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SUMMER 2017| ISSUE NO. 1 L I B E R T Y

U N I V E R S I T Y

S T U D E N T

P U B L I C

A S S O C I A T I O N

PREVENT. PROMOTE. PROTECT.

H E A L T H


PAGE # |  ISSUE 01

GOD

LUPHSA COMMUNITY

STUDENTS

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY PUBLIC STUDENT ASSOCIATION

HEALTH

The purpose of the Liberty University Public Health Student Association (LUPHSA) is to promote health, wellness, and disease prevention within the community, convey awareness of career and academic matters related to public health, and foster Christ-like relationships among students and faculty for the growth and sustainability of the Liberty University Public & Community Health program.         We offer various opportunities to be involved in the Lynchburg community and other cities within the state of Virginia specifically for those wanting to pursue a career in Public Health. Our members participate in health fairs, outreach, research, conferences, and plenty more. Most importantly, through our organization, our members are able to make friends that can accompany them along their journey!


From the President

It is indeed a pleasure to welcome you all to the inaugural Liberty University Public Health Student Association (LUPHSA) Journal. As the 2016-2017 academic year comes to an end, I would like to extend my warm appreciation to all who made this great year possible. I am especially proud of the officers who stepped up, had no idea of what they were getting themselves into and yet gave it all they had. Every sponsored event was a success, thanks to our member's support, and I can only give thanks and praises to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for continued guidance. In this banner year of LUPSHA, we focused on four core areas for strategic growth and development. These areas are 1) Fundraising to gain support and increase awareness for what we are passionate about - Public Health, 2) health fairs to engage communities in building bridges to a healthier society, 3) professional development through student-faculty research, guest speakers who shared experience in the field and networking opportunities., 4) and social events to allow us to create a bond of shared prosperity. These four areas were integral in making an impact on the Liberty University Campus, engaging students' passion for Public Health and, most importantly, making an impact within the community. My hope is that as you read students' recount of the year, you will be inspired to see how you can make an impact in your community; even if you are an online student, this association is for you and we would like you to hear about it. Lastly, but certainly not least, it was an honor and a privilege to have served as your president.  I envision continued growth and success of this association within the Department of Public and Community Health. - Edson Erwin, MPH

FUNDRAISERS

HEALTH FAIRS

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

SOCIAL EVENTS

From the Editor

A heartfelt thanks to our terrific team, the dedicated and passionate student members, and all others who went above and beyond. Thank you, also, Edson Erwin, Guimy Castor, and the Department of Public and Community Health, for the vision, leadership, and opportunities presented for all of us to grow and develop as public health students through the association. I am truly grateful, not only to represent the association, but also for the opportunity to be editor-in-chief and creator of this piece. And with that, I welcome you to the inaugural issue of The Liberty University Public Health Student Association Journal. - Sarafina Cooper


2O16-2O17

LUPHSA

LEADERSHIP

Edson Erwin, President

Guimy Castor, Vice-President

Jacquline Mshamma, Treasurer

Evarista Ogbon, Secretary

Itza Prieto, Event Coordinator

Victoria Ramos, Fundraising Coordinator

Victoria Brown, Graduate Representative

Kristy Gonzalez, Undergraduate Representative

Birhane Teklwold, Graduate Representative

Sarafina Cooper, Graduate Representative

Marson Tare, Undergraduate Representative

Candy Hernandez, Undergraduate Representative


L U P H S A

J O U R N A L

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C O N T E N T S

O 2

O 6

Global Fete Gala

"This is Public Health": National Public

Health Week

O 7

1 5

2 1

Mixteco Outreach

LUPHSA Research

2O17-2O18 Leadership Inauguration

05 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24

Casa Latina | Pathways in Public Health Live Health Liberty Expo Operation Christmas Child | Ledo Pizza Meet & Greet Featured Public Health Student Quotes Medical Reserve Corps | Senior Outreach Jubilee Health Fair | CHES Workshop Community Clean Up | Potluck Research Week Poster Sessions Research Week Oral Presentations Connect the Dots CCIH Advocacy Day Health Advocacy 2O17-2O18 LUPHSA Leadership Pictures Importance of Cultural Competence Final Remarks


The inaugural gala in collaboration with the Virginia Department of Health, Lynchburg Parks & Recreations and Nueva Amanecer TRBC was a great success. 

Held at the elegant Hancock Welcome Center at Liberty University, the event was sold out to over seventy guests in attendance.

l a b o gl e t fe

It was a fun-filled evening with dinner, award presentations, live performances, and music from Vhuthuhawe and the Acoustic Fusion.

PAGE 02 | ISSUE 01

Working with these organizations will further help LUPHSA reach its goal to promote health, wellness, and disease prevention within the community.


CASA LATINA: ANNUAL

PATHWAYS IN

PUBLIC HEALTH

HISPANIC HEALTH FAIR On Saturday, April 29th, LUPHSA was presented with the opportunity to partner with Casa Latina in Roanoke, Virginia, to help provide health information and resources to the local Hispanic community. More specifically, LUPHSA set up and volunteered at three booths that focused on oral health, nutrition, physical exercise/BMI, and prevention of chronic diseases. At the oral health table, individuals were informed about the importance of oral hygiene and were presented with photographs of various oral and gum diseases that result from poor oral hygiene. At this table, community members were also able to take home floss, toothpaste, and toothbrushes to encourage better oral hygiene. Items on other tables included handheld BMI machines, portable blood pressure machines, nutrient-dense versus nutrient-poor meal cards, and visual diagrams regarding exercises and chronic disease. Through this opportunity, students were able to practice public health measures by teaching on disease prevention and engaging the Hispanic community with an open heart and mind. LUPHSA would be delighted to continue serving local and neighboring communities in the future! BY KRISTY GONZALEZ

GENERAL MEETING LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA The most common question asked about public health is, "What kind of jobs are available in the field?" Brittani Thomas, 2014 Public Health Associate for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC), spoke about pathways in public health and the PHAP program during LUPHSA’s monthly meeting in November, 2016. The Public Health Associate Program (PHAP) trains recent bachelor's, or master's entry-level professionals with an interest in public health. Throughout the two-year training program, PHAP associates gain hands-on experience that serves as a foundation for their future public health careers. Jobs that could also be explored in the public health area are public health law, research, and clinical trials to develop protocols and standards. Some of the jobs she’s had with her master’s in public health are career training programs, and surveillance of HIV/Syphilis cases working with the CDC to fund sponsors. Some of the important skills Thomas mentioned for maximizing job opportunities were utilizing available resources and maintaining relationships. In addition, other significant skill areas for public health are grant writing, conference attendance, and working on a capstone project thesis with possibility of publication. 

PAGE 05 | ISSUE 01

BY BIRHANE TEKLEWOLD


"THIS IS PUBLIC HEALTH" NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH WEEK LIBERTY UNIVERSITY, LYNCHBURG,VA

Each year the American Public Health Association (APHA) organizes National Public Health Week during the first week of April. The week is to recognize the contribution of public health, and also determine issues to improve the health of the nation. During this week, Liberty University Public Health Student Association (LUPHSA) alongside Liberty University's Department of Public & Community Health organized events on Liberty’s campus. This event was organized to create awareness about public health among students on campus. It incorporated both fun and educational elements. There were health related questions prepared for students to answer and win prizes. Students who stopped by the station were given basic information about what public health is and how it is integrated in their daily life. Students also participated in a push-up contest and hula hoop challenges. A portable body fat analyzer was available for those who wanted their BMI and body fat percentage calculated.  Students received information about how to keep their BMI in the normal range. "This Is Public Health" stickers were used to raise awareness about how public health affects individuals in their daily lives. Stickers were provided to students to post on items they think are related to public health. The challenge was to take photos of public health efforts and issues and share them on social media - a powerful tool to increase awareness about public health efforts. WRITTEN BY BIRHANE TEKLEWOLD


MIXTECO HEALTH

OUTREACH KINGSLAND BAPTIST CHURCH RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

One of the goals of Liberty University Public Health Student Association (LUPHSA) is to promote health, wellness and disease prevention with the community all while sharing the love of Jesus Christ. Last year, LUPHSA was presented with a great health outreach opportunity to do just that! Initiated by Daniela Ortega in partnership with Nuevo Amanecer TRBC Spanish Campus Church and Iglesia Bautista Conexión, LUPHSA was able to serve an indigenous community in Richmond, Virginia, called the Mixtecos. With an informal survey assessment and health screenings, it was found that the individuals served experienced high blood pressure, high body mass index (BMI) measurements, lack of family planning services, and lack of access to medical insurance and health care. With the leadership and planning of Itza Prieto, this year, on December 10, 2016, LUPHSA members had the opportunity to return to Richmond and host a second health fair and screening event at Kingsland Baptist Church for the local Mixteco community. With the help of online donations and a fundraiser led by Victoria Ramos, the team hosted medical insurance information; cholesterol, BMI and glucose screenings; a nutrition, physical activity and dental hygiene workshop; maternal health information and basic physicals from licensed medical doctors. With the approval of the Institutional Review Board (IRB), a survey was distributed and data collected on those attending the health fair to understand the health needs and problems of the community. The information collected will be used to research future projects and community action plans so that LUPHSA may continue to help the Mixteco community towards better health and overall well-being.

WRITTEN BY SARAFINA COOPER PAGE 07 | ISSUE 01


LIVE HEALTHY

LIBERTY EXPO WRITTEN BY SARAFINA COOPER

At Liberty University’s annual Live Healthy Liberty Expo, LUPHSA members and leadership joined various other campus departments, local health and wellness organizations, and vendors as part of a campus-wide initiative to promote health education, resources, and opportunities. The event targeted campus students, faculty, and staff by providing on-site health screenings and health, wellness, and fitness activities. LUPHSA hosted four health information booths for the event. Members, Guimy Castor, Hedrick Chung, Sarafina Cooper and Thais Jardim, researched and prepared an original poster for Zika virus disease, highlighting real-time data and updates on the emerging disease. In addition, the team created an original poster for oral health and prepared set-ups for breast and testicular cancer for areas of women's and men’s health. The Live Healthy Liberty Expo was a great opportunity for LUPHSA graduate and undergraduate members to volunteer their time, and create relationships with the campus community through outreach that promoted health, wellness and disease prevention. 


L U P H S A

N E W S L E T T E R

OPERATION PAGE 09 | ISSUE 01

CHRISTMAS CHILD WRITTEN BY SARAFINA COOPER

With the help of Liberty University’s Operation Christmas Child Club, LUPHSA members and leadership were able to demonstrate God’s love to needy children around the world. Thirteen shoe boxes were filled with school supplies, hygiene items, clothing accessories, toys, and a few encouraging notes. Through Samaritan’s Purse, hundreds of thousands of shoe boxes will be collected, distributed, and used as resources for evangelical outreach and to fulfill the physical needs of families and children worldwide.

LEDO PIZZA

FUNDRAISER

LUPHSA started off the New Year right with a fundraising event at Ledo’s Pizza! This fundraising event among members, friends, and faculty not only served as a way to raise money for the mission of LUPHSA, but as a way to practically be the hands and feet of Christ through our interactions with the community. The Ledo’s Pizza fundraiser was carefully planned and executed by LUPHSA’s fundraising coordinator, 

Victoria Ramos, not only on January 31st, 2017, but previously in Fall 2016 as well. Her dedication, along with the support of LUPHSA members and community members, led to two successful fundraising turnouts. LUPHSA received 20% of all sales from this establishment between the hours of 5:00-9:00pm during each event day. But most importantly, it is the desire of LUPHSA to be able to serve the community better through future public health outreaches with the money that we raise during these fundraising events.

WRITTEN BY KRISTY GONZALEZ


MEET & GREET HOLLINS MILL PARK LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA

On September 24th, 2016, LUPHSA students met at Hollins Mill Park for the first Meet and Greet under the new leadership. Through the Meet and Greet it was the hope of the leadership to get to know the students and spend time with them in a relaxed environment. During the event, students brought different dishes to share and enjoyed different activities. Such activities included playing a game suggested by Victoria Brown, where two teams had balloons of different colors tied to their feet as each team tried to pop the balloons of members of the opposing team. Other activities included the phone game Heads up, like charades, in which a person guesses while the others act out or give clues to the student guessing. All in all, it was a great occasion to meet new people and make new friendships.

WRITTEN BY ITZA PRIETO PAGE 10 | ISSUE 01


“I've seen how there is so much need in every area of health and would love to work in a career that helps better the health of people all around the world, especially in developing regions."

"I chose public health because I’m passionate about prevention. I see too many people suffering and dying from preventable diseases; that’s what really called me.” --Naomi Sainval, Haiti

--Shelby Todd, Chesapeake, VA "I want to gain greater insight on how to assist the community and help others understand how vital public health is, not only in our community, but also to the world. My overall career goal is to become a dietician. I chose this goal because while growing up I saw many of my family members and friends pass away due to various chronic diseases. I want to be able to help others understand how vital it is to keep your body as a temple for Christ, and that we are an image of Him, and because of this we have to make sure to keep our image in His likeness.” --Travontae Lewis, Goldsboro, NC “Public health has always been intriguing to me because it is the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, public and private, organizations communities and individuals. My ultimate goal is to become a public health physician, and to use the tools learned in my master's program to encourage disease prevention for my patients and within a community. My hope is to make an impact in the community that I serve in so that healthier lifestyles can be made for people.” --Dominique Richburg,    Severn, Maryland "I chose to study Public Health because I grew up around family members with diabetes and high blood pressure and a grandma who has many ailments including Alzheimer's. I became interested in how these things could be prevented and how one can achieve a high quality of life. I hope to help individuals, families, and communities reach their highest potential in health and wellness spiritually, physically, emotionally, and mentally.” --Bethany Williams,    Lindale, Texas

" I wanted to study for a MPH so I can learn health prevention and help people stay out of the hospital. Whether it was from health issues related to smoking in the house, or eating unhealthy diets, I have seen the effects of poor health decisions.” --Randy Green, Delaware "I was a Pre-Med major, but along the way of studying, I have realized that it is much better to prevent diseases especially chronic diseases. The field of medicine only treats one patient at a time; public health on the other hand can improve a population’s health status. It can also reduce an individual’s hospital visits tremendously. Therefore, I decided to change my major to Public Health. The idea that, in the future, the overall health of my community will be impacted by my efforts makes me very excited and proud. I hope more students can be attracted to the field of public health. This would enable more people to work together and improve the overall health nationally and globally.” --Ru Jia, China

“I started undergrad as a nursing student then realized I wanted to prevent diseases from happening rather than just treating them. I choose public health because my grandmother had lung cancer and I saw what health factors led up to that diagnosis, I wanted to prevent others from getting lung cancer. I became interested in why people do such things and how we as health professionals can get them to change their health habits for the better. I hope to help individuals, other families, and communities reach their full potential." --Stephanie Mias, Wilmington, Delaware


MEDICAL

RESERVE CORPS 2ND GENERAL MEETING LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA On March 8th, we had the pleasure of hosting Mr. Adam LaChappelle from the Virginia Reserve Medical Corps. It was an amazing meeting, in which we got to learn about what the Medical Reserve Corps is all about. Now, the VMRC is an organization made up of volunteers who want to be ready and help the community in case of an emergency. The volunteers get an opportunity for proper training in whichever branch they are interested in. One of the aspects that is very interesting about the VMRC is their flexibility. The volunteers get to choose their time of availability when it comes to training and emergency services. The LUPHSA members showed great interest in the organization, and eighteen members registered to volunteer. It was a movement, and we could not do it without Mr. Adam LaChappelle. We thank him  for taking time from his busy schedule and travel from North Carolina to come and talk to us. Also, a big thanks goes to Mr. Castor who thought it well for us to know about about such a great opportunity.

WRITTEN BY NAOMI SAINVAL PAGE 12 | ISSUE 01

SENIOR COMMUNITY

OUTREACH YODER CENTER LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA

         With thousands of people suffering with diabetes in Lynchburg, LUPHSA aims to keep individuals educated, and fight against it. The outreach event at the Yoder Center  educated the local older adult community about hypertension and diabetes. According to the American Heart Association, people with diabetes are “two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than people without diabetes." The audience present were twenty seniors, mostly women, and a few men.  LUPHSA raised awareness of the link between type II diabetes and heart disease and encouraged seniors with type II diabetes to know their heart disease risk and speak to their healthcare provider. Through education, awareness and best practices, individuals learned how to address their condition

WRITTEN BY VICTORIA BROWN through diet and exercise and how their families can avoid the condition if possible. After each presentation, seniors were given a chance to ask questions. In addition, screening booths were provided to check blood glucose, blood pressure, nutrition information profile, and Body Mass Index (BMI) of participants. The seniors could record their information, and talk to the members about their results.  One of the seniors even asked for LUPHSA to come back again. It was a great opportunity to hear the voice of the elderly community, and to educate them on how to live healthier lives. LUPHSA is thrilled to encourage people to act, not only for themselves, but also for their families.


JUBILEE

HEALTH FAIR JUBILEE FAMILY DEVELOPMENT CENTER LYNCHBURG,VA

In September, Horizon Behavior Health partnered with several community organizations and LUPHSA students to host a free health fair at the Jubilee Family Development Center. The fair provided free blood pressure, glucose, HIV, Hepatitis C, and Syphilis screenings. There were over two hundred attendees. There was free food, a moon bounce, face painting, and a raffle for a flat screen TV. The fair provided health services to many individuals who were without insurance. LUPHSA students provided health education at the event and helped with the greeting of guest and managing the raffle. Overall, the event was a success. Many individuals took advantage of the health screenings and benefited from the local referrals to care. WRITTEN BY BRITMARIE WITKOWSKI

CERTIFIED HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST

(CHES) TEST PREP WORKSHOP

WRITTEN BY EDSON ERWIN

LUPSHA hosted two CHES workshops in the Fall and Spring of 2016-2017 to prepare undergraduate and graduate students to sit the certification exam. Our local community partners working in the field of public health were also invited to this training opportunity. Thanks to Dr. James Florence and Dr. Annette Florence, both  MCHES certified, for their continued support and dedication in fostering students' development and community engagement.

PAGE 13 | ISSUE 01


COMMUNITY CLEAN UP KROGER SHOPPING CENTER FOREST,VA

On February 17, 2017, in an effort to impact the local community, LUPHSA members participated in a community clean up event. Students attended to an empty lot beside a Kroger Shopping Center. Completed in partnership with King of Kings Church, students and church members met at the empty lot at five o’clock in the evening. For approximately one hour, volunteers filled trash bags with garbage collected from the field. Volunteers got down and dirty, going deep into bushes to clean up all the trash in sight. It was a wonderful experience for volunteers to witness how quickly and easily it is possible to make an impact in the community. WRITTEN BY VICTORIA RAMOS

DR. FLORENCE

POTLUCK

On October 15th, 2016, LUPHSA students gathered at the house of Dr. Florence for fellowship, a potluck and activities in the lake. This event was a great opportunity for students to share with each other and with professors. During the event, students shared homemade dishes and enjoyed a warm day kayaking, canoeing, and paddle boating, while also getting to know and enjoying the company and conversation with professors. WRITTEN BY ITZA PRIETO


LUPHSA RESEARCH GROUP WRITTEN BY GUIMY CASTOR

The LUPHSA Research Group is a student-led organization designed to help students find research opportunities and participate in research. The group will provide students with the information needed to succeed in research. The Liberty University research week is an annual showcase for undergraduate and graduate student researchers to present their work to the university community. This is an interdisciplinary event that showcases research and creative activities from across campus. Hundreds of student researchers, including those from the Department of Public and Community Health, present their work as poster presentations or oral presentations. LUPHSA Research Group's first meeting was on October 19, 2016. The meeting was to find students who were interested in doing research and how LUPHSA can assists students in their research.  Undergraduate and graduate students learned about what doing research actually means and the benefits of producing papers that advance the field. All students were motivated to find an advisor to supervise their research. Student research teams worked with a research advisor who directed them through the research process. The advisors guided students' research: helping them to select a topic, write a research proposal, perform the research, and evaluate it critically.

RESEARCH TOPICS THAT STUDENTS HAVE WORKED ON THROUGHOUT THE YEAR: 1. Mosquitoes and efforts to keep them from biting. Involves product research on horses and 2 trips to East Tennessee. Advisor: Dr. James Florence

2. GI health among older subjects – focus on Fiber, Fluids, Fitness, and Form of fecal evacuation. Advisor: Dr. James Florence 3. Body Temple Theory. Does one’s belief that the body is a temple of the Holy Spirit have any effect on how one cares for their body? Advisor: Dr. James Florence 4. If Christians are stewards of the environment how can we better manage the climate change issues? What are the Controllable elements of climate change? What is the return of investment for each? Advisor: Dr. Richard Lane. 5. Adequate water intake for reduction of cardiovascular risk. Advisor: Dr. James Florence 6. Water testing standards.  Advisor: Dr. Robyn Anderson.


RESEARCH WEEK

POSTER SESSION

AWARD WINNERS

JERRY FALWELL LIBRARY LU RESEARCH WEEK APRIL 10-14

Olushola O. Ogunleye, Bethesda J. O' Connell & Megan A. Quinn "Pap Smear Utilization Survey through Partnership of Academic, Professional and Lay Health Workers" Advisor: Dr. Bethesda J. O'Connell **1st Place Award, Applied Research Bethany Fox, Oswald Attin, Shiloh Reeves, Olubunmi Obayemi & Ayodeji Ojo "Addressing Risk of Influenza Infection on College Campus: An Emphasis on Housing Arrangement" Advisor: Dr. Oswald Attin **2nd Place Award, Applied Research Victoria Ramos "Critical Control Point Analysis in Zacapa, Guatemala: Surveillance for Foodborne Disease Outbreaks" Advisor: Dr. Richard Lane **3rd Place Award, Applied Research Khristina Kanagy "Breastfeeding Needs Assessment" Advisor: Dr. Richard Lane **2nd Place Award, Theoretical Proposal  Chung Hedrick  "Brief Comparison of Health Care Qualities by Nation" Presented at the Virginia Public Health Association (VPHA) 


RESEARCH WEEK

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

JERRY FALWELL LIBRARY LU RESEARCH WEEK APRIL 10-14

Martha Mabiala & Olushola Ogunleye "Accuracy of Self-Reported Weight Compared to Measured BMI Among Rural Middle School Students in Michigan" Advisor: Dr. Robyn Anderson **1st Place Award, Applied Research Nicolle Palicas, Guimy Castor, Olushola Ogunleye, Kendra Smith, Jacinta Ejirefe & Sonia Gwaneza "Adequate Water Intake for Reduction of Cardiovascular Risk" Advisor: Dr. James Florence Joshua T. Brennan, Ifeoluwa Ogbonnewo, Olushola Olaitan Ogunleye & Candy Hernandez "The Standards for Water Quality Testing: Protecting the Public from Another Flint Water Crisis" Advisor: Dr. Robyn Anderson **1st Place Award, Textual or Investigative Research Kristina Kanagy, Victoria Ramos & Itza Prieto "Planning for the Future: A Basic Needs Assessment of the Mixteco Population Near Richmond, Virginia" Advisor: Dr. Oswald Attin

PAGE 17 | ISSUE 01


Connect the Dots: The Purpose of Research in Public

Health Professional Preparation

As a child you may have created a picture by connecting dots on a page. What looked at first like unrelated points soon turned into an airplane or a princess or a dinosaur. Learning how to do public health research is a lot like connecting the dots on a page. You follow a path, unknown at first, guided by an educated guess, or hypothesis, until the solution begins to take shape. The path of discovery doesn’t always lead to the expected, but to the trained mind it always contributes useful knowledge. The more skilled you become at doing research—even the so-called mundane parts like writing a literature review and creating instruments used for collecting data—the more easily you can see the big picture of the world around you. Liberty University’s MPH program is taking a lead role in helping students research the social and healthcare needs of societies around the globe and to discover effective interventions to meet those needs. The program has produced students recognized for their ability to conduct award-winning research projects. Some of the projects were born out of student interest in a topic and some were products of ongoing interest by faculty. But there’s room for more. We need more people prepared in public health research to identify determinants of health, investigate causes of health disparities, discover effective solutions that honor God and address human spiritual as well as social needs. Will you learn to connect the dots in evidence-based public health research? If so, contact a faculty member soon and ask how you can get involved.

Prepared by Dr. Jim Florence

Professor of Public Health

PAGE 18 | ISSUE 01


CCIH ADVOCACY DAY WASHINGTON, D.C. BY

         Public Health is the society’s collective effort to promote and protect the health of its members. One of the ways we can do this is through advocacy by speaking up for those whose voices are not being heard. Advocacy is important for anyone who is passionate about and wants to invoke change regarding any issue. We got to advocate for global health, nutrition and food security to members of U.S. Congress on our recent trip to Washington D.C. We raised awareness on the countries currently with the greatest need for food security and adequate nutrition such as Syria, South Sudan and Nigeria. We asked for a continuation of allocated funds for these countries as members of Congress prepare for the next fiscal year. Advocacy is especially valuable to us as Christians because in Proverbs 31:8-9, the Bible instructs us to speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, to fight for the rights of those who are destitute, and to defend the rights of the poor and needy.           As Christians, we understand how much God values human life, so it is expected that we speak out regarding issues that are wasting valuable human lives, such as malnutrition and famine. It was a very enlightening experience because we got to interact with decision makers and look at things from their point of view. We are thankful for this experience made possible by Christian Connections for International Health for making. BY IFEOLUWA OLUWAFADEKEMI


Health Advocacy

Visiting Capitol Hill to advocate for food security provided the access, the platform to address a critical global need. I first learned about advocacy 45 years ago while memorizing I John 2:1, “…we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.” I had read the passage before but memorization promotes reflection. Jesus is the model for advocacy. Over the last several decades I have worked among the poor and underserved in many countries. I’ve sat in the small, dark, crowded homes of families with limited food access and have seen firsthand the consequences of chronic malnutrition on the children. Growth stunting, disabilities, reduced resistance to infection, and death from malnutrition are completely preventable. Every Christian has a responsibility to visit the sick, clothe the naked, and feed the hungry. Sometimes this work involves personal charity and sometimes it takes the form of advocacy. Never underestimate the power of one. Advocacy gives us an opportunity to educate and to multiply our impact in a meaningful way. Action at a governmental level allows us to enhance generosity and target a greater portion of the population. Helping as a government reduces the disparity produced by the limits created when aid relies on the individual. The unified voice of the Christian community amplifies our collective desire to serve others. I strongly recommend engaging in the chorus, speaking on behalf of the voiceless, and becoming part of the process as an advocate.

Prepared by Dr. Richard Lane

Director of the Master of Public Health Program

PAGE 20 | ISSUE 01


LUPHSA'S LAST

At our third general meeting April 12th, 2017 LUPHSA was honored to have guest speakers Nicole L. Beckwith and Douglas K Griffin who are HIV/STD Health Equity Program Coordinators at the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. During the meeting, Ms. Beckwith and Mr. Griffin spoke about various public health programs that they, as individuals, have been involved with, such as Project Direct, Period for Purple Crying, and CAPUS. The focus of their presentation was to emphasize the limitless opportunities available in the field of Public Health as well as to discuss the importance of becoming culturally competent.

GENERAL

MEETING &

LEADERSHIP

INAUGURATION

WRITTEN BY KRISTY GONZALEZ

LUPHSA was also delighted to present the new leadership team for the 2017-2018 school year during this final meeting of the semester. These new leadership members include Victoria Ramos (president), Gift Ukaejiofor (vice president), Dominique Richburg (secretary), Ifeoluwa Ogbonnewo (treasurer),

Winnie Rop (nutrition graduate representative), Martha Mabiala (global health graduate representative), Julianna Mshamma (health promotion graduate representative), Naomi Sainval (undergraduate representative), Shelby Todd (undergraduate representative), and Haley Grimste (undergraduate representative).

Victoria Ramos, Â President


Gift Ukaejiofor, Vice President

Dominique Richburg, Secretary

Candy Hernandez, Event Coordinator

Winnie Rop, Graduate Representative

Juliana Mshama, Graduate Representative

Martha Mabiala, Graduate Representative

Haley Grimste, Undergraduate Representative

Naomi Sainval, Undergraduate Representative

PAGE 22 | ISSUE 01

Shelby Todd, Undergraduate Representative


Importance

Individual

of

Cultural

Biases

Competence

Within

Public

and

Services

Ongoing evidence strongly suggests that the current or prevalent models of health and social service provision, which largely reflect white, middle class values, do not effectively meet the needs of ethnically and racially diverse individuals and groups. Failure to properly address cultural differences and our own cultural biases creates and maintains mistrust and other potential conflicts and challenges between service providers and their potential clients, further contributing to low quality of care and poor health outcomes. Therefore, examining our own biases, cultural foundations and experiences and how these impact the reactions and interactions with other people, as well as delivering culturally competent and culturally responsive care and services remains a highly promising strategy and approach to promoting and realizing positive health outcomes among racially and ethnically diverse groups. This will ultimately lead to reduction in health disparities and health inequities. Despite having stated what the evidence suggests, the cultural competence movement has been held back by a lack of strong research linking its strategies to specific health and/or well-being outcomes. A potential step to address this apparent lack of research is to look at the cultural adaption process. An initial step in the cultural adaptation process would be to determine whether an existing evidence-based program, or specific service, is appropriate for a given group. Culturally competent staff attuned to the unique needs of diverse groups of people and families may more readily recognize the incompatibility between an existing program and subsequent services and the cultural context of individuals and families being served, thus helping to determine whether a program is appropriate as originally developed. This approach, or strategy, requires adaptation, or at the very least, needs to be created specifically for those diverse groups who are in need of the many health and well-being related programs and services. We must aggressively address those biases, attitudes, policies and practices that are destructive to cultures and the individuals who make up those cultures.

Prepared

LUPHSA

by

Guimy

Castor

Vice-President


Final

Remarks

This year has been very rewarding. The LUPHSA officers and members have truly surpassed expectations whether in their involvement in community events such as the Mixteco Outreach Project, partnerships such as the Virginia Department of Health's Million Hearts program and various on- and off-campus activities such as public health week and research symposium. This year saw LUPHSA officers and members step out of their comfort zones to truly grasp the concept of public health. We hope to continue to build upon these accomplishments next year. I am looking forward to working with the new team and I can’t wait to see the great work God will do in the community through them.

Dr.

Oswald

Professor

LUPHSA

PAGE 24 | ISSUE 01

of

Attin

Public

Faculty

Health,

Advisor


LIBERTY UNIVERSITY PUBLIC STUDENT ASSOCIATION SUMMERÂ 2017 | ISSUE 01 editor in chief content directors

HEALTH

sarafina cooper edson erwin guimy castor

content editors

olushola o. ogunleye martha mabiala dominique richburg

contributing student writers

victoria brown guimy castor sarafina cooper edson erwin

follow us Lberty University Public Health Student Association - LUPHSA @phsa_liberty

kristy gonzalez ifeoluwa oluwafadekemi itza prieto victoria ramos birhane teklewold britmarie witkowski

luphsa.wordpress.com

on the cover Mixteco Health Outreach Project at Kingsland Baptist Church, Richmond, VA. Photograph by Edson Erwin


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LUPHSA Journal 2017  

LUPHSA Journal 2017  

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