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LSONews.com

TOURNAMENT BRIEFS

Lone✯Star Outdoor News

Archery Continued From Page 8

TIFT winners highlighted The 72nd edition of the Texas International Fishing Tournament concluded on Aug. 7 with 1,200 anglers taking part in the two-day event out of Port Isabel. First place in the sailfish division went to Tye Bradley of Aransas Pass on the boat Mojo, who managed 1,200 points in the tournament. Will Watson of Houston, aboard the Sigsbee Deep, caught the firstplace marlin. D.A. Hughes III, from San Antonio, fishing on the Wildcatter, was one of the leaders on the offshore category with his 47-inch, 36.2-pound dolphin that was the unofficial leader in the category after Saturday‘s weigh-in. Ricky Villarreal of Brownsville also jumped the leader board with a 74-1/2 inch mako shark that weighed in at 106 pounds, 5 ounces. The top flounder was a 4-pound, 5-ounce fish caught by Michael Burt of Port Aransas. Marcus Montalvo of San Benito caught the largest redfish. It weighed 15 pounds, 8 ounces.

Huffman’s Quinn takes Anglers Quest event Randy Quinn of Huffman placed first in the July 30 Anglers Quest Individual tournament on Lake Houston with a total weight of 10 pounds, 9 ounces. Quinn fished mostly the East Fork and Luces Bayou areas on the lake. His bass were all caught on Texasrigged worms and small crankbaits. He fished mostly in 2 to 4 feet of brushcovered water. Quinn also recorded the Big Bass of the day, which weighed 2 pounds, 9 ounces. Second place went to John Littleton of Humble, who fished the North Lake Creeks area and finished with four bass weighing 6 pounds, 8 ounces. Chris DiBerardino of Huffman finished in third place with four bass at 6 pounds, 7 ounces. Anglers reported Lake Houston to be in good shape with water levels about 6 feet below normal. Water temps were reported to be around 91 degrees.

Team Dean-Shelton wins Bass Champs It may have taken Scott Dean of Terrell and Allen Shelton of Coppell eight years, but on July 23 the pair returned to the Bass Champs stage behind a 21-pound, 6-ounce day. Fishing the final open season event on Cedar Lake, Dean and Terrell focused on the docks and shaded areas. Despite spending much of their practice time fishing deep water, the pair decided to move shallow after noticing a majority of the tournament field was fishing deep. Second place went to the team of Paul Chadwick and Brad Cooper from Wylie. Unable to pre-fish, the two finished the day with 17 pounds, 5 ounces. The two also fished the docks with jigs and shaky heads. Their biggest fish of the day — a 6-pound, 2-ounce bass — was caught in 10 to 12 feet of water. Steve White of Eustace and Robert Megallon of Mabank caught 17 pounds, 3 ounces of fish to finish No. 3. The team fished 10-inch worms in the morning, than went to crankbaits in the afternoon, and caught a 3-pound fish. Gene Crane of Rockwall and Rick Clark of Terrell finished in fourth place just 3/100ths of a pound behind third place, anchored by the Big Bass of the tournament at 7 pounds, 4 ounces. Their final weight was 17 pounds, 3 ounces. —Staff report

to the reel on the bow went taught, and the fight was on for a large alligator gar. It’s moments like these that Texas bow fishermen live for. As summer’s heat becomes unbearable in parts of the state, bow fishing offers several advantages for archers: a great tune-up for the upcoming deer season and the ability to shoot at night, which is marginally cooler than during the day. “It really keeps your muscle memory and keeps you in shape for normal bow hunting,” said Randy Edwards of Falcon Archery in Hooks. “You’ll do a lot of shooting on a bow fishing trip and it beats shooting at a target all day.” As the Lone Star Outdoor News crew learned on a recent trip near

August 12, 2011

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Matagorda Bay, bow fishing is more instinctual shooting than shooting a compound bow with a normal deer setup, including a sight and release. The shooting comes fast and furious as gar surface quickly and head under in the blink of an eye. Often, the shooter has to guess which way the gar is moving and shoot at the water near where the fish has just swirled while swinging through the shot, much like shooting at a game bird. Captain Mark Malfa of Big Fish Bowfishing Texas said most beginning shooters tend to shoot high, while experienced bow SHOOT QUICK: Shots while bow fishing come fast and furious. Bow fishing is more instinctual fishermen tend to miss fish low. shooting than hunting deer with a normal compound bow. Photo by Conor Harrison, LSON. Bow fishing arrows do not have fletching, which means the struggling to hook fish, bow fish- down a river, Malfa answered with shooting has to be close to be effec- ermen make their own luck and a standard bow fishing punch line. tive. The average shot on the recent hunt the fish. “I don’t know what they’re bitLSON trip was less than 15 feet. When one rod and reel angler ing on,” Malfa said. “But we are The beauty of bow fishing is asked Malfa, “What they were planning to force feed them an when other “normal” anglers are biting on?” as he slowly motored aluminum arrow.”

August 12, 2011 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

August 12, 2011 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

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