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Issue One

THE INSIDER EDIT FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE Russian VOGUE Art Director Fiona Hayes weighs in on some of our topics.

A rubix cube of technicoloured mayhem // THE MALE MODEL

WHEN I WAS AN INTERN 5 Industry insiders, 10 questions.

‘YOU DON’T OWN ME’

Intelligent Opulence 1


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CONTENTS Issue One

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“Nothing says I love you like a merging wardrobe and colour coordinating basics.”

MIRRORCONTENTS Page 44

“Don’t smoke!”

‘THE INSIDER EDIT’ Page 10

38 FREELANCE FASHION

Balancing fashion and unsuitable men.

44 INTELLIGENT OPULENCE

Opulence lives on this season in the form of embellishment and luxury finishes.

48 SOCIAL PLATFORM Social networking in fashion.

50 MIRROR MIRROR 8 THE INSIDER EDIT

We took to Twitter and asked 20 fashion insiders to dip into their memory bank and pull out their best advice in 140 charachters.

10 THE DEBATE

Guy Hipwel discusses if our countries fashion lecturers are doing enough for their students.

12 BOYS BY GIRLS

The brainchild of Cecile Roberts and India Hobson

15 POSTER BOY

Lucy Smith discusses the creatures that inhabit the creations of this season’s ones to watch.

16 THE BOY WHO KNEW TOO MUCH

28 ECONOMICAL RETREATS Fashion student friendly destinations.

Nothing says I love you like a merging wardrobe.

60 THE DREAMER OF THE DAY Finely tuned paragraphs and interlocking adjectives.

32 SHORT COURSE TO SUCCESS

64 LIFE AND SOLE

34 MCQUEEN GOOSEBUMPS

66 WHEN I WAS AN INTERN

Phillipa Reid discusses ways to kick start so-called ‘portfolio careers’.

Michelle Dugid kicks off our interview series.

36 FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

Art Director of Russian Vogue, Fiona Hayes answers our questions.

Doing it for the lads.

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We chat to footwear buyer Stephanie Smallman.

5 Industry insiders, 10 questions.

72 BOY

Alice Dellal’s new posting at Chanel by Alice Mary Gorto.


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EDITOR’S letter

So here we are W

elcome to the first ever addition of Grandeur Magazine.

It was only a few weeks ago that I was struck with a shiny little epiphany. Where everything I’ve been thinking about for the last year had just nestled neatly into place. It was when compiling our ‘The Insider Edit’ page that I was overcome with a sense of realisation. Realisation that the people that are imbedded in this seemingly untouchable world that we call fashion are actually not as untouchable as you may think. Between editing the pages of their own magazines, dashing from meeting to meeting and boarding planes to destinations far and wide, these people took the time to answer our question. There was no form of payment, no fusspot, neurotic-rich time-poor PA hustling them to their next engagement. It was just me, my trusty Mac, and a bunch of people, experts in their crafts and generous with their knowledge. Moments such as that are the foundations of this magazine. A testament to the power of words, about which I discuss on page 54, and the unrivalled potential

of Twitter, which inspired Mia Holt to put pen to paper and discuss this topic on page 42. The odds are that you have picked up this issue because you want to pursue a career in fashion, and the truth is you haven’t chosen an easy path. There will be years of hard slog and streamlined devotion, where your biggest reward will be the one of knowing yourself what you have achieved. In addition to keeping your head above the murky waters of University life, you will need to intern, probably hold down a part time job and cling on to some sort of social life. As well as an artistic expression of fashion, art, and the world in which we surround ourselves, I envision this quarterly magazine to be the first port of call, a meeting of minds, and a way of making this path you have chosen a little smoother. Connecting the people who work successfully within the industry to those of you dreaming of working alongside them one day. Our aim is to stop you swimming against the tide and to teach you to swim with the current. The one thing that connects everyone in this industry is that we are all daydreamers; some of grandeur, some of modest proportions. My absolute favourite saying is that of T.E Lawrence in The Seven Pillars

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of Wisdom; “Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible.” And as they say, to love what you do, that is the ultimate goal. So here we are…

Editor


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Illustration // POPPY ROBERTS

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THE INSIDER EDIT

“Do not date men who do not work.” -Kelly Cutrone, Founder of People’s Revolution

“Breathe, think about what’s really important and go for it. It’s ok to make mistakes as long as you acknowledge them.” -Jenny Dickinson, Editor of Harpers Bazaar.

‘If you could give one piece of advice to your 21 year old self, what would it be?’ We took to Twitter and asked 20 fashion insiders to dip into their memory bank and pull out their best advice in 140 charachters.. Composed by LUCY SMITH

“Don’t smoke!” -Hillary Alexander, Journalist and Fashion Director

“To have gone on singing.” -Daphne Guinness

“Honestly? I wouldn’t change anything. Mistakes and all.” -Jo Elvin, Editor of Glamour Magazine

“Easy. Pay cash and not credit. Save money.” -Steven Kolb, CEO of Council of Fashion Designers of America

“Hairspray and backcombing : Remember you are going to have to brush that out one day.” -Georgina Langford, Fashion Writer

“The world is kinder than you think. There’s almost always a way.” -Isaac Lock,Editor at LOVE Magazine

“Life has it’s challenges but remember each one, good or bad, will make you stronger than the one before.” -Marina Ansell, ASOS Picture Editor 8


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“Persevere.” -Emma Elwick Bates, British Vogue

“Learn to trust your instinct!” -Sofia Barattieri, Founder of Motilo.

“Follow your dreams. They are a destination.” -Alexis Knox, Stylist “To be confident. I know I have amazing ideas and taste because of working with my mentor at both Elle and Marie Claire, Nina Garcia.” -Kyle Anderson, Accessories Director at Marie Claire US.

“I’d tell my 21 year old self the same thing I tell myself now: try to enjoy the process as much as the result. -David Nicholls, Design Editor of The Telegraph

“Be yourself.” -Susan Tabak, CEO of Luxury Lifestyle Media

“Think again.” -Harriet Quick, British Vogue

“Don’t take any crap from people and be more confident with who you are.” -Claire Smith, Senior Fashion Stylist at Cosmopolitan Magazine “Don’t be afraid!” -Paula Reed, Style Director at Grazia

“Don’t listen to your careers advisor. Do what you want to do. I followed this advice regardless.” -Alex Stedman, Senior Fashion assistant at Red Magazine

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“To not worry. It’ll all be ok in the end ...And to appreciate a lie in!” -Charlie Anderson, Stylist


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THE DEBATE Stylist and Editor of Fashion156.com, Guy Hipwell discusses :

ARE FASHION COLLEGES DOING ENOUGH FOR THEIR STUDENTS?

..And are Fashion Students doing enough for themselves?

Since we launched in 2006, Fashion156 has always worked with students. Without them we would not exist. This has shaped my views, and what is upsetting is that even after graduating the quality of some students’ work is just not up to standard. These are not isolated cases, but reflect dozens of applicants who apply here. Why is this not being picked up on by their lecturers? Why have they been accepted onto a course and spent 3 years of their life – perhaps now with huge debt – only to end up like this? When did ‘average’ become so commonplace? And yes, Mr and Mrs College Lecturer (the ones who are clueless when it comes to the industry today), I am talking about you too. I truly believe the entry criteria for certain courses needs to be raised. Surely it can be considered a form of corruption to entice students onto courses that will never lead to jobs? I have heard of whole classes where not a single graduate has found work. We have had some exceptionally talented people work here, but 2 years on, many ex-interns report they still cannot secure a paid position of their choice. With the move towards digital communication, prospective students should be asking questions too, before they even contemplate applying for a course. What kinds of projects are set – are they really relevant? (I have heard horrific stories). Are colleges collaborating with the right companies? How many past graduates have secured jobs?

If you are on a course that is going nowhere – complain. Take issue with the convener. But do not just accept it. But students: if you turn up late, disrespect your tutors and basically do not give a stuff – guess what – the industry will not give a damn about you either. In my opinion, a fundamental change needs to occur. The government needs to get involved here. Colleges need to be more accountable – it cannot only be about increasing fees. Internships need to be integrated more into courses.

‘If you turn up late, disrespect your tutors and basically do not give a stuff – guess what – the industry will not give a damn about you either.’ More lecturers actually working in the industry need to be recruited. Of course some colleges already do all of this incredibly well – but all colleges need to be doing it too. With magazines folding and constant cutbacks it is harder than ever to secure a great paid job, but students must be more realistic too. I am frustrated that students are sending lack luster cover letters that show no hint of creativity. They attend interviews unprepared and with no knowledge of new 10

designers breaking through in London. That is what London is about and has always been about. If you are interested in fashion then surely you need to know about your subject? Fashion by its very nature is about what is coming next. This next bit is tough to admit, but even if you do everything right it may still not be enough. // It is highly unlikely you will walk into a really well paid job as soon as you graduate. // You are going to need to get some experience first and this will most likely mean interning for free. // This will also more than likely be based in London. Editors honestly cannot care that this may be a struggle for you regarding travel, sorting accommodation etc. There will be someone a short bus ride away who will be ready and able to snap this position up.. // Be honest & realistic with yourself. Know your limitations. Be confident but get over illusions that the fashion industry ‘needs’ you. It may do, but prove this through amazing work. // There seem to be 3 ways to make it: be incredibly good, be incredibly connected or hang out with the right crowd. Best to aim for being good – at least you will have longevity.


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Womens Spring ‘12 Editorial for Fashion156 // Directed by Guy Hipwell.

I set up Fashion156 to support new emerging talent. That is what we do. This is not about bashing students - even if I often want to grab an individual who is slacking or not taking their job at Fashion156 seriously and shake them. So think of this as a wake-up. It can take years of hard slog to make it as a stylist or fashion writer in this industry – but once you succeed it can be the best job in the whole world. You may be thinking, ‘I’ve heard this all before.’ So instead of just talking I will offer some practical support too. Fashion156 will always showcase graduates and students. Our site can act as a great platform to get your

name out into the wider industry domain. Style.com recently linked our blog as ‘one to follow’ so why not contact me about featuring your work with us? A student I only met back in September, is currently on our LFW PREVIEW cover – proof we do take students & graduates extremely seriously.

Email Guy at // info@fashion156.com

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BOYS BY GIRLS

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The brainchild of Cecile Roberts and India Hobson, Boys By Girls was created to showcase how female artists view and capture the male model. Documented online and in print, the duo are currently in the process of creating their third book, which nods to their coveted boys of the industry. India explains the first book; “The ‘Boys by Girls’ book is the first part of this project, and serves as an outlet for our individual discoveries as we worked with 40 of London’s finest models. Shot at the Ragged School Museum in February 2011, we fell into our element working with both natural, incandescent and fluorescent light. We found beauty, strength, vulnerability, wisdom, charm and a bit of cheekiness in our male subjects. All is displayed throughout this book for you to enjoy and something to make your coffee table look incredibly beautiful.” Capturing the male form in editorials and going through the lens to discover the stories of their subjects, Roberts and Hobson bridge the gap between the phenomena of the male model and the humanization of the characters they portray. Fashion writer Mia Holt and junior stylist Crista Repo have recently jumped aboard to do great things, and the larger their portfolio gets, the more often they are needing the help of interns. With internships available on a regular basis, send your cv their way for a minimum 3 month, 2 days a week commitment. // contact@boysbygirls.co.uk

“THE JOURNEY FROM BOY TO MAN IS AN EXCITING ONE AND EVERY BOY EXPLORES IT IN A DIFFERENT WAY. TO CAPTURE IT PHOTOGRAPHICALLY GIVES ME A PURPOSE AND A REASON TO SHOOT.”

- Cecilie Harris

Images // Boys By Girls

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POSTER BOY

J.W Anderson // AW 2012

For as long as I can remember being a girl was the greatest gift of all. Fashion was all about women, and the options were endless. Cobbled streets peppered with shop windows housing over styled mannequins and under styled reflections, the ratio of womenswear to menswear was 10:1.

Watching Rory Smith of FM Agency close the show at J.W Anderson, all death stares and cheekbones engulfed by black quilting was a moment for sure. Playful bounds enhanced by padded shoes quietly echoed under the soundtrack, with no hint that this was his first ever show.

It was only really last year that the menswear collections came to the forefront of my attention. With thanks not only to emerging designers such as J.W Anderson and Christopher Shannon but the chiselled creatures that inhabit their creations. These new faces are the poster boys of the new generation. Paving the way for small town boys, just like them, to enjoy what fashion has to offer. Plucked from obscurity they emerge from fashion week to fan pages, friend requests and street shots.

As I sit here, tapping my chin trying to think of an apt closing line to this piece, in pops the face himself demanding the return of his tinted moisturiser, as he packs for yet another stint of editorials, castings and appointments. He was awarded the looks, so I have convinced myself I was graced with the brains. I go through his schedule, and am torn between wanting the absolute infinity of success for him in travel, money and fulfilment, and willing the generation of new faces that precede him to break through and capture our interest instead. But for now, the time is his. Fly my pretty. Fly.

With only one, possibly two seasons left before they break from the cocoon of the ‘New Faces’ page and flutter on over to the sartorial splendour of the ‘Men’s Board’, are we in fact witnessing the birth of a whole new celebrity genre? Picked for their name drop credentials rather than their calling cards, it’s becoming less about the face and more about the name. I’m really not sure if I’m for or against this. Should these faces walk without a name? Simply a functioning hanger, a clothes horse, if you will? Or are they in fact adding worth to these collections? A personality, an adjoining lifestyle running seamlessly from collar to hem? The true kindred spirits of fashion, hustling backstage in a sea of high fives and gapped toothed grins. A rubix cube of technicoloured mayhem. Where no inter-locking, inter-changeable line of testosterone brickwork is made up of the same three colours.

Words // LUCY SMITH

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THE BOY WHO KNEW TOO MUCH Art Director and Stylist // LUCY SMITH Photographer // LAUREN OWENS

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ROMANIA

Retro Hostel, Transylvania, Romania

Transylvania’s gloomy literary associations belie the fact that it’s the perfect destination for a summer break with guaranteed sunshine and lively settlements nestling in the foothills of the Carpathians. Interrailing around western Europe is an increasingly expensive option for the skint student but Romanian Railways (cfr.ro) will carry you between the area’s historic cities for under £10 on creaking communist-era rolling stock. Fly to the university city of Cluj-Napoca on WizzAir (from £54 return from Luton) and you’ll find a centre filled with bars and clubs such as Insomnia (Strada Universitatii), a converted apartment attached to a small art gallery. It serves cheap beer to a bohemian crowd who will point you in the direction of the city’s other clubs. A bed at Cluj’s central Retro youth hostel (+40 264 45045, retro.ro) only costs £11 per night. From there, catch a train to Sighisoara, a fantastical walled town – and birthplace of national hero Vlad the Impaler – before completing the return circuit via Sibiu, a recent European capital of culture. Beautiful cities, interesting people and cheap drink – all without running the risk of bumping into a British stag party.

ECONOMICAL Y RETREATS

ou’ve met your word count, finished your presentation, and even washed the mountain of dishes that have been been building up for weeks (bet Lagerfeld doesn’t butter his toast with a spoon). Don’t let your lack lustre student account determine your Summer destination. Here are some of our (Fashion) student friendly destinations.. BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

Szimpla, Budapest

While many students will associate summer in Budapest with the Sziget music festival, the Hungarian capital itself has more than enough on offer to be a destination in its own right. The city is famous for its ruin pubs with their arty, underground atmosphere in hidden courtyards. Szimpla (Kazinczy utca 1, szimpla.hu) is the most popular. The Corvinteto Club on top of the Sovietstyle Corvin department store (Blaha Lujzater 1-2, corvinteto.hu) is well-known for its reggae and dubstep nights and its rooftop bar. For daytime sightseeing, most highlights are conveniently located along Andrássy út, with the House of Terror (terrorhaza. hu), dedicated to 20th-century Hungary’s fascist and communist regimes. The tiny, central Budapest Bubble (Brody Sandor utca 2), housed in an old building, is more like a home than a hostel. You’re better off staying on the Pesta side for a relaxed yet vibrant atmosphere that attracts masses of friendly international students.

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ECUADOR

Picture // Jen Pollack Planco ‘Happy Hour at the Halekulani’

Ecuador is considered one of the best places to learn Spanish in Latin America because of the clear accent and low prices. Enjoy a stay at Quito’s Secret Garden Hostel, a place that is quite rightly proud of its terrace’s panoramic views over the historical centre and the Andes beyond. It has its own Spanish school and if you have more time you can apply for its one-month volunteer programme, where you work in the hostel in exchange for a bed, food, drinks, 10 hours of Spanish lessons and one night at its sister hostel by Cotopaxi volcano. Demand to work at this eco-aware hostel is understandably high, but it also has links with other organisations in the area, so you can also consider working on local environmental projects or helping conserve rare Andean bears. All details are on the Secret Garden Hostel website (secretgardenquito.com). Dorm rooms cost around £6 per night; Spanish lessons cost from £60 for Panoramic views at Quito’s Secret Garden Hostel, 20 hours. Cuba.

City University student Sofya Shahab tells us about her half term get away to Cuba: ‘Havana’s glorious crumbling architecture and Caribbean sunshine are obviously a big draw, but it’s the vibrancy of the people that really makes Cuba special. So when the taxi driver pulled over on the side of the road and demanded to teach me salsa, all I could do was go with it. A great way to get a feel for the country and get close to the people (and also travel cheaply and eat good Cuban food) is to stay with local families in casa particulares – cuba-junky.com is a useful site that lists many of them. Our casa provided us with breakfast, dinner and a whole host of recommendations. Travelling round the island was fairly straightforward thanks to the bus system and men in orange boiler suits whose job it is to flag down rides for hitchhikers. Should you fancy a substitute for the traditional British summer festival, make the 13-hour trip to Santiago, a city vibrating with beats and bands playing on every street corner. Head to Casa de La Trova for a taste of the original son, which inspired the Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca on his visit and where the locals were more than happy to teach us a few steps, but only if we could keep up.’ 29


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“For people who know McQueen, there is always an underlying message. It’s usually only the intellectual ones who understand what’s going on in what I do.” — Alexander McQueen

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SHORT COURSE TO SUCCESS?

With thousands of people losing their jobs each day, a new breed of Britons are searching and developing a new set of skills in a variety of different areas as a way to kick start so-called ‘portfolio careers’ to ensure long-term employability. Words // Phillipa Reid The London College of Fashion reports a surge in interest in short courses from portfolio careerists, having seen a 12.5% increase in the number of short courses being run by the world-renowned institution, with subjects ranging from bridal wear to PR, and a record 5,300 students taking such advantage. Linda Roberts, senior business manager for short courses at the LCF explains how given the current economic climate, a greater number of people are signing up as a way to invest in themselves. ‘When the crunch hit a few years ago, students began telling tutors they wanted extra skills and resources up their sleeve to stay financially afloat and that sense has only grown since then.’ Leah Tether, lecturer at Anglia Ruskin University adds how ‘these courses are ideal in showing tangible experience of certain skillsets on a CV and economically beneficial from the student’s point of view as they don’t cost several thousand pounds’.

Balancing hobbies and careers can often be difficult for numerous reasons: time, expense, apathy after a long day in the office, but could this mean the beginning of not only the two going hand-in-hand but a way to capitalise on your passions? // Search through London College of Art’s A-Z of Short Courses on www.fashion.arts.ac.uk // Central Saint Martins provides a catalogue of Fashion & Textiles courses. www.csm.arts. ac.uk/shortcourses/fashionandtextiles // The Fashion Retail Academy houses courses such as ‘Introduction Buying and Range Planning’ and ‘Fashion PR and Marketing. www.fashionretailacademy.ac.uk/shortcourses

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Images // London College of Fashion & Saint Martins

One such example is Natalie James, a full-time advertising executive who was keen to expand her career and enrolled on a 9-week fashion and editorial make-up short course last autumn. Costing £800, on completing the course she has not only built up a portfolio of makeup work but also established a number of contacts in the industry and is now combining advertising with teaching her own makeup lessons in order to launch her own consultancy.


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MCQUEEN GOOSEBUMPS

So tell us about...

Your Time as a Vogueette... I always look back at that time as an apprenticeship. It has very high standards and it taught me how to do things properly. My old boss would always talk about giving people the vogue experience and this applied to make up artist, actresses or interns. It is a very inspiring place and she always wanted people to have enjoyed their time there.

A Shift In Fashion... It is more of a business than before, for example every shoot has a list of credits that you have to use. A credit is simply a brand that needs to have a piece of clothing in the shoot. Sometimes it works with your idea and other times it doesn’t. A plus side of this buisness like industry is that people are professional.

Your Fashion Moment... Going to Papua new Guinea for a shoot was amazing and has inspired me to travel more. Being in a hushed studio whilst Alexander McQueen transformed a male model wearing a suit into a bride wearing a wedding dress in just under two minutes was quite incredible. I had goosebumps all over my arms and it made me understand what a genius he was.

A Typical Day... I get up when my toddler demands, usually around 7am. We have breakfast together and both dress. If I am shooting then I am usually up earlier than this and out the door very quickly. Today Griffin is in Nursery and I am prepping my next three shoots. The first is an advertising job shooting on Thursday so the clothes should be

arriving at my agency today. I just need to arrange with my assistant to check that everything has arrived and to finish getting the last pieces. The second shoot is for a magazine, shooting next week so I am in the process of calling all the clothes in from press offices. I will also go to look at the location later today with the photographer and this may 34

inspire me to take the styling in a slightly different direction so I will have to react to that very quickly and get extra pieces in. The last shoot is a fine jewellery shoot that will happen after Easter and I am in the process of speaking with the photographer about the concept and talking with all of the jewellers to get access to the right people.


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...Fashion stylist and former Vogueette Michelle Duigid kicks off our interview series with defining moments, fashion politics and whitnessing a McQueen transformation...

you and do not be afraid to go for it. If you don’t throw yourself at the industry then there will be hundreds of people that will.

Intern Love... I am pleased to say that I have worked with great interns on the whole but some girls turn up in 6 inch heels and to be honest that is not helpful as it is a physical job as well as creative. As a stylist you never travel light with all the clothes and accessories you need to transport in and out of taxi’s and buses and you can’t get far in heels!

Fashion’s Biggest MisConception... That it is glamorous

Paint story styled by Michelle and shot by Paolo Roversi for Vogue UK, April 2008.

Image courtest of Paolo Roversi

A Proud Moment...

I will also have to sort out security with all of the jewellers as most of the pieces that they will send will cost thousands of pounds. My day is all about juggling!

to have money supporting you to get the change to do work experience. I hope that they will start to pay for internships so that talented people from any background can learn.

Change in the Industry...

How To Make It...

I hate the fact that you now have

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I shot a paint story with Paolo Roversi that I love. I look at the pictures and I remember how great it was to work with him.


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Russian Vogue billboard designed by Fiona. Photography by Hedi Silmane.

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FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE I

rish art director of Russian Vogue Fiona Hayes, lover of shoes and photography, talks international diplomacy and her independent photography magazine DayFour..

What does a typical day contain? There are 6 of us in the Russian Vogue art department, including one dedicated app designer, plus we have two picture editors who report to me. A typical day for me includes designing the main stories for the well of the magazine, plus the cover; overseeing all layouts for the rest of the magazine, working with the designers, approving, or otherwise, their pages and discussing layouts with section heads and the Editor in Chief. I spend time briefing the picture desk on images to call in and shoots to commission. Days consist of choosing, commissioning, and briefing photographers and occasionally going on shoots, to direct them. We also produce BRIDES magazine, so I art direct that. I also send pages to the repro house, with retouching requests and then check retouched and colour corrected page proofs. There are lots of discussions with photographers about shoots. A lot of my job, as Art Director but also as the only Westerner in the office, involves international diplomacy, explaining the needs of a Russian market to foreign photographers, and keeping a harmonious dialogue going across continents and time zones.

Do you have a favourite piece of work that you have created? What is it, and why is it your favourite? I would probably have to say DayFour (www.dayfour. info) my independent photography magazine. It’s a tiny project, and very much under the radar, but after ten years it is still going strong, and I am very proud of the contributors whose work I’ve published and of the respect D4 has. I’ve just started a blog about the contributors and their other projects - www. dayfourphotographyblog.tumblr.com

If you could go back and talk to your 21 year old self, what advice would you give her? Don’t worry, and trust your own judgment.

What was the last thing you Googled? My boyfriends website www.stevewaycartoons.com this evening, to try and figure out whats wrong with my FTP server!!

What would you say has been the defining moment in your career so far? Probably launching Vogue in Russia in 1998 although launching Eve in London in 2000 was also up there. Re-designing the cover of House & Garden in 2006 for the first time since the 80s was a big deal. Of course going to Russia for the first time in 1995 to art direct Russian Cosmo. was a pretty defining moment!

Is there anything you would change about the fashion industry? What and Why? The one issue that I’d probably pick to have changed is the lack of coverage, especially of informed debate of fashion in the wider media. Look at the number of pages most British newspapers give to sport, say – or motoring, or food, or cinema – and compare with how many pages they give to fashion. It’s a huge industry, not a niche interest!

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“DO WEAR HIGH HIGH HIGH HEELS, SHORT SHORT SHORT SKIRTS AND KISS BEAUTIFUL BOYS AS IT IS ONLY REALLY POSSIBLE WHEN YOU ARE YOUNG.”

Photography // DAVID WOOLFALL

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FREELANCE FASHION F

reelance fashion and beauty journalist Lynnette Peck Bateman sheads light on life as a freelance journalist, Sydney backpacking and dating unsuitable men.. What does a typical day contain?

buy a £5 dress just stop and think about how it is able to be so cheap? Think about the person who was paid to make it, where the material and dyes came from and the landfill it will end up in when you have only worn it once. We need to try and go back to the days when fashion was special and people bought one-off pieces that lasted for years and where craftsmanship was valued. I would also insist that every catwalk/ editorial model had to be at least a size 12.

There’s no such thing as a typical day but most days I write a beauty or fashion feature for a magazine. Today I am writing a beauty feature for a well-known women’s consumer weekly magazine. Tomorrow I have to put together seven pages of fashion for a luxury quarterly customer magazine. I also update my vintage fashion website lovelysvintageemporium.com where I sell fashion-forward clothes and accessories. Plus I spend a lot of time sourcing items for my vintage website and writing up the captions. I tweet every day on @LovelyisLovely1 about my magazine life and on @LovelysVintage about my vintage fashion website. I often go on work press trips related to my magazine work. Recently I was reviewing a hotel spa near Durban in South Africa, racing cars in Latvia and later this month I am going to review a spa in West Sussex and two hotel spas in Scotland. I also have to attend press appointments. For example on this week I have a meeting with a fashion PR who represents a well-known London department store and then I have a party for a beauty brand in the evening who are introducing their new MD to journalists. Twice a month I go to a monthly magazines office, where I have a desk, and I check my emails that come there, open my post and have a meeting with the Editor to discuss future features.

Do you have a favourite piece of work that you have created? What is it, and why is it your favourite? I launched a magazine from scratch in 2003 for a publishing company called Celebrity Homes. I created something from nothing and ended up selling 65,000 copies of my first issue. WHSmith made it their ‘Magazine of the Month’. As a result of it I got headhunted by Now magazine to be their Associate Editor.

If you could go back and talk to your 21 year old self, what advice would you give her? Only briefly date unsuitable men. Do as much work experience, in different industries, as you can to get a real feel for what you might like to do as a career. Do not resign from a job you love on a point of principle as only you will suffer and not your boss. Do wear high high high heels, short short short skirts and kiss beautiful boys as it is only really possible when you are young.

What would you say has been the defining moment in your career so far? Can I have two? The first was when I managed to get a job working for Vogue Australia within weeks of being in Sydney as a backpacker. The second is whenmy vintage emporium launched in March last year and someone bought a beautiful 1970s leather handbag in the first minute of the website going live.

What was the last thing you Googled? ‘Temperatures in Naxos, Greece in May’ - even fashion journalists need a holiday!

Is there anything you would change about the fashion industry? What and Why? I think there needs to be more controls on waste. I do not believe that huge high street brands that sell ‘throwaway’ fashion are able to run their businesses in a carbon-friendly or ‘green’ way. Next time you

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STYLIST

rom Aquascutum to River Island, writer and stylist Vanessa Woodgate discusses elitest attitude in the fashion industry, discovering new brands and letting your work speak for itself.. What does a typical day contain? Most days start at the office, checking emails and getting up to date with the latest news and press releases. If I’m prepping for a shoot I’ll spend time researching trends and choosing key looks. I’ll visit PR showrooms to pick out clothes and accessories. Sometimes I discover a surprise piece that changes the creative direction completely so it helps to visualise the final result. There’s so much to pull together on a photo shoot, from selecting models, photographers and make-up artists to finding locations and props, so I spend a lot of time making lists! What would you say has been the defining moment in your career so far? The most satisfying moment was when I saw my first editorial shoot in print. After years of hard graft as an assistant it was a real turning point for me and cemented my role as a fully-fledged stylist. Is there anything you would change about the fashion industry? What and Why? There’s a lot of snobbery in the fashion industry, which can be frustrating. It’s tough when you’re starting out, but over time you learn to rise above the elitist attitude and let your work speak for itself. Do you have a favourite piece of work that you have created? What is it, and why is it your favourite? My favourite shoots tend to be the ones I had the most fun working on! I styled kitsch shoot for Spectrum magazine which was shot on a gloriously sunny day at the coast. The team were a dream to work with and when we broke for lunch, we ate fish and chips in the sunshine - not a bad day’s work! If you could go back and talk to your 21 year old self, what advice would you give her? I would tell her to take more risks and to make the most of being free to work on anything and everything. It’s the perfect time to experiment in different fields and figure out what you want to do in life. Take advantage of every opportunity that presents itself, learn from your mistakes and make great contacts. What was the last thing you Googled? ‘Weekday’, a Swedish brand that I just discovered. It’s not sold in the UK yet but I’m going to Berlin next month and intend to buy up their minimal shirts and paisley prints by the bucket load.

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“When we broke for lunch, we ate fish and chips in the sunshine. -Not a bad days work!”

Spectrum Magazine - Scotland on Sunday - June 2011

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SUITED AND BOOTED M

enswear writer and author of ‘Sharp Suits’ Eric Musgrave gives us an insight into his typical day (or lack there of), and being made ‘Weekly Business Magazine Editor of the Year’..

What does a typical day contain? There is no such thing as a typical day. I am doing this month’s work, setting up next month’s work and chasing last month’s money. If I am lucky, I can stay at home in deepest Kent and write about menswear and men’s style. On a bad day I have to trek up to London, which is money- and time-consuming, for just one meeting with a time-waster. What would you say has been the defining moment in your career so far?

If you could go back and talk to your 21 year old self, what advice would you give him? Be more confident. You are good at what you do. Get on to a publication or TV station that pays more than the trade press. Try and work abroad. What was the last thing you Googled? The correct way to spell “soirée”. I was never good at French accents.

In the early days, being taken on as a junior report on the fashion trade weekly Drapers Record in 1980. Later, being made editor of Drapers Record in 2000. Having merged DR with Menswear in 2002, I was named Weekly Business Magazine Editor of the Year in 2003.

Musgrave’s visual documentation ‘Sharp Suits’ is available on Amazon.co.uk.

Is there anything you would change about the fashion industry? What and Why? It ought to take itself less seriously. It is important, enjoyable, stimulating, but it is not life or death.

Eric’s fashion career has included stints at Vogue, Financial Times, and For Him Magazine.

Do you have a favourite piece of work that you have created? What is it, and why is it your favourite? I was very pleased with lots of stuff I did as a weekly magazine journalist. An exclusive interview with Bernard Lewis, the reclusive founder of Chelsea Girl and River Island fashion businesses was a buzz. I am also very proud of my only book, SHARP SUITS (published by Pavilion in 2009). I was pleased to be the foundereditor of For Him Magazine in April 1985. It helped create the modern men’s style magazine market. It is now called FHM.

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“[FASHION] OUGHT TO TAKE ITSELF LESS SERIOUSLY. IT IS IMPORTANT, ENJOYABLE, STIMULATING, BUT IT IS NOT LIFE OR DEATH.”

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INTELLIGENT OPULENCE

Dressing in the face of economic uncertainty, this season’s woman defies the law of most and indulges in intelligent frivolity. Wearing carefully selected pieces to slip seamlessly between the choices of seasons past, opulence still lives on in the form of embellishment, luxury finishes and materials oozing affluence and refinement.

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Lanvin

Moschino

Moschino

Marking his tenth anniversary at the house of Lanvin, Alber Elbaz provided a delicious array of embellishment and clean lines. Among the rounded contours of leather and velvet lay coloured jewels of Tower of London proportions. Worn like medals of triumph the Lanvin woman, walking to Lesley Gore’s ‘You don’t own me’ sticks a manicured finger up to budget cuts and naysayers alike, and wears her monies earned with pride. Miu Miu adds a delightful touch of texture with interlocked perspex disks placed playfully over shirts and ties. Pumping extravagance and depth into wardrobe basics, the renewal of last year’s cuts adds the intelligence to the frivolity. Louis Vuitton shows that it’s the little things that count, with suited maidens de-boarding a steam train, luxury fastenings running parallel to their first class tickets, providing not only functionality but decoration du jour. An elongated silhouette enhanced by Stephen Jones’ millinery exploits cements the look of pride and assurance whilst flickers of metallic brocade realises the air of exuberance which is worn almost as an accessory of it’s own. As if not to be out done, Moschino’s offering of printed golden embroidery provides the perfect host for the regal nature of this trend. A white runway illuminated by blackened out surroundings ensures the perfect stomping ground for the likes of Cara Delevingne, Ruby Aldridge, and Arizona Muse. Walking to the beat of marching band drums, marching strides slowly melt into a muted trance melody. A regimented brigade of Cadbury’s purple and canary yellow, the Moschino girl sports wrists full of gold and a heart to match. The Salle Wagram was transformed into a cavern of darkness for the McQueen show. Spherical light bulbs hung like illuminated stalactites, highlighting the path to “a beautiful future, positivity, optimism” as described by Sarah Burton herself. Fuscia, blood red and powder puff pinks were sandwiched between swathes of white, providing the perfect habitat for the decoration embedded in the fabrics. A well turned out girl’s girl anchored by heel-less shoes showcased sheathes of tiered chiffon, with a boscage of ostrich feathers literally competing for the attention of the spotlights. Black visors sat anonymously, reflecting the artificial lighting from the ceiling of the listed building. Hiding the windows to the sole, they serve as the perfect shield to weather out the pecuniary storm. Luxury’s matriarch, this season’s woman pays no attention Words // LUCY SMITH to pessimists, indulging in the finest materials and adorned in a treasure chest of jewels. A designer is anyone who devises ways to change existing situations into preferred ones. Fashion waits for no recession, but simply soldiers on, shaping the world around it to become a better place.


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Miu Miu adds a delightful touch of texture with interlocked perspex disks placed playfully over shirts and ties.

Louis Vuitton

Lanvin

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Alexander McQueen

Among the rounded contours of leather and velvet lay coloured jewels of Tower of London proportions.

Louis Vuitton provided not only functionality but decoration du jour.

Fuscia, blood red and powder puff pinks were sandwiched between swathes of white, providing the perfect habitat for the decoration embedded in the fabrics. 45

Images // Style.com


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“Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try.” - Unknown

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SOCIAL PLATFORM The Fashion Industry is a world like no other. A world where your name can mean more than your work and where the motto “it’s who you know” is the golden rule. This golden rule has landed the industry in many controversies over the years as budding journalists, designers and stylists are being forced out by, let’s say, the Editor’s cousin... To make it in this business you need contacts, but when you strive for years building up a name for yourself and still can’t catch a break, it can really be quite soul destroying. As a journalist, I have found this problem quite annoying and daunting. Just like you I have spent many a night emailing Editors, Designers and PR agencies to try and get my name out there but when the opportunities for internship or assistants come up, those in need go directly to the people they already know. Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t necessarily a bad deed by the Editors as they obviously know people who are going to get the job done. However it does mean that if you aren’t already an established name, then you may miss out.

As well as this, by sharing interesting news, pictures or ideas about the fashion industry, you are able to show that you really do “live and breathe” fashion. The social platform is also a great way to plug your own work, blog or website by tweeting it and mentioning industry leaders. With great groups such as the Sunday evening #bbloggers chat, you are able to communicate with hundreds of people at the same time and share your work and loves. What is even greater about the #bbloggers group is that due to the recent rise in blogging attention, many fashion names are now following this Sunday eve gathering to find some great new writers for their website or magazine.

However, with the current twitter boom, those opportunities are being made more accessible and open and it’s down to you to seek them out! Everybody who is anybody is now using twitter and therefore using it as a way of advertising certain positions. If you are clever and media savvy enough, you would have already read the contributors page in your favourite glossy, picked out the names in the areas that you want to work for and started following them on twitter. Not only do you get to know the people behind the magazine in more detail but you are also the first to hear of up and coming positions or opportunities.

So if you really believe that this unique industry is for you, then don’t get left behind. The Fashion industry is finally paying attention to the people who truly make it possible and they are using Twitter and blogs to do so. If you want your name to be noticed, then make it. Don’t rely on things to just land at your doorstep because in this world, they never will. Don’t rely on things to just land at your doorstep because in this world, they never will.

Twitter is a great place for you to get yourself noticed. Through following others, ‘retweeting’ and mentioning key people in the industry, you can show others how well you know this industry and that you are capable of interacting within it. Unlike Facebook, Twitter gives you the space to remain personal yet professional and can really be influential when trying to find a job. By keeping your bio straight to the point yet fun and quirky, you are able to show your true personality to potential employers.

Words // MIA HOLT

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“The qualities that make Twitter seem inane and half-baked are what makes it so powerful” - Jonathan Zittrain, Harvard law professor and Internet expert

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MIRROR Let your tastes merge as seamlessley as your iTunes playlists and your love for take out chinese. Nothing says I love you like a merging wardrobe and colour co-ordinating basics. You’re in love and you want the whole world to know it. After all, there’s no better accessory than a well dressed spouce on your arm.

A couple that dresses together stays together. This is what true love looks like...

Art Director and Stylist // LUCY SMITH Photographer // LAUREN OWENS Make Up // KB ARTISTRY Hair // RICHARD KERR

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Rory // Blaxer - Beyond Retro, Shirt - Topman, Brooch - vineyardvintage.com, Trousers - Topman, Ring - Mozzypop.com Kara // blouse - Rocket, Skirt - Beyond Retro, Nrcklaces - Stylist’s own 51


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As Before. Document Holder - Stylist’s Own.

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As Before

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Shirt - Topman, Necklace - Stylist’s Own, Hat - Model’s Own

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Mac - Topshop, Dress - Topshop, Earrings - ‘The Garage’ flea market (New York), Necklaces - Stylist’s Own

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Kara // Flower Top - Stylist’s Own, Maxi Dress (sleeve just seen) - Topshop Rory // Blazer - Topman, Pendant - ‘The Garage’ Fea Market New York 56


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As Before

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Rory // Suit Jacket - Burtons, Pocket Square - Primark, Shirt - Topman, Necklace Stylist’s Own

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Top - Marni for H&M, Skirt - Marni for H&M, Shoes - New Look

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THE.DREAMER. O F. T H E . D A Y Everyone has people they look up to. Mentors, muses, or people they aspire to be like. I, like many other aspiring fashion journalists have a Twitter full of these. Aside from the celebrity of the moment culture, nothing beats people you can relate to. Maybe with unrealised dreams. Or a dreamer of the day, that can put pen to paper and realise their thoughts and dreams so well that you feel like you’re walking on the clouds of their imagination, where every step you take you fall deeper into the recesses of their mind. That’s kind of how I felt about him. Not an actual friend, but a Twitter friend. Brought together by a Tweet about Pirates of the Caribbean, we exchanged follows. The fact he was, at the time, an employee of Conde Nast I have to say intrigued me more. I’d regularly click onto his website link. Where his short story’s read like pages dipped in what could only be described as pure enchantment, and the line between imagination and reality was so blurred that you could do nothing but get engulfed by his words.

It made me realise that this career I crave and work so hard for may not complete me like I assume it would. I was forced to admit that as important as realizing my dream is, there are a lot more boxes I need to tick. Take the blinkers off, sit back and smell the flowers of today. As dramatic as this may sound, I would compare it to an individual finding out that a religion they had followed their whole life was flawed. That there is not always a cushioned pillow of constant contentment and joy once you enter those gilded gates. Of course, I’m sure the level of elation could scarcely be rivaled, but just like any profession, you have to tread water. The swans of the fashion world, they are graceful and stern. Peacefully gliding over the surface of the pond of life, while their pedicured feet, masked by nature’s version of the waterproof trench are paddling profusely to ensure their destination. I’ve never cried over the death of someone I’ve never met before this. A true testament to the power of words I guess. And I thank him for his.

Tweet’s about Martinis with the ‘Elle girls’, and spending his lunch break dashing off across London to share a slice of tiramisu with ‘ma petite amie’ only added to the allure. I sent him an email once. I picked his brain about the industry and which path I should take. He replied seemingly without hesitation, with a message packed full of insight and knowledge. An expert in his craft at the tender age of 24, he had accomplished what many could only dream of.

Words // LUCY SMITH Illustration // POPPY ROBERTS

I did notice his Twitter submission’s had become quiet. Quickly realizing that it was just after Valentines Day, I imagined he’d whisked his ballerina girl off to some romantic location worthy of a Linda Howard novel. He just seemed that type, you know. A dreamer of the day, living out the words of T.E Lawrence and acting his dreams with open eyes. I admired him. I wondered if our paths would ever cross, laden with double ‘don’t I know you?’ stares. It’s such a shame that will never happen. As on Valentines Day, the boy with the way with words, the dreamer of the day had nothing left to say. His decision to end his own life will echo in my consciousness for years to come. A reminder that what looks perfect from the outside could be riddled with imperfection and unhappiness within. Under those layers of finely tuned paragraphs and interlocking adjectives sliding to the next like butter on warm toast, there was an author so tangled, he could see no other path for himself. 60


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The swans of the fashion world, they are graceful and stern. Peacefully gliding over the surface of the pond of life.....

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“Without inspiration the best powers of the mind remain dormant. There is a fuel in us which needs to be ignited with sparks.” - Johann Gottfried Von Herder

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LIFE AND SOLE

As a Footwear and Accessories buyer for Marks and Spencer, Stephanie Smallman gives us the scoop on the technicalities of the perfect shoe, her favourite London shopping haunts and why the best thing in life is simply freedom...

What makes the perfect shoe? Technically; quality materials, beautiful leathers (Leather uppers, sock & lining are a must) a quality kit, and a hand made last. Proportions, colour balance, trims & fastenings are important. Fit is also key... If the shoe doesn’t fit correctly I won’t sell! Commercially; a fantastic looking product that’s bang on trend for the season, at a good price point. I think it’s really import any for a shoe to scream ‘end use’ so that the customer understands it, how to wear & when, its all about outfit building with Footwear & Accessories. You must have quite the collection. What are your favourite pair? Yes! It’s a big flaw! I have so many shoes & accessories... I have to be very careful when comp/ inspirational shopping as it can become very dangerous! (On my bank account anyway!) My favourite pair at the moment are Topshop Unique Pony Skin Leopard wood plank wedges, I love them! What AW’12 trends can you not wait to try? Well I’m currently working on Spring 2013, so I’m a bit over AW12 already! The only bad thing about being a buyer is by the time the trends hit stores you’ve seen so much of it already it seems dated. AW12 I would say penny loafers, EVA derby shoes & riding boots. SS13... You will have to wait & see!

“I love the style of Chloe, Lanvin and Christian Louboutin.”

“The bad thing about being a buyer is by the time the trends hit stores you’ve seen so much of it already it seems dated.”

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What have you got too many of? The same thing!!! Im a creature of habit.. To the point when I go shopping I have to sense check that I don’t have something similar already! It sounds bizarre, but it’s true. As an example, last AW my boyfriend had to physically stop me from buying my 3rd pair of Chelsea boots! Where do you go for a quick pick me up? When I want a couple of pieces to re-fresh my wardrobe Topshop is the place. Whether its even just be a new season necklace, nail polish, lipstick or Ballerina’s it’s the place to be.. And I hate to say it but Oxford Circus is definitely the best destination. Who’s style never fails to inspire? I love the style of Chole, Lanvin & Christian Louboutin. Celebs would be Fashion Blogger Susie Lau, Olivia Palmero, Kate Moss & Alexa Chung. Finally, what are your best things in life? I am very fortunate as I do love my life. The best thing is my freedom. I love exploring new places. I have lived in London for nearly 7 years but there is always somewhere I haven’t been before. I love my job, growing up I could only dream of what I do now. I love the product, the energy, and the inspiration in the office and the opportunity I have had to travel and see the world.


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Illustrations // ACHRAF AMIRI 65


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WHEN I WAS AN INTERN... 5 Industry insiders // 10 Questions:

1. NAME AND CURRENT

7. WHAT IS THE MOST

JOB POSITION..

VALUABLE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU HAVE ACHIEVED?

2. WHAT DOES A

TYPICAL DAY ENTAIL?

8. WHAT DO YOU WISH

BECOME INTERESTED IN FASHION?

YOU HAD KNOWN WHEN YOU WERE AN INTERN?

4. WHAT IS YOUR

9. DO YOU HAVE ANY

FAVOURITE PART OF THE JOB?

TIPS FOR INTERVIEWS AND CVS?

5. WHERE HAVE YOU

10. HOW CAN INTERNS

3. HOW DID YOU FIRST

GO ABOUT LANDING A JOB AFTER AN INTERNSHIP?

INTERNED IN THE PAST?

6. WHAT IS YOUR

MOST MEMORABLE INTERNSHIP AND WHY?

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1. NATASHA COWAN // SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANT AT THE TELEGRAPH 2.

RESEARCH ONLINE, GOING TO THE SHOWS, AT T E N D I N G APPOINTMENTS. I HAVE B R E A K FA S T MEETINGS AND COLLABORATE WITH THE DESIGN AND SUB’S DESK.

10.

6.

PHILIP TREACY. HE LOOKED AFTER ME SO WELL AND I ENDED UP WORKING THERE FOR QUITE A BIT OF TIME. I GOT TO GO TO THE SHOWS AND WATCHED ALL THE HATS BEING MADE FOR THE COLLECTIONS. I WENT TO THE FABRIC AND TRIMMING SHOPS TO COLLECT ORDERS AND MOST PRECIOUS OF ALL... LOOKED AFTER HIS DOGGY ‘PIGGY’.

5.

PHILIP

TREACY,

TARUN TAHILIANI DELHI, NIAL M C I N E R N Y PHOTOGRAPHY, KIM BLAKE PR, VOGUE MAGAZINE.

DO NOT BE A SATISFACTION ‘KNOW IT ALL’. BE 4. WHEN YOU HAVE PREPARED TO PICK WORKED REALLY UP THE RUBBISH HARD ON A PAGE AND OFF THE FLOOR. YOU SEE IT PRINTED. AS WELL AS MAKE THE TEAS. KEEPING ORDER IN THE WORK PLACE IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS ALL THE INTEGRAL HELP WE REQUIRE.

3. AT

COLLEGE. BEFORE THAT I WAS A GENERALLY CREATIVE PERSON.

8. I WAS QUITE A SAVVY INTERN. BEYOND HANDS ON AND EXTREMELY FORWARD THINKING -I COULD NEVER DO ENOUGH. I EVEN WENT TO AN INTERNSHIP EACH NIGHT TO MAKE TEA FOR THE CUTTING ROOM AFTER INTERNING ALL DAY AT ANOTHER PLACE!

9. BE SWITCHED ON.

7. NEVER EVER ASSUME ANYTHING. NEVER BE IN A POSITION WHERE YOU FIND YOURSELF SAYING .. “BUT I THOUGHT..”

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1. LUCY HARVEY // PRODUCTION

4. WORKING ONSITE AT

CO-ORDINATOR AT BURBERRY.

3. MY INTEREST IN FASHION REALLY DEVELOPED WHILST AT UNIVERSITY, IT WAS INCREASED THROUGH READING MAGAZINES, PROGRAMMES YOU SEE ON TV AND OBSERVING THE GENERAL CULTURE OF THE LUXURY FASHION WORLD.

EVENTS, SEEING PROJECTS COMING TOGETHER. WHEN WORKING IN DIFFERENT REGIONS.COUNTRIES, IT’S GREAT TO SEE THE VARYING WAYS THAT THINGS CAN BE DONE AND HOW TEAMS OPERATE.

2.WORKING ALONG SIDE THE EVENTS

TEAM DISCUSSING UPCOMING PROJECTS, STORE OPENINGS, CORPORATE EVENTS, RUNWAY SHOWS, COCKTAIL RECEPTIONS AND DINNERS. CREATING DOCUMENTS HIGHLIGHTING THE EVENT FORMAT AND OVERALL PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS (SOUND, SET, LIGHTING ETC). COMMUNICATING WITH NEW GLOBAL SUPPLIERS AND BRIEFING IN PROJECTS, FINDING SOLUTIONS OF HOW TO MAKE CERTAIN EVENTS WORK IN DIFFERENT VENUES AND LOCATIONS. PRODUCTION CAN BE QUITE A LOT OF BACK AND FORTH WITH SUPPLIERS TRYING TO SETTLE ON DESIGN. BUDGETS ETC. THESE CONVERSATIONS REALLY HELP CREATE A GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH MOST SUPPLIERS AS YOU BEGIN TO UNDERSTAND THE ARGUMENTS THAT BOTH SIDES HAVE, I INTERNED AT BURBERRY AND AND ALWAYS FIND A WAY OF SETTLING ON THEN BECAME A FULL MEMBER OF SOME OF THE MOST TRICKY PROJECTS.

5.

STAFF.

7. THE MOST VALUABLE PIECE OF ADVICE I RECIEVED WAS BEING TOLD TO MAKE THE MOST OF EVERY

OPPORTUNITY. WHILST INTERNING I WAS OPEN TO MANY DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE BUSINESS AND WAS ABLE TO FORM GOOD RELATIONSHIPS WITH DIFFERENT DEPARTMENTS, AND PEOPLE BEGAN TO KNOW MY FACE AND MY ROLE WITHIN THE COMPANY. THERE WERE ALSO SMALL EVENTS THAT MY HELP WAS NOT NECESSARILY REQUIRED, BUT WHEN ASKED IF I WANTED TO HELP I ALWAYS TOOK THAT OPPORTUNITY EVEN IF IT MEANT STANDING ON THE SIDELINES AND OBSERVING. ALWAYS TAKE THE PROACTIVE APPROACH IF FACED WITH A TASK OR OPPORTUNITY.

9. BE ARTICULATE WHEN

DISCUSSING YOUR PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE. THERE’S ALWAYS A WAY OF MAKING WHAT MAY SEEM TO YOU AN UNEXCITING, DULL JOB, INTO TRANSFERABLE SKILLS. KEEP YOUR CV BRIEF BUT TO THE POINT. WRITE A FRESH COVER LETTER FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL JOB YOU APPLY FOR.

6. THE INTERNSHIP AT BURBERRY WAS VERY MEMORABLE AS MY FIRST PROJECT INCLUDED THE FIRST BURBERRY WOMENSWEAR RUNWAY SHOW AT LONDON FASHION WEEK.

8. I WISH I’D KNOWN MORE ABOUT THR FASHION

INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE. I WAS FORTUNATE THAT I WENT TO THE PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT AND WAS ABLE TO LEARN A LOT ABOUT THE JOB AS I WENT THROUGH DAY TO DAY. I FEEL I WOULD OF BEEN ABLE TO MAKE MORE OF THE OPPORTUNITY IF I HAD A BETTER GRASP OF BURBERRYS POSITION WITHIN THE FASHION INDUSTRY AS WELL AS A CLEARER UNDERSTANDING OF THE WAY LUXURY FASHION OPERATES AND THE VIEWS PEOPLE HOLD AGAINST CERTAIN DESIGNERS.

10. YOU SHOULD REALLY TAKE NOTE OF ALL PROJECTS YOU WORK ON DURING INTERNSHIPS

AND RECALL ALL THE CORE SKILLS YOU LEARNED AND DEVELOPED. YOU NEED TO WORK HARD AND SHOW WILLING ON EVERY TASK THAT COMES YOUR WAY. IF YOU SHOW WILLING ON THINGS AND GET STUCK IN TO ALL PROJECTS ALONG SIDE YOUR DEPARTMENT, THEY’LL SOON BEGIN TO SEE YOU AS AN ASSET.

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1. LINDSAY JUDGE // FASHION ASSISTANT AT S MAGAZINE.

3. I HAVE ALWAYS

BEEN INTERESTED IN FASHION. WHEN I WENT TO UNIVERSITY I STUDIED FASHION MARKETING AND THIS MADE ME LOOK AT FASHION FROM A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE AND REALISE THE SORTS OF JOBS THERE ARE IN THE INDUSTRY.

7. ALWAYS KEEP

6. THE DAILY

EXPRESS HAS TO BE MY MOST MEMORABLE. I FELT I REALLY FIT IN WITH THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE STAFF. THAT MAY BE WHY I ENDED UP STAYING IN THE BUILDING!

2. MY DAYS ARE VERY VARIED. ONE DAY I

CAN BE PUTTING TOGETHER MY ‘GET THIS’ PAGE WHICH IS IN THE MAGAZINE EACH WEEK. THIS INVOLVES CONTACTING PR’S AND GETTING THEM TO SEND THINGS OVER. ANOTHER DAY I MIGHT BE ON A SHOOT ASSISTING THE FASHION EDITOR, OR CALLING IN CLOTHES FROM PR COMPANIES FOR A SHOOT. I ALSO SPEND A LOT OF TIME LOOKING FOR LOCATIONS FOR UPCOMING SHOOTS AND PLANNING TRIPS.

8. I THINK IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO KNOW EVERYTHING AS AN INTERN. IT’S PART OF A LEARNING PROCESS SO THERE’S NOTHING I WISH I KNEW BUT I DO THINK INTERNSHIPS ARE THE ONLY WAY TO LEARN.

YOURSELF BUSY, USE YOUR INITIATIVE AND DON’T ASK TOO MANY QUESTIONS. EVEN IF IT IS QUIET IN THE OFFICE AND YOU ARE SIMPLY READING A MAGAZINE. NO ONE WANTS TO SEE AN INTERN THAT LOOKS AS THOUGH THEY ARE SOING NOTHING.

4. WHEN I GET TO WRITE MY OWN PIECES. 5. THE GUARDIAN, EASY LIVING MAGAZINE, THE 9. BE YOURSELF AND BE 10. IN ALL HONESTLY IT IS ABOUT BEING DAILY EXPRESS, CONFIDENT.

RADIATOR PR. IN THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME. IT CAN BE A LONG PROCESS BUT KEEP DOING INTERNSHIPS, AND IF YOU ARE GOOD AT YOUR JOB SOMEONE WILL DEFINITELY SNAP YOU UP SOONER OR LATER.

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1.JO

ADNITT // FEATURES DIRECTOR AT LOOK MAGAZINE.

2.

3.

THE MORNING IS ALL ABOUT GOING THROUGH THE PAPERS, LOOKING AT WEBSITES (UK AND AMERICAN) TO COMPILE A FEATURES IDEAS LIST BY 10:30AM. THIS IS THEN GIVEN TO THE EDITOR. THEN THE REST OF THE DAY INVOLVES ANYTHING FROM COMMISSIONING A NEW FEATURE TO CHASING FREELANCERS ABOUT THE CASE STUDIES THEY’VE FOUND TO GET THE RIGHT INFORMATION ON THEM TO GIVE TO MY EDITOR. I EDIT COPY AND LOOK AT LAYOUTS AND PROOFS. I HAVE MEETINGS WITH THE ART AND PICTURE TEAM ABOUT FUTURE FEATURES. I DEAL WITH PRS, READER ENQUIRIES, DO MY WEEKLY BUDGET FOR THE FINANCE TEAM AND OVERSEE MY COMMISSIONAING EDITOR AND ALL HER WORK.

4.

THERE’S NO ONE STAND OUT PART, BUT I THINK AS A REAL LIFE EDITOR, IT’S GREAT WHEN YOU SECURE THAT 5. COSMO, 19 AND B MAGAZINE CRACKING CASE STUDY OR STORY THAT YOU KNOW EVERYONE WANTS AND YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE WHO’S FOUND IT. OR COMING UP WITH A GREAT NEWS IDEA WHICH THE EDITOR GOES FOR AND YOU MANAGE TO TURN AROUND WITH PICTURES IN 48 HOURS.

I’VE ALWAYS BEEN REDICULOUSLY KEEN ON FASHION. IT STARTED AS A CHILD AND THROUGHTOUT MY TEEN YEARS EVERY SATURDAY WAS A SHOPPING DAY. IF ANYTHING, I’M LESS INTO IT NOW I’M SURROUNDED BY IT THAT I WAS BEFORE!

6. B MAGAZINE WITHOUT A DOUBT AS I GOT TO DO SO MUCH. I WENT

ON ‘SHOOTS, DID TRIED AND TESTED FEATURES AND LEARNED SO MUCH ABOUT HOW TO FIND CASE STUDIES, STRUCTURE FEATURES AND LEARNED LEGAL ISSUES. ONE STAND OUT MEMORABLE MOMENT WAS REALLY AT COSMO WHEN I WAS GIVEN THE TASK OF FINDING A GUY TO SEND IN A PICTURE OF HIS PENIS FOR A SECTION NAMED ‘PENIS READER’ WHICH WAS WHERE AN OLD WOMAN ANALYSED THE PHOTO AND TOLD HIM ABOUT HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS RELATIONSHIP. SO I HAD TO FORCE MY BOYFRIEND TO DO IT AND OUR FACES APPEARED IN THE MAGAZINE WITH THE PENIS READER’S VERDICT. SHE SAID SHE DIDN’T THINK WE’D BE LIKELY TO STAY TOGETHER. -WE DIDN’T!

8.

THIS INDUSTRY IS VERY SMALL. PLUS IT PAYS REALLY REALLY BAD WHEN YOU’RE LOW DOWN. HOWEVER, MY BEST ADVICE IS TO 7. TO BE PROACTIVE. DON’T SIT IN A ALWAYS LEAVE PLACES ON GOOD MAG WHILST YOU’RE THERE DOING TERMS AS YOU’LL ALWAYS COME WORK EXPERIENCE (OR A JOB) ACROSS PEOPLE IN OTHER PLACES. AND EXPECT IT ALL TO COME TO DON’T BITCH ABOUT COLLEAGUES, IT YOU. YOU NEED TO SHOW BOSSES WILL GET BACK TO THEM USUALLY.

YOU’RE KEEN AND THAT YOU’RE WILLING TO HELP NO MATTER WHAT. DON’T TURN YOUR NOSE UP AT ANYTHING, JUST DO IT.

10. IT’S INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT, BUT I THINK

IT’S ABOUT KEEPING IN TOUCH WITH PEOPLE YOU’VE WORKED WITH.

9.

KEEP CV’S RELEVANT AND TO ONE PAGE. IN INTERVIEWS BE ENTHUSIASTIC BUT NOT COCKY. BE WELL BRIEFED ON THE COMPANY TO ARE TRYING TO GET A JOB AT.

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1.ALEXIS STYLIST

3.

KNOX // FASHION

THROUGH INTERNING AND ALWAYS HAVING AN EYE FOR STYLE.

8.

5.MORE MAGAZINE, NOTION MAGAZINE AND WITH FREELANCE STYLISTS.

2.

EVERY DAY VARIES GREATLY. NO TWO DAYS ARE THE SAME.

4.CREATING IMAGERY AND BEING ORGANISED.

7. EARN YOUR STRIPES

IF IT MAKES YOU CRY EVERY DAY LEAVE, THERE IS A LOT MORE EXPERIENCE OUT THERE. TEARS ONCE IN A WHILE SHOW PASSION.. TEARS EVERY DAY IS A PROBLEM.

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6.WITH A FREELANCE STYLIST AS HE WAS A MONSTER TO HIS INTERNS. 9. DOYOUR RESEARCH ABOUT WHO YOU ARE APPLYING TO. A MASS SENT EMAIL CAN BE SPOTTED A MILE OFF AND I IMMEDIATELY DELETE THEM.

10.

KEEP INTERNING UNTIL YOUR CV IS FULL ENOUGH TO SHOW YOU HAVE THE SKILL AND EXPERIENCE TO WARRENT BEING PAYED.


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This may seem to be a very bold and perhaps risky choice for the iconic brand. After all Chanel, since its establishment in 1909 by Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel has represented a cool sophistication and a casual elegance, with most recent celebrity endorsements featuring the likes of Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss. Dellal is a strikingly different endorsement and this new collaboration perhaps represents a new direction for the brand? The ‘boy’ bag itself is in many ways typical of the Chanel brand as it features high quality leather and is lovingly made however, this bag is far more masculine with a stingray and a raw metal chain. It is easy to see why Dellal has been chosen to represent this bag – she encapsulates everything that the bag stands for. Lagerfield has released a short video to advertise the ‘boy’ bag, starring Dellal. She can be seen looking far more ladylike than we have ever seen her before, clad in a ditsy dress and red lipstick. Her hair is perfectly coifed in cascading curls. However the subtleties which made Dellal’s style interesting are still on show as Chanel has accommodated for them: her famous unkempt roots and shaven head can still be seen and there is also a clear shot of Dellal in her rock-chic leathers and ripped stockings. This all proves that Dellal has not had to let go of her punk roots to represent one of the most famous fashion houses of all time. Her interesting style has been appreciated by many brands and has now been cleverly adapted to suit Chanel. -J’adore.

BOY

Words // ALICE MARY GORTON Illustration // POPPY ROBERTS

Alice Dellal, a twenty-four year old British model, has been chosen by Karl Lagerfield to be the face of the new Chanel ‘boy’ bag. Dellal emerged on the scene as an ‘it’ girl with her quirky punk style in 2007 and by 2008 she had been chosen to be the face of Mango and the body of the Agent Provocateur lingerie collection in addition gracing the pages of many fashion magazines sporting her famous half-shaved head, laddered tights, denim shorts and leather jackets. Alongside this Dellal also play drums for Thrush Metal, an all-girl 4 piece punkrock band formed by her model friends. At this point Alice’s career was soaring as her style was a perfect fit with more modern, edgy and controversial campaigns. After disappearing from the scene for a few years Dellal has returned with zeal and has been chosen by Karl Lagerfield to be the face of Chanel’s new ‘boy’ bag.

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Photography // KARL LAGERFELD/CHANEL

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GRANDEUR quotes

“The first step toward success is taken when you refuse to be a captive of the environment in which you first find yourself.” -Mark Caine

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