVICES

TEEN AREA

WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

CAFÉ/ GALLERY

HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

BISTRO LOUNGE/TECH LOUNGE

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


West Charleston Feels Like...


E

WORKFORCE R S CONNECTIONS E N GAMING INDUSTRY/ RT ENCE A BUSINESS COMMUNITY I P ER P EX ACHES ARTS LOCAL E R C ORGANIZATIONS SCHOOLS T IEN U O PER ARY CHILDCARE EX LIBR CES CENTERS LVMPD N W E I E ER N P X WORKFORCE & CAREER AT TH DEVELOPMENT HEALTH & PLAC E HEALTH & WELL-BEING 1. CONNECT WELLNESS E SERVICES COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

PERFORMING ARTS

TEEN TECH CENTER

HOMEWORK HELP CENTER

West Las Vegas Explore & Empower

CENTERS

LOCAL BUSINESSES

CITY OF LAS VEGAS


West Las Vegas Explore & Empower DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

50 - 250

Existing Spaces The West Las Vegas service area has a population of 22,030, which is set to decline by a modest 237 residents to 21,793 through 2040. This area, near core of the valley, is relatively built-out. Should higher-density redevelopment activities ultimately unfold, there is potential for this service area to outperform current expectations. The largest tapestries of the area include the Industrious Urban Fringe (38.8%) and Modest Income Homes (14.3%). The largest demographic shift will come from these households aging and fewer families with children moving into the area, resulting in a 7.6% drop in families with children (or 175 households through 2040). Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future West Las Vegas is to remain in its current location but look for opportunities to expand public service areas and collaborate with neighboring City of Las Vegas facilities.

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

30,696 SF 21,485 SF (70%)

Collection

3,069 SF (10%)

Staff

6,139 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

98

Adult

Desktop Laptop

36 02

Youth

Desktop Laptop

14 22

Desktop 18 Laptop 06 *Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF Staff


West Las Vegas

Current Facility Limitations

LITERACY SERVICES: There is a high community need for a dedicated learning center and study rooms for individual learning and discovery.

COMPUTER USE: Increase technology access. Currently, computers are in high demand with approximately 40 reservations a day from 3:30 pm7:45 pm.

SOCIAL SERVICES: There is an increased community demand for a variety of social services.

HOMEWORK HELP/TUTORS: The building will need to support the high demand for homework help.

TEEN LOUNGE: Increased teen usage after school brings approximately 60 teens to the facility with limited areas to support them. Expanding teen services is a critical need for this community.

MAKER SPACE: There is a high interest in the community for project-based programming for all ages which would thrive with a dedicated space.


West Las Vegas Explore & Empower

DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

SPACES/SERVICES Community & Culture Welcome/Bookstore Café-Vibe

CIVIC INCUBATOR

COMMUNITY GATHERING

EXPLORE & EMPOWER

Gallery Intergenerational Living Room* Performing Arts Center

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Support Teen Area* Maker Space* Adult Learning Lab

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Business & Career

Partnership Programming & Heritage

One-Stop Career Center

Materials/Collections

Computer Classes

Entertainment/Artistic Expression

CALL Programming

Limitless Learning

Job Fairs

Homework Help/Tutoring

Volunteer Programs-Teens and Adults

Maker Space for All Ages

Government & Social Services

STEAM for All Ages

3 Critical Programs Workforce School Support Government & Social Services

Digital Lab/Classroom

Business & Career Business & Career Services: One-Stop*

Government & Social Services Study Rooms: Social Services*

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections

Partnerships (Nevada Partners, SCORE)

Reference/Periodicals

Social Worker On-Site

Increased Access to Outlets/Charging

Legal Aid Programming(Immigration assistance)

Stations

Certification Training *Priorities


West Las Vegas Explore & Empower

PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at West Las Vegas. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones that support youth, teens and adults. The adjacencies are zoned in a way that provides the resources for equity and opportunity as well as creative arts programming.

CAFÉ/GALLERY INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

HOMEWORK & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

STUDY ROOMS

BUSINESS/ CAREER SERVICES

SOCIAL SERVICES

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY MAKER SPACE

West Las Vegas will thrive as a place for local hospitality workers to build skills. Students will enjoy a place for out-of-school access to the arts, homework help, and life skills. West Las Vegas will be an active community hub for civic engagement, character education and social justice education, and social and government services. It will continue to flourish as a stage for local and national talent to be seen and heard!

TEEN AREA

COMPUTER LAB

ADULT LEARNING LAB

OUTDOORS ACTIVITY AREA

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


West Las Vegas Feels Like...


THREE

LVMPD

E

R SQUARE ARTS NE CES T ORGANIZATIONS R N PA ERIE P DRUG EX ACHES REHABILITATION E CENTERS CCSD TR IENC NEVADA HEALTH & U PARTNERSHIP FOR R O PE WELL-BEING HOMELESS YOUTH SERVICES X R Y A R E LIB CES HOMELESS TEST N W E SHELTERS I WORKORCE PREPARATION E ER CONNECTIONS SOCIAL N P SERVICES X ORGANIZATIONS STEAM ETHNIC AT TH PROGRAMS GROCERY PLAC E STORES 1. CONNECT E COMMUNITY MOVIES

2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

ENGINEERING FOR KIDS ART CLASSES PERFORMING ARTS

Whitney

Recreation & Imagination

LOCAL SCOOLS

HOMEWORK TUTORS


Whitney

Recreation & Imagination DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

50 - 250

Whitney Library in southeast Las Vegas currently has a population of 100,446; it is anticipated that the population will grow by 1,158 to 101,604 residents in 2040. The area is largely built out, with some land availability near the fringes of the service area (future development). The largest tapestries served by Whitney Library are Inner City Tenants (15.2%) and Crossroads (14.5%). The largest demographic shifts of this area, including an increase of Hispanic/Latino households and a decrease in households with children are unlikely to largely impact either of these two tapestries significantly. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Whitney is to remain its current size and at its current location.

Existing Spaces

Proposed Space Breakdown Total Public

24,600 SF 17,220 SF (70%)

Collection

2,460 SF (10%)

Staff

4,920 SF (20%)

Existing Technology

Total

77

Adult

Desktop Laptop

31 02

Youth

Desktop Laptop

11 16

Desktop 13 Laptop 04 *Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF Staff


Whitney

Current Facility Limitations

COMPUTER USE: The Digital Divide is severe in this community. Computer demand is high for all ages.

SOCIAL SERVICES: Social service needs are in high demand and the library is offering increased wraparound support services requiring specialized space design.

PROGRAMS & EVENTS: The performing arts center lacks storage and would be better suited as flexible programming space to support project-based learning.

HOMEWORK HELP/TUTORS: This in-demand service is limited in growth by the facility constraints.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT: As more patrons are requiring private areas for studying, test taking, and interviews, the study rooms cannot accommodate the needs of the customers to provide adequate support for success.

THREE SQUARE SERVICES: 60+ students per day are coming in for the Three Square after-school snacks and about 140+ per month for the produce giveaway. The building needs to accommodate this program more intentionally.


Whitney

Recreation & Imagination DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

SPACES/SERVICES Community & Culture Welcome/Bookstore CafĂŠ-Vibe Gallery Intergenerational Living Room*

IMAGINATION

Outdoor Activity Area*

RECREATION

ACCESS

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Teen Area Performing Arts Center* Maker Space

Business & Career

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Business & Career

Movie Screenings/Movie Premiers

Job Fairs/Workforce Training

Live Performances

Computer Classes

Painting Parties

Key Note Speakers

Games

Limitless Learning

Government & Social Services Tutoring/Homework Help

Adult Learning Lab Digital Lab/Classroom*

Government & Social Services Social Services Meeting Rooms*

Tools/Enablers

Artistic Classes

On-Site Counselor

Health/Wellness Programs

3 Square

Collections/New Collections

Finance & Budgeting Workshop

Health Services

Reference/Periodicals

Technology Access and Instruction Adult Education and English Classes College Satellite Classes Short Certification Courses

3 Critical Programs School Support CALL Government & Social Services

Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations Increased Access to Technology/Devices Storage *Priorities


Whitney

Recreation & Imagination PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram below illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Whitney. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones for community engagement and connection, project-based learning, youth and family support and increased access to community resources. Whitney serves diverse working households of families, couples, and singles who will need to connect with new technologies, engage in learning and training opportunities for better jobs, and receive support for success in school and life. The community will celebrate together in the renovated stage, serving as a flexible community plaza for popular culture and community events!

TEEN AREA

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY

CLUB ROOM

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS)

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER/ MAKER SPACE

WELCOME/ BOOKSTORE

CA F

MEETING ROOM

É/GALLE

SOCIAL SERVICES

ADULT LEARNING LAB

DIGITAL LAB

STUDY ROOMS

RY

OUTDOOR ACTIVITY AREA

LEGEND OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Whitney Feels Like...


US STATE

E

R DEPARTMENT ARTS NE CES ORGANIZATIONS T R PA ERIEN AARP P EX ACHES CHILDCARE CENTERS E CCSD R NC LOCAL T E I U SCHOOLS O PER SNHD ARY R LOCAL EX B I L BUSINESSES CES N W STEAM E I E KITS N PER LVMPD X YOUTH/TEEN LOCAL & FAMILY AT TH PARKS PROGRAMMING E PLAC HOMEWORK 1. CONNECT E TUTORS COMMUNITY 2. FACILITATE LEARNING EXPERIENCES 3. ACTIVATE THE COLLECTIONS

PERFORMING ARTS

CHARGING STATIONS PASSPORT SERVICES

MAKER SPACE

Windmill

Where Family Life Flourishes!


Windmill

Where Family Life Flourishes DEMOGRAPHIC SYNTHESIS

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

2040 Population

2,000 - 3,000

Less than 1,000

3,000 - 4,000

Population Loss

250 - 1,000

1,000 - 2,000

Over 4,000

0 - 50

Over 1,000

2015 to 2040 Growth

50 - 250

Existing Spaces Library Space Expansion Space

Proposed Space Breakdown Currently, the Windmill Library serves a population of 139,769 residents. The service area is expected to add approximately 50,000 new residents (net), representing a growth rate of 1.2% per year, with the resident base rising to 189,607 by the end of the study period. The influx of new residents suggests that no particular demographic is anticipated to shrink during this time frame, however when measured in share there will be fewer households with children and more Hispanic/ Latino households emerging. As currently situation, Windmill may draw residents from the west (i.e., Sahara West service area). The largest tapestries are Enterprising Professionals (28.8%) and Aspiring Young Families (27.1%). It is unlikely that either of these tapestry segments will be impacted by more than a percentage point or two in share as a result of the influx of new residents or the gradual change in demographics during this time frame. Due to demographic and community needs it is recommended that the future Windmill is to remain its current size and at its current location. However, given future demographic growth, it is recommended that Windmill ultimately build out the existing expansion space to absorb new demand from urban growth.

Total

52,890 SF

Library

44,634 SF

Expansion Space

8,256 SF 99,504 SF (70%)

Public

14,215 SF (10%)

Collection

28,430 SF (20%)

Staff Existing Technology Adult Youth Staff

Total

99

Desktop Laptop

37 10

Desktop

28

Desktop Laptop

19 05

*Collections (10-20%) SF to be distributed throughout public SF


Windmill

Current Facility Limitations

HOMEWORK HELP CENTER: There is an increased demand for homework help. Homework help and homeschool support are expected to grow in demand in this community.

MAKER SPACE: There is an interest in the community for project-based programming. Programs would thrive with a dedicated space for both youth and adults.

STUDY ROOMS: There is a need for more study rooms. There is a high demand for individual study rooms and small groups.

PERFORMANCE VENUE SPACES: There is high demand for this performance venue which often fills the 299-seat house.

STORYTIMES: There is a need for a larger storytime room. Toddler, preschool and 0-5 storytimes are at capacity with over 50 attendees. This location would have an active storytime space throughout the day.

BUSINESS CENTER: There is a need for a dedicated space for small business needs.


Windmill

Where Family Life Flourishes DESTINATION FEATURE & FLAVOR

SPACES/SERVICES Community & Culture Welcome Gallery

COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS

LIFE-LONG LEARNING

Café-Vibe

FAMILY SUCCESS

Bookstore Intergenerational Living Room* Performing Arts Center

Limitless Learning Youth Story & Activity Homework Help & Homeschool Support Teen Area

EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS/SERVICES Community & Culture

Maker Space

Business & Career

Movies

Computer Training

Youth Activities & Programs

Resume & Job Help

Music Programming

Video Conferencing

Fitness & Exercise Programming (adults) Café/Food Services

Limitless Learning Language Classes College Satellite Location Recreational & Travel Events Life Skills Mentoring (Adulting 101) Information Literacy Classes

Government & Social Services AARP Tax Aide Passport Services Notary Proctoring

3 Critical Programs Community & Culture Early Literacy & Family Literacy College and Career Readiness

Digital Lab/Classroom Study Rooms

Business & Career Business & Career Services Study Rooms

Government & Social Services Meeting Room: Community Meeting Room

Tools/Enablers Collections/New Collections Reference/Periodicals Increased Access to Outlets/Charging Stations *Priorities


Windmill

Where Family Life Flourishes PROPOSED NEW SERVICES/SPACE DIAGRAM The program diagram below illustrates a conceptual approach to the services needed at Windmill. It is not intended to be a literal program diagram but to be used as a guide for any future design development, planning and prioritization. The diagram shows a preliminary approach to adjacencies that represent zones that activate youth, adults and families to connect, learn and create, as well as zones for project-based learning, technology access and co-working. A refuge in the storm of growth in the southwest of the Vegas valley, expansion space will be utilized to support student learning, project-based learning, enterprise and employment development, family activities, cool events, and community festivals.

OUTDOOR ACTIVITY AREA

STUDY ROOMS

DIGITAL LAB

HOMEWORK HELP & HOMESCHOOL SUPPORT

ADULT MAKER SPACE

YOUTH MAKER SPACE

YOUTH STORY & ACTIVITY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING ROOM (COLLECTIONS) CAFÉ/ BOOKSTORE LEGEND

STUDY ROOMS

MEDIUM MEETING ROOM

GALLERY

WELCOME

MEETING ROOM

OPEN SEMI-OPEN CLOSED


Windmill Feels Like...


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS WORKSHEET Describe how this project proposal will create a meaningful impact for the community! Branch Location: Proposal: IDENTIFY THE COMMUNITY NEEDS Identify the community needs that inform this capital improvement project. Consider, “Who are we designing this for and why?,” what change or transformation will occur for the individuals who will benefit from this capital improvement project, and what are the specific outcome goals who can envision if this need is better met.

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

1


LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS WORKSHEET IDENTIFY GROWTH AND DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE Identify how the population characteristics are informing this capital improvement project.

ARTICULATE STRATEGIC GOALS

How will this capital improvement project enable the Strategic Goals of the District? How will this project align with the “role and purpose” of our facilities? What is critical about this being a building project, and why will other service channels, such as partnerships, outreach and virtual services, not be as impactful?

2


Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Service Design Worksheet The Capital Improvement Project is: The places that work for this Capital Improvement Project:

The Collections plan for this Capital Improvement Projectis:

These are the Programs & Activities that most effectively foster this Capital Improvement Project:

The Marketing plan for this Capital Improvement Project will be:

The Skills and Talents required will be:

The Technology plan for this Capital Improvement Project will be:

Outreach In order to gather more information from this community, we have developed the following outreach plan:

In order to gather/develop productive information from our partners, we have developed the following plan:

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

Appendix 2

3


Appendix 2

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

4

The Library is committed to this because: KEY NEEDS

KEY OUTCOMES WE ANTICIPATE

DEVELOP A LEARNING CULTURE

ARTICULATE A “BRAND” EXPERIENCE What elements of this project connect people to the library in a lasting and meaningful way? What is the “look and feel” that attracts the target audiences to experience this library environment?

Provide examples of how the Experience Principles are realized externally and internally.


Current Conditions Inventory 03 By General Services Department, LVCCLD

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

298


2019-2039 Facilities Assessment and Maintenance Renewal Plan Las Vegas–Clark County

General Services

Library District

Division

August 2018


2019-2039 Facilities Assessment and Maintenance Renewal Plan Table of Contents Executive Summary .................................................................................... 3 Introduction ............................................................................................. 3 Assessment Objectives ................................................................................. 3 Scope of Work ......................................................................................... 4 FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS .......................................... 5 Facility Ages............................................................................................. 5 Facility Condition Index (FCI) .................................................................... 6 5 Year FCI Score by Location .................................................................... 9 20 Year FCI Score by Location .................................................................. 10 MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN .................................................................. 11 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan by Location .......................................... 11 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan by Year ................................................ 12 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan by Category ......................................... 13 5 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan ............................................................. 14 MANAGING THE MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN ........................................ 15 MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN DETAILS ................................................... 19 CAPITAL RENEWALS COMPLETED WITHIN THE PAST FIVE YEARS ............. 37 BIBLIOGRAPHY .......................................................................................... 40

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Page |2


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction The General Services Division is responsible for ensuring that all facility assets are provided and maintained in a safe, clean, reliable, and fiscally responsible manner. As such, the District is very cognizant of the fact that having well-maintained, high performing buildings plays a vital role in the overall customer experience and aligns directly with the District’s current mission statement to nurture the social, economic, and educational well-being of people and communities as well as the goals of the Vision 2020 Strategic Plan. In 2018, General Services completed a comprehensive Facility Condition Assessment (FCA) of District owned buildings to accurately identify and quantify the District’s current and future capital renewal needs. The data collected as a result of this FCA will be used to assess and prioritize short and long-term facility maintenance and capital renewal needs throughout the District and make recommendations regarding the appropriate financial expenditures.

Assessment Objectives The objectives of this assessment were to determine and report on the general status of each assessed buildings’ current and future maintenance conditions based on its various components’ useful life and to provide recommended funding budgets for the District’s capital renewal expenditures over the Forecast Period of 2019-2039. A general Facility Condition Assessment (FCA) is defined as an assessment of various building systems that make up the facility, e.g., foundation systems, structural systems, roofing systems, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. The FCA includes gathering information such as make, model, and installation dates of the various systems. Deficiencies were generated at the systems level based on an individual systems’ installation date and expected useful life.

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Page |3


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Scope of Work The scope of work included the following: 1. Identify and document current and forecasted conditions for 17 District owned properties compromising 706,901 square feet of space. 2. Identify and document current site infrastructure needs. 3. Identify and document remaining service life of major building systems such as the envelope, architectural finishes, roofs, electrical, plumbing, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). 4. Provide Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for building system renewal and site infrastructure repairs. 5. Forecast facility renewal requirements based on lifecycle analysis of existing systems over the next 20 years. 6. Provide a Facility Condition Index (FCI) measurement to illustrate the relative condition of all facilities. This report does not provide a detailed code analysis or make suggestions about programmatic changes the District may choose to make. The system by system analysis of each building and site allows the District to anticipate both routine maintenance and capital project costs occurring in the short-term (2019-2023) and long-term (2024-2039), to assist with long–range plan decision making.

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Page |4


FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS Facility Ages The age of a building is just one criteria used when conducting a facility assessment. However, there is no clear correlation between age and condition. The average age of the District’s 17 owned facilities is 22.5 years. Different parts of the same facility may be of different ages making it difficult to draw a direction comparison. The 5 Lifecycle Stages* of a facility are identified as follows: Pre-Natal/Planning (Years 0): The facility is in the planning and/or construction stage. There are typically no maintenance or capital improvement funds required. Childhood (Years 1-16): Standard operating and maintenance budgets are typically adequate to operate the facility. Adolescence (Years 17-29): Standard operating and maintenance budgets may not be adequate to address the major refurbishment or replacement of building elements that have deteriorated. The ability of facility operators to fund these additional expenditures can have a significant impact on the future lifespan of the facility.

Age of District Owned Buildings Library Name Year Built Current Age Centennial Hills 2009 9 Clark County 1994 24 Enterprise 1996 22 Laughlin 1994 24 Mesquite Library 2018 3 Months Mesquite Library Learning Center 1990 28 Moapa Valley 1987 31 Mt. Charleston 1987 31 Rainbow 1994 24 Sahara West 1997 21 Spring Valley 1988 30 Summerlin 1993 25 Sunrise 1987 31 West Charleston 1993 25 West Las Vegas 1989 29 Whitney 1994 24 Windmill Library and Service Center 2011 7 Average 1995 22.6

Adulthood (30-49): Many major components will require replacement. In addition to standard operating and maintenance budgets, significant capital improvement funding may be required to extend the life of the facility.

Stage Childhood Adolesence Adolesence Adolesence Childhood Adolesence Adulthood Adulthood Adolesence Adolesence Adulthood Adolesence Adulthood Adolesence Adolesence Adolesence Childhood Adolesence

Old age (50 plus): The facility systems are now at a variety of service ages. There is no longer a single baseline and facility managers are tasked with ongoing rehabilitation and replacement projects. Decisions will arise as to the relative merits of continued reinvestment or redevelopment. * Also referred to as the "Condition-Age Correlation" or "FCI-Age correlation. http://www.assetinsights.net/Glossary/G_Condition_Age_Matrix.html

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Page |5


FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS Facility Condition Assessment This portion of the report details overall findings as they relate to the physical condition of building systems and components. It is important to note condition assessments are simply a snapshot in time because facilities and building systems deteriorate with age and continued use and asset conditions will change in the future. It is also important to recognize the findings in this report are based, in part, on the condition of the overall facility (as determined by the Facility Condition Index, or FCI) and in greater part, by the condition of individual building systems.

Calculating the Facility Condition Index (FCI) One of the most important outcomes of the Facility Condition Assessment (FCA) was to determine the Facility Condition Index (FCI) for each facility. A tool developed and published in 1991 by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO), the FCI is a measure widely used in facilities management to represent the physical condition of a facility (or asset) as compared to its replacement value. The lower the FCI, the better the facility condition. The FCI is expressed as a ratio of the cost of remedying existing deficiencies/requirements and capital renewal requirements to the current replacement value (i.e., FCI=(DM+CR)/CRV). FCI = DM (Deferred Maintenance) + CR (Capital Renewal) CRV (Current Replacement Value) It’s important to note that at the time of this report the District had zero deferred or backlogged maintenance at any of its facilities.

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Page |6


FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS A Facility Condition Index (FCI) was calculated for each facility and was used to Current Estimated CRV by Location quantify the physical condition at a specific point in time and is calculated using Library Name Square Footage CRV the estimated system replacement costs (costs associated with the systems Centennial Hills 45,555 $ 22,777,500 average service life) and the current replacement value (CRV) of the building. Clark County 120,000 $ 60,000,000 Enterprise 26,300 $ 13,150,000 The FCI can be helpful in several ways to include: Laughlin 15,562 $ 7,781,000 • Comparing the condition of one facility to a group of facilities. Mesquite Library 13,313 $ 6,656,500 5,464 $ 2,732,000 • Tracking trends (the extent of improvement or deterioration over time). Mesquite Library Learning Center Moapa Valley 4,700 $ 2,350,000 • Prioritizing capital improvement projects. Mt. Charleston 2,800 $ 1,400,000 • Making renovation versus replacement decisions. Rainbow 26,800 $ 13,400,000 Sahara West 122,000 $ 61,000,000 The FCI is calculated and based on the quantitative result of the calculation and Spring Valley 26,645 $ 13,322,500 the score is given a corresponding qualitative condition ratings including: Summerlin 40,165 $ 20,082,500 “Excellent”, “Good”, “Fair”, and “Poor”. * Sunrise 23,000 $ 11,500,000 West Charleston 38,900 $ 19,450,000 West Las Vegas 30,693 $ 15,346,500 Whitney 24,600 $ 12,300,000 Windmill Library and S.C 142,149 $ 71,074,500 Total 708,646 $ 354,323,000

Current Replacement Value (CRV) The CRV is the cost to construct a replacement building in today’s dollars. The figure is based on square footage of the current structure and the estimated current construction cost for that type of structure. This report uses $500 per square foot. * http://www.assetinsights.net/Glossary/G_Facility_Condition_Index.html

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

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FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS Capital Renewal Capital Renewal is previous or future repairs or replacements paid from the capital funds budget and not funded for normal maintenance in the annual operating budget cycle. Repairs - work to restore damaged or worn-out assets/systems/components (e.g., large scale roof replacement) to normal operating condition. Replacement - an exchange of one fixed asset for another (e.g., replacing an HVAC system chiller) that has the same capacity to perform the same function. Minimum dollar threshold levels for capital renewal are set at costs in excess of $10,000.

Renewal Costs Renewal costs were calculated using recent hard bid numbers when available or estimates to create a current cost of replacement. The current cost was then extended based on remaining useful life to establish the future replacement cost. An inflation rate of 2% compounded annually was added for each extended year. The 5-year maintenance plan will be adjusted for inflation annually and the 20-year plan every three years.

Life Cycles Expected life cycles for building systems are based on the Building Operators and Managers of America (BOMA) recommended cycles, manufacturer’s suggested useful life, and material life based on historical records. BOMA standards are a nationally recognized source of life cycle data (based on its members’ historical data) for various components and/or systems associated with facilities.

This report evaluates and scores District Facilities in the short-term (5 Year - 2019-2023) as well as the long-term (20 Year - 2019-2139).

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Page |8


FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS 5 Year FCI Score by Location Library Name

Square Footage

CRV

Renewal Costs

FCI %

45,555 $

22,777,500 $

54,459

0.24

FCI SCORE Excellent

120,000 $

60,000,000 $

161,027

0.27

Excellent

Enterprise

26,300 $

13,150,000 $

637,825

4.85

Excellent

Laughlin

15,562 $

7,781,000 $

279,702

3.59

Excellent

Mesquite Library

13,313 $

6,656,500 $

0

0.00

Excellent

Mesquite Library Learning Center

5,464 $

2,732,000 $

78,030

2.86

Excellent

Moapa Valley

4,700 $

2,350,000 $

5,000

0.21

Excellent

Mt. Charleston

2,800 $

1,400,000 $

55,204

3.94

Excellent

26,800 $

13,400,000 $

566,074

4.22

Excellent

Sahara West

122,000 $

61,000,000 $

2,100,685

3.44

Excellent

Spring Valley

26,645 $

13,322,500 $

443,926

3.33

Excellent

Summerlin

40,165 $

20,082,500 $

563,336

2.81

Excellent

Sunrise

23,000 $

11,500,000 $

228,493

1.99

Excellent

West Charleston

38,900 $

19,450,000 $

632,740

3.25

Excellent

West Las Vegas

30,693 $

15,346,500 $

97,147

0.63

Excellent

Whitney

24,600 $

12,300,000 $

194,031

1.58

Excellent

142,149 $

71,074,500 $

0.62 2.23

Excellent

Centennial Hills Clark County

Rainbow

Windmill Library and Service Center

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

438,159 Average FCI

Page |9

.


FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT FINDINGS 20 Year FCI Score by Location Library Name Centennial Hills

Square Footage

CRV

Renewal Costs FCI %

FCI SCORE 11.68 Fair

45,555 $

22,777,500

$

2,659,599

120,000 $

60,000,000

$

5,059,559

8.43

Enterprise

26,300 $

13,150,000

$

1,531,698

11.65

Fair

Laughlin

15,562 $

7,781,000

$

1,378,940

17.72

Fair

Mesquite Library

13,313 $

6,656,500

$

505,706

7.60

Good

Mesquite Learning Center

5,464 $

2,732,000

$

204,061

7.47

Good

Moapa Valley

4,700 $

2,350,000

$

335,011

14.26

Fair

Mt. Charleston

2,800 $

1,400,000

$

194,480

13.89

Fair

26,800 $

13,400,000

$

2,113,877

15.78

Fair

Sahara West

122,000 $

61,000,000

$

3,891,586

6.38

Good

Spring Valley

25,645 $

12,822,500

$

1,048,717

8.18

Good

Summerlin

40,165 $

20,082,500

$

2,963,783

14.76

Sunrise

23,000 $

11,500,000

$

841,395

7.32

West Charleston

38,900 $

19,450,000

$

2,047,309

10.53

West Las Vegas

30,693 $

15,346,500

$

1,496,022

9.75

Whitney

24,600 $

12,300,000

$

1,572,946

12.79

142,149 $

71,074,500

$

4,412,726 Average FCI

Clark County

Rainbow

Windmill Library and Service Center

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

6.21

Good

Fair Good Fair Good Fair Good

10.85

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20 YEAR MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN 20 YR Maintenance Plan by Location Future Capital Renewal Costs An integral part of this report was to identify future capital renewals for each District owned Facility. Capital renewal is the planned replacement of building systems such as roofs, electrical systems, HVAC systems, and plumbing systems that have reached the end of their useful life. This forecast assists in the creation of budgets for future capital renewal requirements. Future capital renewal requirements are estimated by taking the cost of a particular system renewal and forecasting the date of renewal by determining the expected life. The breakdown of all building components in the cost models use this same logic. The information generated by the cost models help determine the remaining life of each system to forecast the expected date of replacement. Although the cost models do not provide perfect information, they do produce a reasonable approximation of the expected cost for system replacement. The total cost for capital renewal for all District owned buildings for the 20-year period of 2019 -2039 is $32,257,417. A complete detailed cost estimate by location is provided later in the plan document.

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Library Centennial Hills Clark County Enterprise Laughlin Mesquite Learning Center Mesquite Library Moapa Valley Mt. Charleston Rainbow Sahara West Spring Valley Summerlin Sunrise West Charleston West Las Vegas Whitney Windmill Library and S. C. Total

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Renewal Cost 2,659,599 5,059,559 1,531,698 1,378,940 204,061 505,706 335,011 194,480 2,113,877 3,891,586 1,048,717 2,963,783 841,395 2,047,309 1,496,022 1,572,946 4,412,726 32,257,417

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20 YEAR MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN 20 Year Renewal Plan by Year 20 YR Maintenance Renewal Cost Estimates by Year Year Estimated Costs 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Total $

1,030,792 2,825,856 837,738 330,910 1,510,541 3,134,130 1,579,726 1,612,656 1,623,942 1,472,359 3,060,428 1,853,247 2,380,741 231,894 1,771,673 560,011 671,751 1,672,544 694,687 2,446,433 955,359 32,257,417

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

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20 YEAR MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN 20 Year Renewal Plan by Category 20 YR Maintenance Renewal Cost Estimates by Category Category Estimated Costs Concrete $ 117,664 Construction $ 150,000 Doors $ 546,443 Electrical $ 952,428 Elevators $ 350,000 Fire $ 1,539,562 Flooring $ 3,631,455 Fuel $ 20,698 HVAC $ 9,737,444 Landscaping $ 478,514 Lighting $ 1,560,733 Painting $ 2,849,147 Parking lot $ 4,935,108 Roofing $ 3,677,688 Security $ 248,675 Theater $ 1,461,858 Total $ 32,257,417

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

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5 YEAR MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN Short-Term Renewal Plan - Utilizing the costs identified in the 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan, the short-term Maintenance Renewal Plan for 2019-2023 totals $6,535,837. 5 YR Maintenance Renewal Plan by Library Library Estimated Cost Clark County $ 161,027 Centennial Hills $ 54,459 Enterprise $ 637,825 Laughlin $ 279,702 Moapa Valley $ 5,000 Mesquite Library $ 0 Mesquite Library L. C. $ 78,030 Mt. Charleston $ 55,204 Rainbow $ 566,074 Sahara West $ 2,100,685 Summerlin $ 563,336 Spring Valley $ 443,926 Sunrise $ 228,493 West Charleston $ 632,740 Whitney $ 97,147 Windmill Library and S. C. $ 194,031 West Las Vegas $ 438,159 Total $ 6,535,837

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

5 YR Maintenance Renewal Plan by Year Year Estimated Cost 2019

$

1,030,792

2020

$

2,825,856

2021

$

837,738

2022

$

330,910

2023

$

1,510,541

Total $

6,535,837

5 YR Maintenance Renewal Plan by Category Category Estimated Cost Concrete Construction Doors Electrical Elevators Fire Flooring Fueling System HVAC Landscaping Lighting Painting Parking lot Roofing Security Theater

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Total $

0 150,000 164,710 306,703 0 434,512 672,094 0 1,586,919 280,622 597,779 873,445 926,432 513,911 0 28,711 6,535,837

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MANAGING THE MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN Managing the Maintenance Renewal Plan General Services utilizes a multifaceted approach to managing the District’s capital assets and maintenance requirements. The following describes best practices and are part of a strategy for maintenance, capital planning, and budgeting to ensure satisfactory long-term operation of District facilities.

Staffing In order to effectively maintain the District’s building portfolio, General Services hires qualified employees and utilizes various policies, procedures, and software systems to maintain productivity and operate facilities efficiently including: Written job descriptions that clearly delineate duties, responsibilities, and minimum qualifications. Training protocol for newly hired staff including orientation, instructions on operating equipment, major building systems, and safety protocols. Data driven performance evaluation system that is used to review performance annually is updated regularly to address new goals and account for new building systems. •

Specialized training for health, safety, and code compliance for appropriate staff. Training on how to improve the energy efficiency, air quality, and comfort of District facilities.

Ensuring vendor contracts compliance.

Preventive /Predictive Maintenance General Services utilizes proactive preventive and predictive maintenance as components of an effective maintenance strategy.

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

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MANAGING THE MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN MANAGING THE MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN Preventive Maintenance is the regularly scheduled work needed to keep buildings and their components operating at peak efficiency, prevent their breakdown, and extend their useful life. Preventive maintenance includes activities such as periodic inspections, lubrication, adjustments, and replacement of minor parts, as well as, roof inspections, exterior wall inspections, interior flooring and finishes inspections, repainting, door hardware adjustments, and window replacement. Predictive Maintenance activities are scheduled based on condition of equipment rather than on elapsed time. This approach requires monitoring equipment for excessive vibration and temperature, among other things, and preemptively replacing or repairing components when the equipment condition warrants it.

Work Order System General Services utilizes an electronic work order system to systematically track planned and completed maintenance activities, including scheduled preventive maintenance and emergencies. Whether the job originates as a request communicated by building users or as part of planned maintenance project, the work order system provides uniformity in planning maintenance jobs. Using work orders for upcoming preventive maintenance tasks helps schedule the work so it is not neglected and is accomplished on time.

Building Inspections Plan Preventive maintenance is facilitated by an inspection program conducted on a regular basis and looks at predetermined building components. Standardized checklists for components facilitate the process so technicians are more likely to collect consistent information and complete thorough inspections. This method allows year-to-year comparisons that can be applied uniformly by staff responsible for the inspections. General Services utilizes: •

Standardized forms, checklists, and a standard condition rating system allows for observing building components logically and recording data uniformly.

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MANAGING THE MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN •

A detailed schedule of inspections for each building within the District and all building components within each building.

A detailed and regular schedule for testing life safety systems and equipment (e.g., fire detection alarms, suppression systems, and fire extinguishers, etc.).

A methodology for storing and retrieving the data collected.

A link to the Department’s work order/capital program plan for deficient items found during inspections.

Energy Conservation and Sustainability Energy conservation and building sustainable design is not limited to new buildings. General Services continues to pursue and install innovative, energy-efficient technology into existing facilities to increase energy efficiency. Energy-efficient technology currently being utilized: LED Lamp Conversion – Both interior and exterior lighting. Zone Scheduling – Permits defined sections of a building to have HVAC and lighting reduced or shut down on a schedule. Night/Unoccupied Setback – Changes the comfort settings (set points) of HVAC systems so that space temperature decreases in winter and increases in summer, thereby reducing demand for heating and cooling during unoccupied hours. After-Hours Override – Allows temporary changes to comfort settings after-hours. This eliminates the need to modify schedules, which can sometimes become permanent by accident. This also avoids having the entire building run in occupied mode to meet the needs of a small group.

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20MANAGING YR MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN THE MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN Occupancy Sensors – Detect motion or infrared signatures in the space, to trigger lights or HVAC accordingly. Holiday Scheduling – A calendar defines HVAC and lighting controls for an entire calendar year, saving staff time implementing special schedules and ensuring holiday weekdays do not run in occupied mode. Follow Sunrise & Sunset – Permits lighting schedules (such as parking lots, signs, and outdoor access lighting) to vary throughout the year as the length of daylight changes. This prevents lights from being on during the daytime. The building automation system automatically computes sunrise and sunset based on the latitude and longitude of the building’s location. Daylight Harvesting – In zones of the building near exterior walls and windows, lighting can be dimmed or shut off based on specified minimum lighting levels detected by photocells. Controlled use of shades optimize the availability of natural light without compromising energy efficiency. Optimum Start – Starts HVAC equipment only as early as required to bring the building set points to comfort levels for occupancy. Control routines take into account outside air temperature and inside space temperatures when initiating the morning warm-up or cool-down cycles. Optimum start takes the guess-work out of scheduled startup Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) – VFDs optimize the power consumed by HVAC fans, speeding up or slowing down the fan based on climate demands of the space under control. A 20% reduction in fan speed (and air flow) results in a 49% decrease in electrical consumption. Integrated control of VFDs can also be part of a load shedding strategy. Central Monitoring and Control – Maintenance staff can monitor and control the whole building from a single console on-site or remotely over the Internet. Alarms appear at the console or are sent to an email address or cell phone.

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MAINTENANCE RENEWAL PLAN DETAILS

Maintenance Renewal Plan Details By Location

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CENTENNIAL HILLS LIBRARY (CH) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

CH

HVAC

Actuators

Original

2009

$

8,800.00

10

2019

$

10,727

CH

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

2009

$

12,675.00

10

2020

$

15,451

CH

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

2009

$

23,200.00

10

2020

$

28,281

CH

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Original

2009

$

104,535.00

15

2024

$

140,690

CH

Painting

Exterior Paint

Original

2009

$

125,000.00

15

2024

$

143,586

CH

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Original

2009

$

60,000.00

15

2024

$

68,921

CH

Doors

Exterior Doors - Front

Original

2009

$

20,125.00

20

2029

$

29,905

CH

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

2009

$

175,000.00

20

2029

$

260,041

CH

Electrical

UPS

Original

2009

$

22,000.00

20

2029

$

27,354

CH

HVAC

Chiller

Original

2009

$

120,000.00

20

2029

$

149,205

CH

HVAC

Cooling Tower

CH

HVAC

Actuators

Original

2009

$

260,000.00

20

2029

$

323,277

Replaced

2019

$

323,277.32

10

2029

$

CH

HVAC

13,076

DDC Change

Original

2019

$

25,000.00

10

2029

$

CH

30,475

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

2009

$

25,000.00

20

2029

$

37,149

CH

Roofing

Reroof

Original

2009

$

250,552.50

20

2029

$

305,422

CC

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

CH

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2020

$

32,500.00

10

2030

$

39,617

CH

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement

Replaced

2020

$

54,500.00

10

2030

$

66,435

CH

HVAC

Boiler Replacement

Original

2009

$

150,000.00

30

2039

$

227,350

CH

Parking Lot

Parking Lot - Replace

Original

2009

$

480,322.50

30

2039

$

728,009

$

2,659,599

Vital Statistics Address: 6711 N. Buffalo Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89131 Age: 9 years Year Built - 2009 Square Footage -45,555 Parcel Size - 7 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Rooms, Distribution Center

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - .24 - Excellent Renewal Costs - $54,459 20 – Year FCI - 11.68 - Fair Renewal Costs – $2,659,599

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CLARK COUNTY LIBRARY (CC) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

CC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1994

$

32,500.00

10

2020

$

32,500

CC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1994

$

54,500.00

10

2020

$

54,500

CC

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2013

$

30,364.00

10

2023

$

37,014

CC

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2013

$

30,364.00

10

2023

$

37,014

CC

Elevators

Elevators (4) - Upgrade Fund

Original

1994

$

200,000.00

30

2024

$

200,000

CC

HVAC

Flat Plate

Original

1994

$

25,000.00

30

2024

$

28,154

CC

Parking Lot

Parking Lot - Replace

Original

1994

$

468,120.00

30

2024

$

527,179

CC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2005

$

350,000.00

20

2025

$

520,082

CC

Roofing

Reroof

Recoated

2017

$

660,000.00

10

2027

$

743,267

CC

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

Original

1994

$

280,000.00

35

2029

$

375,000

CC

Theater

Theater Seating

Original

1994

$

200,000.00

35

2029

$

250,000

CC

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

CC

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replacement

2020

$

32,500.00

10

2030

$

39,617

CC

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement

Replacement

2020

$

54,500.00

10

2030

$

66,435

CC

Electrical

UPS

Replaced

2012

$

27,621.00

20

2032

$

41,043

CC

HVAC

Chiller

Replaced

2013

$

270,700.00

20

2033

$

364,327

CC

HVAC

Cooling Tower

Replaced

2013

$

112,000.00

20

2033

$

166,426

CC

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2023

$

166,426.11

10

2033

$

45,119

CC

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2023

$

37,013.55

10

2033

$

45,119

CC

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Replaced

2013

$

24,000.00

20

2033

$

35,663

CC

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2018

$

189,600.00

15

2033

$

255,177

CC

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2018

$

180,000.00

15

2033

$

242,256

CC

Theater

Stage Flooring

Original

2018

$

25,500.00

15

2033

$

34,320

CC

Doors

Exterior Doors - Front

Replaced

2015

$

20,125.00

20

2035

$

29,905

CC

Doors

Exterior Doors - Theater

Replaced

2016

$

48,725.00

20

2036

$

72,403

CC

Fire

Fire Alarm

Replaced

2018

$

175,000.00

20

2038

$

260,041

CC

Electrical

Generator

Replaced

2018

$

165,000.00

20

2038

$

245,181

CC

Theater

Lighting Dimmer

Replaced

2018

$

200,000.00

20

2038

$

$

297,189

Vital Statistics Address: 1401 East Flamingo Rd. Las Vegas, NV 89119. Age: 24 years Year Built - 1994 Square Footage – 120,000 Parcel Size – 6.51 Acres Amenities - Theater (seats 399), Gallery, Meeting Rooms

5,059,559

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - .27 Excellent Renewal Costs - $161,027 20 – Year FCI - 8.43 Good Renewal Costs – $5,059,559

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ENTERPRISE LIBRARY (EN) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

ENT

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1996

$

12,961.00

10

2020

$

12,961

ENT

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1996

$

12,000.00

10

2020

$

12,000

ENT

Doors

Exterior Doors -(Set of 4)

Original

1996

$

25,000.00

25

2021

$

26,530

ENT

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

1996

$

48,000.00

25

2021

$

50,938

ENT

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Original

1996

$

131,490.00

25

2021

$

139,538

ENT

HVAC

Chiller $1600/ton

Original

1996

$

150,000.00

25

2021

$

162,365

ENT

HVAC

Cooling Tower

Original

1996

$

75,000.00

25

2021

$

81,182

ENT

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2011

$

17,932.85

10

2021

$

21,860

ENT

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1996

$

25,000.00

25

2021

$

41,015

ENT

Painting

Exterior Paint

Original

2008

$

41,554.00

15

2023

$

45,879

ENT

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Original

2008

$

39,450.00

15

2023

$

43,556

ENT

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2015

$

18,647.00

10

2025

$

22,731

ENT

HVAC

Boiler

Original

1996

$

75,000.00

30

2026

$

87,874

ENT

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1996

$

244,800.00

30

2026

$

286,822

ENT

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

ENT

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2020

$

244,800.00

10

2030

$

15,799

ENT

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement

Replaced

2020

$

12,000.00

10

2030

$

14,628

ENT

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

ENT

HVAC

Actuators

ENT

HVAC

ENT

Roofing

Original

1996

$

175,000.00

35

2031

$

226,381

Replaced

2021

$

226,381.16

10

2031

$

26,647

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2025

$

21,160.00

10

2035

$

23,362

Reroof - Overlay

Replaced

2017

$

63,962.00

20

2037

$

175,000

$

1,531,698

Vital Statistics Address: 25 East Shelbourne Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89123 Age: 22 Years Year Built - 1996 Square Footage – 26,300 Parcel Size – 3.55 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Rooms

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - 4.85 Excellent Renewal Costs - $637,825 20 – Year FCI - 11.65 Fair Renewal Costs – $1,531,698

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LAUGHLIN LIBRARY (LA) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

LA

Doors

Exterior Doors

Original

1994

$

25,000.00

25

2019

$

25,000

LA

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

1994

$

35,000.00

25

2019

$

35,000

LA

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Original

1994

$

77,805.00

25

2019

$

77,805

LA

Painting

Exterior Paint

Original

1994

$

31,124.00

25

2019

$

31,124

LA

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1994

$

6,500.00

10

2021

$

6,500

LA

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1994

$

19,200.00

10

2021

$

19,200

LA

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2013

$

13,800.00

10

2023

$

16,822

LA

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2013

$

20,752.00

10

2023

$

25,297

LA

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2008

$

38,905.00

15

2023

$

42,954

LA

HVAC

Boiler

Original

1994

$

80,000.00

30

2024

$

99,470

LA

Parking Lot

Parking Lot

Original

1994

$

106,520.00

30

2024

$

117,607

LA

Roofing

Reroof

Replaced

2008

$

85,145.00

20

2028

$

126,521

LA

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

Original

1994

$

75,000.00

35

2029

$

84,462

LA

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

LA

HVAC

Chiller

Replaced

2010

$

369,135.00

20

2030

$

548,515

LA

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Replaced

2005

$

20,000.00

25

2030

$

25,365

LA

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2021

$

369,135.00

10

2031

$

7,923

LA

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2021

$

20,000.00

10

2031

$

23,405

LA

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2023

$

23,404.69

10

2033

$

20,506

LA

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2023

$

20,506.07

10

2033

$

30,836

$

1,378,940

Vital Statistics Address: 2840 South Needles Hwy. Laughlin, NV 89029 Age: 24 Years Year Built - 1994 Square Footage – 15,562 Parcel Size – 1.33 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 3.59 Excellent Renewal Costs - $279,702 20 – Year FCI – 17.72 - Fair Renewal Costs - $1,378,940

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MESQUITE LIBRARY (MQ) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

MQL

Lighting

LED -Interior

Original

2018

$

20,000.00

10

2028

$

MQL

Lighting

LED -Parking Lot

Original

2018

$

2,500.00

10

2028

$

3,047

MQL

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

MQL

Painting

Exterior Paint

Original

2018

$

5,000.00

15

2033

$

6,729

MQL

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Carpet

Original

2018

$

31,365.00

15

2033

$

42,213

MQL

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Rubber

Original

2018

$

27,936.00

15

2033

$

37,598

MQL

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Original

2018

$

27,750.00

15

2033

$

37,348

MQL

Doors

Exterior Doors

Original

2018

$

25,000.00

20

2038

$

37,149

MQL

HVAC

Heat Pumps

Original

2018

$

90,000.00

20

2038

$

133,735

MQL

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

2018

$

18,000.00

20

2038

$

26,747

MQL

Lighting

LED -Interior

Original

2028

$

24,379.89

10

2038

$

29,719

MQL

Lighting

LED -Parking Lot

Original

2028

$

3,047.49

10

2038

$

3,715

MQL

Roofing

Reroof

Original

2018

$

73,150.00

20

2038

$

108,697

$

24,380

505,706

Vital Statistics Address: 160 West First North St. Mesquite, NV 89027 Age: 3 Months Year Built - 2018 Square Footage – 13,313 Parcel Size – 1.63 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Rooms, Café

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 0.00 - Excellent Renewal Costs - 0 20 – Year FCI – 7.60 - Good Renewal Costs - $505,706

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MESQUITE LIBRARY LEARNING CENTER (MQLC) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

MQLC

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1990

$

75,000.00

30

2020

$

78,030

MQLC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

2014

$

1,950.00

10

2024

$

2,377

MQLC

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2010

$

6,200.00

15

2025

$

7,558

MQLC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

2018

$

5,000.00

10

2028

$

6,729

MQLC

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

MQLC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2014

$

13,995.00

15

2029

$

18,835

MQLC

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2018

$

15,500.00

15

2033

$

18,894

MQLC

HVAC

Heat Pumps

Replaced

2014

$

20,000.00

20

2034

$

27,456

MQLC

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2024

$

2,377.04

10

2034

$

3,532

MQLC

Roofing

Reroof

Original

2014

$

15,400.00

20

2034

$

16,022

MQLC

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2028

$

3,532.16

10

2038

$

9,999

$

204,061

Vital Statistics Address: 121 West First North St. Mesquite, NV 89027 Age: 28 years Year Built - 1990 Square Footage - 5,464 Parcel Size – 1.12 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - 2.86 Excellent Renewal Costs -$78,030 20 – Year FCI - 7.47 - Good Renewal Costs - $ 204,061

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MOAPA VALLEY LIBRARY (MV) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipm ent

Description of

Category

Equipm ent

Repair/Replace Last/Projected Status

or Project

Actual or

Repair/Replace Current Estim ated Year

Cost

Life

Next Scheduled

Estim ated Total

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

(Years)

Year

or Replace

MOA

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1997

$

2,600.00

10

2019

$

MOA

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1997

$

2,400.00

10

2019

$

2,600 2,400

MOA

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1997

$

159,200.00

30

2027

$

194,064

MOA

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2014

$

19,500.00

15

2029

$

23,770

MOA

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2019

$

2,600.00

10

2029

$

3,169

MOA

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2019

$

19,500.00

10

2029

$

2,926

MOA

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2014

$

4,825.00

15

2029

$

6,494

MOA

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

MOA

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Replaced

2007

$

14,000.00

25

2032

$

22,968

MOA

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2018

$

10,800.00

15

2033

$

14,535

MOA

HVAC

HVAC

Replaced

2015

$

22,000.00

20

2035

$

32,691

MOA

Roof

Reroof

Replaced

2012

$

9,000.00

25

2037

$

14,765

$

335,011

Vital Statistics Address: 350 North Moapa Blvd. Overton, NV 89040 Age: 31 Years Year Built - 1987 Square Footage - 4,700 Parcel Size - .99 Acres Amenities – None

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - .21 - Excellent Renewal Costs -$5,000 20 – Year FCI - 14.26- Fair Renewal Costs – $335,011

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 26


MOUNT CHARLESTON LIBRARY (MC) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

MTC

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1987

$

50,000.00

35

2022

$

55,204

MTC

Concrete

Walk ways

Replaced

2013

$

35,245.00

15

2028

$

47,435

MTC

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

MTC

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

7,400.00

15

2030

$

9,959

MTC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2016

$

18,395.00

15

2031

$

24,757

MTC

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2016

$

7,350.00

15

2031

$

9,892

MTC

HVAC

Gas Pack

Replaced

2005

$

18,000.00

30

2035

$

32,605

$

194,480

Vital Statistics Address: 75 Ski Chalet Place Las Vegas, NV 89124 Age: 31 Years Year Built - 1987 Square Footage - 2,800 Parcel Size – 3.59 Acres Amenities - Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 3.94 - Excellent Renewal Costs - $ 55,204 20 – Year FCI – 13.89 - Fair Renewal Costs – $194,480

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 27


RAINBOW LIBRARY (RB) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Category

Equipment

Status

or Project

Last/Projected

Actual or

Repair/Replace Current Estimated Year

Cost

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

(Years)

Year

or Replace

RB

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

1994

$

55,000.00

25

2019

$

56,100

RB

HVAC

Chiller

Original

1994

$

425,000.00

25

2019

$

425,000

RB

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1994

$

25,000.00

25

2019

$

25,000

RB

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1994

$

10,400.00

10

2021

$

10,400

RB

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1994

$

20,000.00

10

2021

$

20,000

RB

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2012

$

24,261.00

10

2022

$

29,574

RB

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2009

$

133,965.00

15

2024

$

166,569

RB

HVAC

Boiler

Original

1994

$

115,000.00

30

2024

$

129,509

RB

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1994

$

468,000.00

30

2024

$

629,866

RB

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2015

$

20,129.00

10

2025

$

24,537

RB

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replacement

2010

$

24,000.00

15

2025

$

32,301

RB

Doors

Exterior Doors

Replaced

2009

$

20,000.00

20

2029

$

24,867

RB

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

Original

1994

$

300,000.00

35

2029

$

337,849

RB

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

RB

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replacement

2021

$

10,400.00

10

2031

$

12,678

RB

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replacement

2021

$

20,000.00

10

2031

$

24,380

RB

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2023

$

29,574.02

10

2033

$

30,166

RB

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replacement

2018

$

80,400.00

15

2033

$

90,543

RB

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2025

$

24,537.14

10

2035

$

29,911

$

2,113,877

Vital Statistics Address: 3150 North Buffalo Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89128 Age: 24 years Year Built - 1994 Square Footage - 26,800 Parcel Size – 7.11 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Rooms, Outdoor Amphitheater (Capacity 900)

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 4.22 Excellent Renewal Costs - $566,074 20 – Year FCI – 15.78 - Fair Renewal Costs - $2,113,877

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 28


SAHARA WEST LIBRARY (SW) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

SAH

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1995

$

39,000.00

10

2019

$

39,000

SAH

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1995

$

28,000.00

10

2019

$

28,000 172,303

SAH

HVAC

Cooling Tower

Original

1995

$

150,000.00

25

2020

$

SAH

Doors

Exterior Doors

Original

1995

$

75,000.00

25

2020

$

78,030

SAH

Painting

Exterior Paint

Original

1995

$

192,276.00

25

2020

$

200,044

SAH

Fire

Fire Alarm - Devices

Original

1995

$

160,000.00

25

2020

$

166,464

SAH

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Original

1995

$

342,720.00

25

2020

$

378,391 176,653

SAH

Electrical

Generator

Original

1995

$

160,000.00

25

2020

$

SAH

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1995

$

50,000.00

25

2020

$

57,434

SAH

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Original

1995

$

305,000.00

25

2020

$

305,000

SAH

Roofing

Reroof

Original

1995

$

359,975.00

25

2020

$

374,518

SAH

Painting

STUCCO REPAIR

Original

1995

$

120,000.00

25

2020

$

124,848

SAH

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2015

$

17,157.00

10

2025

$

20,914

SMR

HVAC

DDC Software

Replaced

2015

$

19,173.00

10

2025

$

23,372

SAH

Elevators

Elevators - Refresh

Original

1995

$

150,000.00

30

2025

$

150,000

SAH

HVAC

Flat Plate

Original

1995

$

24,000.00

30

2025

$

24,970

SAH

Parking Lot

Parking lot Replacement

Original

1995

$

454,400.00

30

2025

$

521,963

SAH

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

SAH

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2019

$

454,400.00

10

2029

$

47,541

SAH

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

29,131

SAH

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

Original

1995

$

200,000.00

35

2030

$

253,648

SAH

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2025

$

253,648.36

10

2035

$

25,494

SAH

HVAC

Boiler

Replaced

2005

$

75,000.00

30

2035

$

105,018

SMR

HVAC

DDC Software

Replaced

2025

$

105,018.11

10

2035

$

28,490

SAH

Concrete

Concrete cladding

Replaced

2016

$

47,262.00

20

2036

$

70,229

SAH

HVAC

Chiller

Replaced

2018

$

320,000.00

20

2038

$

475,503

$

3,891,586

Vital Statistics Address: 9600 West Sahara Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89117 Age: 21 Years Year Built - 1997 Square Footage -122,000 Parcel Size – 8.6 Acres Amenities Galleries, Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 3.44 Excellent Renewal Costs - $ 2,100,685 20 – Year FCI – 6.38 - Good Renewal Costs -$ 3,891,586

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 29


SPRING VALLEY LIBRARY (SV) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Category

Equipment

Status

or Project

Last/Projected

Actual or

Repair/Replace Current Estimated Year

Cost

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

(Years)

Year

or Replace

SV

Fire

Fire Alarm - Devices

Replaced

2000

$

25,000.00

20

2020

$

26,010

SV

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1995

$

25,000.00

25

2020

$

26,010

SV

Roofing

Reroof

Replaced

2000

$

133,980.00

20

2020

$

139,393

SV

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1995

$

11,778.00

10

2021

$

11,778

SV

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1995

$

16,800.00

10

2021

$

16,800

SV

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1988

$

215,240.00

35

2023

$

223,936

SV

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2009

$

43,200.00

15

2024

$

48,650

SV

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2009

$

45,000.00

15

2024

$

50,677

SV

HVAC

Gas Packs

Replaced

2005

$

50,000.00

20

2025

$

57,434

SV

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

SV

Doors

Exterior Doors

Replaced

2009

$

18,000.00

20

2029

$

22,381

SV

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

21,220.00

15

2030

$

26,912

SV

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2021

$

18,000.00

10

2031

$

14,357

SV

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2021

$

21,220.00

10

2031

$

20,479

SV

HVAC

Gas Packs

Replaced

2014

$

65,000.00

20

2034

$

89,231

SV

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2018

$

175,000.00

20

2038

$

$

260,041

1,048,717

Vital Statistics Address: 4280 South Jones Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89103 Age: 30 Years Year Built - 1988 Square Footage - 25,645 Parcel Size – 1.93 Acres Amenities - Gallery, Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 3.33 -Excellent Renewal Costs - $ 443,927 20 – Year FCI – 8.18 - Good Renewal Costs -$1,048,717

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 30


SUMMERLIN LIBRARY (SM) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipm ent

Description of

Category

Equipm ent

Repair/Replace Last/Projected Status

or Project

Actual or

Repair/Replace Current Estim ated Year

Cost

Life

Next Scheduled

Estim ated Total

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

(Years)

Year

or Replace

SMR

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1993

$

25,000.00

25

2019

$

25,500

SMR

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1993

$

12,675.00

10

2019

$

12,675

SMR

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1993

$

20,000.00

10

2019

$

20,000

SMR

Electrical

Generator

Original

1993

$

125,000.00

27

2020

$

130,050

SMR

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1993

$

339,750.00

30

2023

$

375,111

SMR

Paining

Paint & Wall Cover

Replacement

2009

$

60,247.00

15

2024

$

60,247

SMR

HVAC

DDC Softw are

Replaced

2015

$

20,752.00

10

2025

$

25,297

SMR

Fire

Fire Alarm

Replaced

2006

$

45,000.00

20

2026

$

66,868

SMR

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2017

$

8,800.00

10

2027

$

10,727

SMR

HVAC

Chiller

Replaced

2007

$

439,000.00

20

2027

$

652,331

SMR

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

Original

1993

$

300,000.00

35

2028

$

365,698

SMR

Theater

Theater Seating

Original

1993

$

177,500.00

35

2028

$

177,500

SMR

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

SMR

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Rubber

Replaced

2009

$

40,104.00

20

2029

$

59,592

SMR

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

15,451

SMR

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2019

$

40,104.00

10

2029

$

24,380

SMR

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replacement

2016

$

80,213.00

15

2031

$

107,956

SMR

Theater

Stage Flooring

Original

2017

$

25,500.00

15

2032

$

34,320

SMR

Doors

Exterior Doors

Replaced

2014

$

50,000.00

20

2034

$

74,297

SMR

HVAC

DDC Softw are

Replaced

2025

$

74,297.37

10

2035

$

30,836

SMR

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Carpet

Replaced

2015

$

152,100.00

20

2035

$

226,013

SMR

Roofing

Reroof

Replaced

2016

$

216,000.00

20

2036

$

308,501

SMR

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2027

$

8,800.00

10

2037

$

13,076

SMR

HVAC

Boiler

Replaced

2007

$

65,000.00

30

2037

$

79,235

SMR

Theater

Lighting Dimmer

Replaced

2018

$

36,000.00

20

2038

$

53,494

$

2,963,783

Vital Statistics Address: 1771 Inner Circle Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89134 Age: 25 Years Year Built - 1993 Square Footage - 40,165 Parcel Size - 4.5 Acres Amenities - Theater (seats 291), Gallery, Meeting Rooms

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 2.81 -Excellent Renewal Costs - $ 563,336 20 – Year FCI – 14.76 - Fair Renewal Costs - $ 2,963,743

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 31


SUNRISE LIBRARY (SU) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

SU

Construction

Replace Lattice Walkway

Original

1987

$

150,000.00

35

2022

$

150,000

SU

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Replaced

1997

$

25,000.00

25

2022

$

27,061

SU

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1997

$

11,778.00

10

2022

$

11,778

SU

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1997

$

11,778.00

10

2022

$

14,357

SU

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2013

$

20,752.00

10

2023

$

25,297

SU

Door

Exterior Doors

Replaced

2001

$

14,000.00

25

2026

$

22,968

SU

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

SU

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

21,000.00

15

2030

$

28,263

SU

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2015

$

52,500.00

15

2030

$

70,658

SU

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2022

$

20,000.00

10

2032

$

20,000

SU

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2022

$

20,000.00

10

2032

$

24,380

SU

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2023

$

24,379.89

10

2033

$

30,836

SU

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

2014

$

35,000.00

20

2034

$

52,008

SU

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2014

$

114,975.00

20

2034

$

170,847

SU

HVAC

Heat Pumps/Air Handler

Replaced

2017

$

120,000.00

20

2037

$

$

178,314

841,395

Vital Statistics Address: 5400 Harris St. Las Vegas, NV 89110 Age: 31 Years Year Built - 1987 Square Footage - 23,000 Parcel Size – 2.41 Acres Amenities - None

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 1.99 -Excellent Renewal Costs - $228,493 20 – Year FCI – 7.32 -Good Renewal Costs - $841,395

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 32


WEST CHARLESTON LIBRARY (WC) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

WC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1993

$

15,600.00

10

2021

$

WC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1993

$

20,000.00

10

2021

$

20,000

WC

HVAC

Boiler

Original

1993

$

130,000.00

30

2023

$

143,531

WC

HVAC

Chiller

Original

1993

$

140,000.00

30

2023

$

154,571

WC

HVAC

Cooling Tower

Original

1993

$

70,000.00

30

2023

$

77,286

WC

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1993

$

25,000.00

30

2023

$

27,602

WC

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Replaced

1993

$

172,400.00

30

2023

$

194,150

WC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2009

$

160,875.00

15

2024

$

181,171

WC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2009

$

27,000.00

15

2024

$

30,406

WC

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2009

$

97,250.00

15

2024

$

109,519

WC

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2015

$

20,000.00

10

2025

$

20,000

WC

HVAC

DDC Software

Replaced

2015

$

16,543.00

10

2025

$

20,166

WC

Doors

Exterior Doors

Replaced

2005

$

27,000.00

20

2025

$

31,015

WC

Paining

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2010

$

28,500.00

15

2025

$

33,392

WC

HVAC

Air Handler Replace

Original

1993

$

300,000.00

35

2028

$

365,698

WC

Theater

Theater Seating(276)

Original

1993

$

172,500.00

35

2028

$

172,500

WC

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

WC

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2025

$

20,000.00

5

2030

$

22,082

WC

Roofing

Reroof

Replaced

2010

$

128,627.00

20

2030

$

191,133

WC

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2021

$

15,600.00

10

2031

$

19,016

WC

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2021

$

20,000.00

10

2031

$

24,380

WC

Theater

Lighting Dimmer

Replaced

2013

$

21,000.00

20

2033

$

28,263

WC

Fire

Fire Alarm

Replaced

2014

$

85,210.00

20

2034

$

126,618

WC

HVAC

DDC Software

Replaced

2025

$

20,165.82

10

2035

$

$

15,600

24,582

2,047,309

Vital Statistics Address: 6301 West Charleston Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89146 Age: 25 Years Year Built - 1993 Square Footage - 38,900 Parcel Size – 4 Acres Amenities - Lecture Hall (seats 276), Gallery, Meeting Rooms

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI – 3.25 - Good Renewal Costs - $ 632,740 20 – Year FCI – 10.53 - Fair Renewal Costs – $2,047,309

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 33


WEST LAS VEGAS LIBRARY (WV) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

WV

Doors

Exterior Doors

Original

1994

$

30,000.00

25

2019

$

35,150

WV

Fire

Fire Pump

Original

1994

$

100,000.00

25

2019

$

100,000

WV

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1994

$

25,000.00

25

2019

$

25,500

WV

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2005

$

73,395.00

15

2020

$

76,360

WV

HVAC

Gas Packs - YPL

Replaced

2000

$

25,000.00

20

2020

$

26,010

WV

HVAC

Gas Packs

Replaced

2000

$

60,000.00

20

2020

$

62,424

WV

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1994

$

12,675.00

10

2020

$

12,675

WV

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1994

$

20,000.00

10

2020

$

20,000

WV

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2005

$

29,362.00

15

2020

$

39,517

WV

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover (Library)

Replaced

2008

$

36,702.50

15

2023

$

40,523

WV

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacements

Original

1994

$

137,531.25

30

2024

$

151,846

WV

HVAC

DDC Software

Replaced

2015

$

20,752.00

10

2025

$

25,297

WV

Fire

Fire Alarm -Devices

Replaced

2006

$

40,000.00

20

2026

$

40,800

WV

Theater

Stage Flooring

Original

2012

$

17,500.00

15

2027

$

23,553

WV

HVAC

Gas Packs (Theater)

Replaced

2008

$

150,000.00

20

2028

$

182,849

WV

Theater

Theater Seating

Original

1994

$

186,250.00

35

2029

$

186,250

WV

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

WV

Flooring

Floor Coverings (Theater)

Replaced

2015

$

79,500.00

15

2030

$

100,825

WV

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2020

$

12,675.00

10

2030

$

15,451

WV

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2020

$

20,000.00

10

2030

$

24,380

WV

Painting

Paint/Wall Cover (Theater)

Replaced

2015

$

26,650.00

15

2030

$

33,799

WV

Roofing

Reroof

Replaced

2013

$

118,000.00

20

2033

$

175,342

WV

HVAC

DDC Software

Replaced

2025

$

25,296.57

10

2035

$

30,836

WV

Theater

Dimmer Rack

Replaced

2015

$

35,000.00

20

2035

$

$

52,008

1,496,022

Vital Statistics Address: 951 West Lake Mead Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89106 Age: 29 Years Year Built - 1989 Square Footage - 30,693 Parcel Size - 2 Acres Amenities - Theater (seats 298), Gallery, Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - .63 - Excellent Renewal Costs -$97,146 20 – Year FCI – 9.75 - Good Renewal Costs - $1,496,022

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 34


WHITNEY LIBRARY (WH) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

WH

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

1994

$

25,000.00

25

2019

$

25,500

WH

Theater

Stage Flooring

Original

1994

$

17,500.00

25

2019

$

28,711

WH

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

1994

$

6,136.00

10

2022

$

6,136

WH

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

1994

$

36,800.00

10

2022

$

36,800

WH

Parking Lot

Parking Lot Replacement

Original

1994

$

219,937.50

30

2024

$

247,685

WH

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2015

$

15,340.00

10

2025

$

18,699

WH

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

WH

Theater

Theater Seating

Original

1994

$

123,750.00

35

2029

$

123,750

WH

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

55,000.00

15

2030

$

74,023

WH

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2015

$

30,000.00

15

2030

$

40,376

WH

Roofing

Reroof

Replaced

2010

$

97,800.00

20

2030

$

145,326

WH

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2022

$

6,136.00

10

2032

$

7,480

WH

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2022

$

36,800.00

10

2032

$

44,859

WH

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2023

$

18,699.37

10

2033

$

19,455

WH

Fire

Fire Alarm

Replaced

2017

$

26,000.00

20

2037

$

38,635

WH

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2017

$

131,675.00

20

2037

$

195,662

WH

HVAC

Chiller

Replaced

2018

$

340,000.00

20

2038

$

505,222

$

1,572,946

Vital Statistics Address: 5175 East Tropicana Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89122 Age: 24 Years Year Built - 1994 Square Footage - 24,600 Parcel Size – 3.08 Acres Amenities – Theater (seats 298), Gallery, Meeting Room

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - 1.58 - Excellent Renewal Costs - $194,031 20 – Year FCI – 12.79 - Fair Renewal Costs – $1,572,946

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 35


Windmill Library and Service Center (WM) 20 Year Maintenance Renewal Plan Library

Equipment

Description of

Repair/Replace

Last/Projected

Actual or

Life

Next Scheduled

Estimated Total

Category

Equipment

Status

Repair/Replace

Current Estimated

Expectancy

Repair/Replace

Cost to Repair

Year

Cost

(Years)

Year

or Project

or Replace

WM

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Original

2011

$

30,364.00

10

2021

$

33,524

WM

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Original

2011

$

37,013.55

10

2021

$

45,119

WM

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Original

2011

$

52,000.00

10

2021

$

52,000

WM

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Original

2011

$

52,000.00

10

2021

$

63,388

WM

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Carpet

Original

2011

$

380,000.00

15

2026

$

445,231

WM

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Rubber Tile

Original

2011

$

227,376.00

15

2026

$

266,407

WM

Painting

Exterior Paint

Original

2011

$

144,000.00

15

2026

$

193,805

WM

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Original

2011

$

150,000.00

15

2026

$

201,880

WM

Security

Access Upgrade

Replaced

2019

$

12,000.00

10

2029

$

14,628

WM

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

2011

$

175,000.00

20

2031

$

260,041

WM

Electrical

UPS

Original

2011

$

27,500.00

20

2031

$

35,574

WM

Electrical

photovoltaic

Original

2011

$

20,000.00

20

2031

$

25,872

WM

Fuel

Pumps

Original

2011

$

16,000.00

20

2031

$

20,698

WM

HVAC

Computer room AC

Original

2011

$

100,000.00

20

2031

$

129,361

WM

HVAC

Cooling Tower

Original

2011

$

218,000.00

20

2031

$

282,006

WM

Lighting

LED - Interior -1st Replacement

Replaced

2021

$

84,000.00

10

2031

$

84,000

WM

Lighting

LED Parking Lot - 1st Replacement Replaced

2021

$

84,000.00

10

2031

$

102,396

WM

Lighting

Dimmer - Theater

Original

2011

$

36,000.00

20

2031

$

44,761

WM

Roofing

Reroof

Original

2011

$

660,000.00

20

2031

$

853,780

WM

Doors

Exterior Doors - Library

Original

2012

$

24,795.00

20

2032

$

36,844

WM

Electrical

Generator

Original

2011

$

165,000.00

25

2036

$

270,700 297,075

WM

HVAC

Chiller Compressors

Original

2016

$

208,000.00

20

2036

$

WM

Landscaping

Landscaping/Irrigation

Original

2011

$

50,000.00

25

2036

$

50,000

WM

Parking Lot

Parking Lot - Replace Prev. Con.

Original

2011

$

406,229.50

25

2036

$

603,636

$

4,412,726

Vital Statistics Address: 7060 W. Windmill Lane Las Vegas, NV 89113 Age: 7 Years Year Built - 2011 Square Footage - 142,149 Parcel Size - 15 Acres Amenities - Auditorium (seats 300), Gallery, Meeting Rooms

Facility Condition Audit 5 – Year FCI - .62 - Excellent Renewal Costs - $438,158 20 – Year FCI – 6.21 - Good Renewal Costs – $4,412,726

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 36


CAPITAL RENEWALS COMPLETED WITHIN THE PAST 5 YEARS

Capital Renewals Completed Within the Past 5 Years $4,136,525

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 37


CAPITAL RENEWALS COMPLETED WITHIN THE PAST 5 YEARS Capital Renewals Completed From 2014 – 2018 Library Equipment Category

Description of Equipment or Project

Repair/Replace Last/Projected Actual or Status Repair/Replace Current Estimated Year Cost

CC

Doors

Exterior Doors - Front

Replaced

2015

$

20,125.00

CC

Doors

Exterior Doors - Theater

Replaced

2016

$

48,725.00

CC

Fire

Fire Alarm *

Replaced

2018

$

175,000.00

CC

Electrical

Generator *

Replaced

2018

$

165,000.00

CC

Theater

Lighting Dimmer

Replaced

2018

$

200,000.00

CC

Painting

Exterior Paint *

Replaced

2018

$

189,600.00

CC

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover *

Replaced

2018

$

180,000.00

CC

Roofing

Reroof

Recoated

2017

$

100,000.00

CC

Theater

Stage Flooring

Replaced

2018

$

25,500.00

EN

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2015

$

18,647.00

EN

Roofing

Reroof - Overlay

Replaced

2017

$

63,962.00

MC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2016

$

18,395.00

MC

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

7,400.00

MC

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2016

$

7,350.00

MQLC

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2014

$

13,995.00

MQLC

HVAC

Heat Pumps

Replaced

2014

$

20,000.00

MQLC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Interior

Replaced

2014

$

1,950.00

MQLC

Lighting

LED Upgrade -Parking Lot

Replaced

2018

$

5,000.00

MQLC

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2018

$

15,500.00

MQLC

Roofing

Reroof

Original

2014

$

15,400.00

MV

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2014

$

19,500.00

MV

HVAC

HVAC

Replaced

2015

$

22,000.00

MV

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2018

$

10,800.00

MV

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2014

$

4,825.00

RB

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2015

$

20,129.00

RB

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover *

Replaced

2018

$

80,400.00

SM

Doors

Exterior Doors

Replaced

2014

$

50,000.00 152,100.00

SM

Flooring

Floor Coverings - Carpet

Replaced

2015

$

SM

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2017

$

8,800.00

SM

HVAC

DDC Softw are

Replaced

2015

$

20,752.00

SM

Theater

Lighting Dimmer *

Replaced

2018

$

36,000.00

SM

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2016

$

80,213.00

Replaced

2016

$

216,000.00

Original

2017

$

25,500.00

SM

Roofing

Reroof

SM

Theater

Stage Flooring

* Scheduled for completion during the 2018/19 fiscal year

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 38


CAPITAL RENEWALS COMPLETED WITHIN THE PAST 5 YEARS Capital Renewals Completed From 2014 – 2018 Library Equipment Category

Description of Equipment or Project

Continued

Repair/Replace Last/Projected Actual or Status Repair/Replace Current Estimated Year Cost

SU

Fire

Fire Alarm

Original

2014

$

35,000.00

SU

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2014

$

114,975.00

SU

HVAC

Heat Pumps/Air Handler

Replaced

2017

$

120,000.00

SU

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

21,000.00

SU

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2015

$

52,500.00

SV

Flooring

Floor Coverings *

Replaced

2018

$

175,000.00

SV

HVAC

Gas Packs

Replaced

2014

$

65,000.00

SV

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

21,220.00

SW

Concrete

Concrete cladding

Replaced

2016

$

47,262.00

SW

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2015

$

17,157.00

SW

HVAC

DDC Softw are

Replaced

2015

$

19,173.00

SW

HVAC

Chiller *

Replaced

2018

$

320,000.00

WC

Fire

Fire Alarm

Replaced

2014

$

85,210.00

WC

HVAC

Actuators

Replaced

2015

$

20,000.00

WC

HVAC

DDC Softw are

Replaced

2015

$

16,543.00

WH

Fire

Fire Alarm

Replaced

2017

$

26,000.00

WH

Flooring

Floor Coverings

Replaced

2017

$

131,675.00

WH

HVAC

Chiller

Replaced

2018

$

340,000.00

WH

HVAC

DDC Upgrades

Replaced

2015

$

15,340.00

WH

Painting

Exterior Paint

Replaced

2015

$

55,000.00

WH

Painting

Paint & Wall Cover

Replaced

2015

$

30,000.00

WM

HVAC

Chiller Compressors

Replaced

2016

$

208,000.00

WV

Flooring

Floor Coverings (Theater)

Replaced

2015

$

79,500.00

WV

HVAC

DDC Softw are

Replaced

2015

$

20,752.00

WV

Painting

Paint/Wall Cover (Theater)

Replaced

2015

$

26,650.00

WV

Theater

Dimmer Rack

Replaced

2015

$

35,000.00

$

4,136,525.00

* Scheduled for completion during the 2018/19 fiscal year

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 39


BIBLIOGRAPHY Bibliography “Asset Lifecycle Model for Total Cost of Ownership Management Framework, Glossary & Definitions.” International Facility Management Association (IFMA), 2009, pp. 1–28. Albrice, David. “Facility Condition Index (FCI).” Culture of the Organization, www.assetinsights.net/Glossary/G_Facility_Condition_Index.html “Best Practices for Maintenance and Capital Planning.” Maintenance and Capital Planning Best Practices , 2011, www.massschoolbuildings.org. Brooks, Robert G. “History of the Facility Condition Index.” Facilities Manager, 2004, pp. 41–43. Hemmerdinger, Robert. “Predictive Maintenance Strategy for Building Operations: A Better Approach.” FMMmagazine, 2014, pp. 2. “Leading Techniques for Energy Savings in Commercial Office Buildings.” Schneider-Electric.com, 2006, pp. 1–14, Schoen, Lawrence J. “Preventive Maintenance Guidebook.” Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) I, 2010, pp. 1–80,

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

P a g e | 40


Financial Analysis

04

By Applied Analysis

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

339


Financial Analysis Executive Summary


Table of Contents Executive Summary: Financial Analysis ................................................................................................................................. 1 Detailed Results and Methodology .......................................................................................................................................... 3  Revenues ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3  Expenditures ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5  Capital Fund.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 6  Alternative Funding Strategies ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8  Bonding Strategies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8  Incremental Tax Revenues from Existing Sources ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 10  Incremental Tax Revenues Sourced to the Implementation of New Taxes ............................................................................................................................................................ 11  Appendix – Detailed Financial Tables by Year...................................................................................................................... 15  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Historical/Current Budget ............................................................................................................................... 15  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base (Medium) Scenario ................................................................................................................................ 16  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – High Scenario ................................................................................................................................................. 18  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Low Scenario .................................................................................................................................................. 20  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Finance Department Provided Scenario ......................................................................................................... 22  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Medium Term Bond ........................................................................................................ 24  General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Long Term Bond ............................................................................................................. 27 


Executive Summary: Financial Analysis An assessment of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District’s (the “Library District” or the “District”) capital fund availability is a vital and necessary step for any master planning. In order to estimate available funding, an analysis of revenues, expenditures and recurring capital costs was conducted. A scenario-based approach to the analysis was employed details are provided in later sections of this section. As part of this evaluation, in the anticipated base-case scenario, it was determined that there would be approximately $34.5 million available by the fiscal year 2023, growing to approximately $138.8 million by FY 2034.1 Furthermore, an evaluation of alternative sources of funding for the capital fund was also undertaken. Key areas of focus include potential bond financing, tax rate increase from existing public sources of revenue and the possibility of the implementation of new taxes in support of the District’s facilities master plan. Both tax increases and new taxes were ranked as remote possibilities given an expectation of limited support and technical hurdles that would be challenging to overcome. However, the possibility of bond financing may be a viable option, potentially allowing the District to access capital sooner, provide expanded services to the community quicker, potentially limit construction cost escalation exposure, and fulfill the needs of potentially larger, more capital-intensive projects. Financing infrastructure through borrowings would be done at the expense of less additional revenue available to the capital fund throughout the period (and beyond, in the case of the long-term bond which extends $4.0 million payments through FY 2034). In summary, the District could potentially generate $68.0 million by issuing a long-term bond (20 years) or $47.5 million by taking a short-term bond (10 years) in FY 2020. Notably, a financing transaction would come at the expense of future available cash flows. By the end of the projection period, the capital fund balance (without accounting for expenditures that are part of the master plan) would be $130.6 million for the long-term bond option and $131.1 million for the medium-term bond scenario, both are less than the $138.8 million available to pay-as-you-go financed projects.

1

The financial analysis contained herein is through FY 2034, which represents 15 years from the current period (FY 2019).

Applied Analysis | Page 1


FY '20 FY '21 $50.0 M

$49.8 M

FY '22 FY '23 FY '24 FY '25 FY '26 FY '27 FY '28

$90.8 M

FY '29 FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33

$130.6 M $131.1 M $138.8 M

$120.3 M $116.8 M $124.5 M

$111.2 M $103.7 M $111.4 M

$103.3 M $91.8 M $99.5 M

$96.5 M $81.0 M $88.7 M

$71.3 M $79.0 M

$66.5 M $70.2 M

$86.0 M

$81.4 M

$77.7 M

$61.9 M $61.6 M

$58.2 M $53.9 M

$74.4 M

$72.1 M

Medium Term Bond

$55.0 M $46.6 M

$52.6 M $40.3 M

$70.3 M

$69.4 M

$69.3 M

$68.0 M

Long Term Bond

$50.8 M $34.5 M

$29.6 M

$25.5 M

$21.9 M

$47.5 M

Capital Fund Balance by Bond Scenario – Inflation Unadjusted (Base Scenario)

Pay-As-You-Go

FY '34

Applied Analysis | Page 2


Detailed Results and Methodology Forecasting the availability of capital funds through 2034 required the forecasting of general fund revenues, expenditures, and ending fund balances. Detailed results of revenues for the various models can be seen beginning on page 15.

Revenues Revenues for the District are largely comprised of property taxes, consolidated tax (sales tax) and other sources of revenues (e.g., charges for services). In the fiscal year 2018 budget, property taxes are expected to account for 60% of revenues and consolidated tax represents another 33% of revenues. It is important to note that property tax revenues are impacted by statutory limitations on the amount that a property tax payers annual tax bill can rise.2 For revenue modeling purposes, a range of forecasts scenarios were developed: a low (conservative) scenario, a base-case (or mid-range) scenario and high (aggressive) scenario. While revenues have the potential to fluctuate in any given year, the long-range forecast is designed to provide an order of magnitude estimate. For the base forecast, it is assumed that property taxes will grow at 4.6% to 5.1% per year through the period largely as a result of the property tax abatement cap. Although the assessed values of property within the state may not grow at this rate, there is still a significant amount of value of LVCCLD property tax funding that is abated. Under the abatement cap, residential property is generally capped at 3% growth in taxes each year, other property types grow at 8%, and both have alternative minimum cap that equals the greater of double the CPI inflation index growth or the 10-year average annual assessed value change for homes. In addition, new developments will not have abated value to begin with and will pay full assessed value on the first year of taxes. With these justifications in mind, we feel that a 4.6% to 5.1% growth rate over the next 15 years in property taxes is a reasonable expectation. In terms of consolidated taxes, we anticipate growth in the 3.3% to 3.9% range over the 15-year forecast horizon. Consolidated taxes are largely a result of the 1.75% portion of the statewide sales tax dedicated to supplemental city-county tax relief. This supplement is gathered at the state level and distributed based on complex population formula to each county, city and special District in the state, including the LVCCLD. In general, the consolidated tax is estimated to grow at roughly the same pace as the overall economy plus inflation growth during this time. Finally, other revenues, including charges for services, are estimated to grow at a rate of 4.2% to 4.6% per year. In total, revenue is anticipated to increase from $69.4 million in FY 2020 to $129.9 million in FY 2034. For the low and high forecast, growth rates for all revenue sources were adjusted upward or downward by one percentage point in each direction. A summary of the rates used in the forecast growth rate estimates are provided in the table below. Finally, charts including base case revenues by type and a forecasted range for revenues over the period are provided on the following page. Summary of Revenue Growth Rate Estimates Property Tax Sales Tax Other Revenues

2

See http://www.lvccld.org/pdfs/publications/adpt_budget_17-18.pdf.

Base (Medium)

Low

High

4.6 – 5.1 percent 3.3 – 3.9 percent 4.2 – 4.6 percent

3.6 – 4.1 percent 2.3 – 2.9 percent 3.2 – 3.6 percent

4.6 – 6.1 percent 4.3 – 4.9 percent 5.2 – 5.6 percent

Applied Analysis | Page 3


Base Case Revenues by Type Property Tax

Consolidated Tax

Other

$79.1 M

$82.8 M

$69.4 M

$72.4 M

$75.7 M

$86.6 M

FY '20

FY '21

FY '22

FY '23

FY '24

FY '25

$90.6 M

$94.8 M

$99.2 M

FY '26

FY '27

FY '28

$103.7 M $108.5 M

FY '29

FY '30

$113.5 M

FY '31

$118.7 M

FY '32

$124.2 M

FY '33

$129.9 M

FY '34

Forecasted Range of General Fund Revenues $160.0 M

+$19.9 M

$140.0 M

$129.9 M

$120.0 M

-$17.4 M

$100.0 M $80.0 M $60.0 M $40.0 M $20.0 M $0.0 M FY '20

FY '21

FY '22

FY '23

FY '24

FY '25

FY '26

FY '27

Range (High to Low)

FY '28

FY '29

FY '30

FY '31

FY '32

FY '33

FY '34

Base Applied Analysis | Page 4


Expenditures Expenditures within the general fund primarily consists of labor; salaries, wages, and benefits, which account for 70% of the District’s operating expenditures. The remaining portion of the budget goes towards funding library materials, other services and supplies and administrative costs. The expenditure side of the general fund model follows the same general trend lines in revenues. The expenditure modeling contained herein relies on information about union contracts, expected operating costs and other factors sourced to District staff. The growth in labor expenditures is estimated to be 4.0% through FY 2021, after which the growth rate increases to 4.7% through FY 2034.The growth in services and supplies is anticipated to grow 1.5% through FY 2021 and 2.0% through FY 2034. Finally, library materials are anticipated to grow at the average growth of the other two categories throughout the period. It is worth noting that the District’s expenditures have the potential to fall short of expectations in any given year. Cost savings can occur for any number of reasons, but in the event a position remains vacant longer than expected, there may be additional savings. After these budgets and savings are considered, the net expenditure is anticipated to grow from $63.7 million in FY 2020 to $111.1 million in FY 2034.

Expenditures by Category Salaries & Wages

Benefits

$68.5 M

$74.2 M

$63.7 M

$65.9 M

$71.3 M

$77.2 M

FY '20

FY '21

FY '22

FY '23

FY '24

FY '25

Supplies & Services

Total Expenditures After Savings

$80.4 M

$83.6 M

$87.1 M

$90.7 M

FY '26

FY '27

FY '28

FY '29

$94.4 M

FY '30

$98.3 M

FY '31

$102.4 M

FY '32

$106.7 M

FY '33

$111.1 M

FY '34

Applied Analysis | Page 5


Capital Fund Finally, after total revenues and expenditures are considered, the amount available to the capital fund is calculated. Each year the general fund reserves are diminished to approximately 10% of expenditures, a fairly reasonable target and prudent financial management strategy. Guidelines set forth in the latest budget documents of LVCCLD call for a reserve between 5% and 10% each year. The difference between the revenues minus expenditures and the amount required to fulfill this obligation is reserved exclusively for the capital fund throughout the forecast period. Once the funds are in the capital fund, there is one other consideration. There are preexisting obligations for the capital fund such as furnishing current capital projects (i.e. the East Las Vegas Library) or to repair and replace existing facilities and equipment. In total, these expenditures will require $5.8 million in FY 2020, fall to $2.75 million and then grow to $4.0 million by FY 2029. After anticipated capital fund expenditures and transfers-in from the general fund are totaled, the net change in fund balance can be calculated. The net growth in the capital fund each year is shown on the following page. When these changes are summed over time, the total available capital fund can also be calculated, which is also shown on the following page. In summary, the base-case scenario is anticipated to generate $40.3 million in pay-as-you-go funding through 2024 and generate a total of $138.8 million through 2034. Note that this result does not consider any potential bonding or project costs resulting from developments in the master plan but represents the total cash available each year.

Capital Fund Expenditures & Transfers-in by Year $45.0 M $40.0 M $35.0 M $30.0 M $25.0 M $20.0 M $15.0 M $10.0 M $5.0 M $0.0 M FY '20

+$19.9 M

$18.3 M

-$17.5 M FY '21

FY '22

FY '23

FY '24

FY '25

Range of Transfers-in (High to Low)

FY '26

FY '27

FY '28

Transfers-in (Base Scenario)

FY '29

FY '30

FY '31

FY '32

FY '33

FY '34

Existing Capital Fund Expenditures

Applied Analysis | Page 6


Net Capital Fund Growth by Year (Base Scenario)

$11.3 M

$3.6 M

FY '20

FY '21

$4.2 M

FY '22

$4.9 M

FY '23

$5.8 M

FY '24

$6.4 M

FY '25

$7.3 M

$7.7 M

FY '26

FY '27

$8.6 M

$8.8 M

FY '28

FY '29

$9.7 M

FY '30

$10.8 M

FY '31

$11.9 M

FY '32

$14.3 M

$13.1 M

FY '33

FY '34

Forecasted Range of Capital Fund Availability $300.0 M +$128.4 M

$250.0 M $200.0 M $150.0 M

$138.8 M $79.0 M

$100.0 M $40.3 M

$50.0 M $21.9 M $0.0 M FY '20

FY '21

-$116.9 M FY '22

FY '23

FY '24

FY '25

FY '26

FY '27

Range (High to Low)

FY '28

FY '29

FY '30

FY '31

FY '32

FY '33

FY '34

Base

Applied Analysis | Page 7


Alternative Funding Strategies Finally, the financial analysis considered alternative funding strategies for the LVCCLD. The potential alternative funding sources included bonding strategies, raising existing taxes or implementing new taxes. The following assesses each of these strategies. Bonding Strategies A potential funding strategy considered is the issuance of bonds to generate additional proceeds for investment in the District’s facilities. While bonding strategies would raise additional funding; this strategy would result in recurring debt services payments (principal and interest). Bond funding would potentially allow the District to mitigate against some construction cost inflation and advance implementation of its strategic plan quicker than a purely pay-as-you-go funding model. Two bond options have been estimated by the District’s financial advisors – Hobbs, Ong and Associates and PFM - one for a medium-term 10-year bond and one for a longer-term bond of 20 years. The ramifications of both these bonds on the available capital project fund spending are included below and in detail on page 24. The final chart of the section includes a comparison of the resulting capital projects fund for payas-you-go, medium term bond, and long-term bond financing after being adjusted for construction cost inflation.

FY '22

FY '24

FY '25

FY '26

FY '27

FY '28

FY '29

FY '30

FY '31

FY '32

FY '33

$138.8 M

$124.5 M

$116.8 M

$111.4 M

$103.7 M

$99.5 M

$91.8 M

$88.7 M

$81.0 M

$79.0 M

$71.3 M

$70.2 M

$66.5 M

$61.6 M

$61.9 M

$53.9 M

$58.2 M

$46.6 M

$55.0 M

$52.6 M

$50.8 M

FY '23

$40.3 M

FY '21

$34.5 M

$25.5 M

FY '20

$29.6 M

$49.8 M $21.9 M

$47.5 M

Pay-As-You-Go

$50.0 M

Medium Term Bond

$131.1 M

Medium Term Bond Capital Fund End of Year Balance (Base Case Revenue Scenario)

FY '34

Applied Analysis | Page 8


FY '23

FY '25

FY '26

FY '27

FY '28

FY '29

FY '30

FY '31

FY '32

FY '33

$138.8 M

$124.5 M

$120.3 M

$111.4 M

$111.2 M

$99.5 M

$103.3 M

$88.7 M

$96.5 M

$79.0 M

$90.8 M

$70.2 M

$86.0 M

$81.4 M

$77.7 M

$74.4 M

FY '24

$61.6 M

$34.5 M

FY '22

$53.9 M

$29.6 M

FY '21

$46.6 M

$25.5 M

FY '20

$40.3 M

$72.1 M

$70.3 M

$69.3 M $21.9 M

$68.0 M

Pay-As-You-Go

$69.4 M

Long Term Bond

$130.6 M

Long Term Bond Capital Fund End of Year Balance (Base Case Revenue Scenario)

FY '34

Note: The long term bond continues to have debt obligations of $4.0 million each year through 2039, which are not reflected in the forecast period above.

$58.3 M $44.4 M $44.2 M

$59.8 M $46.3 M $48.8 M

$61.3 M $48.2 M $53.4 M

$63.3 M $53.2 M $58.2 M

$65.8 M $58.5 M $63.4 M

FY '24

FY '25

FY '26

FY '27

FY '28

FY '29

FY '30

FY '31

FY '32

$72.2 M $70.1 M $74.7 M

$57.4 M $43.0 M $39.8 M

FY '23

$68.8 M $64.1 M $68.9 M

$56.6 M $41.8 M $35.5 M

FY '22

Pay-As-You-Go

$56.5 M $41.2 M $31.5 M

FY '21

$24.6 M

$57.7 M $41.5 M

Medium Term Bond

$56.7 M $41.0 M $27.8 M

FY '20

$21.8 M

$19.3 M

$41.9 M

$59.3 M $42.6 M

$60.0 M

Long Term Bond

FY '33

$76.1 M $76.4 M $80.9 M

Long Term Bond and Medium Term Bond Adjusted For Construction Cost Escalation – 2018 Dollars (Base Case Revenue Scenario)

FY '34

Applied Analysis | Page 9


Incremental Tax Revenues from Existing Sources Tax increases were considered as a possible source for funding the planned developments of the LVCCLD as part of the facilities master plan. Currently, the majority of District revenues are sourced to property tax and a share of the consolidated tax. Both revenues present unique difficulties in enacting and raising significant new revenues. Property taxes, as previously discussed in the Revenue section of this document, have significantly capped increases. Currently, at least 95% of all property value in the county falls under the property tax cap. Additionally, revenue is also capped in redevelopment areas, where any incremental revenue would not inure to the District but rather to the redevelopment agency. This applies to roughly 4.3% of all value in the county. Applying both limitations to LVCCLD property tax rate increases suggests that doubling the property tax rate in the District would results in an increase of just $2.1 million of revenue in FY 2020, or 4.9% over existing revenues. The viability and utility of such a tax increase has been deemed infeasible for purposes of this analysis. Additional Property Taxes Raised by Doubling the Rate

$2.1 M

$2.2 M

$2.3 M

FY '20

FY '21

FY '22

$2.4 M

$2.6 M

$2.7 M

$2.8 M

FY '23

FY '24

FY '25

FY '26

$3.0 M

$3.1 M

$3.3 M

FY '27

FY '28

FY '29

$3.4 M

FY '30

$3.6 M

FY '31

$3.8 M

FY '32

$4.0 M

FY '33

$4.2 M

FY '34

Consolidated taxes are also difficult to raise, as their distribution is the result of a complex, statewide statutory formula based on population. Short of increasing the underlying basic and supplemental city-county relief component of the sales tax, cigarette tax, liquor tax, real estate transfer taxes or government service taxes statewide, there is not a substantial way of increasing taxes received by the District.

Applied Analysis | Page 10


Incremental Tax Revenues Sourced to the Implementation of New Taxes This analysis also considered a number of incremental revenues given the existing tax framework across the state of Nevada. Below is a table that considers nearly every government revenue stream in the state and Clark County, its current rates, the incremental rate change, and the anticipated revenue generation from a rate change for the next two fiscal years for the state or county. These sources of revenue are not considered to be readily available to the District and would require significant political effort to enact, but are included below as a hypothetical of what revenues libraries state or county-wide could see from the additional tax change. New Tax Revenue Generated (State or County Level, NOT at LVCCLD Level)

Source BUSINESS TAXES & FEES Commerce Tax Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting Mining, Quarrying and Oil and Gas Extraction Utilities Construction Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Air, Rail, and Truck Transportation* Other Transportation Warehousing and Storage Publishing, Software and Data Processing Telecommunications Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Support Services Waste Management and Remediation Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment and Recreation Accommodation Food Services and Drinking Places Other Services Unclassified Business Business License Fee MODIFIED BUSINESS TAX Nonfinancial Financial

Current Rate

Incremental Rate Change

0.063% 0.051% 0.136% 0.083% 0.091% 0.101% 0.111% 0.058% 0.128% 0.129% 0.253% 0.136% 0.111% 0.250% 0.181% 0.137% 0.154% 0.261% 0.281% 0.190% 0.240% 0.200% 0.194% 0.142% 0.128% $200.00

0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% 0.250% $1.00

1.475% 2.000%

0.250% 0.250%

Incremental Revenue FY 2018

FY 2019

$360,990,170 $217,113 $444,113 $10,297,501 $17,600,427 $32,592,989 $53,445,374 $78,507,734 $504,610 $2,055,104 $1,599,604 $7,267,336 $8,332,009 $9,014,640 $23,277,731 $12,756,099 $481,512 $8,078,218 $2,433,154 $775,107 $22,186,551 $8,103,034 $41,972,700 $15,072,146 $2,485,349 $1,490,015 $527,795 $106,230,521 $99,656,271 $3,727,375

$378,317,295 $227,534 $465,430 $10,791,769 $18,445,228 $34,157,416 $56,010,692 $82,276,018 $528,830 $2,153,747 $1,676,383 $7,616,160 $8,731,937 $9,447,333 $24,395,036 $13,368,377 $504,624 $8,465,964 $2,549,942 $812,311 $23,251,481 $8,491,971 $43,987,342 $15,795,592 $2,604,643 $1,561,534 $531,705 $111,208,570 $104,361,695 $3,921,500 Applied Analysis | Page 11


Source Mining Branch Bank Excise Tax Incorporation Fees Uniform Commercial Code Unemployment Insurance DRUG TAXES Retail Marijuana Excise Tax RECREATIONAL LICENSE FEES Application Fee Initial Retail License Initial Cultivation License Initial Production License Initial Laboratory License Renewal Retail License Renewal Cultivation License Renewal Production License Renewal Laboratory License MEDICAL LICENSE FEES Initial Retail License Initial Cultivation License Initial Production License Initial Laboratory License Renewal Retail License Renewal Cultivation License Renewal Production License Renewal Laboratory License Wholesale Marijuana Excise Tax EXCISE TAXES Cigarette Tax Other Tobacco Tax Liquor Tax FUEL TAXES Fuel Tax - State Share Fuel Tax - County Share County Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Special Fuel Tax (Diesel) Jet Fuel Tax GAMING TAXES STATE TAXES GROSS GAMING REVENUE TAX

Current Rate 2.000% $7,000.00 $110.00 Varies -

Incremental Rate Change 0.250% $1.00 $1.00 -

10.00%

0.25%

$5,000 $20,000 $30,000 $10,000 $15,000 $6,600 $10,000 $3,300 $5,000

$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00

$30,000 $3,000 $3,000 $5,000 $5,000 $1,000 $1,000 $3,000 15.00%

Incremental Revenue FY 2018 $2,846,875 $398 $253,845 $0 -

FY 2019 $2,925,375 $400 $255,782 $0 -

$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 0.25%

$662,093 $228 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $51 $100 $69 $8 $1,312 $0 $0 $0 $0 $67 $1,004 $227 $14 $397,397

$926,370 $228 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $51 $100 $69 $8 $1,312 $0 $0 $0 $0 $67 $1,004 $227 $14 $539,583

$1.80 30.00% $0.00

$1.00 0.25% $0.00

$95,876,111 $125,717 $8,254,864

$94,530,556 $130,592 $8,350,124

$0.18 $0.05 $0.10 $0.37 $0.03

$0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01

$12,434,389 $41,021,862 $16,388,711 $2,404,574 $3,900,681

$12,827,880 $42,320,014 $16,907,338 $2,431,591 $4,024,120

$28,168,619

$28,960,086 Applied Analysis | Page 12


Source First $50,000 of Month Next $84,000 Revenue Exceeding $134,000 OTHER STATE GAMING TAXES AND FEES Pari-mutuel Tax Racing Fees Flat Fees-Restricted Slots Non-Restricted Slots Quarterly Fees-Games Advance License Fees Slot Machine Route Operator Gaming Info Systems Annual Interactive Gaming Fee - Operator Interactive Gaming Fee - Service Provider Interactive Gaming Fee - Manufacturer Equip Mfg. License Expired Slot Machine Wagering Vouchers LOCAL TAXES GROSS GAMING REVENUE TAX First $150,000 of Month Next $250,000 Revenue Exceeding $400,000 OTHER LOCAL GAMING TAXES AND FEES Quarterly Fees-Restricted Slots Quarterly Fees-Slot Machine Route Operator Quarterly Fees-Unrestricted Slots Quarterly Fees-Tables Quarterly Fees-Poker INSURANCE TAXES Insurance Premium Tax Insurance Retaliatory Tax Captive Insurer Premium Tax LODGING TAXES State Fund for Tourism Promotion COUNTY TAXES Lodging Tax Initiative Education School District Fund LVCVA LVCVA Expansion Transportation District

Current Rate 3.50% 4.50% 6.75%

Incremental Rate Change 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%

$500.00 $1.00 $0.05 $0.00 $100.00 $1.00 $250.00 $1.00 $324.00 $1.00 Blending of Other Increases $500.00 $1.00 $6,000.00 $1.00 $250,000.00 $1.00 $1,000.00 $1.00 $25,000.00 $1.00 $1,000.00 $1.00 75.00% 0.25%

Incremental Revenue FY 2018 $505,500 $849,240 $26,813,879 $149,673 $7 $556 $81,280 $42,232 $19,920 $5,606 $66 $6 $2 $55 $4 $273 $29,427

FY 2019 $507,000 $851,760 $27,601,326 $149,960 $7 $556 $81,930 $41,832 $19,948 $5,617 $65 $6 $2 $54 $4 $272 $30,447 $26,011,991 $255,000 $425,000 $25,331,991 $689,400 $74,676 $220 $588,844 $22,572 $3,088

0.30% 0.40% 0.55%

0.25% 0.25% 0.25%

$39.50 $225.00 $30.00 $150.00 $75.00

$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 $1.00

$25,269,886 $255,000 $425,000 $24,589,886 $689,400 $74,676 $220 $588,844 $22,572 $3,088

3.50% 3.50% 0.52%

0.25% 0.25% 0.25%

$26,553,786 $14,579 $540,060

$27,757,857 $14,579 $558,849

0.38%

0.25%

$17,088,390

$18,072,812

3.00% 1.63% 5.00% 0.50% 1.00%

0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%

$13,821,673 $14,666,526 $13,724,760 $13,724,760 $15,040,275

$14,098,106 $14,959,856 $13,999,255 $13,999,255 $15,341,081 Applied Analysis | Page 13


Source County Stadium District-Primary Gaming Corridor Stadium District-Non PGC MINING TAXES Net Proceeds of Minerals MISCELLANEOUS TAXES AND FEES Athletic Commission Fees Statewide Car Rental Tax Local Car Rental Tax Option Live Entertainment Tax Tire Tax Transportation Network Tax (Cabs/Uber) SALES AND USE TAXES Sales and Use Tax - State Local School Support Tax (Statewide) Basic City-County Relief Tax (Statewide) Supplemental City-County Relief Tax (Statewide) Public Mass Transit (Clark County) Infrastructure (Clark County) Flood Control (Clark County) More Cops (Clark County) PROPERTY TAXES State Property Tax CCSD Property Tax Clark County Property Tax Average City Rate Average Town Rate Average Special District Rate PROPERTY TAXES WITHOUT ABATEMENT ON CHANGE State Property Tax CCSD Property Tax Clark County Property Tax Average City Rate Average Town Rate Average Special District Rate

Incremental Revenue

Current Rate 1.00% 0.88% 0.50%

Incremental Rate Change 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%

FY 2018 $15,546,298 $6,862,380 $6,862,380

FY 2019 $15,857,224 $6,999,628 $6,999,628

2.44%

0.25%

$4,681,440

$4,714,004

10.00% 2.00% 9.00% $1.00 3.00%

0.25% 0.25% 0.25% $1.00 0.25%

$1,389,600 $1,174,651 $3,689,250 $2,001,214 $1,570,667

$1,424,100 $1,203,815 $3,795,306 $2,021,226 $2,068,250

2.00% 2.60% 0.50% 1.75% 0.50% 0.25% 0.25% 0.40%

0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25% 0.25%

$144,340,500 $144,346,154 $143,208,543 $143,208,543 $107,010,986 $107,010,986 $107,010,986 $107,010,986

$151,814,750 $151,820,513 $150,623,995 $150,623,995 $112,552,100 $112,552,100 $112,552,100 $112,552,100

$0.1700 $1.3034 $0.6541 $0.3778 $0.1049 $0.4645

$0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100

$434,252 $292,656 $286,093 $282,834 $285,872 $381,909

$443,892 $299,153 $292,444 $289,113 $292,218 $390,388

$0.1700 $1.3034 $0.6541 $0.3778 $0.1049 $0.4645

$0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100 $0.0100

$8,685,041 $5,853,117 $5,721,862 $5,656,687 $5,717,433 $7,638,188

$8,877,849 $5,983,056 $5,848,887 $5,782,266 $5,844,360 $7,807,755

It is important to note, the potential tax implications noted above have been included as order-of-magnitude estimates. The viability and practicality of any of these moving forward for the facilities master planning process is unlikely.

Applied Analysis | Page 14


Appendix – Detailed Financial Tables by Year General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Historical/Current Budget

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '10 $65,700,429 $46,845,382 $16,243,638 $2,611,409

FY '11 $62,099,716 $43,386,133 $15,622,697 $3,090,886

FY '12 $58,758,642 $39,609,264 $16,504,108 $2,645,270

FY '13 $57,004,507 $37,214,770 $17,366,883 $2,422,854

FY '14 $57,178,239 $36,674,034 $18,345,024 $2,159,181

FY '15 $58,325,876 $36,724,582 $19,457,174 $2,144,120

FY '16 $63,279,444 $37,865,551 $20,118,630 $5,295,263

FY '17 $61,810,779 $38,619,668 $21,019,709 $2,171,402

FY '18 $70,275,000 $39,640,000 $21,600,000 $9,035,000

FY '19 $66,665,000 $41,225,600 $23,097,470 $2,341,930

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$49,433,707 $32,995,973 $9,053,258 $7,384,476 N/A

$44,705,052 $30,672,926 $8,145,752 $5,886,374 N/A

$46,657,027 $30,969,707 $8,654,729 $7,032,591 N/A

$47,504,528 $30,812,965 $9,029,855 $7,661,708 N/A

$48,338,486 $32,170,162 $8,761,579 $7,406,745 N/A

$50,962,717 $33,544,679 $9,479,987 $7,938,051 N/A

$52,669,250 $35,284,765 $9,670,176 $7,714,309 N/A

$55,403,585 $36,830,028 $9,936,123 $8,637,434 N/A

$58,963,134 $42,334,732 $13,517,980 $9,904,500 -$6,794,078

$61,816,549 $43,155,137 $15,348,749 $10,234,678 -$6,922,015

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$11,315,117 -$5,000,000 -$6,315,117

-$8,903,500 -$3,774,000 -$5,129,500

-$7,629,500 $0 -$7,629,500

-$17,479,036 -$1,500,000 -$15,979,036

-$6,600,000 -$6,600,000 $0

-$8,100,000 -$8,100,000 $0

-$18,100,000 -$18,100,000 $0

$0 $0 $0

-$7,400,000 -$7,400,000 $0

-$7,000,000 -$7,000,000 $0

$4,951,605

$8,491,164

$4,472,115

-$7,979,057

$2,239,753

-$736,841

-$7,489,806

$6,407,194

$3,911,866

-$2,151,549

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$5,717,661 $10,669,266

$10,669,266 $19,160,430

$19,160,430 $23,632,545

$23,632,545 $15,653,488

$15,653,488 $17,893,241

$17,893,241 $17,156,400

$17,156,400 $9,666,594

$9,666,594 $16,073,788

$16,073,788 $19,985,654

$19,985,654 $17,834,105

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$75,956,598 $5,000,000 $0 $1,046,759 -$27,602,001 N/A $54,401,356

$54,401,356 $3,774,000 $0 $177,472 -$20,172,000 N/A $38,180,828

$38,180,828 $0 $0 $441,852 -$1,286,224 N/A $37,336,456

$37,336,456 $1,500,000 -$29,320,000 $16,498 -$2,535,959 N/A $6,996,995

$6,996,995 $6,600,000 $0 $50,566 -$3,015,162 N/A $10,632,399

$10,632,399 $8,100,000 $0 $118,866 -$2,742,718 N/A $16,108,547

$16,108,547 $18,100,000 $0 $7,193,326 -$3,881,381 N/A $37,520,492

$37,520,492 $0 $0 $34,468 -$4,651,737 N/A $32,903,223

$32,903,223 $7,400,000 $0 $0 -$24,816,600 N/A $15,486,623

$15,486,623 $7,000,000 $0 $0 -$11,826,603 N/A $10,660,020

Net change in fund balances

Applied Analysis | Page 15


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base (Medium) Scenario

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '20 $69,431,598 $43,121,978 $23,870,500 $2,439,120

FY '21 $72,383,164 $45,148,711 $24,691,645 $2,542,808

FY '22 $75,683,872 $47,444,566 $25,580,544 $2,658,761

FY '23 $79,140,251 $49,833,043 $26,527,024 $2,780,183

FY '24 $82,779,933 $52,335,489 $27,536,399 $2,908,045

FY '25 $86,612,664 $54,959,658 $28,610,318 $3,042,688

FY '26 $90,617,998 $57,711,272 $29,723,331 $3,183,395

FY '27 $94,803,498 $60,596,315 $30,876,752 $3,330,431

FY '28 FY '29 $99,177,049 $103,746,874 $63,621,040 $66,791,983 $32,071,937 $33,310,281 $3,484,073 $3,644,610

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$63,742,438 $44,898,605 $15,578,980 $10,422,280 -$7,157,427

$65,884,661 $46,712,508 $15,812,665 $10,775,147 -$7,415,659

$68,537,497 $48,922,197 $16,128,918 $11,210,450 -$7,724,068

$71,306,657 $51,236,412 $16,451,497 $11,664,857 -$8,046,108

$74,195,371 $53,660,099 $16,780,527 $12,139,240 -$8,384,495

$77,211,117 $56,198,437 $17,116,137 $12,634,516 -$8,737,973

$80,359,714 $58,856,848 $17,458,460 $13,151,642 -$9,107,235

$83,647,254 $61,641,012 $17,807,629 $13,691,618 -$9,493,005

$87,080,113 $64,556,878 $18,163,782 $14,255,495 -$9,896,041

$90,664,966 $67,610,677 $18,527,057 $14,844,369 -$10,317,138

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$17,100,000 -$17,100,000 $0

-$6,300,000 -$6,300,000 $0

-$6,900,000 -$6,900,000 $0

-$7,500,000 -$7,500,000 $0

-$8,300,000 -$8,300,000 $0

-$9,100,000 -$9,100,000 $0

-$10,000,000 -$10,800,000 -$10,000,000 -$10,800,000 $0 $0

-$11,700,000 -$11,700,000 $0

-$12,800,000 -$12,800,000 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$11,410,840

$198,502

$246,375

$333,594

$284,561

$301,547

$258,284

$356,243

$396,935

$281,908

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$17,834,105 $6,423,265

$6,423,265 $6,621,767

$6,621,767 $6,868,142

$6,868,142 $7,201,736

$7,201,736 $7,486,297

$7,486,297 $7,787,844

$7,787,844 $8,046,128

$8,046,128 $8,402,371

$8,402,371 $8,799,307

$8,799,307 $9,081,215

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$10,660,020 $17,100,000 $0 $0 -$5,835,000 $0 $21,925,020

$21,925,020 $6,300,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $25,475,020

$25,475,020 $6,900,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $29,625,020

$29,625,020 $7,500,000 $0 $0 -$2,630,000 $0 $34,495,020

$34,495,020 $8,300,000 $0 $0 -$2,530,000 $0 $40,265,020

$40,265,020 $9,100,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $46,635,020

$46,635,020 $10,000,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $53,905,020

$53,905,020 $10,800,000 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $61,585,020

$61,585,020 $11,700,000 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $70,165,020

$70,165,020 $12,800,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $78,965,020

Applied Analysis | Page 16


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base (Medium) Scenario, Continued

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33 FY '34 $108,521,544 $113,509,994 $118,721,540 $124,165,890 $129,853,167 $70,115,976 $73,600,159 $77,251,990 $81,079,265 $85,090,128 $34,593,224 $35,922,249 $37,298,883 $38,724,699 $40,201,319 $3,812,343 $3,987,586 $4,170,667 $4,361,926 $4,561,719

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Material Savings from Budget

$94,408,797 $70,808,932 $18,897,598 $15,459,390 -$10,757,124

$98,318,920 $102,402,989 $106,669,016 $111,125,389 $74,158,478 $77,666,471 $81,340,406 $85,188,132 $19,275,550 $19,661,061 $20,054,283 $20,455,368 $16,101,761 $16,772,740 $17,473,645 $18,205,855 -$11,216,869 -$11,697,283 -$12,199,317 -$12,723,966

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$13,700,000 -$13,700,000 $0

-$14,800,000 -$15,900,000 -$14,800,000 -$15,900,000 $0 $0

Net change in fund balances General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

-$17,100,000 -$18,300,000 -$17,100,000 -$18,300,000 $0 $0

$412,746

$391,074

$418,551

$396,874

$427,778

$9,081,215 $9,493,961

$9,493,961 $9,885,035

$9,885,035 $10,303,585

$10,303,585 $10,700,459

$10,700,459 $11,128,237

$78,965,020 $13,700,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $88,665,020

$88,665,020 $99,465,020 $111,365,020 $124,465,020 $14,800,000 $15,900,000 $17,100,000 $18,300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $99,465,020 $111,365,020 $124,465,020 $138,765,020

Applied Analysis | Page 17


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – High Scenario

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '20 $70,098,248 $43,534,234 $24,101,475 $2,462,539

FY '21 $73,779,112 $46,015,685 $25,171,580 $2,591,847

FY '22 $77,881,210 $48,815,784 $26,329,473 $2,735,953

FY '23 $82,216,664 $51,761,449 $27,566,958 $2,888,257

FY '24 $86,819,888 $54,878,348 $28,891,572 $3,049,968

FY '25 $91,707,738 $58,178,802 $30,307,259 $3,221,677

FY '26 FY '27 FY '28 FY '29 $96,865,606 $102,308,134 $108,050,746 $114,109,684 $61,673,374 $65,373,220 $69,290,121 $73,436,519 $31,789,360 $33,340,847 $34,964,821 $36,664,512 $3,402,872 $3,594,067 $3,795,804 $4,008,654

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$63,742,438 $44,898,605 $15,578,980 $10,422,280 -$7,157,427

$65,884,661 $46,712,508 $15,812,665 $10,775,147 -$7,415,659

$68,537,497 $48,922,197 $16,128,918 $11,210,450 -$7,724,068

$71,306,657 $51,236,412 $16,451,497 $11,664,857 -$8,046,108

$74,195,371 $53,660,099 $16,780,527 $12,139,240 -$8,384,495

$77,211,117 $56,198,437 $17,116,137 $12,634,516 -$8,737,973

$80,359,714 $58,856,848 $17,458,460 $13,151,642 -$9,107,235

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$17,800,000 -$17,800,000 $0

-$7,600,000 -$7,600,000 $0

-$9,100,000 -$9,100,000 $0

-$10,700,000 -$12,300,000 -$14,200,000 -$10,700,000 -$12,300,000 -$14,200,000 $0 $0 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$11,444,190

$294,451

$243,714

$210,007

$324,516

$296,621

$305,892

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$17,834,105 $6,389,915

$6,389,915 $6,684,366

$6,684,366 $6,928,079

$6,928,079 $7,138,087

$7,138,087 $7,462,603

$7,462,603 $7,759,224

$7,759,224 $8,065,116

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$10,660,020 $17,800,000 $0 $0 -$5,835,000 $0 $22,625,020

$22,625,020 $7,600,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $27,475,020

$27,475,020 $9,100,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $33,825,020

$33,825,020 $10,700,000 $0 $0 -$2,630,000 $0 $41,895,020

$41,895,020 $12,300,000 $0 $0 -$2,530,000 $0 $51,665,020

$51,665,020 $14,200,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $63,135,020

$63,135,020 $16,200,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $76,605,020

$83,647,254 $61,641,012 $17,807,629 $13,691,618 -$9,493,005

$87,080,113 $64,556,878 $18,163,782 $14,255,495 -$9,896,041

$90,664,966 $67,610,677 $18,527,057 $14,844,369 -$10,317,138

-$16,200,000 -$18,300,000 -$16,200,000 -$18,300,000 $0 $0

-$20,600,000 -$20,600,000 $0

-$23,100,000 -$23,100,000 $0

$360,880

$370,633

$344,719

$8,065,116 $8,425,996

$8,425,996 $8,796,628

$8,796,628 $9,141,347

$76,605,020 $91,785,020 $109,265,020 $18,300,000 $20,600,000 $23,100,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 -$3,120,000 -$4,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $91,785,020 $109,265,020 $128,365,020

Applied Analysis | Page 18


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – High Scenario, Continued

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33 FY '34 $120,502,056 $127,245,877 $134,360,118 $141,864,754 $149,780,822 $77,825,552 $82,471,091 $87,387,784 $92,591,092 $98,097,338 $38,443,288 $40,304,660 $42,252,286 $44,289,978 $46,421,709 $4,233,216 $4,470,126 $4,720,048 $4,983,684 $5,261,774

Expenditures Salaries, wages and benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$94,408,797 $70,808,932 $18,897,598 $15,459,390 -$10,757,124

$98,318,920 $102,402,989 $106,669,016 $111,125,389 $74,158,478 $77,666,471 $81,340,406 $85,188,132 $19,275,550 $19,661,061 $20,054,283 $20,455,368 $16,101,761 $16,772,740 $17,473,645 $18,205,855 -$11,216,869 -$11,697,283 -$12,199,317 -$12,723,966

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$25,700,000 -$25,700,000 $0

-$28,600,000 -$31,500,000 -$28,600,000 -$31,500,000 $0 $0

Net change in fund balances General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

-$34,800,000 -$38,200,000 -$34,800,000 -$38,200,000 $0 $0

$393,259

$326,957

$457,129

$395,738

$455,432

$9,141,347 $9,534,606

$9,534,606 $9,861,563

$9,861,563 $10,318,692

$10,318,692 $10,714,430

$10,714,430 $11,169,862

$128,365,020 $150,065,020 $174,665,020 $202,165,020 $232,965,020 $25,700,000 $28,600,000 $31,500,000 $34,800,000 $38,200,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $150,065,020 $174,665,020 $202,165,020 $232,965,020 $267,165,020

Applied Analysis | Page 19


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Low Scenario

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '20 $68,764,948 $42,709,722 $23,639,525 $2,415,701

FY '21 $71,000,548 $44,289,981 $24,216,330 $2,494,237

FY '22 $73,528,259 $46,099,270 $24,845,954 $2,583,035

FY '23 $76,150,995 $47,959,028 $25,516,795 $2,675,171

FY '24 $78,891,794 $49,887,778 $26,232,561 $2,771,455

FY '25 $81,755,707 $51,890,337 $26,993,305 $2,872,064

FY '26 $84,719,023 $53,969,379 $27,773,479 $2,976,165

FY '27 $87,785,042 $56,127,667 $28,573,501 $3,083,873

FY '28 $90,957,164 $58,368,059 $29,393,796 $3,195,309

FY '29 $94,238,899 $60,693,507 $30,234,795 $3,310,596

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$63,742,438 $44,898,605 $15,578,980 $10,422,280 -$7,157,427

$65,884,661 $46,712,508 $15,812,665 $10,775,147 -$7,415,659

$68,537,497 $48,922,197 $16,128,918 $11,210,450 -$7,724,068

$71,306,657 $51,236,412 $16,451,497 $11,664,857 -$8,046,108

$74,195,371 $53,660,099 $16,780,527 $12,139,240 -$8,384,495

$77,211,117 $56,198,437 $17,116,137 $12,634,516 -$8,737,973

$80,359,714 $58,856,848 $17,458,460 $13,151,642 -$9,107,235

$83,647,254 $61,641,012 $17,807,629 $13,691,618 -$9,493,005

$87,080,113 $64,556,878 $18,163,782 $14,255,495 -$9,896,041

$90,664,966 $67,610,677 $18,527,057 $14,844,369 -$10,317,138

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$16,400,000 -$16,400,000 $0

-$4,900,000 -$4,900,000 $0

-$4,800,000 -$4,800,000 $0

-$4,500,000 -$4,500,000 $0

-$4,400,000 -$4,400,000 $0

-$4,300,000 -$4,300,000 $0

-$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 $0

-$3,800,000 -$3,800,000 $0

-$3,600,000 -$3,600,000 $0

-$3,200,000 -$3,200,000 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$11,377,490

$215,886

$190,763

$344,338

$296,423

$244,589

$359,309

$337,788

$277,051

$373,933

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$17,834,105 $6,456,615

$6,456,615 $6,672,501

$6,672,501 $6,863,264

$6,863,264 $7,207,602

$7,207,602 $7,504,024

$7,504,024 $7,748,614

$7,748,614 $8,107,923

$8,107,923 $8,445,711

$8,445,711 $8,722,761

$8,722,761 $9,096,694

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$10,660,020 $16,400,000 $0 $0 -$5,835,000 $0 $21,225,020

$21,225,020 $4,900,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $23,375,020

$23,375,020 $4,800,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $25,425,020

$25,425,020 $4,500,000 $0 $0 -$2,630,000 $0 $27,295,020

$27,295,020 $4,400,000 $0 $0 -$2,530,000 $0 $29,165,020

$29,165,020 $4,300,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $30,735,020

$30,735,020 $4,000,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $32,005,020

$32,005,020 $3,800,000 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $32,685,020

$32,685,020 $3,600,000 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $33,165,020

$33,165,020 $3,200,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $32,365,020

Applied Analysis | Page 20


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Low Scenario, Continued

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33 FY '34 $97,633,866 $101,145,799 $104,778,550 $108,536,090 $112,422,516 $63,107,066 $65,611,893 $68,211,250 $70,908,510 $73,707,157 $31,096,938 $31,980,671 $32,886,447 $33,814,726 $34,765,975 $3,429,861 $3,553,234 $3,680,852 $3,812,854 $3,949,384

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$94,408,797 $70,808,932 $18,897,598 $15,459,390 -$10,757,124

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds Net change in fund balances General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$98,318,920 $102,402,989 $106,669,016 $111,125,389 $74,158,478 $77,666,471 $81,340,406 $85,188,132 $19,275,550 $19,661,061 $20,054,283 $20,455,368 $16,101,761 $16,772,740 $17,473,645 $18,205,855 -$11,216,869 -$11,697,283 -$12,199,317 -$12,723,966

-$2,800,000 -$2,800,000 $0

-$2,500,000 -$2,500,000 $0

-$1,900,000 -$1,900,000 $0

-$1,500,000 -$1,500,000 $0

-$800,000 -$800,000 $0

$425,068

$326,879

$475,561

$367,073

$497,127

$9,096,694 $9,521,762

$9,521,762 $9,848,641

$9,848,641 $10,324,202

$10,324,202 $10,691,275

$10,691,275 $11,188,402

$32,365,020 $2,800,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $31,165,020

$31,165,020 $2,500,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $29,665,020

$29,665,020 $1,900,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $27,565,020

$27,565,020 $1,500,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $25,065,020

$25,065,020 $800,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $21,865,020

Applied Analysis | Page 21


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Finance Department Provided Scenario

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '20 $69,431,598 $42,936,462 $24,056,015 $2,439,120

FY '21 $72,382,440 $44,761,262 $25,078,396 $2,542,783

FY '22 $75,639,650 $46,775,519 $26,206,924 $2,657,208

FY '23 $79,043,434 $48,880,417 $27,386,235 $2,776,782

FY '24 $82,679,432 $51,128,916 $28,646,002 $2,904,514

FY '25 $86,482,686 $53,480,847 $29,963,718 $3,038,122

FY '26 $90,460,890 $55,940,965 $31,342,049 $3,177,875

FY '27 $94,622,091 $58,514,250 $32,783,783 $3,324,058

FY '28 FY '29 $98,974,707 $103,527,544 $61,205,905 $64,021,377 $34,291,837 $35,869,262 $3,476,964 $3,636,905

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$63,742,438 $44,898,605 $15,578,980 $10,422,280 -$7,157,427

$65,884,661 $46,712,508 $15,812,665 $10,775,147 -$7,415,659

$68,537,497 $48,922,197 $16,128,918 $11,210,450 -$7,724,068

$71,306,657 $51,236,412 $16,451,497 $11,664,857 -$8,046,108

$74,195,371 $53,660,099 $16,780,527 $12,139,240 -$8,384,495

$77,211,117 $56,198,437 $17,116,137 $12,634,516 -$8,737,973

$80,359,714 $58,856,848 $17,458,460 $13,151,642 -$9,107,235

$83,647,254 $61,641,012 $17,807,629 $13,691,618 -$9,493,005

$87,080,113 $64,556,878 $18,163,782 $14,255,495 -$9,896,041

$90,664,966 $67,610,677 $18,527,057 $14,844,369 -$10,317,138

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$12,000,000 -$12,000,000 $0

-$6,500,000 -$6,500,000 $0

-$6,500,000 -$6,500,000 $0

-$7,500,000 -$7,500,000 $0

-$8,000,000 -$8,000,000 $0

-$8,900,000 -$8,900,000 $0

-$10,500,000 -$11,500,000 -$10,500,000 -$11,500,000 $0 $0

-$13,000,000 -$13,000,000 $0

-$13,000,000 -$13,000,000 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$6,310,840

-$2,221

$602,153

$236,778

$484,061

$371,569

-$398,824

-$525,163

-$1,105,406

-$137,422

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$17,834,105 $11,523,265

$11,523,265 $11,521,044

$11,521,044 $12,123,197

$12,123,197 $12,359,974

$12,359,974 $12,844,035

$12,844,035 $13,215,605

$13,215,605 $12,816,780

$12,816,780 $12,291,617

$12,291,617 $11,186,211

$11,186,211 $11,048,788

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$10,660,020 $12,000,000 $0 $0 -$5,835,000 $0 $16,825,020

$16,825,020 $6,500,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $20,575,020

$20,575,020 $6,500,000 $0 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $24,325,020

$24,325,020 $7,500,000 $0 $0 -$2,630,000 $0 $29,195,020

$29,195,020 $8,000,000 $0 $0 -$2,530,000 $0 $34,665,020

$34,665,020 $8,900,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $40,835,020

$40,835,020 $10,500,000 $0 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $48,605,020

$48,605,020 $11,500,000 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $56,985,020

$56,985,020 $13,000,000 $0 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $66,865,020

$66,865,020 $13,000,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $75,865,020

Applied Analysis | Page 22


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Finance Department Provided Scenario, Continued

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33 FY '34 $108,289,811 $113,271,142 $118,481,614 $123,931,769 $129,632,630 $66,966,360 $70,046,813 $73,268,966 $76,639,339 $80,164,748 $37,519,248 $39,245,133 $41,050,409 $42,938,728 $44,913,910 $3,804,202 $3,979,196 $4,162,239 $4,353,702 $4,553,972

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$94,408,797 $70,808,932 $18,897,598 $15,459,390 -$10,757,124

$98,318,920 $102,402,989 $106,669,016 $111,125,389 $74,158,478 $77,666,471 $81,340,406 $85,188,132 $19,275,550 $19,661,061 $20,054,283 $20,455,368 $16,101,761 $16,772,740 $17,473,645 $18,205,855 -$11,216,869 -$11,697,283 -$12,199,317 -$12,723,966

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$14,000,000 -$14,000,000 $0

-$16,000,000 -$16,000,000 -$16,000,000 -$16,000,000 $0 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$18,000,000 -$19,000,000 -$18,000,000 -$19,000,000 $0 $0

-$118,987

-$1,047,778

$78,625

-$737,248

-$492,759

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$11,048,788 $10,929,802

$10,929,802 $9,882,023

$9,882,023 $9,960,649

$9,960,649 $9,223,401

$9,223,401 $8,730,642

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$75,865,020 $14,000,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $85,865,020

$85,865,020 $97,865,020 $109,865,020 $123,865,020 $16,000,000 $16,000,000 $18,000,000 $19,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $97,865,020 $109,865,020 $123,865,020 $138,865,020

Applied Analysis | Page 23


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Medium Term Bond

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '10 $65,700,429 $46,845,382 $16,243,638 $2,611,409

FY '11 $62,099,716 $43,386,133 $15,622,697 $3,090,886

FY '12 $58,758,642 $39,609,264 $16,504,108 $2,645,270

FY '13 $57,004,507 $37,214,770 $17,366,883 $2,422,854

FY '14 $57,178,239 $36,674,034 $18,345,024 $2,159,181

FY '15 $58,325,876 $36,724,582 $19,457,174 $2,144,120

FY '16 $63,279,444 $37,865,551 $20,118,630 $5,295,263

FY '17 $61,810,779 $38,619,668 $21,019,709 $2,171,402

FY '18 $70,275,000 $39,640,000 $21,600,000 $9,035,000

FY '19 $66,665,000 $41,225,600 $23,097,470 $2,341,930

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$49,433,707 $32,995,973 $9,053,258 $7,384,476 N/A

$44,705,052 $30,672,926 $8,145,752 $5,886,374 N/A

$46,657,027 $30,969,707 $8,654,729 $7,032,591 N/A

$47,504,528 $30,812,965 $9,029,855 $7,661,708 N/A

$48,338,486 $32,170,162 $8,761,579 $7,406,745 N/A

$50,962,717 $33,544,679 $9,479,987 $7,938,051 N/A

$52,669,250 $35,284,765 $9,670,176 $7,714,309 N/A

$55,403,585 $36,830,028 $9,936,123 $8,637,434 N/A

$58,963,134 $42,334,732 $13,517,980 $9,904,500 -$6,794,078

$61,816,549 $43,155,137 $15,348,749 $10,234,678 -$6,922,015

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$11,315,117 -$5,000,000 -$6,315,117

-$8,903,500 -$3,774,000 -$5,129,500

-$7,629,500 $0 -$7,629,500

-$17,479,036 -$1,500,000 -$15,979,036

-$6,600,000 -$6,600,000 $0

-$8,100,000 -$8,100,000 $0

-$18,100,000 -$18,100,000 $0

$0 $0 $0

-$7,400,000 -$7,400,000 $0

-$7,000,000 -$7,000,000 $0

$4,951,605

$8,491,164

$4,472,115

-$7,979,057

$2,239,753

-$736,841

-$7,489,806

$6,407,194

$3,911,866

-$2,151,549

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$5,717,661 $10,669,266

$10,669,266 $19,160,430

$19,160,430 $23,632,545

$23,632,545 $15,653,488

$15,653,488 $17,893,241

$17,893,241 $17,156,400

$17,156,400 $9,666,594

$9,666,594 $16,073,788

$16,073,788 $19,985,654

$19,985,654 $17,834,105

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$75,956,598 $5,000,000 $0 $1,046,759 -$27,602,001 N/A $54,401,356

$54,401,356 $3,774,000 $0 $177,472 -$20,172,000 N/A $38,180,828

$38,180,828 $0 $0 $441,852 -$1,286,224 N/A $37,336,456

$37,336,456 $1,500,000 -$29,320,000 $16,498 -$2,535,959 N/A $6,996,995

$6,996,995 $6,600,000 $0 $50,566 -$3,015,162 N/A $10,632,399

$10,632,399 $8,100,000 $0 $118,866 -$2,742,718 N/A $16,108,547

$16,108,547 $18,100,000 $0 $7,193,326 -$3,881,381 N/A $37,520,492

$37,520,492 $0 $0 $34,468 -$4,651,737 N/A $32,903,223

$32,903,223 $7,400,000 $0 $0 -$24,816,600 N/A $15,486,623

$15,486,623 $7,000,000 $26,908,963 $0 -$11,826,603 N/A $37,568,983

Net change in fund balances

Applied Analysis | Page 24


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Medium Term Bond, Continued Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '20 $69,431,598 $43,121,978 $23,870,500 $2,439,120

FY '21 $72,383,164 $45,148,711 $24,691,645 $2,542,808

FY '22 $75,683,872 $47,444,566 $25,580,544 $2,658,761

FY '23 $79,140,251 $49,833,043 $26,527,024 $2,780,183

FY '24 $82,779,933 $52,335,489 $27,536,399 $2,908,045

FY '25 $86,612,664 $54,959,658 $28,610,318 $3,042,688

FY '26 $90,617,998 $57,711,272 $29,723,331 $3,183,395

FY '27 $94,803,498 $60,596,315 $30,876,752 $3,330,431

FY '28 FY '29 $99,177,049 $103,746,874 $63,621,040 $66,791,983 $32,071,937 $33,310,281 $3,484,073 $3,644,610

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$63,742,438 $44,898,605 $15,578,980 $10,422,280 -$7,157,427

$65,884,661 $46,712,508 $15,812,665 $10,775,147 -$7,415,659

$68,537,497 $48,922,197 $16,128,918 $11,210,450 -$7,724,068

$71,306,657 $51,236,412 $16,451,497 $11,664,857 -$8,046,108

$74,195,371 $53,660,099 $16,780,527 $12,139,240 -$8,384,495

$77,211,117 $56,198,437 $17,116,137 $12,634,516 -$8,737,973

$80,359,714 $58,856,848 $17,458,460 $13,151,642 -$9,107,235

$83,647,254 $61,641,012 $17,807,629 $13,691,618 -$9,493,005

$87,080,113 $64,556,878 $18,163,782 $14,255,495 -$9,896,041

$90,664,966 $67,610,677 $18,527,057 $14,844,369 -$10,317,138

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$17,100,000 -$17,100,000 $0

-$6,300,000 -$6,300,000 $0

-$6,900,000 -$6,900,000 $0

-$7,500,000 -$7,500,000 $0

-$8,300,000 -$8,300,000 $0

-$9,100,000 -$9,100,000 $0

-$10,000,000 -$10,800,000 -$10,000,000 -$10,800,000 $0 $0

-$11,700,000 -$11,700,000 $0

-$12,800,000 -$12,800,000 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$11,410,840

$198,502

$246,375

$333,594

$284,561

$301,547

$258,284

$356,243

$396,935

$281,908

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$17,834,105 $6,423,265

$6,423,265 $6,621,767

$6,621,767 $6,868,142

$6,868,142 $7,201,736

$7,201,736 $7,486,297

$7,486,297 $7,787,844

$7,787,844 $8,046,128

$8,046,128 $8,402,371

$8,402,371 $8,799,307

$8,799,307 $9,081,215

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$37,568,983 $17,100,000 -$1,291,750 $0 -$5,835,000 $0 $47,542,233

$47,542,233 $6,300,000 -$1,291,750 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $49,800,483

$49,800,483 $6,900,000 -$3,996,750 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $49,953,733

$49,953,733 $7,500,000 -$3,996,500 $0 -$2,630,000 $0 $50,827,233

$50,827,233 $8,300,000 -$3,999,500 $0 -$2,530,000 $0 $52,597,733

$52,597,733 $9,100,000 -$3,995,250 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $54,972,483

$54,972,483 $10,000,000 -$3,998,750 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $58,243,733

$58,243,733 $10,800,000 -$3,999,250 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $61,924,483

$61,924,483 $11,700,000 -$3,996,500 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $66,507,983

$66,507,983 $12,800,000 -$3,995,250 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $71,312,733

Applied Analysis | Page 25


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Medium Term Bond, Continued

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33 FY '34 $108,521,544 $113,509,994 $118,721,540 $124,165,890 $129,853,167 $70,115,976 $73,600,159 $77,251,990 $81,079,265 $85,090,128 $34,593,224 $35,922,249 $37,298,883 $38,724,699 $40,201,319 $3,812,343 $3,987,586 $4,170,667 $4,361,926 $4,561,719

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$94,408,797 $70,808,932 $18,897,598 $15,459,390 -$10,757,124

$98,318,920 $102,402,989 $106,669,016 $111,125,389 $74,158,478 $77,666,471 $81,340,406 $85,188,132 $19,275,550 $19,661,061 $20,054,283 $20,455,368 $16,101,761 $16,772,740 $17,473,645 $18,205,855 -$11,216,869 -$11,697,283 -$12,199,317 -$12,723,966

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$13,700,000 -$13,700,000 $0

-$14,800,000 -$15,900,000 -$14,800,000 -$15,900,000 $0 $0

Net change in fund balances General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

-$17,100,000 -$18,300,000 -$17,100,000 -$18,300,000 $0 $0

$412,746

$391,074

$418,551

$396,874

$427,778

$9,081,215 $9,493,961

$9,493,961 $9,885,035

$9,885,035 $10,303,585

$10,303,585 $10,700,459

$10,700,459 $11,128,237

$71,312,733 $13,700,000 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $81,012,733

$81,012,733 $91,812,733 $103,712,733 $116,812,733 $14,800,000 $15,900,000 $17,100,000 $18,300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $91,812,733 $103,712,733 $116,812,733 $131,112,733

Applied Analysis | Page 26


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Long Term Bond

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '10 $65,700,429 $46,845,382 $16,243,638 $2,611,409

FY '11 $62,099,716 $43,386,133 $15,622,697 $3,090,886

FY '12 $58,758,642 $39,609,264 $16,504,108 $2,645,270

FY '13 $57,004,507 $37,214,770 $17,366,883 $2,422,854

FY '14 $57,178,239 $36,674,034 $18,345,024 $2,159,181

FY '15 $58,325,876 $36,724,582 $19,457,174 $2,144,120

FY '16 $63,279,444 $37,865,551 $20,118,630 $5,295,263

FY '17 $61,810,779 $38,619,668 $21,019,709 $2,171,402

FY '18 $70,275,000 $39,640,000 $21,600,000 $9,035,000

FY '19 $66,665,000 $41,225,600 $23,097,470 $2,341,930

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$49,433,707 $32,995,973 $9,053,258 $7,384,476 N/A

$44,705,052 $30,672,926 $8,145,752 $5,886,374 N/A

$46,657,027 $30,969,707 $8,654,729 $7,032,591 N/A

$47,504,528 $30,812,965 $9,029,855 $7,661,708 N/A

$48,338,486 $32,170,162 $8,761,579 $7,406,745 N/A

$50,962,717 $33,544,679 $9,479,987 $7,938,051 N/A

$52,669,250 $35,284,765 $9,670,176 $7,714,309 N/A

$55,403,585 $36,830,028 $9,936,123 $8,637,434 N/A

$58,963,134 $42,334,732 $13,517,980 $9,904,500 -$6,794,078

$61,816,549 $43,155,137 $15,348,749 $10,234,678 -$6,922,015

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$11,315,117 -$5,000,000 -$6,315,117

-$8,903,500 -$3,774,000 -$5,129,500

-$7,629,500 $0 -$7,629,500

-$17,479,036 -$1,500,000 -$15,979,036

-$6,600,000 -$6,600,000 $0

-$8,100,000 -$8,100,000 $0

-$18,100,000 -$18,100,000 $0

$0 $0 $0

-$7,400,000 -$7,400,000 $0

-$7,000,000 -$7,000,000 $0

$4,951,605

$8,491,164

$4,472,115

-$7,979,057

$2,239,753

-$736,841

-$7,489,806

$6,407,194

$3,911,866

-$2,151,549

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$5,717,661 $10,669,266

$10,669,266 $19,160,430

$19,160,430 $23,632,545

$23,632,545 $15,653,488

$15,653,488 $17,893,241

$17,893,241 $17,156,400

$17,156,400 $9,666,594

$9,666,594 $16,073,788

$16,073,788 $19,985,654

$19,985,654 $17,834,105

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$75,956,598 $5,000,000 $0 $1,046,759 -$27,602,001 N/A $54,401,356

$54,401,356 $3,774,000 $0 $177,472 -$20,172,000 N/A $38,180,828

$38,180,828 $0 $0 $441,852 -$1,286,224 N/A $37,336,456

$37,336,456 $1,500,000 -$29,320,000 $16,498 -$2,535,959 N/A $6,996,995

$6,996,995 $6,600,000 $0 $50,566 -$3,015,162 N/A $10,632,399

$10,632,399 $8,100,000 $0 $118,866 -$2,742,718 N/A $16,108,547

$16,108,547 $18,100,000 $0 $7,193,326 -$3,881,381 N/A $37,520,492

$37,520,492 $0 $0 $34,468 -$4,651,737 N/A $32,903,223

$32,903,223 $7,400,000 $0 $0 -$24,816,600 N/A $15,486,623

$15,486,623 $7,000,000 $48,450,176 $0 -$11,826,603 N/A $59,110,196

Net change in fund balances

Applied Analysis | Page 27


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Long Term Bond, Continued Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '20 $69,431,598 $43,121,978 $23,870,500 $2,439,120

FY '21 $72,383,164 $45,148,711 $24,691,645 $2,542,808

FY '22 $75,683,872 $47,444,566 $25,580,544 $2,658,761

FY '23 $79,140,251 $49,833,043 $26,527,024 $2,780,183

FY '24 $82,779,933 $52,335,489 $27,536,399 $2,908,045

FY '25 $86,612,664 $54,959,658 $28,610,318 $3,042,688

FY '26 $90,617,998 $57,711,272 $29,723,331 $3,183,395

FY '27 $94,803,498 $60,596,315 $30,876,752 $3,330,431

FY '28 FY '29 $99,177,049 $103,746,874 $63,621,040 $66,791,983 $32,071,937 $33,310,281 $3,484,073 $3,644,610

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$63,742,438 $44,898,605 $15,578,980 $10,422,280 -$7,157,427

$65,884,661 $46,712,508 $15,812,665 $10,775,147 -$7,415,659

$68,537,497 $48,922,197 $16,128,918 $11,210,450 -$7,724,068

$71,306,657 $51,236,412 $16,451,497 $11,664,857 -$8,046,108

$74,195,371 $53,660,099 $16,780,527 $12,139,240 -$8,384,495

$77,211,117 $56,198,437 $17,116,137 $12,634,516 -$8,737,973

$80,359,714 $58,856,848 $17,458,460 $13,151,642 -$9,107,235

$83,647,254 $61,641,012 $17,807,629 $13,691,618 -$9,493,005

$87,080,113 $64,556,878 $18,163,782 $14,255,495 -$9,896,041

$90,664,966 $67,610,677 $18,527,057 $14,844,369 -$10,317,138

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$17,100,000 -$17,100,000 $0

-$6,300,000 -$6,300,000 $0

-$6,900,000 -$6,900,000 $0

-$7,500,000 -$7,500,000 $0

-$8,300,000 -$8,300,000 $0

-$9,100,000 -$9,100,000 $0

-$10,000,000 -$10,800,000 -$10,000,000 -$10,800,000 $0 $0

-$11,700,000 -$11,700,000 $0

-$12,800,000 -$12,800,000 $0

Net change in fund balances

-$11,410,840

$198,502

$246,375

$333,594

$284,561

$301,547

$258,284

$356,243

$396,935

$281,908

General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year

$17,834,105 $6,423,265

$6,423,265 $6,621,767

$6,621,767 $6,868,142

$6,868,142 $7,201,736

$7,201,736 $7,486,297

$7,486,297 $7,787,844

$7,787,844 $8,046,128

$8,046,128 $8,402,371

$8,402,371 $8,799,307

$8,799,307 $9,081,215

Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

$59,110,196 $17,100,000 -$2,336,250 $0 -$5,835,000 $0 $68,038,946

$68,038,946 $6,300,000 -$2,336,250 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $69,252,696

$69,252,696 $6,900,000 -$3,996,250 $0 -$2,750,000 $0 $69,406,446

$69,406,446 $7,500,000 -$3,998,250 $0 -$2,630,000 $0 $70,278,196

$70,278,196 $8,300,000 -$3,996,000 $0 -$2,530,000 $0 $72,052,196

$72,052,196 $9,100,000 -$3,999,500 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $74,422,696

$74,422,696 $10,000,000 -$3,998,250 $0 -$2,730,000 $0 $77,694,446

$77,694,446 $10,800,000 -$3,997,250 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $81,377,196

$81,377,196 $11,700,000 -$3,996,250 $0 -$3,120,000 $0 $85,960,946

$85,960,946 $12,800,000 -$3,995,000 $0 -$4,000,000 $0 $90,765,946

Applied Analysis | Page 28


General Fund Revenue, Expenditure and Capital Fund Availability – Base Scenario with Long Term Bond, Continued

Revenues Property Taxes Consolidated Tax Other

FY '30 FY '31 FY '32 FY '33 FY '34 $108,521,544 $113,509,994 $118,721,540 $124,165,890 $129,853,167 $70,115,976 $73,600,159 $77,251,990 $81,079,265 $85,090,128 $34,593,224 $35,922,249 $37,298,883 $38,724,699 $40,201,319 $3,812,343 $3,987,586 $4,170,667 $4,361,926 $4,561,719

Expenditures Salaries, Wages and Benefits Supplies and Services Library Materials Savings from Budget

$94,408,797 $70,808,932 $18,897,598 $15,459,390 -$10,757,124

$98,318,920 $102,402,989 $106,669,016 $111,125,389 $74,158,478 $77,666,471 $81,340,406 $85,188,132 $19,275,550 $19,661,061 $20,054,283 $20,455,368 $16,101,761 $16,772,740 $17,473,645 $18,205,855 -$11,216,869 -$11,697,283 -$12,199,317 -$12,723,966

Net Transfers from Fund To Capital Projects To Other Funds

-$13,700,000 -$13,700,000 $0

-$14,800,000 -$15,900,000 -$14,800,000 -$15,900,000 $0 $0

Net change in fund balances General Fund, beginning of year General Fund, end of year Capital Fund, beginning of year Transfers from General Fund Debt Transfers Other Revenue Capital Expenditures, Baseline Capital Expenditures, 2020 Plan Capital Fund, end of year

-$17,100,000 -$18,300,000 -$17,100,000 -$18,300,000 $0 $0

$412,746

$391,074

$418,551

$396,874

$427,778

$9,081,215 $9,493,961

$9,493,961 $9,885,035

$9,885,035 $10,303,585

$10,303,585 $10,700,459

$10,700,459 $11,128,237

$90,765,946 $96,467,696 $103,272,196 $111,175,446 $120,278,946 $13,700,000 $14,800,000 $15,900,000 $17,100,000 $18,300,000 -$3,998,250 -$3,995,500 -$3,996,750 -$3,996,500 -$3,999,500 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 -$4,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $96,467,696 $103,272,196 $111,175,446 $120,278,946 $130,579,446

Note: The long term bond continues to have debt obligations of $4.0 million each year through 2039, which are not reflected in the forecast period above.

Applied Analysis | Page 29


Community Needs Assessment 05 By CIVICTechnologies

LVCCLD Facilities Master Plan Framework

371


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Briefing Book June 19 and 20, 2017

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Workshop Objectives

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civictechnologies.com Toll free: 888.606.7600 Analytics 1


Super Groups Community Needs Assessment January 2015

Analytics 2


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Table of Contents

Page 1

1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 2.0 Super Group Summary...................................................................................................................................... 3 3.0 Super Group: Families with Children............................................................................................................. 14 4.0 Super Group: Professionals, Couples/Singles ............................................................................................. 37 5.0 Super Group: Seniors...................................................................................................................................... 57 Appendix: FAQs ..................................................................................................................................................... 77

Analytics 3


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

1.0 Introduction This document provides summary of Super Groups, as defined below, to support the community needs assessment and facilities planning process. The data and information provided in this document are from CommunityConnect, value added analysis to CommunityConnect data, and interactive workshops with over 90 District staff in September 2014.

Appendix

Page 2

The information provided for the Seniors Super Group mirrors the information presented for the Families with Children Super Group.

Seniors Super Group

The information provided for the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group mirrors the information presented for the Families with Children Super Group.

Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group

This includes a summary of information about this Super Group, data about each segment in this Super Group, information about the service areas in which this Super Group’s segments are located, findings about key segments prepared by Library staff during the planning workshop including similarities and differences, and the thematic statement for this Super Group.

Families with Children Super Group

This includes a summary of overall Super Group information and statistics such as population, customers and non customers, checkouts, market share and market potential, and customer growth potential; and a summary of Super Group statistics by service area.

Super Group Summary

This document is organized into the following sections: •

The appendix is an FAQ focused market segmentation, CommunityConnect, and measures used in this document.

Analytics 4


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

2.0 Super Group Summary 2.1 INTRODUCTION

Professionals, Couples/Singles

Seniors

Families with Children

Page 3

Super Groups are combinations of segments that share similar lifestyle and lifestage characteristics. Groups “roll up” individual segments characteristics. We have identified three super groups:

Super Group statistics in this report represent data from the top 24 segments ranked by population (these 24 segments represent 1,393,662 people or 90.7 percent of the District’s population). Table 2-1: Segments in Each Super Group

Inner City Tenants

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

Up And Coming Families

Exurbanites

In Style

Young And Restless

Old And Newcomers

Enterprising Professionals

Simple Living

Senior Sun Seekers

Retirement Communities

Silver And Gold

Prosperous Empty Nesters

Social Security Set

Super Group: Seniors

Milk And Cookies

Cozy And Comfortable

Super Group: Professionals, Couples/Singles

NeWest Residents

Midlife Junction

Super Group: Families with Children

Sophisticated Squires Boomburbs Main Street USA Crossroads City Dimensions

Analytics 5


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

2.2 LOCATION OF SUPER GROUPS Map 2-1: Super Group Segments by Block Group

Page 4

Analytics 6


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Map 2-2: Segments in the Families with Children Super Group by Block Group

Page 5

Analytics 7


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Map 2-3: Segments in the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group by Block Group

Page 6

Analytics 8


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Map 2-4: Segments in the Seniors Super Group by Block Group

Page 7

Analytics 9


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

2.3 SUMMARY OF SUPER GROUP STATISTICS The following table and figure displays key data about each Super Group.

345,074

Customers

202,325

597,521

Non Customers

3,303,122

7,243,457

21,922,455

Checkouts (1)

32.0%

35.2%

36.6%

Market Share

68.0%

64.8%

63.4%

Market Potential

6.8

32.5

290.0

Customer Growth Potential

Page 8

942,595 109,840 94,457

64.2%

Table 2-2: Super Group Statistical Summary

Families with Children 312,165 44,445 35.6%

Population

Seniors 138,902 32,469,034

Super Group

Professionals, Couples/Singles 894,303

312,165

Professionals, Couples/Singles

Seniors

138,902

499,359

942,595

Families with Children

Analytics 10

1,393,662

Total Super Group Population

1. Checkouts from 7.1.10 to 8.31.14

0

100,000

200,000

300,000

400,000

500,000

600,000

700,000

800,000

900,000

1,000,000

Figure 2-1: Super Groups by Population

Population


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION Page 9

The following table and figure displays the population share, customer share, and checkout share of each Super Group.

Families with Children 22%

68%

9%

22%

69%

Customer Share

100%

10%

22%

68%

Checkout Share

Table 2-3: Super Groups by Population Share, Customer Share, and Checkout Share

Seniors 10% 100%

Population Share

Professionals, Couples/Singles 100%

Segment

Total Super Group Population

68%

69% 68%

Families with Children

22%

Population Share

22%

Customer Share

22%

Professionals, Couples/Singles

10%

Seniors

9%

10%

Checkout Share

Figure 2-2: Super Groups by Population Share, Customer Share, and Checkout Share

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Analytics 11


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

597,521

345,074

Families with Children

109,840 Professionals, Couples/Singles

Customers

94,457 44,445 Seniors

Non Customers

The following figure represents the proportion of customers and non customers by Super Group.

1,000,000 900,000 800,000 700,000 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0

202,325

Figure 2-3: Super Groups by Customers and Non Customers

Population

Page 10

Analytics 12


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

2.4 SUPER GROUPS BY SERVICE AREA The following table displays information about the distribution of the three Super Groups by service area.

Las Vegas

Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley

Enterprise

Clark County

0

0

1,742

970

0

31,277

55,761

49,552

59,803

101,524

1,353

0.1%

0.0%

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

3.3%

5.9%

5.3%

6.3%

10.8%

0.1%

26,946

0

0

0

948

0

2,130

0

5,104

66,833

20,399

15,584

0

25.2%

8.6%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.3%

0.0%

0.7%

0.0%

1.6%

21.4%

6.5%

5.0%

0.0%

Professionals, Couples/ Singles: Pop Share

1,291

6,253

3,552

0

800

0

9,541

1,262

5,269

15,737

0

24,093

35,165

4,198

0

Seniors: Population

8.1%

0.9%

4.5%

2.6%

0.0%

0.6%

0.0%

6.9%

0.9%

3.8%

11.3%

0.0%

17.3%

25.3%

3.0%

0.0%

Seniors: Pop Share

41,947

71,053

1,291

160,396

133,966

985

800

0

12,231

2,232

7,399

47,014

60,865

140,478

115,367

121,306

1,353

Total Population

Page 11

Laughlin

985

11.0%

78,794

0.0%

11,238

1.4%

Table 2-4: Super Group Population and Population Share by Service Area

Meadows

103,468

8.0%

0

6.4%

2,012

Service Area

Mesquite

75,349

0.0%

20,105

2.2%

Centennial Hills

Mount Charleston Rainbow Sahara West Searchlight

Professionals, Couples/ Singles: Population

Moapa Town

0

4.2%

6,715

Families with Children: Pop Share

Moapa Valley

39,710

3.5%

Families with Children: Population

Spring Valley

33,220

Bunkerville

Summerlin

Analytics 13


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

86,139

187,813

1.3%

9.1%

19.9%

Families with Children: Pop Share

16,660

1,044

13,681

4,299

Professionals, Couples/ Singles: Population

10.5%

5.3%

0.3%

4.4%

1.4%

Professionals, Couples/ Singles: Pop Share

138,902

970

7,467

1,521

5,257

3,276

Seniors: Population

100.0%

0.7%

5.4%

1.1%

3.8%

2.4%

Seniors: Pop Share

1,393,662

66,376

92,897

15,241

105,077

195,388

Total Population

Page 12

West Charleston 12,676 7.3% 32,923 100.0%

Service Area

West Las Vegas 68,770 3.4% 312,165

Families with Children: Population

Whitney 32,483 100.0%

Sunrise

Windmill 942,595

Total

Some service areas share relatively equal amounts of Families with Children and Professionals, Couples/Singles such as Enterprise, Sahara West, and Windmill.

Some service areas have relatively high proportions of the Seniors Super Group such as Clark County, Enterprise, Las Vegas, Laughlin, and Mesquite.

Some service areas are dominated by a single Super Group such as Families with Children in Centennial Hills, Goodsprings/Sandy Valley, Rainbow, Summerlin, Sunrise, and West Charleston.

Segments in each Super Group are represented in service areas throughout the District. The following figure describes the relative proportion Super Groups by service area.

Analytics 14


Super Group Report

West Charleston

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

105,077

195,388

Sunrise

Figure 2-4: Super Groups by Population by Service Area

Families with Children

71,053 41,947

Summerlin

Professionals, Singles/Couples

1,291

Spring Valley

160,396 133,966

Sahara West

Seniors

985

Rainbow

225,000

800

Mount Charleston

200,000

Moapa Valley

140,478

Enterprise

175,000

121,306

Centennial Hills

150,000 115,367

Clark County

125,000

47,014

Mesquite

100,000 60,865

Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley

75,000

Moapa Town

-

15,241

92,897

Whitney

Page 13

66,376

Analytics 15

Windmill

12,231

West Las Vegas

2,232

Searchlight

7,399

Meadows

1,353

Las Vegas

50,000

-

Laughlin

25,000

Bunkerville


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.0 Super Group: Families with Children 3.1 FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN: SUMMARY The following table displays key data points about the Families with Children Super Group. Table 3-1 Families with Children: Summary

68% of Super Group population

Note

942,595 69% of District customers

Value

Population 345,074

Item (1)

Customers 67% of District non customers

21,922,455

Compared to 35.6% District wide

597,521

Checkouts (2) 36.6%

Compared to 64.4% District wide

Non Customers

Market Share 63.4%

68% of District checkouts

Market Potential

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs. 2. Checkouts from 7.1.10 to 8.31.14

Page 14

Analytics 16


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.2 FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN: SEGMENT INFORMATION The following table displays information segments which represent the “high” numbers in the Families with Children Super Group. Table 3-2 Families with Children: Summary of Segment Information

Page 15

Number

Segment with the Highest Population Up and Coming Families

Up and Coming Families

147,992

90,998

238,290

Segment

Segment with the Highest Number of Customers Up and Coming Families

41.1%

Item (1)

Segment with the Highest Number of Non Customers Boomburbs

69.9%

11

Segment with the Highest Market Share

NeWest Residents

Number of Segments

Segment with the Highest Market Potential

Up and Coming Families

39.5

Segment with the Highest Customer Growth Potential

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs.

Analytics 17


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

The following table displays detailed segment information for the Families with Children Super Group.

Sophisticated Squires

NeWest Residents

Milk and Cookies

Inner City Tenants

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

Up and Coming Families

27,209

37,255

73,664

106,616

112,901

126,529

154,894

238,290

9,587

11,185

13,483

22,404

43,316

41,328

42,383

57,759

90,998

Customers

14,299

16,964

16,024

23,772

51,260

63,300

71,573

84,146

97,135

147,292

Non Customers

354,305

393,157

608,031

775,411

812,988

1,363,825

2,739,484

2,784,723

2,461,856

3,705,008

5,923,667

Checkouts

36.6%

32.1%

33.1%

36.1%

41.1%

36.2%

30.4%

40.6%

36.6%

33.5%

37.3%

38.2%

Market Share

63.4%

67.9%

66.9%

63.9%

58.9%

63.8%

69.6%

59.4%

63.4%

66.5%

62.7%

61.8%

Market Potential

4.2 median

0.2

0.3

0.5

0.5

1.0

4.2

7.6

9.1

12.0

16.9

39.5

Customer Growth Potential

Page 16

Boomburbs 26,551 7,074

11,756

21,922,455

Table 3-3 Families with Children: Detailed Segment Information

Main Street USA 21,373 5,557

597,521

Population

Crossroads 17,313 345,074

Segment

City Dimensions 942,595

Total

Analytics 18


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION Page 17

The following table and figure displays population share, customer share, and checkout share for segments in the Families with Children Super Group.

Boomburbs

Sophisticated Squires

NeWest Residents

Milk and Cookies

Inner City Tenants

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

Up and Coming Families

2.8%

2.9%

4.0%

7.8%

11.3%

12.0%

13.4%

16.4%

25.3%

Population Share

98.2%

95.9%

93.1%

90.2%

86.2%

78.4%

67.1%

55.1%

41.7%

25.3%

Population Cumulative

1.6%

2.0%

2.8%

3.2%

3.9%

6.5%

12.6%

12.0%

12.3%

16.7%

26.4%

Customer Share

100.0%

98.4%

96.3%

93.6%

90.3%

86.4%

79.9%

67.4%

55.4%

43.1%

26.4%

Customer Cumulative

1.6%

1.8%

2.8%

3.5%

3.7%

6.2%

12.5%

12.7%

11.2%

16.9%

27.0%

Checkout Share

100.0%

98.4%

96.6%

93.8%

90.3%

86.6%

80.4%

67.9%

55.2%

43.9%

27.0%

Table 3-4 Families with Children: Detailed Segment Information (Population, Customer, Checkout Share)

Main Street USA 2.3%

100.0%

Checkout Cumulative

Crossroads 1.8%

Segment

City Dimensions

100%

100%

100%

Total

Analytics 19


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Aspiring Young Families

Industrious Urban Fringe

Inner City Tenants

NeWest Sophisticated Boomburbs Residents Squires

Population Share

Families with Children

Milk and Cookies

Main Street USA

Customer Share

Figure 3-1 Families with Children by Segment: Share of Population, Customers, and Checkouts

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

0% Up and Coming Families

Page 18

City Dimensions

Checkout Share

Crossroads

Analytics 20


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

The following figure displays the number and proportion of customers and non customers by segment; and displays the customer potential by segment.

39.5

147,292 16.9

Families With Children Total Non Customers

11,756

0.2

Customer Potential

0.3

5,557

Total Customers

Figure 3-2 Families with Children by Segment: Customers, Non Customers, and Customer Potential

250,000

200,000

150,000

0.5

14,299

City Dimensions

12.0

4.2 0.5

16,964

7,074

1.0 16,024

9,587

Crossroads

23,772

11,185

Main Street USA

7.6

51,260 13,483

Boomburbs

Page 19

40.0

30.0

20.0

10.0

0.0

-10.0

Analytics 21

Sophisticated Squires

9.1

63,300

43,316 Milk and Cookies

71,573

41,328 Inner City Tenants

84,146

42,383 Industrious Urban Fringe

97,135

Aspiring Young Families

100,000

90,998 57,759 22,404 NeWest Residents

50,000

0 Up and Coming Families


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.3 FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN: SERVICE AREA INFORMATION Segments in the Families with Children Super Group are in the following 18 service areas: • Bunkerville • Centennial Hills • Clark County • Enterprise • Goodsprings/Sandy Valley • Las Vegas • Meadows • Mesquite • Mount Charleston • Rainbow • Sahara West • Spring Valley • Summerlin • Sunrise • West Charleston • West Las Vegas • Whitney • Windmill

Page 20

Number

Service Area with the Highest Number of Customers of this Super Group

Service Area with the Highest Population of this Super Group

Sunrise

Sunrise

Sunrise

47.2%

128,241

59,572

187,813

Service Area

The following table displays key information about the Families with Children Super Group, with respect to service areas. Table 3-5 Families with Children: Summary of Service Area Information

Item (1)

Service Area with the Highest Number of Non Customers of this Super Group

Summerlin

86.8%

18

Service Area with the Highest Market Share of this Super Group

Bunkerville

Number of Service Areas with segments in this Super Group

Service Area with the Highest Market Potential of this Super Group

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs.

Analytics 22


Summerlin

Sunrise

West Charleston

West Las Vegas

Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Las Vegas

Laughlin

Meadows Mesquite

Figure 3-3 Families with Children by Service Area: Customers and Non Customers

Families with Children

Whitney

Page 21

Analytics 23

Windmill

Patrons

Spring Valley

Non Patrons

Searchlight

200,000

Sahara West

180,000

Rainbow

160,000

Mount Charleston

140,000

Moapa Valley

120,000

Moapa Town

100,000

Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley

80,000

Enterprise

60,000

Clark County

40,000

Centennial Hills

20,000 Bunkerville


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Table 3-6 Families with Children: Detailed Service Area Information

Non Customers

13.2%

Market Share

86.8%

86.8%

Page 22

Customers

1,174 13.2%

Bunkerville

179 1,174

Customers

45,105

Non Customers

47.9%

41.1%

Market Share

58.8%

52.1%

58.9%

Market Potential

1,353 179

31,497

2,841

41.2%

64.9%

Population

Industrious Urban Fringe 1,353

Service Area

Total

76,602 2,612

1,833

35.1%

64.3%

Centennial Hills

5,453 1,282

9,246

35.7%

59.5%

Boomburbs

Market Potential

Up and Coming Families

3,115 5,007

1,350

40.5%

Population

Aspiring Young Families

14,253

751

60,375

Service Area

Milk and Cookies

2,101

41,149

Sophisticated Squires

101,542

Total

Analytics 24


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

32,389

9,737

1,850

978

12,920

3,405

510

Customers

4,273

1,718

19,469

6,332

1,340

Non Customers

30.3%

44.4%

36.3%

39.9%

35.0%

27.6%

Market Share

66.4%

69.7%

55.6%

63.7%

60.1%

65.0%

72.4%

Page 23

Inner City Tenants 2,696 3,411 1,823

33.6%

61.4%

Clark County

Milk and Cookies 7,684 792 1,880

38.4%

Market Potential

NeWest Residents 2,615 952 36,835

Population

Main Street USA 2,832 22,968

Service Area

City Dimensions 59,803

Total

Analytics 25


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Milk and Cookies

Aspiring Young Families

Up and Coming Families

2,791

4,656

2,864

10,363

27,182

11,880

656

282

1,246

838

2,983

5,965

Customers

Non Customers

37,672

1,037

2,509

3,410

2,029

7,470

21,217

Non Customers

36.1%

Market Share

24.0%

38.7%

10.1%

26.8%

29.2%

27.9%

21.9%

Market Share

66.4%

63.9%

76.0%

61.3%

89.9%

73.2%

70.8%

72.1%

78.1%

Page 24

Sophisticated Squires

1,693

Customers

16,737

33.6%

74.6%

Enterprise

Boomburbs

45,552

9,462

16,352

25.4%

66.1%

Population

Goodsprings/Sandy Valley Service Area

Market Potential

Main Street USA

26,199

8,265

2,387

33.9%

65.7%

Population

Up and Coming Families 24.167

814

1,153

34.3%

Service Area

Aspiring Young Families 3,201

591

36,629

Total

Milk and Cookies 1,744

19,132

Market Potential

Boomburbs

55,761

Total

Analytics 26


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

808

2,971

Customers

10,405

1,365

6,998

Non Customers

43.1%

31.6%

37.2%

29.8%

Market Share

67.1%

56.9%

68.4%

62.8%

70.2%

Page 25

9,969

4,811 2,228 32.9%

Las Vegas

Industrious Urban Fringe 2,173

1,691 20,996

Market Share

56.3%

Meadows Service Area

Market Potential

Inner City Tenants 15,216

10,281

Non Customers

43.7%

56.3%

Population

NeWest Residents 3,919

Customers

546

43.7%

Service Area

City Dimensions 31,277

424

546

Total

970 424

Market Share

49.2%

Market Potential

NeWest Residents 970

Non Customers

50.8%

49.2%

Population

Total

Customers

355

50.8%

Mesquite

366

355

Market Potential

721

366

Population

Main Street USA

721

Service Area

Total

Analytics 27


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Non Customers

0.9%

Market Share

99.1%

99.1%

Page 26

Customers

976 0.9%

Mount Charleston

9 976

Up and Coming Families

14,670

33,136

21,754

6,571

4,820

14,008

9,591

Customers

610

9,298

9,850

19,128

12,163

Non Customers

39.5%

36.6%

41.4%

32.9%

42.3%

44.1%

Market Share

68.4%

60.5%

63.4%

58.6%

67.1%

57.7%

55.9%

Market Potential

985 9

Population

Crossroads 985

Service Area

Total

Aspiring Young Families

15,869 352

5,527

31.6%

63.5%

Rainbow

Inner City Tenants

962 3,608

743

36.5%

59.6%

Market Potential

Milk and Cookies

9,135

343

4,352

40.4%

Population

Sophisticated Squires 1,086

2,504

61,671

Service Area

Boomburbs 6,856

41,797

NeWest Residents

Main Street USA 103,468

Total

Analytics 28


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Milk and Cookies

Aspiring Young Families

Up and Coming Families

3,481

2,967

2,412

2,976

23,001

40,512

Customers

28,889

1,317

1,345

865

1,326

8,854

15,182

Customers

1,629

Non Customers

46,460

2,164

1,622

1,547

1,650

14,147

25,330

Non Customers

40.6%

34.2%

Market Share

38.3%

37.8%

45.3%

35.9%

44.6%

38.5%

37.5%

Market Share

61.2%

59.4%

65.8%

61.7%

62.2%

54.7%

64.1%

55.4%

61.5%

62.5%

Page 27

Sophisticated Squires

75,349

845

502

38.8%

55.9%

Sahara West

Boomburbs

2,474

343

9,715

44.1%

74.5%

Spring Valley Service Area

Aspiring Young Families

Market Potential

Main Street USA

845

6,171

8,419

25.5%

70.2%

Population

Industrious Urban Fringe 15,886

6,632

2,692

29.8%

61.1%

Service Area

Inner City Tenants 15,051

920

1,293

38.9%

Total

Milk and Cookies

3,612

549

24,250

Market Potential

NeWest Residents

1l842

15,460

Population

Crossroads

39,710

Total

Analytics 29


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Aspiring Young Families

Up and Coming Families

62,994

9,723

20,933

33,220

1,439

15,426

1,616

14,739

4,918

18,102

3,164

7,627

Customers

15,686

649

7,027

1,029

6,981

Customers

21,739

9,218

44,892

6,559

13,306

Non Customers

17,534

790

8,399

587

7,758

Non Customers

25.5%

37.7%

34.8%

28.7%

32.5%

36.4%

Market Share

47.2%

45.1%

45.6%

63.7%

47.4%

Market Share

65.0%

74.5%

62.3%

65.2%

71.3%

67.5%

63.6%

52.8%

54.9%

54.4%

36.3%

52.6%

Page 28

Industrious Urban Fringe 14,136

13,167

20,275

35.0%

72.1%

Summerlin

Inner City Tenants 34,906

6,936

2,319

27.9%

56.2%

Sophisticated Squires Boomburbs Main Street USA Total

Sunrise Service Area

Market Potential

Milk and Cookies 27,211

1,248

1,352

43.8%

75.1%

Population

NeWest Residents

3,567

523

2,325

24.9%

68.3%

Service Area

Sophisticated Squires

1,875

1,810

6,256

31.7%

Up and Coming Families

Main Street USA

4,135

2,077

128,241

Market Potential

Crossroads

8,333

59,572

Population

City Dimensions

187,813

Total

Analytics 30


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

18,515

22,805

12,436

3,385

7,139

5,948

8,889

3,932

Customers

2,231

8,652

8,574

12,567

13,916

8,504

Non Customers

28.5%

31.4%

28.1%

45.4%

32.1%

39.0%

31.6%

Market Share

64.3%

71.5%

68.6%

71.9%

54.6%

67.9%

61.0%

68.4%

Page 29

Inner City Tenants 15,713

1,023 986

35.7%

West Charleston

Milk and Cookies 12,037

393 55,430

Market Share

62.9%

West Las Vegas Service Area

Market Potential

NeWest Residents 3,254

30,709

Non Customers

37.1%

60.8%

Population

Main Street USA 1,379

Customers

5,473

39.2%

61.3%

Service Area

City Dimensions 86,139

3,235

1,897

38.7%

Total

8,708

1,221

7,776

Market Potential

Industrious Urban Fringe 3,118

4,900

Population

NeWest Residents 12,676

Total

Analytics 31


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Milk and Cookies

Inner City Tenants

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

1,833

10,222

15,132

10,118

12,082

480

545

4,569

5,743

5,259

4,499

Customers

2,031

1,136

1,288

5,653

9,389

4,859

7,583

Non Customers

32.7%

39.5%

29.7%

29.7%

44.7%

38.0%

52.0%

37.2%

Market Share

60.6%

67.3%

60.5%

70.3%

70.3%

55.3%

62.0%

48.0%

62.8%

Page 30

NeWest Residents 1,616 1,325 9,705

39.4%

Whitney

Sophisticated Squires 3,356 4,706 41,644

4,693

Customers

11,582

5,676

Non Customers

77.3%

41.4%

45.3%

Market Share

65.7%

22.7%

58.6%

54.7%

Market Potential

Main Street USA 14,411 27,126

Population

Crossroads 68,770

Service Area

Total

10,369

8,177

248

34.3%

56.4%

Windmill

Up and Coming Families 19,759

8,46

829

43.6%

Market Potential

Aspiring Young Families

1,094

432

18,335

Population

Boomburbs

1,261

14,148

Service Area

Main Street USA

32,483

Total

Analytics 32


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.4 FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN: FINDINGS 3.4.1 Families with Children: Overall Findings

Page 31

Findings result from when you apply values to the data to derive meaning: what does the data mean? What stands out about the data? What’s important? What gets your attention and why?

• Largest super group

Top 5 segments are 78% of super groups population

Supergroup market share almost equal to district market share

People in our segments are adults and children

5 segments have the largest customer potential in the district*

Young families

48% of district population are top 5 family segments

Population and patrons – 2/3

• Huge impact potential/move the needle

19.9% of supergroup Only 1/3 are current patrons

10.9% of supergroup

10.7% of supergroup Almost ½ are current patrons

9.1% of supergroup

8% of supergroup

Sahara West--75,349

West Charleston – 86,139

• •

Centennial Hills – 101,524

Rainbow – 103,468

• •

Sunrise – 187,813

Top Service Areas

Overview

The following findings were made at the Workshop. While these are not a final say in what the data means, it is intended to foster an evolving understanding of the service area and its segments. •

• •

• •

• • •

Analytics 33


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.4.2 Families with Children: Segment findings

Page 32

• Facts: represent specific information gleaned from the one-page segment descriptions.

At the Workshop, participants described a few of the top population segments in this service area. The following are their notes.

• Read Between the Lines: represents workshop participant interpretations about “what makes this segment tick”…or what are their unique characteristics reading between the lines of their formal descriptions.

Median age – 32.6 Median income -- $69,500 2/3 of 25 and older have some college Mostly while Single family housing Ownership – 80% Buy baby equipment, clothes, toys First time homeowners Eat out at family restaurants Theme parks Rent comedy, family, action DVDs Country music, Learning and Disney Channel ½ of households have kids

Read Between the Lines

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Facts

Up and Coming

Key Families with Children segments include the following: • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Mortgage, property values DIY Spend time with kids Consumer mode – status conscious Acquisitional Convenience/pressed for time Career-oriented Balance work/family Value of education – kids • School success • Elementary

Analytics 34


Super Group Report

Young start up Married couples and single parents Family size – 3.1 Average age – 31.1 Median income – $46,275 60% employed professionally 87% graduated high school 24% college degree Residential – 40% homeowners Diversity Online users – profession, entertainment, shopping Music, computer equipment Theme parks, TV DVDs, sports

Facts • • • • • • • • • • • • •

More concerns about money Saving for homes Might not have kids Digital native/tech savvy Want kids to do well in school Student loans Concerned about career advancement * Looking for cheaper family entertainment

Read Between the Lines • • • • • • • •

Facts Slightly more than ½ have kids 54% married households 17% single parents Multigenerational households Median age – 39 Median income -- $40.400 62% Hispanic ¼ foreign born Household size – 3.5 Lower discretionary income 62% home ownership/more single family Manufacturing, construction, retail trade

Industrious Urban Fringe

Aspiring Young Families

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Page 33

Analytics 35


Super Group Report

• • • • • • Large payments Shop discount Dine out less No savings Less likely to have health insurance Watch movies, TV, radio

Concerns – money, health Language issues Caring for parents and children Wide variety of generational needs Financial insecurity – live paycheck to paycheck Free entertainment and services Lower literacy?

Read Between the Lines • • • • • • •

Inner City Tenants

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

• •

Facts • Diverse population – white, black, Hispanic • Median age – 28.8 • 34% single • 28% married couple/family • 21% single parents • More transient • Median income -- $30,000 • 45% of 25 and older college • Fast food restaurants • No internet at home • Target/Walgreens • 17% don’t have car • Read magazines, sports Read Between the Lines • Self-improvement • Free services • Online access • Concerns: housing, school issues • Paycheck to paycheck • Library users for internet

Page 34

Analytics 36


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.4.3 Families with Children: Segment Similarities and Differences

Family oriented

Value cheap/free entertainment

Financial concerns

School success

Have children

Convenience is a problem

Time with kids is an issue

Age group – 20s and 30s

Digital abilities and access

Career level

Level of education

Language, in some cases

Different levels of financial concerns

Transportation

Housing

Ethnicity

Income

Differences

Similarities

Page 35

At the Workshop, participants noted the similarities and differences between the segments. Noting similarities and differences clarifies things people have in common or what distinguishes them. Using similarities and differences enabled participants to generalize with a basis in facts. •

Analytics 37


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3.5 FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN: THEMATIC STATEMENT 3.5.1 Families with Children: Background

Page 36

A thematic statement is a brief, pithy statement that represents, at a high level, the idea or theme that characterizes your service area as a whole. The thematic statement combines an idea about what makes your service area tick and is written in a manner to clarify your intentions with respect to an organized service approach. A thematic statement is an internal positioning statement used internally to the library but not externally to the public. A thematic statement can be considered as an elevator pitch. It is not a mission statement or a vision statement. A thematic statement is accurate as a generalization. It is interpretive and actionable and frequently are clever, catchy, and memorable. Thematic statements are based upon your unique service area segment data and characteristics. Thematic Statements were developed by the library staff including branch managers. 3.5.2 Families with Children: Thematic Statement The thematic statement for this service area is:

“Families first; convenient, connected, creative�

Analytics 38


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.0 Super Group: Professionals, Couples/Singles 4.1 PROFESSIONALS, COUPLES/SINGLES: SUMMARY The following table displays key data points about the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group. Table 4-1 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Summary

Customers

Population

202,235

109,840

312,165

23% of District non customers

22% of District customers

22% of Super Group population

Note

Non Customers 7,243,457

Compared to 35.6% District wide

Value

Checkouts (2) 35.2%

Compared to 64.4% District wide

Item (1)

Market Share 64.8%

22% of District checkouts

Market Potential

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs. 2. Checkouts from 7.1.10 to 8.31.14

Page 37

Analytics 39


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.2 PROFESSIONALS, COUPLES/SINGLES: SEGMENT INFORMATION

Page 38

The following table displays information segments which represent the “high” numbers in the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group. Table 4-2 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Summary of Segment Information

Number

Segment with the Highest Population Enterprising Professionals

Enterprising Professionals

62,827

34,426

97,253

Segment

Segment with the Highest Number of Customers Enterprising Professionals

38.5%

Item (1)

Segment with the Highest Number of Non Customers

Cozy and Comfortable

67.4%

7

Segment with the Highest Market Share

Young and Restless

Number of Segments

Segment with the Highest Market Potential

Enterprising Professionals

62.7

Segment with the Highest Customer Growth Potential

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs.

Analytics 40


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION Page 39

The following table displays detailed segment information for the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group.

In Style

Young and Restless

Old and Newcomers

Enterprising Professionals

34,088

37,964

44,011

51,192

97,253

12,282

11,283

13,119

14,335

18,854

34,426

Customers

10,215

19,619

22,805

24,845

29,676

32,338

62,827

Non Customers

7,243,457

387,707

848,101

773,897

916,208

929,881

1,202,471

2,185,192

Checkouts

35.2%

35.2%

38.5%

33.1%

34.6%

32.6%

36.8%

35.4%

Market Share

64.8%

64.8%

61.5%

66.9%

65.4%

67.4%

63.2%

64.6%

Market Potential

9.7 median

1.7

6.4

8.0

9.7

13.4

17.0

62.7

Customer Growth Potential

Table 4-3 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Detailed Segment Information

Exurbanites 31,901 5,541 202,325

Population

Cozy and Comfortable 15,756 109,840

Segment

Midlife Junction 312,165

Total

Analytics 41


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION Page 40

The following table and figure displays population share, customer share, and checkout share for segments in the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group.

Old and Newcomers

Enterprising Professionals

14.1%

16.4%

31.2%

Population Share

73.8%

61.7%

47.6%

31.2%

Population Cumulative

10.3%

11.9%

13.1%

17.2%

31.3%

Customer Share

95.0%

83.8%

73.5%

61.6%

48.5%

31.3%

Customer Cumulative

11.7%

10.7%

12.6%

12.8%

16.6%

30.2%

94.6%

82.9%

72.3%

59.6%

46.8%

30.2%

Table 4-4 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Detailed Segment Information (Population, Customer, Checkout Share)

Young and Restless 12.2% 84.7% 11.2%

Checkout Cumulative

In Style 10.9% 95.0%

100.0%

Checkout Share

Exurbanites 10.2%

5.4%

Segment

Cozy and Comfortable

100.0%

100%

5.0% 100%

100.0%

100%

5.0%

Midlife Junction Total

Analytics 42


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

In Style

Exurbanites

Population Share

Professionals, Couples/Singles

Old and Newcomers Young and Restless

Page 41

Midlife Junction

Checkout Share

Cozy and Comfortable

Customer Share

Figure 4-1 Professionals, Couples/Singles by Segment: Share of Population, Customers, and Checkouts

35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Enterprising Professionals

Analytics 43


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

The following figure displays the number and proportion of customers and non customers by segment; and displays the customer potential by segment.

62.7

62,827

34,426

Enterprising Professionals

17.0

32,338

18,854

Old and Newcomers

Total Non Customers

Professionals, Couples/Singles

13.4 9.7

Total Customers

6.4

11,283

Cozy and Comfortable

12,282

24,845 13,119

Exurbanites

29,676

14,335 In Style

19,619

Young and Restless

22,805

8.0

-10.0

0.0

10.0

20.0

30.0

40.0

50.0

60.0

70.0

Page 42

Midlife Junction

5,541

10,215

1.7

Customer Potential

Figure 4-2 Professionals, Couples/Singles by Segment: Customers, Non Customers, and Customer Potential

120,000

100,000

80,000

60,000

40,000

20,000

0

Analytics 44


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.3 PROFESSIONALS, COUPLES/SINGLES: SERVICE AREA INFORMATION

Windmill

Whitney

West Las Vegas

West Charleston

Sunrise

Summerlin

Spring Valley

Sahara West

Rainbow

Mesquite

Las Vegas

Laughlin

Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley

Enterprise

Clark County

Centennial Hills

Segments in the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group are in the following 16 service areas:

Page 43

Number

Service Area with the Highest Number of Customers of this Super Group

Service Area with the Highest Population of this Super Group

Enterprise

Sahara West

Sahara West

56.4%

49,361

30,686

78794

Service Area

The following table displays key information about the Professionals, Couples/Singles Super Group, with respect to service areas. Table 4-5 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Summary of Service Area Information

Item (1)

Service Area with the Highest Number of Non Customers of this Super Group

West Las Vegas

73.9%

16

Service Area with the Highest Market Share of this Super Group

Enterprise

Number of Service Areas with segments in this Super Group

Service Area with the Highest Market Potential of this Super Group

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs.

Analytics 45


West Charleston

West Las Vegas

Super Group Report

Whitney

Laughlin

Meadows

Summerlin

Sunrise

Page 44

Analytics 46

Windmill

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Las Vegas

Figure 4-3 Professionals, Couples/Singles by Service Area: Customers and Non Customers

Spring Valley

Professionals, Couples/Singles

Searchlight

Patrons

Sahara West

Non Patrons

Rainbow

90,000

Mount Charleston

80,000

Moapa Valley

70,000

Moapa Town

60,000

Mesquite

50,000

Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley

40,000

Enterprise

30,000

Clark County

20,000

Centennial Hills

10,000 -

Bunkerville


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Table 4-6 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Detailed Service Area Information

1,470

1,294

7,046

311

1,637

446

159

3,328

Customers

9,703

550

3,276

1,024

1,135

3,718

Non Customers

Market Share

37.7%

36.1%

33.3%

30.3%

12.3%

47.2%

Market Share

60.7%

62.3%

63.9%

66.7%

69.7%

87.7%

52.8%

Page 45

4,913

5,881

Non Customers

39.3%

61.8%

Centennial Hills

Enterprising Professionals

861

Customers

5,338

38.2%

71.2%

Total

Clark County Service Area

Exurbanites

Market Potential

Young and Restless

15,584

3,461

2,821

28.8%

66.3%

Midlife Junction

Population

In Style

8,799

1,744

559

33.7%

63.0%

Service Area

Exurbanites

4,565

226

4,142

37.0%

Cozy and Comfortable

785

2,108

12,860

Market Potential

Old and Newcomers

6,250

7,539

Population

Young and Restless

20,399

Total

Analytics 47


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Young and Restless

Old and Newcomers

6,555

9,492

9,009

5,130

30,869

17,472

2,033

1,111

1,494

3,133

1,649

8,052

Customers

Non Customers

49,631

3,745

5,444

7,998

5,876

3,481

22,817

Non Customers

35.1%

Market Share

26.1%

35.2%

16.9%

15.7%

34.8%

32.1%

26.1%

Market Share

55.4%

64.9%

73.9%

64.8%

83.1%

84.3%

65.2%

67.9%

73.9%

Page 46

In Style

5,778

Customers

1,307

44.6%

81.3%

Enterprise

Exurbanites

66,833

708

888

18.7%

66.7%

Total

Market Share

66.5%

Population

Goodsprings/Sandy Valley Service Area

Market Potential

Cozy and Comfortable

2,015

715

1,208

33.3%

Population

Young and Restless 1,603

278

3,403

Service Area

In Style 1,486

1,701

Enterprising Professionals

Midlife Junction 5,104

Non Customers

33.5%

66.5%

Market Potential

Total

Customers

1,416

33.5%

Laughlin

714

1,416

Market Potential

2,130

714

Population

Old and Newcomers

2,130

Service Area

Total

Analytics 48


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

2,971

Customers

1,365

6,998

Non Customers

31.6%

37.2%

29.8%

Market Share

68.6%

68.4%

62.8%

70.2%

Page 47

9,969 808 10,405 31.4%

Las Vegas

Young and Restless 2,173 4,811 18,768

Non Customers

52.3%

Market Share

47.7%

47.7%

Market Potential

In Style 15,216 8,590

Population

Cozy and Comfortable 27,358

Service Area

Total

Customers

452

52.3%

Mesquite

496 452

Enterprising Professionals 3,269

1,620

2,530

1,411

362

Customers

730

3,267

1,858

1,258

Non Customers

40.3%

56.2%

43.6%

43.2%

22.3%

Market Share

71.9%

59.7%

43.8%

56.4%

56.8%

77.7%

Market Potential

948 496

Old and Newcomers 5,797

935

4,057

28.1%

62.8%

Population

Midlife Junction 948

Service Area

Total

Young and Restless

1,665

2,740

4,694

37.2%

61.8%

Rainbow

In Style

6,797

1,838

795

38.2%

Market Potential

Exurbanites

6,532

471

16,659

Population

Cozy and Comfortable

1,266

10,287

Service Area

Midlife Junction

26,946

Total

Analytics 49


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Enterprising Professionals

6,215

16,359

21,085

32,213

30,686

1,408

2,459

6,572

8,011

12,236

Customers

Non Customers

48,108

1,514

3,756

9,787

13,074

19,977

Non Customers

34.2%

Market Share

38.9%

48.2%

39.6%

40.2%

38.0%

38.0%

Market Share

59.4%

65.8%

61.1%

51.8%

60.4%

59.8%

62.0%

62.0%

Page 48

Old and Newcomers

2,922

Customers

1,629

40.6%

61.2%

Sahara West

In Style

78,794

845

502

38.8%

55.9%

Spring Valley Service Area

Cozy and Comfortable

Market Potential

Exurbanites

2,474 343

9,715

44.1%

74.5%

Population

Cozy and Comfortable

845

6,171

8,419

25.5%

60.6%

Service Area

Old and Newcomers

15,886

6,632

2,692

39.4%

Total

Young and Restless

15,051

920

22,957

Market Potential

In Style

3,612

14,911

Population

Exurbanites

37,868

Total

Analytics 50


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

3,699

6,715

680

1,501

4,534

1,473

321

1,152

Customers

3,343

304

927

2,112

Customers

Non Customers

2,826

279

2,547

Non Customers

3,372

376

574

2,422

Non Customers

36.7%

Market Share

34.3%

53.5%

31.1%

Market Share

49.8%

44.7%

61.8%

46.6%

Market Share

67.6%

63.3%

65.7%

46.5%

68.9%

50.2%

55.3%

38.2%

53.4%

Page 49

600

Customers

2,164

32.4%

63.5%

Summerlin

Enterprising Professionals

4,299

1,255

2,287

36.5%

47.1%

Total

Sunrise Service Area

Exurbanites Cozy and Comfortable Total

West Charleston Service Area

Population

Market Potential

In Style

3,419

1,097

1,894

59.2%

65.2%

Population

Old and Newcomers

3,384

1,062

1,094

34.8%

61.9%

Service Area

In Style

2,911

1,231

1,071

38.1%

Exurbanites

Exurbanites

2,325

571

8,465

Market Potential

Market Potential

Cozy and Comfortable

1,642

5,216

Population

Midlife Junction

13,681

Total

Analytics 51


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Non Customers

56.4%

Market Share

43.6%

43.6%

Page 50

Customers

455 56.4%

West Las Vegas

589 455

1,787

3,714

717

259

Customers

11,970

4,917

5,525

1,528

Non Customers

Market Share

28.2%

43.0%

11.5%

14.5%

Market Share

60.2%

71.8%

57.0%

88.5%

85.5%

Market Potential

1,044 589

Population

Old and Newcomers 1,044

Service Area

Total

6,242

4,690

Non Customers

39.8%

73.1%

Whitney

8,631

Customers

12,635

26.9%

66.4%

Windmill Service Area

Enterprising Professionals

Market Potential

Old and Newcomers

16,660

8,336

1,228

33.6%

62.8%

Population

Young and Restless

2,0971

452

6,816

37.2%

Service Area

Cozy and Comfortable

1,680

3,456

20,679

Total

Old and Newcomers

10,272

12,244

Market Potential

Young and Restless

32,923

Population

Total

Analytics 52


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.4 PROFESSIONALS, COUPLES/SINGLES: FINDINGS 4.4.1 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Overall Findings

Page 51

Findings result from when you apply values to the data to derive meaning: what does the data mean? What stands out about the data? What’s important? What gets your attention and why?

Enterprising Professionals – largest population

Percent of customers matches percent of population

Mid-life Junction – lowest customer potential

Enterprising Professionals – greatest customer potential

61 - 67% Market potential for each segment

20% of LVCCLD patrons

Professionals, Singles, Couples •

202,325 potential customers (109,840 patrons)

20% of total population

6 out of 7 segment – small population and population percent

WM

EN

SW

27,000

33,000

67,000

79,000

Population

17,000

10,000

12,000

17,000

30, 000

Patrons

49,000

16,000

20,000

49,000

48,000

Non Patron

Top Service Areas

Overview

The following findings were made at the Workshop. While these are not a final say in what the data means, it is intended to foster an evolving understanding of the service area and its segments. •

RB

66,000

Branch

CC

Analytics 53


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.4.2 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Segment findings

Page 52

• Facts: represent specific information gleaned from the one-page segment descriptions.

At the Workshop, participants described a few of the top population segments in this service area. The following are their notes.

• Read Between the Lines: represents workshop participant interpretations about “what makes this segment tick”…or what are their unique characteristics reading between the lines of their formal descriptions.

Age: 33 years Income: $64,000 Housing: Moves frequently, prefers to own Education: Half over 25 – Bachelor’s • 3 out of 4 – college Occupation: management, finance, sales, computers, office Interests: cell phones, online, music, investment $, laptops, video games, travel

Facts • • • • • •

Mobile Career-oriented Status is big! Homeowners Travel a lot New tech/toys Highly educated Tech-savvy jobs Love entertainment Partiers Standing in line for iPhone 6 (Rich snobs)

Read Between the Lines • • • • • • • • • • • •

Age: 20 – 75 years Income: $39,000 Education: College and grad school; above average Occupation: Range = US

Facts

Old and Newcomers

Enterprising Professionals

Key Professionals, Couples/Singles segments include the following: •

• • • • • •

Analytics 54


Super Group Report

• • •

Housing: 60% rent; move every 5 years Diversity: Mostly white • Diversity = US Interest: Fiction and nonfiction, TV, music, movies/dvds, cook at home

Just starting or just finishing Mobile – travel Close to friends/family Active Home bodies Live civic life (living alone) Cultural Cheap/frugal Staying alive Life on the edge (hipsters regardless of age)

Read Between the Lines • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

Living college life style with money in pockets Gym life/fitness Dating/club scene Loves tech Very mobile – no community ties Awake 24/7! Hooking up (finding hotties) Next selfie (sex, drugs, and rock and roll)

Read Between the Lines

Age – 28.9 • 66% under 35 years Income -- $39,000 • Below US average Housing – 85% rent and mobile Education – 36% grad, 69% college Diversity – 56% white and diverse Occupation – Professional, sales, office Interests – tech, convenience, online, TV, music, bars, gyms, American cars

Facts

Young and Restless

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

• •

• • • • • • • • • •

Page 53

Analytics 55


Super Group Report

• • • • • • • •

Made American dream Maybe underwater Status is important Vacations – travel Up-scale Obsessed with money Out a lot Golfers High investments Spend money on homes Did they get the right box seat? (real snobs)

Read Between the Lines

Age: 40.5 years Diversity: All white 2/3 have no kids Income: $65,000 – 47% investment income Education: 42% degree over bachelor’s Occupation: Professional, management Housing: Single family, suburbs • 69% ownership Interests: Computers, investments, books, travel, sporting events, exercise, diet

Facts

In Style

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Page 54

Analytics 56


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.4.3 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Segment Similarities and Differences

Few – no kids

Active

Travel

Professionals

Majority white

Cultural/social

Well educated

Party

Techies – social media

Marital status

Status symbol

Some invest (save money), some don’t (spends money)

Some transient, some are not

Some home entertain, some party outside

Age (20 – 75 yrs)

Income (40 – 60K)

Home ownership

Differences

Similarities

Page 55

At the Workshop, participants noted the similarities and differences between the segments. Noting similarities and differences clarifies things people have in common or what distinguishes them. Using similarities and differences enabled participants to generalize with a basis in facts. •

Analytics 57


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

4.5 PROFESSIONALS, COUPLES/SINGLES: THEMATIC STATEMENT 4.5.1 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Background

Page 56

A thematic statement is a brief, pithy statement that represents, at a high level, the idea or theme that characterizes your service area as a whole. The thematic statement combines an idea about what makes your service area tick and is written in a manner to clarify your intentions with respect to an organized service approach. A thematic statement is an internal positioning statement used internally to the library but not externally to the public. A thematic statement can be considered as an elevator pitch. It is not a mission statement or a vision statement. A thematic statement is accurate as a generalization. It is interpretive and actionable and frequently are clever, catchy, and memorable. Thematic statements are based upon your unique service area segment data and characteristics. Thematic Statements were developed by the library staff including branch managers. 4.5.2 Professionals, Couples/Singles: Thematic Statement The thematic statement for this service area is:

“Get your style on and keep it!�

Analytics 58


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

5.0 Super Group: Seniors 5.1 SENIORS: SUMMARY The following table displays key data points about the Seniors Super Group. Table 5-1 Seniors: Summary

Note

138,902 9% of District customers

Value

Population 44,445 11% of District non customers

Item (1)

Customers 94,457

Checkouts (2) 32.0%

3,303,122

Compared to 64.4% District wide

Compared to 35.6% District wide

10% of Super Group population

Non Customers

Market Share 68.0%

10% of District checkouts

Market Potential

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs. 2. Checkouts from 7.1.10 to 8.31.14

Page 57

Analytics 59


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

5.2 SENIORS: SEGMENT INFORMATION

Page 58

The following table displays information segments which represent the “high” numbers in the Seniors Super Group. Table 5-2 Seniors: Summary of Segment Information

Number

Segment with the Highest Population Social Security Set

Social Security Set

20,300

13,377

32,384

Segment

Segment with the Highest Number of Customers Prosperous Empty Nesters

42.0%

Item (1)

Segment with the Highest Number of Non Customers Simply Living

79.8%

16

Segment with the Highest Market Share Silver and Gold

Number of Segments

Segment with the Highest Market Potential

Social Security Set

31.9

Segment with the Highest Customer Growth Potential

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs.

Analytics 60


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

The following table displays detailed segment information for the Seniors Super Group.

Prosperous Empty Nesters

Social Security Set

25,398

26,363

32,384

6,346

5,142

6,063

13,377

Customers

11,480

13,414

20,256

20,300

19,007

Non Customers

569,107

486,463

448,688

384,510

400,459

1,013,895

Checkouts

32.0%

42.0%

35.4%

32.1%

20.2%

23.0%

41.3%

Market Share

68.0%

58.0%

64.6%

67.9%

79.8%

77.0%

58.7%

Market Potential

20.2 median

8.9

10.6

13.7

26.7

27.7

31.9

Customer Growth Potential

Page 59

Silver and Gold 19,760 6,278 10,000 3,303,122

Table 5-3 Seniors: Detailed Segment Information

Retirement Communities 17,758 7,239 94,457

Population

Senior Sun Seekers 17,239 44,445

Segment

Simple Living 138,902

Total

Analytics 61


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION Page 60

The following table and figure displays population share, customer share, and checkout share for segments in the Seniors Super Group.

Prosperous Empty Nesters

Social Security Set

Segment

18.3%

19.0%

23.3%

Population Share

74.8%

60.6%

42.3%

23.3%

Population Cumulative

14.1%

14.3%

11.6%

13.6%

30.1%

Customer Share

83.7%

69.6%

55.3%

43.7%

30.1%

Customer Cumulative

12.2%

14.2%

21.4%

21.5%

20.1%

100.0%

89.4%

77.3%

63.1%

41.6%

20.1%

Table 5-4 Seniors: Detailed Segment Information (Population, Customer, Checkout Share)

Silver and Gold 14.2% 87.6%

10.6%

Checkout Cumulative

Retirement Communities 12.8%

100.0%

Checkout Share

Senior Sun Seekers 16.3%

100%

100.0% 100%

12.4% 100%

Simple Living Total

Analytics 62


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Social Security Set

Prosperous Empty Nesters

Silver and Gold

Population Share

Senior Sun Seekers

Customer Share

Simple Living

Checkout Share

Page 61

Retirement Communities

Seniors

Figure 5-1 Seniors by Segment: Share of Population, Customers, and Checkouts

35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

Analytics 63


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

20,300

6,063

Old and Newcomers

26.7

20,256

5,142

Seniors

In Style

6,346

13,414

13.7

Total Non Customers

Young and Restless

Total Customers

10.6

11,480

6,278

Exurbanites

-10.0

0.0

10.0

20.0

30.0

40.0

Page 62

Cozy and Comfortable

7,239

10,000

8.9

Customer Potential

The following figure displays the number and proportion of customers and non customers by segment; and displays the customer potential by segment.

31.9

19,007

13,377

27.7

Figure 5-2 Seniors by Segment: Customers, Non Customers, and Customer Potential

35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0 Enterprising Professionals

Analytics 64


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

5.3 SENIORS, COUPLES/SINGLES: SERVICE AREA INFORMATION

Windmill

Whitney

West Las Vegas

West Charleston

Sunrise

Summerlin

Spring Valley

Searchlight

Rainbow

Mesquite

Meadows

Laughlin

Las Vegas

Enterprise

Clark County

Centennial Hills

Segments in the Seniors Super Group are in the following 16 service areas:

Service Area

Page 63

Number

The following table displays key information about the Senior Super Group, with respect to service areas. Table 5-5 Seniors: Summary of Service Area Information

Item (1) Number of Service Areas with segments in this Super Group Service Area with the Highest Population of this Super Group Service Area with the Highest Number of Customers of this Super Group Service Area with the Highest Number of Non Customers of this Super Group Service Area with the Highest Market Share of this Super Group Service Area with the Highest Market Potential of this Super Group

1. For item definitions see Appendix 1: FAQs.

Analytics 65


Las Vegas Laughlin Meadows Mesquite Moapa Town

Mount Charleston Rainbow

Seniors

Moapa Valley

Sahara West Searchlight Spring Valley Summerlin Sunrise West Charleston West Las Vegas

Windmill

Page 64

Analytics 66

Whitney

Super Group Report

Goodsprings/ Sandy Valley

Patrons

Enterprise

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Clark County

Non Patrons

Centennial Hills

Figure 5-3 Seniors by Service Area: Customers and Non Customers

40,000

35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

-

Bunkerville


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Table 5-6 Seniors: Detailed Service Area Information

Customers

1,388

Non Customers

26.7%

37.2%

Market Share

67.8%

73.3%

62.8%

Page 65

821 1,458 32.2%

Centennial Hills

2,209 531 2,846

1,341

5,472

Customers

7,436

2,677

8,475

Non Customers

31.2%

31.7%

33.4%

39.2%

Market Share

65.2%

68.8%

68.3%

66.6%

60.8%

Market Potential

Prosperous Empty Nesters 1,989 1,352

13,947

3,450

4,344

34.8%

Population

Silver and Gold 4,198

Service Area

Total

4,018

1,970

22,932

Market Share

95.6%

Clark County

Social Security Set

10,886

12,233

Non Customers

4.4%

98.8%

Enterprise Service Area

Market Potential

Prosperous Empty Nesters

6,314

Customers

9,892

1.2%

97.4%

Population

Retirement Communities

35,165

456

13,576

2.6%

Service Area

Simple Living

10,348

169

23,468

Total

Prosperous Empty Nesters

13,745

625

Market Potential

Silver and Gold

24,093

Population

Total

Analytics 67


Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

5,978

Customers

1,377

7,601

Non Customers

42.9%

36.2%

44.0%

Market Share

57.1%

63.8%

56.0%

Page 66

781 8,978

Market Share

30.8%

Las Vegas

13,579

6,759

Non Customers

69.2%

23.9%

Simple Living Total

Laughlin Service Area

Market Potential

2,158

Customers

620

76.1%

26.5%

Population

15,737

1,391 778

73.5%

Service Area

2,011 2,480

1,398

Social Security Set

Silver and Gold 3,258 3,871

Market Share

43.9%

Market Potential

Simple Living 5,269

Non Customers

56.1%

43.9%

Population

Total

Customers

554

56.1%

Meadows

708

554

Market Potential

1,262

708

Population

Social Security Set

1,262

Service Area

Total

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

1,668

Customers

2,425

1,781

Non Customers

63.3%

49.2%

48.4%

Market Share

49.2%

36.7%

50.8%

51.6%

Page 67

3,449 2,345 485 50.8%

Mesquite

Silver and Gold 4,770 837 4,691

867

Customers

661

1,702

Non Customers

33.5%

32.8%

33.7%

Market Share

66.5%

67.2%

66.3%

Market Potential

Senior Sun Seekers 1,322 4,850

Population

Simple Living 9,541

Service Area

Total

322

2,363

Market Share

72.3%

Rainbow

2,569

1,189

Non Customers

27.7%

61.2%

Retirement Communities Total

Sahara West Service Area

Market Potential

983

Customers

2,339

38.8%

67.0%

Population

3,522

895

1,848

33.0%

Service Area

3,234

1,171

4,187

Prosperous Empty Nesters

Silver and Gold

3,019

2,066

Market Potential

Prosperous Empty Nesters

6,253

Population

Total

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Non Customers

16.4%

Market Share

83.6%

83.6%

Page 68

Customers

1,079 16.4%

Searchlight

212 1,079

1,388

1,520

734

532

Customers

1,194

2,752

1,393

856

Non Customers

26.3%

15.6%

35.6%

34.5%

38.3%

Market Share

68.5%

73.7%

84.4%

64.4%

65.5%

61.7%

Market Potential

1,291 212

Population

Senior Sun Seekers 1,291

Service Area

Total

Social Security Set 2,127

221

1,501

31.5%

Spring Valley

Prosperous Empty Nesters 4,272

535

7,696

Market Share

64.7%

Summerlin Service Area

Market Potential

Retirement Communities 1,415

3,542

Non Customers

35.3%

64.7%

Population

Senior Sun Seekers 2,036

Customers

1,301

35.3%

Service Area

Simple Living 11,238

711

1,301

Total

2,012

711

Market Potential

Retirement Communities

2,012

Population

Total

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Non Customers

25.4%

Market Share

74.6%

74.6%

Page 69

Customers

2,445 25.4%

Sunrise

831 2,445

Customers

1,521

Non Customers

39.5%

31.1%

Market Share

78.7%

60.5%

68.9%

Market Potential

3,276 831

Population

Senior Sun Seekers 3,276

Service Area

Total

687 506

21.3%

West Charleston

2,208 331 1,264 458

28.7%

24.3%

71.3%

75.7%

Market Potential

837 343 147

3,749

Market Share

65.5%

Population

Social Security Set

1,607

Service Area

Prosperous Empty Nesters

1,508

Non Customers

34.5%

65.5%

Retirement Communities 605

Customers

996

34.5%

Senior Sun Seekers 5,257

525

996

Service Area

West Las Vegas

Total

1,521

525

Market Potential

Simple Living

1,521

Population

Total

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

342

Customers

3,714

894

Non Customers

17.6%

33.7%

27.7%

Market Share

68.7%

82.4%

66.3%

72.3%

Page 70

1,887 519 31.3%

Whitney

1,236

111 5,127

Market Share

49.7%

Total

Windmill Service Area

Market Potential

5,601

2,340

Non Customers

50.3%

49.7%

Population

Prosperous Empty Nesters

630

Customers

482

50.3%

Service Area

Senior Sun Seekers

7,467

488

482

Simple Living

970 488

Market Potential

Silver and Gold 970

Population

Total

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

5.4 SENIORS: FINDINGS 5.4.1 Seniors: Overall Findings

Page 71

Findings result from when you apply values to the data to derive meaning: what does the data mean? What stands out about the data? What’s important? What gets your attention and why?

Large market potential within this group but low in DW comparison

Underperforming market share as compared to district

Minimal/poor customer potential ranking

Population shares are all very small

Almost 100,000 seniors are not patrons

Highest market potential – Silver and Gold (3 in pop for this group)

All segments have high market potential

Social Security segment double the amount of other senior segments

9.5% non patrons

8% of our patrons

9% of our population

rd

• Percent of seniors: 25%

12,000 are patrons

625 patrons (11%)

6,700 patrons (8%)

LV population: 16,000

EN population: 24,000

CC largest senior population >35,000

Top Service Areas

Overview

The following findings were made at the Workshop. While these are not a final say in what the data means, it is intended to foster an evolving understanding of the service area and its segments. •

• • • • •

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5.4.2 Seniors: Segment findings

Page 72

• Facts: represent specific information gleaned from the one-page segment descriptions.

At the Workshop, participants described a few of the top population segments in this service area. The following are their notes.

• Read Between the Lines: represents workshop participant interpretations about “what makes this segment tick”…or what are their unique characteristics reading between the lines of their formal descriptions.

40% are 65 and older Median age is 44 Live alone Ethnically diverse Low/fixed income Some wealth can be tapped into $17,000 median household income 8% of households rely on public assistance 2/3 graduated high school 37% attended college 16% bachelor’s or higher Large cities Most rent apartments/low income ½ households, no vehicle Rely on easy/public transportation Shop at discount stores Dependent on Medicare/Medicaid Bank in person, pay cash Cable TV

Worry about health and bills* Watch TV as a distraction Lonely/alone – pets? More inclined to stick to routines/not able to get out*

Read Between the Lines

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Facts

Social Security Set

Key Seniors segments include the following: • •

• • • • •

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Super Group Report

60% households 55 or older 40% married couples (no children at home) Population in this segment slowly increasing Not ethnically diverse – 90% white Invest prudently for future $64,000 household income Nearly 70% attended college Many still working (education, healthcare) Most homes (77%) built before 1980 Single family housing Value health and financial well being Lots of different investments Median age is 47.6 Take pride in homes and community Likely to travel in US and abroad Regularly take a multitude of vitamins Attend sporting evens Own/lease luxury car

Facts • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Concerned about money lasting and long-term care costs* Want to enjoy life and able to do so* Travel Make plans in advance Know neighbors Word of mouth would work well with this group Can afford to choose what they do with their time (time is valuable) Have toys/have fun

Read Between the Lines • • • • • • • •

Median age is 60.5 Retired from professional occupations ½ are married, no children Segment is small – less that 1% of all US 93% white Wealthy, educated 60% in the south (FL)

Facts

Silver and Gold

Prosperous Empty Nesters

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

• • • • • • • • •

Page 73

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Super Group Report

• • • • • • • Home ownership – 82% Free time and discretionary income Active in communities Play golf, eat out, avid readers of biographies and mysteries Watch news Shop by phone Many work from home

Do what they want, when they want* Worry about kids, grandkids, their investments, who to leave their money to Entertainment – this the neighborhood you want to go trick or treating in

Read Between the Lines • • •

75% single Median age – 50.3 Mostly white Median income -- $46,000 ½ receive investment income ½ social security 35% bachelor’s degree Only ½ own home 57% -- multi unit buildings where meals are provided Play music, paint, draw Visit museums, theaters Gamble Joiners – belong to clubs Avid readers

Most likely to take classes (lifelong learning) Know their mailman and will talk* Routines Entertain within reason Likely to volunteer Need services done for them* Frugal*

Read Between the Lines

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Facts

Retirement Communities

FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

• •

• • • • • • • •

Page 74

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5.4.3 Seniors: Segment Similarities and Differences

Baby boomers?

All have some degree of “free time”

All love company

No children at home

All have financial concerns

All have health care costs/medical concerns

Income

Some till work, some don’t

Large age range

Transportation

Home ownership

Education levels

Discretionary income

Some bills/some investments

Social Security diverse, rest are predominantly while

Differences

Similarities

Page 75

At the Workshop, participants noted the similarities and differences between the segments. Noting similarities and differences clarifies things people have in common or what distinguishes them. Using similarities and differences enabled participants to generalize with a basis in facts. •

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

5.5 SENIORS: THEMATIC STATEMENT 5.5.1 Seniors: Background

Page 76

A thematic statement is a brief, pithy statement that represents, at a high level, the idea or theme that characterizes your service area as a whole. The thematic statement combines an idea about what makes your service area tick and is written in a manner to clarify your intentions with respect to an organized service approach. A thematic statement is an internal positioning statement used internally to the library but not externally to the public. A thematic statement can be considered as an elevator pitch. It is not a mission statement or a vision statement. A thematic statement is accurate as a generalization. It is interpretive and actionable and frequently are clever, catchy, and memorable. Thematic statements are based upon your unique service area segment data and characteristics. Thematic Statements were developed by the library staff including branch managers. 5.5.2 Seniors: Thematic Statement The thematic statement for this service area is:

“Senior moments become golden memories at your library�

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Appendix: FAQs WHAT IS TAPESTRY MARKET SEGMENTATION? Introduction

Page 77

A cornerstone of success for a public library is a thorough knowledge of its existing and prospective patrons. Market segmentation is an empirically-based method that accurately characterizes patrons and neighborhoods. What is market segmentation? Segmentation systems operate on the theory that people with similar tastes, lifestyles, and behaviors seek others with the same tastes—“like seeks like.” These behaviors can be measured, predicted, and targeted. Esri’s Tapestry Segmentation system combines the “who” of lifestyle demography with the “where” of local neighborhood geography to create a model of various lifestyle classifications or segments of actual neighborhoods with addresses—distinct behavioral market segments. How are segments created? Tapestry classifies all U.S. census block groups into one of 65 distinct market segments. LVCCLD has 54 segments. Block groups with the most similar characteristics are grouped together in a segment, while block groups with divergent characteristics are made in separate segments. The key to developing a powerful market segmentation system lies in the selection of the variables used to classify consumers. U.S. consumer markets are multidimensional and diverse. Using a large, well-selected array of attributes captures this diversity with the most powerful data available. Data sources include Census 2010 data; Esri’s Updated Demographics; and consumer surveys such as the Survey of the American Consumer from GfK MRI, to capture the subtlety and vibrancy of the US marketplace. Tapestry combines the traditional and latest data mining techniques to provide a robust and compelling segmentation of US neighborhoods. Esri developed and incorporated the data mining techniques to complement and strengthen traditional methods to work with large geodemographic databases. Robust methods are less susceptible to extreme values, or outliers, and are therefore crucial to small-area analysis. Complementary use of data mining techniques and implementation of robust methods enhance the effectiveness of traditional statistical methodology in developing Tapestry Segmentation.

What verification steps are taken? Verification procedures follow the creation of the segments to ensure their stability and validity. Replicating the segments with independent samples confirms stability. Validity is checked through the use of characteristics not used to generate the segments. Linking the Tapestry segmentation system to the latest consumer survey data is the critical test. A market segmentation system must be able to distinguish consumer behavior— spending patterns and lifestyle choices—as expected.

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How can Tapestry be used by out library?

Page 78

Market segmentation helps libraries answer the questions: who are we serving and not serving? Are there any surprises? What are the service implications of these findings with respect to marketing campaigns, customer development, collection development, program development, partnerships, use of existing facilities, staff alignment, election campaigns, customer loyalty programs, media relations, siting new facilities, and building public awareness, among others. Library segmentation data reveals the demographic, lifestyle, and interest preferences of the library’s customers. If a library knows who its customers are, it can better respond to their needs and improve communications, products, and services. Market segmentation can add tremendous value to a public library especially in terms of collection development, outreach and advocacy, patron development campaigns, and development of library services to meet local and unique community needs from teen programs to literacy.

WHAT IS COMMUNITYCONNECT? CommunityConnect is a software-as-a-service application from CIVICTechnologies that uses data and maps to understand customers, neighborhoods and service areas, and community conditions that impact library service strategies.

WHAT IS CURRENT YEAR ESTIMATE (CYE) OF POPULATION? Current year estimate (CYE) of population are annual population updates. These updates are usually issued by our data provider Esri in June or July for the previous calendar year. Example: CYE 2012 is for the calendar year 2011; CYE 2013 will be for calendar year 2012. Esri’s CYE is based upon the U.S. Census Bureau’s CYE. The Census CYE is released for counties and metro areas. Esri takes that data and using proprietary methodologies applies it to smaller geographical units like the census block group.

CAN WE COLLECT OTHER LIBRARY DATA SUCH AS PROGRAM ATTENDANCE, DATABASE USAGE, COMPUTER USAGE, AND GATE COUNT? These other data sets will eventually be provided including program attendance, summer reading participation, computer usage, database usage, e books, e audio books, and others.

DOES TAPESTRY PROVIDE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CHILDREN AND TEENS? Tapestry provides information about families and households, providing substantial quantitative and qualitative data on context in which young people live. Demographic and socio-economic data, like population by age and population by race or ethnicity, provides detailed data on children and teens. Using Tapestry data to understand the demographic and socio-economic context which condition children across age ranges is instrumental to understanding their needs, interests, and concerns and in turn developing relevant services.

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION Page 79

ARE POPULATION, CUSTOMER, AND CHECKOUT DATA CALCULATED IN TERMS OF THE BRANCH OR THE SERVICE AREA? Libraries usually calculate data, like the number of customers and checkouts, by the branch the items were checked out at, or by the number of customers “registered” at or who frequent a branch (e.g., gate count). We don’t use this approach. Instead, we calculate in terms of the area related to a branch. This difference in the way things are measured can make it look like customer counts or checkouts counts are out of the norm for a branch. It’s not that they are off or out of the norm; rather, the methods are not comparable. We calculate the number of customers by the block groups that they live in. We assign a group of block groups to one service area. There is one service area for each outlet, and the service area is named for the outlet. The data for the service area derives from the block groups that configure it. So, let’s say the Athmar Service Area has 10 block groups in it. Those block groups each have a unique number of people in each of them. Let’s say that in total, those block groups add up to a total of 5,001 people. In this case, the Athmar Service Area has a total population of 5,001 people. We do a similar thing counting customers. We count the number of customers in the block groups that comprise the Athmar Service Area. So, let’s say that a total of 2,500 customers live in those blocks groups. They are counted as the number of customers in the Athmar Service Area. With respect to checkouts, we count the number of checkouts from customers who live in the service area block groups regardless of which branch an item is checked out from. So, if the 2,500 customers living in the Athmar Service Area have a total of 10,111 checkouts, ALL of those 10,111 checkouts are credited to the Athmar Service Area regardless of which branch they are checked out from. Those 10,111 checkouts are not necessarily from the Athmar Branch, but they are from people who live in block groups that comprise the Athmar Service Area.

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF MARKET SHARE AND MARKET POTENTIAL? Market Share The percent of population that are library cardholders; sometimes called the penetration rate. Market Share is the inverse of Market Potential. Examples (see Market Potential for the inverse of these same examples): Example 1: Let’s say there are 4,000 people in a census block group of which 2,400 people are patrons, the Market Share of that census block group is 60.0 percent (2,400 / 4,000). Example 2: Let’s say there are 2,550 people in Inner City Tenants segment of which 1,350 people are patrons, the Market Share of this segment is 52.9 percent (1,350 / 2,550). Example 3: Let’s say there are 23,000 people in a service area of which 12,500 people are patrons, the Market Share of this service area is 54.4 percent (12,500 / 23,000).

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Super Group Report FACILITIES PLANNING INFORMATION

Market Potential

Page 80

The percent of population that are NOT library cardholders (non-cardholders); sometimes called the open market rate. Market Potential is the inverse of market share. Examples (see Market Share potential for the inverse of these same examples): Example 1: Let’s say there are 4,000 people in a census block group of which 1,600 people are nonpatrons; the Market Potential of that census block group is 40.0 percent (1,600 / 4,000). Example 2: Let’s say there are 2,550 people in Inner City Tenants of which 1,200 people are nonpatrons, the Market Potential of this segment is 47.1 percent (1,200 / 2,550). Example 3: Let’s say there are 23,000 people in a service area of which 10,500 people are non-patrons, the Market Potential of this service area is 45.6 percent (10,500 / 23,000).

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF CUSTOMER POTENTIAL? Customer Potential Customer Potential is a relative strength index that identifies the Tapestry segment, census block group, or service area with the highest potential for customer growth. Customer Potential is an index and commonly referred to as a relative strength measure. The higher the Customer Potential value, the higher the patron growth potential; the lower the Customer Potential value, the lower the growth Customer Potential. Generally, Customer Potential is calculated as the product of the population share (of a segment or block group or service area) times the Market Potential of that same segment or block group or service area. The formula for calculating Customer Potential is generally: Formula: ((local population / total population) * (non-customers / total population)) * 1,000. Notes Local population = the population of the segment, block group or service area Total population = the total population of the city Non-customers = total population minus customers Example: Let’s take the segment “Metropolitans” in a given city. There are 91,264 population, 38,974 customers, and 52,290 non-customers. And, the total city population is 621,845. Formula: ((91,264 / 621,845) * (52,290 / 621,845)) * 1,000 = 62.7

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WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF AVERAGE CUSTOMER CHECKOUTS AND AVERAGE POPULATION CHECKOUTS? Average Customer Checkouts

Page 81

For a given area (e.g., segment, census block group, or service area), the total number of checkouts in that area divided by the number of patrons in the same area. Formula: Checkouts / customers Example: Let’s say there are 10,206 people in the Aspiring Young Families segment of which 3,885 are customers; they made 53,680 checkouts. The Average Customer Checkouts are 13.82. Average Population Checkouts For a given area (e.g., segment, census block group or service area), the total number of checkouts in that area divided by the number of people who live in the same area. Formula: Checkouts / population Example: Let’s say there are 10,206 people in the Aspiring Young Families segment of which 3,885 are customers; they made 53,680 checkouts. The Average Population Checkouts are 5.26. Note: the difference between Average Customer Checkouts and Average Population Checkouts is a ratio. This ratio describes, from the point of view of customers, the relative strength (how strong or weak) those customers (usually by segment) are at checking stuff out. The same ratio is applied to the population: how strong or weak the population (usually by segment) is at checking stuff out. By comparing (the ratio between) Average Customer Checkouts and Average Population Checkouts, we can determine the potential for increasing checkouts by increasing the Market Share of that segment.

Analytics 83

Profile for Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework  

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework  

Las Vegas-Clark County Library District Library Facilities Master Plan Decision Framework

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