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EXPERIENCE GREATER AKRON CONTENTS

A MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

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ood news! Greater Akron is flourishing. Our businesses are excelling, our culture is vibrant and our community is prosperous. We have exceptional healthcare and top-notch educational resources, making our region one of the most highly regarded in the state. With our unique blend of big-city life coupled with a small-town feel, Greater Akron has the potential to make anyone feel right at home. Our area’s leaders continue to be committed to advancing Greater Akron’s economy by placing it on an international level, extending both its reach and opportunities by continual efforts to improve and expand Greater Akron as a whole and through supporting our renowned attractions, the Metro Parks and our ever-growing downtown district (just to name a few). In this relocation guide filled with fun facts, useful information and a touch of local pride, you’ll find an entertaining collection of reasons to love our region. You are guaranteed to learn and admire why we are so passionate about our community. If you are moving to Greater Akron with your family or starting your business or have been living here your whole life, the Chamber is here to help. Together, we can celebrate and secure the promise and unstoppable potential of one of our state’s most vital and unique regions. There has never been a better time to be in Greater Akron, for it is continuing to be just that: Greater and Greater.

Daniel C. Colantone, CCE, IOM President and CEO Greater Akron Chamber Published for the Greater Akron Chamber by Live Publishing Company Publisher: John Schambach Project Manager/Editorial Supervisor: Gail Kerzner Project Director: Jeff Ritter Senior Writer: Connie Swenson Art Direction & Designer: Ben Small Production Manager: Gail Smith Operations Manager: M. Melinda Myer Operations Assistant: Beth Koblitz Principal Photography: Bruce Ford, except where noted.

4 75 Reasons We Love Greater Akron

16 Web Primer

17 Food & Drink

20 Shopping

23 Family Outings

25 Family-Friendly Sports

27 Venues for Victory

29 Parks

32 Arts

38 Business Focus

42 The Entrepreneurial Spirit

46 Young Professionals

49 Philanthropy & Volunteerism

53 Education

64 Healthcare

72 Transportation

73 Landmarks

74 Communities

Copyright ©2016 by Live Publishing Company. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted by any form or means without written permission from Live Publishing Company. Greater Akron Chamber Senior Vice President: Rebecca Guzy Woodford Greater Akron Chamber Manager of Publications: Tammy Grimmett Greater Akron Chamber 1 Cascade Plaza, 17th Floor Akron, Ohio 44308-1192 phone: (330) 376-5550, fax: (330) 379-3164 greaterakronchamber.org While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information and listings contained herein, Live Publishing Company and the Greater Akron Chamber assume no liability for errors or omissions. 2

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Because

more coverage matters WKSU 89.7 has you covered with more engaging NPR programs and in-depth reporting in more of Northeast Ohio (22 counties to be precise).

Celebrating 65 years

WKSU, an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, is committed to attaining excellence through the recruitment and retention of a diverse workforce. 16-UR-00310-079


75 REASONS WE L

eBron came home. The St. Vincent-St. Mary’s grad came back and pulled the whole region together, giving us another reason to celebrate. We already had worldclass medical care, outstanding universities, affordable living, and now, the greatest sports team in the world. But we love a lot of other things about the Greater Akron Region: our incredible Summit Metro Parks system and the Cuyahoga Valley National Park that people come from miles away to visit, our music history and our restaurants. Here’s the countdown of our favorite reasons we love Greater Akron.

1

YES, LEBRON CAME HOME TO AKRON TO EVEN THE SCORE. Akron’s Prodigal Son returned home with one intention: to bring the championship back to Northeast Ohio, thereby removing “the curse”—and he did. He will always be our hometown hero because he’s a team player and a motivational philanthropist, instilling the importance of education to the children of the Akron Public Schools. No matter what, he is “just a kid from Akron.”

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BECAUSE GREATER AKRON HAS TAKEN ITS LEGACY as the Tire Capital of the World and transformed itself into a region that excels in many areas, including biomedicine, corrosion control, advanced materials, liquid crystals, polymers and—mysteriously enough—raising celebrities and athletes.

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BECAUSE THREE OUT OF FOUR SUMMIT COUNTY RESIDENTS SAY THIS IS AN EXCELLENT OR GOOD PLACE TO LIVE, according to The Summit Poll 2016, conducted by the Center for Marketing and Opinion Research. By the way, Akron comes from the Greek word for “high place.” We’re not going anywhere but up.

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BECAUSE WE’RE STILL A GATEWAY TO EVERYWHERE. Greater Akron is within 500 miles of 42 major U.S. cities. You may want to leave occasionally, if only to remind yourself how good you have it in Greater Akron; your easy road trip choices are many. And businesses can get employees and products from here to there with speed and ease.

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BECAUSE EVERYONE IN NORTHEAST OHIO LOVES THE EASE AND ACCESSIBILITY OF THE AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT. The airport recently completed a $2.7 million renovation and expansion for non-stop flights on American Airlines to Chicago and is still the easiest airport to access in Northeast Ohio.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR ROCK STARS. The city of Akron honored Mark Mothersbaugh, the artist and DEVO founder (and composer of many television and movie themes), with a key to the city in May 2016. And of course, there’s Chrissie Hynde, Akron native and founder of The Pretenders, who wrote a new book in 2016—Reckless: My Life as a Pretender—controversial, yet very revealing. Then there’s the Black Keys, the funky, bluesy rock duo that has won five Grammy Awards. Their songs have been featured in more than 300 commercials, video games and movie soundtracks.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE 91.3 THE SUMMIT WAPS-FM. The Akron-based, listener-supported public radio station spins a handpicked and eclectic selection of music including rock, indie, folk, local and more—curated just for Northeast Ohio. In 2016, The Summit launched a new community service channel called The 330, featuring the past, present and future of Northeast Ohio music—homegrown, hyper-local and 24/7.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR RESIDENTS SPREADING THE WORD. The Akronist is a multimedia community news and entertainment website about Greater Akron. Think of it as a town square equipped with high-tech tools and a slippersallowed policy. Residents can create stories, videos and photos with the aid of The Akronist’s training arm, the Akron Digital Media Center. And you own your original content.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE THE CUYAHOGA VALLEY SCENIC RAILROAD, which provides a unique travel experience to Cuyahoga Valley National Park visitors, year-round. The train presents an excellent view of the natural scenery and wildlife of the park, as well as monthly excursions tailored to kids and adults. You can also board your bike and ride the trails when you get off.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE THE ONLY FAMILY-FRIENDLY NEW YEAR’S EVE NIGHT IN THE REGION. First Night Akron, a celebration of the arts on New Year’s Eve, brings the community together for families. It features indoor and outdoor entertainment, including the region’s best music, dance, theater and visual and interactive arts.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR NATIONAL PARK. The Cuyahoga Valley National Park is 33,000 acres of natural magic just minutes from downtown Akron. The park receives 2.2 million recreational visits each year, making it one of the most-visited national parks in the United States. Happy 100th Anniversary.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR HISTORIC INNS. The Inn at Brandywine Falls, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, was named one of the top 10 in the nation in 2016 by CNN. Built in 1848 as the home of James and Adeline Wallace and overlooking Brandywine Falls, the Inn keeps its 19th century character.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE KENT IN PORTAGE COUNTY, not just because of its crazy black squirrels but also because it’s known as the “Tree City,” thanks to an expert horticulturist named John Davey who, in the late 19th century, planted hundreds of trees around town. He also trained people how to care for the newly planted trees. Davey later founded The Davey Tree Expert Company, which is still headquartered in Kent. 6

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BECAUSE WE HAVE THE BLIMP. There are actually three flying right now: Spirit of Innovation, Wingfoot One (christened in 2014) and Wingfoot Two (christened in 2016). Goodyear plans to christen Wingfoot Three in 2017. The Wingfoots are all Zeppelin NTs (but still called ‘blimps’).

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BECAUSE OUR BLIMPS ALSO ASSIST SCIENCE, allowing environmentalists to watch for troubled manatees in South Florida and observe whale behavior in the Atlantic—just for a start.

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BECAUSE WE’RE AFFORDABLE. The cost of living here is a fraction of larger cities. Your $250,000 will buy a showplace here or a parking space in New York City.

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BECAUSE WE HONOR TRADITION BUT EMBRACE THE FUTURE. Every July, children from all over come to the FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby at Derby Downs to race in the world championship.

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BECAUSE OUR AKRON ZOO is among the top 10 percent of all zoos and aquariums in the United States and boasts the two most wanted exhibits right now: the triplet snow leopard cubs, born in 2016, and the first-ever Chilean flamingo chick, successfully hatched at the Akron Zoo in 2016.

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BECAUSE SAND RUN PARKWAY in the Summit County Metro Parks is just a weird and wonderful roadway in itself. It’s a semi-major artery from northwest Akron into Fairlawn, but it winds through some of the most amazing scenery around.

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BECAUSE OF THE 20-MINUTE RULE. No, it’s not guaranteed, but you can go just about anywhere in Greater Akron in 20 minutes or less. Akron to Kent? Wadsworth to downtown Akron? Yep, 20 minutes.

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BECAUSE MORE THAN 30 INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION are within a 50-mile radius of Greater Akron. The University of Akron and Kent State University have combined enrollments of more than 53,000 on their two main campuses and tens of thousands of others on their satellite campuses.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE THE BEST LONG-TERM INVESTMENT OF ANY NORTHEAST OHIO PUBLIC UNIVERSITY—The University of Akron. Payscale.com released its ranking of Best Value Colleges in the summer of 2016. The ranking looks at cost of attendance and earning potential and then determines which universities and colleges offer the best return in dollars.

COURTESY OF AKRON ZOO

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BECAUSE WE’RE HELPING TO ADDRESS THE SHORTAGE OF PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS in Greater Akron and beyond. With its trailblazing Education for Service program and pre-med to M.D. pathways, Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) partners with higher education and healthcare institutions, businesses, public officials and communities. As a result, NEOMED develops a more diverse field of healthcare professionals who understand and have a desire to return to and care for our underserved areas and populations. Each year, NEOMED graduates more than 200 healthcare professionals with the majority returning to Northeast Ohio.

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BECAUSE WE’RE A MODEL OF OUTSTANDING AND INNOVATIVE, TEAM-BASED, PATIENT-CENTERED CARE. NEOMED has long recognized the importance of interprofessional education in healthcare. They develop their medicine and pharmacy students to work with other health professionals and provide the best team-based care to patients. It truly takes a village to treat the whole patient and not just focus on their current symptoms.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE TO RUN. Since The Akron Marathon started 14 years ago with 3,775 participants, events and community support have grown, resulting in the Akron Children’s Hospital Akron Marathon Series with three events, over 20,000 participants, 4,000 volunteers and 120,000 spectators.

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BECAUSE WE ENTICE THE WORLD’S GREATEST GOLFERS HERE each August with the chance to play the formidable course at Firestone Country Club in south Akron. The World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational is a PGA Tour-sanctioned event that welcomes a field of about 75 male golfers from around the world and dozens of corporations who host the event.

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BECAUSE THE KING OF ELECTRICITY, THOMAS EDISON, married an Akron girl, Mina Miller, in the home of her father, inventor Lewis Miller in February 1886. The house, called Oak Place, still stands and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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BECAUSE THEY DON’T CALL US THE CITY OF INVENTION FOR NOTHING. Among others, Greater Akron is the birthplace of: ¢ Ready-to-eat breakfast cereal ¢ Grade levels in schools ¢ Wound golf balls ¢ Police patrol wagons ¢ U.S. space suits ¢ Synthetic rubber tires ¢ U.S.-built dirigibles (blimps) ¢ The trucking industry ¢ The first toy company (S.C. Dyke—clay marbles) ¢ The first liquid crystal display (LCD) screens used in watches ¢ Electric railway lines

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BECAUSE WE’RE GRATEFUL FOR SMITH & WILSON. Akron is the birthplace of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The Gate Lodge at Stan Hywet Hall, the Tudor mansion of Goodyear’s founding family, is where New York stockbroker Bill Wilson met Akron doctor Bob Smith. Dr. Bob’s home in Highland Square is on the National Register of Historic Places, as is Stan Hywet Hall. Dr. Bob’s home has been restored to look as it did in the early days of AA. Each June, about 15,000 recovering alcoholics from across the globe gather in Akron to celebrate the birth of the program.

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BECAUSE THE AKRON ART MUSEUM’S UNWAVERING FOCUS on art from 1850 onward has allowed it to develop one of the finest collections of the period. But it’s not a static space. In 2007, the soaring glass and steel structure with “roof cloud” designed by Coop Himmelb(l)au of Vienna was added to the late 19th century brick and limestone post office structure. In summer 2016, the Bud and Susie Rogers Garden opened to the public.

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BECAUSE A TEMPORARY, INTERACTIVE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM in downtown Akron was so successful in winter 2015/2016—nearly 10,000 people wandered through—organizers put down permanent roots. The Pop-Up Site on O’Neil’s parking deck next to Lock 3 in 2016 was the direct result of the Akron Children’s Museum’s collaboration with Summit County Historical Society.

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BECAUSE WE DO WELL WHILE DOING GOOD. Akron has won the Oscar of municipal life—the All-America City Award—three times. Citing Akron as one of the most successful cities between the eastern seaboard and Chicago, the Brookings Institution called Akron an economic recovery model for other cities to follow.

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BECAUSE WE’RE LIGHT AND FLEXIBLE. More than 40 years ago, Kent State University researchers invented the liquid crystal display (LCD) that quickly became ubiquitous in consumer electronics. Research is now focused on the production of lightweight, flexible and strong materials to replace heavier, rigid and breakable devices of the current generation.

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BECAUSE GREATER AKRON COMPANIES PROVIDE THE WORLD WITH SOME OF ITS BEST-KNOWN, USEFUL PRODUCTS: ¢ Goodyear tires ¢ Rust-Oleum® (RPM) ¢ DayGlo® paint (RPM) ¢ A.I. Root Candles (a favorite among celebs)

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¢ Audio-Technica (microphones and headphones) ¢ Twinkle Polish® (Malco) ¢ The Cozy Coupe® (Little Tikes) ¢ The Frog Sandbox® (Step2) ¢ Purell® hand sanitizer (GOJO) ¢ Bil-Jac dog food and treats® ¢ EcoSmartTM and DuraBright® CFL light bulbs (TCP) ¢ Main Street Gourmet muffin batter

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BECAUSE EVERYONE NEEDS TO TAKE A BREAK FROM MODERN-DAY TECHNOLOGY. Hale Farm & Village in Bath is the perfect place to escape. Spend the afternoon exploring historic buildings, experiencing a working farm (complete with sheep, oxen, pigs and chickens) and period crafts such as candlemaking, blacksmithing, pottery, glassblowing, spinning and weaving. Hale Farm is open from June through August.

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BECAUSE NORKA SODA (or pop, as we say here) is back. NORKA is, of course, Akron spelled backward. And the Cherry-Strawberry was voted the 2016 National King of Pops.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR FIREFIGHTERS. The Fire Museum, run by the Hudson Fire Department Association, opened in summer 2016 at the Hudson Town Hall, housed in the same location as the first Hudson Fire House. The museum is filled with memorabilia, including the 1859 hand pumper and the 1928 Seagrave fire truck, which will be switched out every so often to display the 1948 Old Number 1 Mack fire truck.

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BECAUSE WE KNOW FASHION. Kent State University’s Fashion School, one of the top in the U.S., has yet another accolade: Kara Kroeger, who graduated in May 2016 with a B.F.A. in fashion design, has been named a Kenneth Cole Footwear + Accessory Innovation Award winner. The Fashion School even has its own store in downtown Kent.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE FASHION SO MUCH, we even have Kent State University Museum’s collection of more than 2,000 pieces. Delight in the apparel from the 18th20th centuries or plan to view upcoming diverse exhibits like the Fashions of Southern Africa and Magical Designs for Mozart’s Magic Flute.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE TO ROCK THE LOCK. The Lock 3 open-air music venue in downtown Akron hosts concerts all summer, specializing in extraordinary cover bands and classic artists. And you can ice skate there in the winter. Lock 4, home to the LockBottom Blues & Jazz Club, draws the funky set every Wednesday night. Also check out Saturday night cover bands.

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BECAUSE AKRON-SUMMIT COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY is special, and even the government says so. 2015 marked the 20th anniversary of the Akron-Summit County Public Library’s designation as a Patent and Trademark Resource Center (PTRC). The PTRC Program is a nationwide network of libraries that serves as a link between the public and the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Washington, D.C. It is one of only 80 such libraries in the country. But any visitor to the library knows it as an astounding resource for any lover of literature, science, art and life. And entrepreneurs can even enjoy co-op space in the new Microbusiness Center.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR WINTER SPORTS in Northeast Ohio. Boston Mills/Brandywine ski resorts, both located in Penninsula, are among the largest in the region, offering lessons, rentals and every level of skiing/ snowboarding/tubing hills. Families can also beat the winter blues by ice skating at Cuyahoga Falls River Square from the end of November through February.

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BECAUSE THE NORTHSIDE DISTRICT is on its way. Just north of downtown is an area lit up by stylish loft condominiums, restaurants, bars, an artists’ haven called 43 Furnace Street and a new Marriott hotel, complete with Speakeasy (but we’re not revealing the password). A monthly Artwalk, sponsored by the Downtown Akron Partnership, gives artists a chance to show off their work and the district to show off its progress.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE TO “PLAY BALL”! The Akron RubberDucks, Double-A Affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, play from spring to fall at Canal Park. And families enjoy “home-run” games, food, fireworks and even movie nights. In July 2016, the Ducks hosted the Eastern League All-Star Game.

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BECAUSE WE QUACK FOR THE RUBBERDUCKS’ MASCOTS. Webster was joined in 2016 by his little sister, Rubberta, following a public naming contest. The dynamic duo cheer on the players with Homer, the pigeon, and Orbit, the cat.

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BECAUSE OHIO’S LARGEST MANUFACTURING SECTOR INDUSTRY IS POLYMERS and advanced materials. The majority of Ohio’s 130,000 polymer fabrication workers are concentrated in Northeast Ohio. Only California—with a population three times ours—has more polymer-related employees.

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BECAUSE THE UNIVERSITY OF AKRON’S POLYMER SCIENCE and engineering programs are consistently ranked among the top in the world.

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BECAUSE WE’RE STILL PUTTING THE WORLD ON WHEELS. Bridgestone Americas, Inc. has the state-ofthe-art Americas Technical Center in Akron. The $100 million facility’s employees develop innovative and advanced tire technologies for the company.

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BECAUSE WE’RE THE BIRTHPLACE OF SOME FAIRLY AWESOME PEOPLE:

¢  NBA star LeBron James ¢ Football coach Ara Parseghian ¢ Paul Tazewell, Tony Award winner for Hamilton’s Best Costume Design ¢ Filmmaker Jim Jarmusch ¢ Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Rita Dove ¢ Actor Jesse White, the original, lonely, Maytag repairman ¢ Actress Melina Kanakaredes ¢ Astronaut Judith Resnik Jesse White

¢ Singer James Ingram ¢ Tim “Ripper” Owens, one-time lead singer of Judas Priest ¢ Jani Lane, from the glam band Warrant ¢ Carol Heiss, Olympic skater

Rita Dove

¢ Actress Lola Albright ¢ E.T. Barnette, founder of Fairbanks, Alaska ¢ Olympian Butch Reynolds ¢ Yankees Catcher Thurman Munson ¢ Tom Batiuk, creator of comic strips Funky Winkerbean and Crankshaft

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BECAUSE COMPASSIONATE CARETAKERS TAKE CARE OF YOU. Akron Children’s Hospital is one of the largest pediatric hospitals in the U.S. and ranked among the best children’s hospitals by U.S. News and World Report. They handle nearly 800,000 patient visits a year through two hospital campuses and a large network of locations offering primary and specialty care at 90 locations. Cleveland Clinic Akron General and Summa Health serve more than one million patients annually.

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BECAUSE ONCE A YEAR, WE SEE DOUBLE. Twinsburg in northern Summit County is the site of the annual Twins Days Festival, the largest gathering of multiples on the planet. More than 2,500 sets of twins—from newborn to 90— gather each August in a town that was founded by twins. The festival is a happy laboratory for researchers who study twins for a variety of scientific purposes, including life-saving treatments.

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BECAUSE SNAZZY DIGS IN AKRON HAVE GOODYEAR WRITTEN ALL OVER THEM. In summer 2015, the Residences at the East End—luxury loft apartments located in the historic Goodyear Hall—welcomed its first tenants. Late in 2014, an $18 million Hilton Garden Inn, located a short walk from the Goodyear campus, opened for business. And in 2013, Goodyear formally opened its new $160 million world headquarters on part of its existing campus.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE WORLD-CLASS SUMMER MUSIC. Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls is the summer home of The Cleveland Orchestra. Blossom, considered one of the most beautiful and acoustically admired outdoor music venues in the United States, also hosts Live Nation concerts by pop artists such as Luke Bryan and the Kings of Leon. Pack a picnic and get your groove on.

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BECAUSE WE INVENTED THE HAMBURGER. A couple of other cities claim it too, but the annual National Hamburger Festival in August is a chance to make peace and patties with our competitors—all over one of the largest assortment of burgers ever assembled in one place.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE THE BEST BURGERS IN THE COUNTRY. Swenson’s was voted Number One in a 2016 national poll. The Rail, The Windsor Pub and Louie’s Bar and Grill also made the list.

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BECAUSE WE CHERISH TRADITION. The International Rubber Hall of Fame recognizes the careers of notable professionals in rubber technology at The University of Akron. The Goodyear Polymer Center at The University of Akron houses the Hall of Fame’s portrait gallery.

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR HOMETOWN CLASSICAL MUSICIANS. The Akron Symphony Orchestra began in 1949 when Mabel Lamborn Graham received $500 as seed money from the publisher of the Akron Beacon Journal with the instruction to begin raising money for a professional, union orchestra.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE THE AWESOME AKRON AIRDOCK. Constructed in 1929 by the GoodyearZeppelin Corporation, later Goodyear Aerospace, the Airdock was designed for blimp manufacturing. The floor space is larger than eight football fields. On occasion, condensation creates rain in the Airdock even if it’s sunny outside. It’s still used for blimp manufacturing.

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BECAUSE IF YOU GET LOST, JUST FIND YOUR WAY TO THE SIGNAL TREE. Everyone in Greater Akron knows the Signal Tree is in the Chuckery area of the Cascade Valley Metro Park. We guess it signals the 300-year-old burr oak, with its strange three-pronged structure, was used by Native Americans as a signpost of sorts between the Cuyahoga River and the portage path to the Tuscarawas River to the south

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BECAUSE THE NIGHTLIGHT THEATER in downtown Akron shows cult, indie and foreign films. It was opened in 2014 by its nonprofit parent, Akron Film + Pixel. The 50-seat, digital projection venue is just a short walk from the High St. parking deck.

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BECAUSE WE RECOGNIZE THOSE WHO NEED US. Through the County of Summit Developmental Disabilities Board, we provide employment and other support for the differently-abled, helping them with work and life skills and providing support for their families and the employers who hire them. Also, Hattie Larlham, a nonprofit organization with executive offices in Twinsburg, provides care to 1,500 children and adults with disabilities and their families and communities.

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BECAUSE WE ALREADY HAVE CHARMING MAIN STREETS USA. The downtowns of Ravenna and Kent in Portage County and Medina Square in Medina County are authentic, quaint town centers with buildings that date to the Western Reserve’s earliest days. During the summer months, residents gather in the squares for ice cream socials, band concerts and plays.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE TUBACHRISTMAS AND TUBASUMMER led by a retired University of Akron professor named—no kidding—Tucker Jolly. Imagine a sort of flash mob for tuba lovers. The annual Christmas concert began about 30 years ago and proved so popular that fans soon demanded a warm-weather version.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE OUR OWN IDEAS ABOUT HIGH STYLE. Every fall, Ravenna’s annual Balloon A-Fair, celebrates one of the city’s earliest industries—toy balloons made by the Oak Rubber Co.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE A TASTE FOR THE ABSURD. Every March, from time immemorial, turkey vultures (buzzards) have returned to roost in Medina County’s Hinckley Township. And since 1957, buzzard lovers—clad in crazy vulture-themed paraphernalia—gather in the pre-dawn hours on March 15 to await the return of the carrion-gnawing critters.

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BECAUSE UP AT LOCK 15, the Mustill Store and House—an 1850s-era general store and residence— have been restored and opened to the public, thanks to the Cascade Locks Park Association. The park encompasses the area between Locks 10 and 16 and will be developed completely as a heritage and educational site.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE THE RUBBER CITY ROLLERGIRLS, Akron’s own women’s roller derby league. The women come from all walks of life, but when they roll, they’re all made for hard hits and speed. You can see them five times a year at the John S. Knight Convention Center in downtown Akron. Farrah Fawcett hairdos are optional.

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BECAUSE KENT HAS STREET FAIRS, LIVE MUSIC, sidewalk cinema and festivals throughout the year. Art in the Park, Heritage Festival, Kent Blues Fest and Ghost Walk— just to name a few. There’s always something fun to do.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE A VOICE. After two successful pop-up locations, The Akron Sound Museum is looking for a permanent space. It will be dedicated to preserving legendary Akron new wave bands such as DEVO, Chrissie Hynde, Tin Huey, the Bizarros and The Rubber City Rebels, fostering new artists and promoting the spoken word. As curator Wayne Beck says, “basically anything that makes a sound in Akron.”

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BECAUSE WHO DOESN’T LOVE THE NOSTALGIA of seeing a movie under the stars at a classic drive-in? We love the Blue Sky Drive-In in Wadsworth, open April through September. Pack your car for a one-carload price.

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BECAUSE WE STILL HAVE SOME HIPPIE IN US. Back in the ’60s, a group of ambitious Kent State University students celebrated the folk music revival with a concert on campus. The songs, the spirit and the Kent State Folk Festival, newly re-named the ’Round Town Music Festival, have been with us every autumn since.

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BECAUSE FRONT PORCH ROCKIN’ means something entirely different here. On a sunny weekend in the summer, dozens of bands play on porches of homes in Highland Square during the Porch Rokr Festival.

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BECAUSE WE HAVE SOME FOOD YOU JUST CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT:

¢ West Point Market “Killer” brownies (Death by Chocolate; bring it on.) ¢ Strickland’s frozen custard (Nothing better on a hot summer day.) ¢ A Luigi’s cheese-smothered salad (Get your dairy for the month in one sitting.) ¢ Skyway’s SkyHi burger (Yummy, fattening, spectacular.) ¢ Sauerkraut balls (No one is quite sure of the origin of these little deep-fried beauties, but no Akron area party is complete without them.)

¢ Akron Honey (Don’t miss the September batch, Keeper’s Mark.)

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SHANE WYNN

¢ Barberton Chicken (Juicy, greasy, with piles of fries and hot rice.)

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BECAUSE WE LOVE OUR NEIGHBORHOODS. Akron2Akron’s informal walking tours led by Akron residents are the most fun way to learn about unique people, places and plans.

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BECAUSE STAN HYWET HALL & GARDENS HAS BEEN A TREASURED AKRON LANDMARK FOR 100 YEARS. Built
as the residence for the family of F.A. Seiberling,
co-founder of The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, this national historic landmark includes a 65-room Manor House, historic gardens on 70 acres and a 5,000square-foot Playgarden. Claims to fame:

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¢ Best Historic Home Tour in America—USA Today ¢ Best Historic Estate in the Midwest—American Bus Association ¢ One of America’s Castles ¢ One of America’s most significant historic estates because of its size and the collection’s authenticity ¢ 6th largest historic estate open to the public in America ¢ Gate Lodge was the site of early discussions in the formation of AA ¢ One of the best examples of American Tudor Revival architecture ¢ Deck The Hall—Top 100 Events in America—American Bus Association

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¢ Deck the Hall—one of the largest holiday light experiences in Ohio ¢ One of the largest wedding sites in Northeast Ohio

SOMETIMES A LITTLE DIFFERENCE CAN MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.

AT DOMINION, COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF POWERING OUR BUSINESS. At Dominion, diversity isn’t just something we strive for, it’s something we insist on. The bottom line is that diversity is good business—having a workforce and group of suppliers who come from different backgrounds and who have had different sets of experiences helps us generate a broader range of better ideas. As a result, our company is strengthened, our communities prosper and, most important, our customers benefit. To learn more about Dominion, our dedication to diversity, and how we help power the communities that power our business, please visit dom.com.

dom.com

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WEB PRIMER

GET TO KNOW GREATER AKRON . . . 365 ExperienceGreaterAkron

@ExperienceAkron

SOCIAL MEDIA FANS Plug in and discover the best of Greater Akron.  Hidden gems  Can’t-miss events  People and businesses making a difference

Building Communities Makes Business Sense

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING Experience Greater Akron (EGA)’s social media component enhances the print and electronic magazines and engages target audiences all year. Tap into thousands of EGA’s fans and followers throughout the year with EGA social media.  Drive immediate traffic  Promote timely events  Reach an even bigger audience To get involved, contact Gail Kerzner at Live Publishing Company (330) 882-8100 gkerzner@livepub.com

Business and community—building programs at the Greater Akron Chamber brings more wealth and opportunity to everyone in the region. Opportunity. One more way the Chamber makes a difference.

Be a part of the

Leading Businesses. Leading Communities.TM Call (330) 376-5550 or log onto www.greaterakronchamber.org

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The Greater Akron Chamber’s website promotes the strengths of the region and is an important resource – a place that people come back to again and again for all the information they need about Greater Akron and the Chamber. It contains information about the Chamber, member resources, economic development, business advocacy, visiting and living, and so much more. Check it out at greaterakronchamber.org. We hope you visit often. g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


SHANE WYNN

FOOD & DRINK

Nuevo Modern Mexican & Tequila Bar Restaurant rooftop

FOOD FOR THOUGHT FROM SMALLER, GOURMET RESTAURANTS TO TEA ROOMS AND BREWERIES, THE AREA HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERY TASTE

T

here are enough culinary offerings in the Greater Akron area to please any palate. From elegant grills to down-home diners and drive-ins with carhop service, our local eateries, lounges, wineries and breweries are just waiting to satisfy your every craving. Here are just a few highlights: If you want to find out where locals consistently frequent, try the legendary Luigi’s. The restaurant, complete with photos of Hollywood stars, is famous for magnificent old-world pizza. Crave, also in downtown Akron, gets great reviews. It is upscale, yet modern. For a great martini, try Jimmy’s Downtown, at 376 S. Main St. which celebrated a fresh renovation in 2016. Ken Stewart’s Grille, on W. Market St. in Akron, and Ken Stewarts Lodge, in Bath, have been constant favorites among locals for over two decades. Fine dining at its best. Akron’s Diamond Grille, for those diehard red 20 1 6 -20 1 7

meat lovers, is all about the steak. The downtown fixture is known for attracting the world’s top PGA golfers when they’re in town to play the famed South Course of Firestone Country Club. And downtown Akron ethnic flavors impress at Nuevo Modern Mexican & Tequila Bar Restaurant, with its modern interpretation of traditional cuisine and luscious margarita flights, and at Cilantro Thai and Sushi Restaurant, where the combination of chic environment and delicious food is perfect. If you enjoy watching your food being cooked in front of you, Cuyahoga Falls’ Raj Mahal or Akron’s Saffron Patch will be happy to oblige. For more casual fare (so casual that you don’t even get out of your car), Swensons Drive In has cheeseburgers that were named best in the country in Gourmet magazine. Swensons has a longtime friendly rivalry with Skyway Drive-In, and both operations—which

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FOOD & DRINK feature carhops and old-fashioned shakes—have their diehard fans. Looking to cure your sweet tooth? One of our favorite hometown bakers opened a retail bakery in 2016 in the heart of downtown Akron. Sweet Mary’s Bakery features a variety of baked goods, from quiche, scones, pies, cookies, granola and of course, cake. They feature a seasonally changing menu of savory baked items for breakfast and lunch, such as buttermilk biscuits, handpies and sandwiches. Bars and dance clubs rule the downtown nightlife. Lux Nightclub is a great place to hang for a drink and some dancing. Lock 4 features hot jazz and cool blues. Barley House is a popular sports-themed restaurant and bar that actually has a giant garage door that opens to the street. Jilly’s Music Room is a combination eatery and bar that serves up tapas fare and the hottest bands in the region. It’s always hopping on weekends and is considered one of the top places in the area to hear live music. Akron has two new spots for classic craft cocktails, drinks made completely from scratch, as in no pre-made mixes. Northside’s Speakeasy seats only about 30 and is located on the ground floor of the new Courtyard by

Swensons

Marriott in downtown Akron’s Northside District. Chop & Swizzle craft cocktail bar opened in the spring of 2016 in the old fire station in the West Hill neighborhood. The food and nightlife in Kent are as diverse as its residents, although every Greater Akronite knows the city’s live music scene is first-rate. The Venice Café, an icon in the storied history of Kent entertainment, stands at the corner of Erie Street and Franklin Avenue where it opened in 1941. The café recently came under new ownership and incorporated the menu of another favorite spot, Taco Tontos, into its offerings. The original Taco Tontos, known for its baked burritos since it opened in 1972, is alive and

well on Franklin Avenue; the café is simply a hybrid satellite spot. The café now offers live music and is home to Kent’s first nanobrewery. Bar 145 is a casual gastropub. It offers build-yourown burgers, a roster of bourbons and live music on most nights. Downtown 140 is a fine dining restaurant in Hudson. The executive chef and owner came from the famed Johnny’s in Cleveland and brought along an enchanting atmosphere and gourmet approach to food. The menu includes the classic Oysters Rockefeller, beef tartare with quail egg and duck breast with fig jam. If you feel like venturing a little south, try Gervasi Vineyard and Italian Bistro, 1700 55th St., Canton.

MORE RESTAURANTS, WINERIES AND BREWERIES *Bricco—Kent 210 S. Depeyster St., Ste. 100, Kent (330) 677-1335

Medina County *A Cupcake a Day 115 W. Liberty St., Medina (330) 389-1247 Fireside Restaurant at Rustic Hills 5399 River Styx Rd., Medina (330) 725-4281 High & Low Winery 588 Medina Rd., Medina (844) 466-4456

*Miss Molly’s Tea Room & Gift Shop 140 W. Washington St., #6, Medina (330) 725-6830

Portage County *Arnie’s Westbranch Steakhouse 5343 State Route 14, Ravenna (330) 297-1717

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*Ray’s Place 135 Franklin Ave., Kent (330) 673-2233

Stark County

Jilbert Winery 1496 Columbia Rd., Valley City (216) 781-4120

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Mazzulo’s Market 302 Aurora Commons Cir., Aurora (330) 562-3200

Akron

*Driftwood Restaurant at Embassy Suites by Hilton Akron-Canton Airport 7883 Freedom Ave., NW, North Canton (330) 305-0500 *Gervasi Vineyard and Italian Bistro 1700 55th St., NE, Canton (330) 497-1000 *Twisted Olive 5430 Massillion Rd., North Canton (330) 899-0550

Summit County *Barley House 222 S. Main St., Akron (330) 374-0925 *The Basement 255 E. Waterloo Rd., Akron (330) 724-0477 *Bricco—Akron 1 W. Exchange St., Ste. 100, Akron (330) 475-1600 *Brick House Tavern & Tap 581 Howe Ave., Cuyahoga Falls (330) 920-6244 *Bruegger’s Bagels—Fairlawn 3737 W. Market St., Unit C, Fairlawn (216) 870-6338 CASA D’Angelo Restaurant 893 E. Aurora Rd., Macedonia (330) 467-9699

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*Corner Cup Coffeehouse 3019 Graham Rd., Stow (330) 608-2462

*Mustard Seed Market & Café 3885 W. Market St., Akron (330) 666-7333

*Pizza Fire 22 E. Exchange St., Akron (330) 314-4756

*Diamond Deli 378 S. Main St., Akron (330) 688-0852

*Natalie’s Akron 50 S. Main St. #122, Akron (234) 334-4166

*Stricklands Frozen Custard Inc. 419 Heathrow Dr., Cuyahoga Falls (330) 620-4400

El Gato Taqueria 209 Main St., Akron (330) 353-4323

*Nuevo Modern Mexican & Tequila Bar 54 E. Mill St., Akron (330) 762-8000

*Swensons Drive In Restaurants 680 E. Cuyahoga Falls Ave., Akron (330) 928-3797

*Frank’s Place on Market 549 W. Market St., Akron (330) 376-8307

*Ohio Brewing Company 804 W. Market St., Akron (234) 208-6797

*The Tangier 532 W. Market St., Akron (330) 376-7171

*Grape and Granary 915 Home Ave., Akron (330) 633-7223

*Old Carolina Barbecue & Catering Co. 620 Ridgewood Crossings Dr., Akron (330) 665-4222

*Thirsty Dog Brewing Company 529 Grant St., Akron (330) 252-2739

*Hyde Park Prime Steak House 4073 Medina Rd., Akron (330) 670-6303

Pad Thai 12 E. Exchange St., Akron (330) 434-1888

*Jerzee’s Sports Grille 1019 E. Turkeyfoot Lake Rd., Akron (330) 896-9464

*Pandora’s Cupcakes 3571 Brookwall Dr., Akron (330) 665-2253

Totally Cooked to Go 388 S. Main St. (Inside AES Bldg.), Akron (330) 294-1102

*Jilly’s Music Room 111 N. Main St., Akron (330) 576-5960

*Panera Bread/Medina Road 3895A Medina Rd., Akron (330) 670-9347

*West Side Bakery—Akron 2303 W. Market St., Akron (330) 836-4101 *Greater Akron Chamber member

William D. Evans II Attorney at Law

DESIGN BUILD CONTRACTORS AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERS

�� General practice with

a focus on injury, wills, probate, business law, labor and employment; investigations and risk management �� Leading expert in Polygraph Technology

Design Build, Due Diligence, Retail, Commercial, Industrial Architecture/ Engineering Development & Leasing

Truth & Law Center

1185 S. Main St. Akron, Ohio 44301 P: 330-434-2344 • F: 330-434-4611 billevanslaw@sbcglobal.net Member of the Akron Bar Association, The Ohio Bar Association, The American Bar Association, Cuyahoga County Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, Ohio Criminal Defense Lawyers Association. Graduate with distinction of the University Of Akron School Of Law, former managing editor Akron Law Review; former Summit County Sheriff ’s Deputy

3457 Granger Road Bath, Ohio 44333 330-659-2040 www.beaconmarshall.com

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SHANE WYNN

SPECIALTY SHOPPING

Highland Square

EVERYTHING YOU NEED THIS AREA IS HOME TO SPECIALTY SHOPS THAT MEET MOST EVERY NEED . . . FROM GOURMET FOOD TO GRAPHIC CLOTHING

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reater Akron has pretty much every shopping option anyone could desire—from traditional malls and lifestyle centers to charming neighborhood boutiques and resale shops. Shoppers come from all over Northeast Ohio to peruse gems such as Mustard Seed Market, Don Drumm Studios and Rubber City Clothing, among others. The historic town of Hudson is home to First and Main, 43 Village Way, a collection of national, regional and local merchants charmingly placed amid village greens and brick streets. Gracylane, a locally owned boutique, carries both highly popular and unique gifts and collectibles. (There’s another Gracylane at 100 E. Erie St. in Kent.) Look for the collection of Vera Bradley bags and accessories plus Alex and Ani’s jewelry. New retailers in Hudson include Suburban Sit, a furniture and fine interiors retailer, and Gwendolyn Elizabeth, which sells handmade soaps and spa products.

NickyNicole is a one-of-a-kind shop for girls with fabulous fashions, gifts, jewelry and the hottest trends for girls four to 14! Ask about their birthday parties. nickynicole.com. On Hudson’s old-fashioned N. Main St., The Learned Owl has been a destination spot for true bibliophiles for decades. It serves brain food for intellectual gourmets of all ages. In the Village of Peninsula, a collection of artists’ galleries and gift shops caters to the many visitors who come through on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad or by bike on the Towpath Trail. Terry Lumber & Supply Co. is celebrating its 75th anniversary. It’s far more than a place to pick up a few two-by-fours (although it has those, plus fine wood finishes, molding and hardware). Specialty items such as Radio Flyer wagons, Lodge cast iron cookware and handmade birdfeeders draw shoppers looking for a trip to simpler times. Blueyedog is a collection of jewelry and collectibles g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


by local artists, antiques, secondhand and dry goods. Century Cycles, which also has stores in Medina and suburban Cleveland, has a mindbending, leg-stretching selection of cycles from the top names in the sport, including Raleigh, Giant Defy and Surlys. Whether your passion is granite or gravel or even snow, Century Cycles has exactly the right ride to fit your plans and your physique. The store also rents bicycles by the hour, day or week. Drive or take the train to Peninsula, rent a bike at Century and see the sights around the lovely village and along the Towpath Trail. Century Cycles also sponsors night rides along the Towpath and bike challenges for kids. Kent’s downtown offers unique options for everyone of every age. Acorn Alley, part of the city’s spectacular downtown revitalization, offers one-of-a kind shops such as The Fashion School Store, featuring items designed and crafted by Kent State University Fashion School students. These are glad rags you won’t find anywhere else—or on anyone else. Woodsy’s music-audio-video store on S. Water St. is a magnet for both the musically inclined and the passionate, from school band members to charttopping rockers. In 1972, Woodsy’s

opened as an instrument repair shop in a tiny storefront. Today, 43 years and several thousand square feet later, Woodsy’s is Northeast Ohio’s largest independent, family-owned and operated music store. It’s the kind of store musicians love to discover because of its selection of gear, prices matching the chain stores and overall atmosphere of cool camaraderie. Experienced musicians are available for consultations or on-the-spot jamming. Kent Central Gateway Footwear opened in spring 2015 in the new multimodal transportation complex (called Kent Central Gateway) at 201 E. Erie St. It has an enormous selection of high-end, hip shoes such as Doc Martens, Born, Tom’s One for One and Merrell. Kent Central Gateway Footwear is a sister store to the popular Wild Earth Outfitters at 175 E. Erie St., which specializes, as one might expect, in gear and clothing suitable for conquering the wilderness. The store carries coats, backpacks, sleeping bags and hiking boots by top names in outdoor gear, including Patagonia, The North Face and Lowe. If water is your primary vehicle, look for kayaks by Native and Hurricane (paddles too, of course). Serious climbing gear, including harnesses and caribiners, is

available for the stout of heart. Main Street Medina has 200 businesses that together create a treasure trove of shopping, dining and services. On the subject of treasures, the Medina Gem Co., on the city’s quaint Public Square, is no ordinary jewelry store. As the company says, every masterpiece begins with a story and a stone. Come in with your own ideas, or just tell them your story, and the craftsmen at the store will come up with several ideas for you. Pick your favorite, and in less than two weeks, you’ll have your one-of-a-kind piece. No design is ever made twice. Medina is also known for its antique shops, including many in the Medina Antique Mall (on Medina Rd.) and Brothers Antique Mall (Wooster Pike). Smaller shops include Along Memory Lane Antiques, Medina Depot Antiques, Peace by Piece Gallery and Perfectly Charming. The City of Akron itself has a superb mix of malls, centers and neighborhood enclaves. Akron’s artsy Highland Square is home to hip boutiques and vintage shops. Revival carries the work of indie and local artists, but it is also a consignment, secondhand and vintage store where you just may find that perfect 1950s-era dinette as well as 1970s Gucci goods. It also carries hip

INNOVATOR

Shopping with a Conscience

Goodwill’s blue boutiques, with locations in downtown Akron and Kent, offer new and gently used designer clothing, shoes and accessories for women, men and children, in an environment you wouldn’t necessarily expect from a Goodwill store. There are now 60 blue stores across the country. If you’re looking for cool vintage clothing, don’t worry. The boutiques still offer great slightly used clothing, but limited to a smaller selection of hand-selected items, in an easier, more comfortable environment. Proceeds from local Goodwill stores help to provide job services and training to about 10,000 people in the Greater Akron area each year (goodwillakron.org).

SHANE WYNN

Urban Buzz is a beeswax candle company dedicated to providing 100 percent natural clean-burning candles. Kaley Foster, the “Queen Bee” behind the label, purchases her beeswax exclusively from local apiaries. Purchasing materials locally has enabled her to create the 100 percent natural beeswax candles here in Akron. “Our focus isn’t just selling candles. We are passionate about engaging with our customers and providing inspiration and motivation for them to live their dream, thus, creating a more vibrant, thriving and engaged Akron for us to live in.” (urbnbuzz.com)

blue boutiques

Neighbors Apparel, Akron, provides local refugee women a chance to make and provide handmade goods with their authentic fabrics, giving them a sense of dignity and an income. Neighbors Apparel won a $30,000 grant through a competition called SEAChange NEO in the summer of 2016. They will use the grant to expand their sales team, hire a designer and crank out new products for the holiday season. They currently have four part-time refugee seamstresses, all from the Southeast Asia region, and hope to create at least one more full-time position by the 2016 holiday season (neighborsapparel.com). 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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SPECIALTY SHOPPING Akron souvenirs, such as tire magnets and t-shirts with insider slogans. Goodwill’s new boutique store, blue, opened on S. Main St. in 2015, offering vintage shopping in a more upscale venue. The Market Path is a global wonderland, with jewelry and home goods from all corners of the world. The Market Path is a merchant with a mission. The creation of a west Akron pastor, it’s a fair trade store that helps people in poverty—mainly mothers who are on the road to economic stability. The Mustard Seed Market and Café (867 W. Market St.) is the newest Highland Square addition. The store is the third Mustard Seed location. The flagship store is in Greater Akron’s Montrose area, 3885 Medina Rd. The Highland Square location offers healthy, fresh and organic foods as well as vitamins and assorted home goods. The second-floor café offers elegant meals and juice drinks created from the market’s offerings, and the outdoor patio is hip for both work and relaxing. All stores have an extensive

wine and beer selection in both the market and the café. The family-owned Mustard Seed, founded in 1981, is the largest locally owned natural and organic retailer in Ohio. It also provides education and information on food issues and the environment. When downtown, make sure to visit Rubber City Clothing at 18 N. High St., where you can find apparel and accessories that promote Akron in funky, fun ways, including lots of new LeBron gear. In the Orangerie Mall at 76 S. Main St., NOTO brings city style to Akron, offering locally, USA-made contemporary women’s fashion. A must for shoppers is the Don Drumm Studios and Gallery at 437 Crouse St., near The University of Akron campus, featuring the work of North American artists, including that of the locally legendary Drumm himself. You’ll see Drumm’s work, from sculptures to decorative freeway sound walls, all around Greater Akron. Drumm set up his studio near UA in 1960. In 1971, together with his wife, Lisa Drumm, he expanded the studio to incorporate a one-room gallery. Since then, the

enterprise has grown extensively and now embraces eight buildings, providing gallery facilities for over 500 artists and studio space for three resident artists.

FOOD SELLERS

West Point Market. Although the grocer, an internationally honored gourmet retailer, closed its landmark Akron location in 2016, fans of its legendary Killer Brownies need not fear. The first phase of the reinvented West Point, including a wine department with a bar, is expected to open in late October 2016 in Fairlawn, at 33 Shiawassee Ave., just two miles west of its old Akron store. Until then, the store still offers its many specialties online and in kiosks around Greater Akron (westpointmarket.com). Hattie’s Food Hub opened in spring 2015 in a former vacant lot near the Akron Zoo. The 4,400 square-foot facility is an innovative food processing hub and store operated by people with developmental disabilities. The hub houses a produce processing kitchen, community space and a market. It employs and trains people to collect produce from its community gardens and farmers and then to do the washing, preparing, flash freezing ement Core Values And Drivers ternational nonprofit • Youth Education and Leadership Development and packaging (hattielarlham.org). s to build knowledge • Family Engagement and Enrichment • Honesty, Hattie’s Cafe & Gifts makes its eaningful experiences Integrity and Perseverance • Innovation and and fair and Entrepreneurship • Teamwork and Collaboration own unique coffees, sauces, jams, tition. • Mentoring • Volunteerism • Commitment to Community relishes, pickles and snacks. Their Youth Development gift baskets are assembled by adults Education Races Derby Downs Events Other Kids Events with developmental disabilities, and Junior Committee Kids Fun Day ade School/Middle School Race United Way Corporate Derby Challenge Building tomorrow’s leaders through Presented by Fallsway Equipment Company A free event just for kids. Each kid will have ap Box Derby cars are placed into middle purchases support Hattie Larlham’s mentorship and training. Soap Box Derby A high-energy event that ignites a team’s the unique experience to try out Soap Box ool environments (classrooms, after competitors lead and teach by example theworks training program. Hattie’s competitive fire as they collaborate, assemble, Derby racing in an official Soap Box Derby. ool, clubs) where teams of up to 10 kids values of sportsmanship, responsibility and decorate and compete in an entertaining race Free food and other fun activities can be nstruct, test and fine-tune their cars. They Food Hub, with Hattie’s Gardens, leadership. The members help with race-day with their own Adult “vintage” Soap Box offered. n race against other teams. operations, mentorship of new drivers and Derby car. It’s a great team-building event theAnd aquaponics program and Hattie’s TheMission FirstEnergy All-American Soap Statement Core Values Drivers families. They provide leadership through where teams race to see who is crowned STEM Summer Camp gh School Open Class Race The SoapBox Box Derby is “Corporate an international nonprofit • Youth Education and Leadership Development Derby World Championship community service, fundraising, promotional Cafe & Gifts, are part of a sustainable Derby Champion.” The Soap Box Derby STEM Summer ap Box Derby Car chassis (floorboard, organization whose mission is to build knowledge • Family Engagement and Enrichment • Honesty, events and engagement. The Committee Program is designed for kids ages 9-12. This es, wheels, steering and braking systems) more... agriculture loop. and character, and to createrace meaningfuland experiences and Perseverance • Innovation and is responsible for creatingIntegrity fundraising Senior Day five-day program gives kids the opportunity placed into high school classrooms. through collaboration and fair and Entrepreneurship • Teamwork and Collaboration opportunities, planning non-Derby Presented by Cleveland Clinic Akron General to: construct and race a Soap Box Derby car, e students are given a list of rules and Acme Fresh Market (17 locations in honestRacing competition. • Mentoring • Volunteerism • Commitment to Community •  Gravity Challenge engagement activities and helping the Derby Cross it off the bucket list! Seniors are invited make friends and be part of a racing team, terials that can be used in the design and Greater Akron and Stow). Acme Stores, carry out its mission of creating meaningful to the track to race in adult sized Soap Box STEM Team Competition design, build, race, and take home a Mini nstruction of the body. They then race experiences. This can be done both on and Derby cars. It’s a fun-filled day at the track Youth Development Soap BoxDerby car. Invite family and friends to inst otherAll-American high school teams. Races Education Races Downs Events Other Kids Events under the leadership of the Albrecht •  FirstEnergy All-American off the track. for older adults to act like kids again. Friday’s picnic, races, and awards ceremony, Soap Box Derby showcase yourCorporate team’s STEM raceChallenge week family, been feeding Greater Juniorhave Committee Kids Fun Day Local Race Grade School/Middle School Race United Way Derby ™ into middle achievements, participate in a variety of fun, Building tomorrow’s leaders through Derby Challenge Presented by Fallsway Equipment Company A free event just for kids. Each kid will have A Local Race is held annually•  byCorporate a Soap Box Soap Box Derby cars are placed Akron families forSoap more than 120 STEM projects. mentorship and training. Box Derby A high-energy event that ignites a team’s the unique experience to try out Soap Box Derby® licensed Local Race Organization. A school environments afterDay hands-on Inclusion •  STEM Summer Camp • (classrooms, competitors and teach carry by examplegourmet the competitive fire as they collaborate, assemble, Derby racing in an official Soap Box Derby.years. participant is required to enter and compete school, clubs) where teams of up to 10 kids Thelead stores and values of sportsmanship, responsibility and decorate and compete in an entertaining race •  Senior Day • orFamily Dayconstruct, test and fine-tune Free food and other fun activities can be n the Local Race closest to his her their cars. They homemade itemshelp aswithwell as everyday leadership. The members race-day with their own Adult “vintage” Soap Box offered. residence. then race against other teams. •  Private Events Derby car. It’s a great team-building event •  Kids Day operations, mentorship of new drivers and necessities. families. They provide leadership through where teams race to see who is crowned STEM Summer Camp Rally Race High School Open Class Race community service, fundraising, promotional “Corporate Derby Champion.” The Soap Box Derby STEM Summer The Rally Race Program allows participants Soap Box Derby Car chassis (floorboard, Buehler’s was founded in 1929 events and engagement. The Committee Program is designed for kids ages 9-12. This o earn points by racing in various Rally axles, wheels, steering and braking systems) responsible for creating fundraising andis has four stores in the Greater Senior Day ni Soap Box Derby five-day program gives kids the opportunity Races throughout the Cars United States and are placed into high school classrooms. opportunities, planning non-Derby Presented by Cleveland Clinic Akron General ade school children assemble, decorateraces and to: construct and race a Soap Box Derby car, Canada. A participant in this program The students are given a list of rules and region plus several others in engagement activities and helping the Derby Cross it off the bucket list! Seniors are invited make friends and be part of a racing team,Akron e 1/13 scaletoMini Box Derby cars. year-round win aSoap “Rally Regional Title.” materials that can be used in the design and carry out areas. its mission ofItcreating meaningful to the track to race in adult sized Soap Box design, build, race, and take home a Mini outlying Racers can compete in as many Rally Races as construction of the body. They then race prides itself on selling experiences. This can be done both on and Family Derby cars. It’s a fun-filled day at the track Soap Box car. Invite family and friends to ehey Derby’s STEM-based Education wish during the course of one season. againstDay other high school teams. off the track. for older adults to act like kids again. Presented by the City of Akron locally grown products, Friday’s picnic, races, and awards ceremony,sustainable, ogram uses the tools and values of Soap Family members young and old race against showcase your team’s STEM race week x Derby racing to introduce Science, gluten-free options and alternative fuel each other in adult sized and kid-sized cars. achievements, participate in a variety of fun, hnology, Engineering and Math to A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for multi hands-on STEM projects. dents in an enjoyable, engaging way. sources. generations.

Super Kids Super Kids is a Local Soap Box Derby race for physically and mentally challenged children. Local races are held throughout the year.

The winners of each Local Race, Super Kids Race and the top Rally point earners xp e n each region are invited 22 to the E FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby World Championship to compete against other

SHANE WYNN

789 Derby Downs Drive Akron, OH 44306 330.733.8723 | soapboxderby.org Mini Soap Box Derby Cars Grade school children assemble, decorate and race 1/13 scale Mini Soap Box Derby cars. The Derby’s STEM-based Education

Family Day

Box Derby racing to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering and Math to

Family members young and old race against each other in adult sized and kid-sized cars.

by the City of Akron r i Program e n c uses e the G tools r eand a values t e rof Soap A k r oPresented n

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COURTESY OF AKRON ZOO

FAMILY OUTINGS

Snow leopard cubs at the Akron Zoo

FAMILYFRIENDLY FUN FROM THE AKRON ZOO TO THE SCENIC RAILROAD AND SOAP BOX DERBY, THE AREA ATTRACTS VISITORS FROM ACROSS THE NATION

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reater Akron is definitely a great place to raise a family. There are tons of activities to keep everyone entertained. We’ve listed some of the best ideas here, but you’ll find others throughout the magazine.

AKRON ZOO The Akron Zoo is a nonprofit, world conservation zoo, with over 700 animals from around the world. The snow leopard cubs—Layan, Attai and Asha—born in March 2016, are currently the zoo’s most popular exhibit. The cubs’ naming contest, which was sponsored by Akron Children’s Hospital, yielded 6,710 submissions, making it the largest naming contest in the history of the zoo. Also in 2016, the first Chilean flamingo chick hatched and went on exhibit with the zoo’s other 23 Chilean flamingoes in the Legends of the Wild exhibit. 20 1 6 -20 1 7

Nature’s Play has five activities that encourage visitors to test their abilities against those of primates. This free play space is located between the tiger and red panda exhibits. Located just west of downtown Akron, the zoo strives to provide a dynamic, financially responsible, guest-centered animal experience that is energized by innovation and fun. The Akron Zoo is open daily and is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

THE CUYAHOGA VALLEY SCENIC RAILROAD This one-of-a-kind railway winds its way through the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area and alongside an historic canal. Stops are made for shopping, eating, biking, hiking or sightseeing. You can board your bike and ride one-way to one of the Towpath Trail stops for only $3, or sign up for a longer adventure including

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FAMILY OUTINGS wine and beer tastings, a murdermystery tour and various other theme dinners. Special events for children and families include the Polar Express tour held every winter. The train follows the route of the popular movie with the same name.

ALL-AMERICAN SOAP BOX DERBY Each July, hundreds of boys and girls from nearly every state and several countries converge at Akron’s Derby Downs to compete in the Derby. For 81 years, the FirstEnergy All-American Soap Box Derby has made Akron its permanent world headquarters. Before you start building your car, however, check the official website, soapboxderby.org, for rule changes. The track is also open year-round for luge practice, corporate events and other non-derby festivities.

AKRON ART MUSEUM GARDEN The Bud and Susie Rogers Garden opened in July 2016 and is open to the public, even when the museum is closed. The garden is located on an acre of green space between Broadway

and High Sts. The museum plans to use the garden as a studio for artists to work.

AKRON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM Due to the success of the 2015-16 Holiday pop-up site (the temporary site welcomed 9,500 visitors in one season), Akron Children’s Museum and the City of Akron are opening an expanded museum in late 2016 at Lock 3. The mission of the museum is to be a fun place for kids where play inspires exploration, discovery and problem solving.

GLOBAL VILLAGE FESTIVAL In September, the Global Village Festival of Greater Akron celebrates the ethnic heritage and international diversity of Greater Akron at Lock 3 in downtown Akron. Local cultural societies, councils and microcommunity groups are invited to communicate their traditions and values. The event boasts of beautiful traditional wardrobes, performances and interactive activities including fitness exploration (e.g. Zumba, Bokwa, Tai Chi, Yoga, hooping, bellydance) for

enthusiastic festival attendees. The festival also hosts forums to discuss misconceptions about immigration, race and religion. Other attractions include food, merchandise, sales of and information about fair trade products and a farmers’ market.

FREE SUMMER CONCERTS AND OTHER NO-COST ACTIVITIES The City of Akron sponsors free concerts by area bands in the summer throughout the city at neighborhood parks including Hardesty Park, Firestone Park, Shadyside Park, Cascade Plaza, the Akron Art Museum, Goodyear Heights Metro Park and Lock 3 and Lock 4. Many parks include playgrounds where the kids can burn off some energy while the parents listen to the tunes. There’s also the Heinz Poll Ballet in the Parks series and outdoor movie nights in all kinds of places, including Akron’s historic Glendale Cemetery. Head to North Canton (about 15 minutes south) for a tour of the Harry London Candies Inc. Chocolate Factory. Its 45-minute tours let you view the production floor and wind up in the largest chocolate store in the Midwest, with more than 500 types of gourmet chocolates and candies, so you will have plenty of opportunity to satisfy your sweet tooth. Reservations are required.

HOLIDAY FUN

Enjoy a Year of Adventure YOU’VE NEVER BEEN THIS CLOSE! akronzoo.org

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An Akron Zoo membership let’s you get noseto-nose with hundreds of animals. You’ll enjoy free admission to the Akron Zoo, discounts at other zoos and aquariums nationwide, special members-only pricing for events and more!

Santa kicks off the holiday season in November each year in the Welcome Santa Parade. Come watch the floats and bands as they march down Main St. in this traditional downtown Akron event. The John S. Knight Center in downtown Akron hosts the annual Holiday Tree Festival. More than 150 donated decorated trees and wreaths are on display each year, attracting more than 200,000 visitors to this free event. Purchase of the trees and other holiday items benefit Akron Children’s Hospital. First Night Akron is a family-friendly, alcohol-free New Year’s Eve celebration. Children can create art, watch jugglers and other performers, see science demonstrations, ice skate and witness fireworks set off at 8:30 p.m. The fun runs from 6 p.m. to midnight, with fireworks repeated at midnight. Admission is free for children under 10.

Visit akronzoo.org to become a member today!

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FAMILY-FRIENDLY SPORTS

King James Shooting Stars Classic

GAMES FOR ALL AGES GOLFING, SKIING, HORSEBACK RIDING . . . THE AREA HAS (MORE THAN) A BIT OF EVERYTHING

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kron has pretty much anything you desire, whether you are just looking for exercise or a true athletic experience.

SWIMMING There are many options for swimming. Today’s YMCA with their Olympic-size pools, coffee bars, libraries, modern fitness equipment and water parks are a whole new breed. Membership at one Y allows you to visit all the others in the region at any time. Reciprocal facilities vary, so call first. Water Works Family Aquatic Center in Cuyahoga Falls is a great spot to cool down in the summer. It’s a half million gallons of fun where guests can float on a lazy river, shoot down the drop or flume slides, swim laps or just sit back and enjoy the beautiful zerodepth pool and landscaping. Poolside cabanas can be rented for the day. The park is open to all, but Cuyahoga Falls residents get discounted admission. 20 1 6 -20 1 7

If you’re into swimming with nature, try Monroe Falls Metro Park or Silver Creek Park in Norton. They offer lake swimming (dogpaddling, but no dogs, allowed in lake), picnic areas, pedal boat rentals and play areas. Admission is charged for entrance to the lake area each summer. Lifeguards are on duty, and a first aid station and snack stand are available at both. Monroe Falls also offers soccer as well as basketball, volleyball and tennis courts. Membership in the Shaw Jewish Community Center in west Akron is open to people of all walks of life and features indoor and outdoor pools, fitness facilities and more. Medina County Recreation Center, a complete fitness facility, has a leisure pool with geysers and a 129-foot slide. Cuyahoga Falls Natatorium has two pools for serious swimming, a therapy pool, an indoor water park, various aerobic classes and weight and training equipment, plus areas for just relaxing.

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FAMILY-FRIENDLY SPORTS

CLEVELAND CLINIC AKRON GENERAL The two Wellness Centers run by Cleveland Clinic Akron General have spacious pools and workout rooms and fitness classes. Family memberships are available at a discount.

HOOPS

bus services

In April, school-age basketball players from across the country come to Akron for the King James Shooting Stars Classic tournament sponsored by LeBron James. Also, The University of Akron Head Coach Keith Dambrot runs a basketball clinic for youth during the off-season of his Zips. Programs include the Zips Basketball School for boys and girls.

FENCING

trip planner

The Kiraly Fencing Academy near downtown Akron offers classes in Japanese and European fencing and martial arts. It holds special classes for children 12 and under and teen and adult classes. Its home is an old building on N. Howard St. that has been renovated to look like a 15th century castle. Kent State University also has a fencing club open to the community.

HORSEBACK RIDING

schedules

Greater Akron has riding academies and farms that offer horseback riding lessons (horses provided) and stables, including Bath Equestrian Center in Akron, and White Horse Farms in Streetsboro, among many others. Cuyahoga Valley National Park has seven bridle trails that vary in length and difficulty, from less than a mile to nearly five miles.

ICE SKATING, SKATEBOARDING Ice skating fans will find many free outdoor rinks in the area in the winter, including one in downtown Akron and another in Cuyahoga Falls. For indoor skating, Kent State University’s ice rink is open to the public all year for skating and hockey, as is Center Ice Sports Complex near the Akron-Canton Airport. If you have a skateboarder in the family, visit the Akron Skate Park, near Derby Downs, on the east side of town. It was designed with the help of skateboarders ages 8-18. It covers 19,000 square feet of fiberglassreinforced concrete and includes bowls, a pyramid, spines and quarter pipes. A BMX Bike track for stunt and bike racing is adjacent to the skate park. Both are free and open to all. 26 E x p e r i e n c e

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GOLFING There are dozens of public golf courses in the Greater Akron area—from Loyal Oak in Norton to Turkeyfoot in New Franklin. Mud Run Golf Course is a City of Akronowned and operated public facility and home of the First Tee of Akron. This 9-hole, par-34 golf course boasts a state-of-the-art practice driving range, chipping and pitching green and 9-hole putting green. In addition, the property has a spacious clubhouse and outdoor covered picnic area. The First Tee program provides affordable golf facilities for those with no or little previous exposure to the game.

SKIING, TUBING, SLEDDING Boston Mills/Brandywine in Peninsula is the biggest ski resort in Ohio. Nearby and on the mountain, you can find lodging, shops, services, bars and restaurants. There is also a ski school and daily lessons available for beginners or those wanting to sharpen their skills. Skiing at Boston Mills/ Brandywine includes more than 15 trails with quad and triple chairlifts and surface lifts. Trails range in variety from beginner to expert. All-day, morning, half-day, evening and late-night skiing are available. The resort also features snow tubing at Polar Blast, with up to 20 tubing lanes to plummet down. The area also includes sledding hills, but particular favorites are those at Monroe Falls Metro Park and Goodyear Metro Park in Akron. g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


PHOTO BY DAVID MONSEUR

VENUES FOR VICTORY

Canal Park

GAME ON! THE CITY’S FIRESTONE COUNTRY CLUB IS HOME TO THE WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP, BUT YOUNGER PLAYERS COME FROM ALL OVER THE NATION EVERY JULY TO THE ALL-AMERICAN SOAP BOX DERBY

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ortheast Ohio is wild about sports; whether winning or losing, our fans are diehard. You’ll find many venues in Greater Akron and a few miles beyond to cheer on your favorite teams.

FIRESTONE STADIUM Firestone Stadium is the home of the Akron Racers, the city’s National Pro Fastpitch softball team. The stadium was built in 1924 and dedicated on July 25, 1925, by Harvey S. Firestone Sr., founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company. It was upgraded in 1998 when Firestone donated the stadium to the City of Akron and is undergoing a $1.5 million makeover. The stadium in Akron’s Firestone Park neighborhood has hosted local, regional, state and national events, and drawn thousands of visitors to the city. The project goal is to give back to the community and provide an opportunity for young girls and women to learn and play softball. 20 1 6 -20 1 7

The 80-by-160-foot indoor facility is the centerpiece of the project and will permit players to train year-round without worrying about the Northeast Ohio weather.

SUMMA FIELD AT INFOCISION STADIUM The University of Akron’s $70 million football stadium stands at the heart of the UA campus. The stadium seats 33,000 fans with room for an 11,000seat future expansion. It includes 522 club seats, 38 loges, 17 suites and a presidential suite for 52. It also features state-of-the-art locker rooms and sports medicine facilities. This exciting venue makes it a pleasure to come cheer your Division I Zips to victory!

CUB CADET FIELD AT FIRSTENERGY STADIUM If you like soccer, Akron is a fan paradise. Since 2007, The University of Akron Division I men’s soccer

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VENUES FOR VICTORY program has posted a winning record. Completely revamped in 2010, the soccer stadium and field at UA is home to both the men’s and women’s teams. A two-tiered grandstand with chair-back and bleacher-back seats and team meeting rooms surrounds the field. The men’s soccer team won the NCAA Championship in 2010, the school’s first national championship team in any sport.

CANAL PARK The Akron RubberDucks, the Double-A Affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, play at beautiful Canal Park in downtown Akron. Canal Park has 25 luxury suites; The Game Grill+Bar, which is a full-service restaurant open on game days; the Duck Club, a private event space; picnic areas in both fields; and a Tiki Bar. Nightly promotions throughout the 71 home games each season provide familyfriendly entertainment, including Fireworks Friday, Giveway Saturday, and Sunday Family FUN days with kids allowed to play catch on the field before the game and run the bases after the game. Many of the players are just a step away from making their break in the MLB with the Indians, while many Cleveland Indians players come to Akron to get back in shape after an injury. For the first time, Akron was selected to host the 2016 Eastern League All-Star Game held in July 2016. September fun? Don’t miss the Annual Ballpark Festival of Beers on September 17, 2016. Visit akronrubberducks.com for promotions and schedule.

This Center was built in 1952 in honor of the brave Kent State students and alumni who fought in World War II. It hosts Golden Flashes basketball, gymnastics, volleyball and wrestling events, as well as convocation and select entertainment events. The facility underwent a major facelift in the 1990s, including a name change from Memorial Gymnasium to the MAC Center. Along with interior renovations, including team rooms, galleries, trophy rooms and an improved fan experience, the exterior features an inviting façade to welcome Kent State students, alumni and fans.

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Located on the outskirts of Akron, Firestone Country Club has the finest 54 holes of golf of any private club in the country. The country club’s water tower is a familiar sight to fans who associate it with some of the best professional golf in the game’s history. Firestone’s renowned South Course is an 18-hole championship course redesigned by the famed Robert Trent Jones in 1960. Over the years, it has hosted numerous pro tournaments, including several PGA championships. Each summer, Firestone hosts the World Golf Championship-Bridgestone Invitational, which features top-

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includes the Gravity Racing Challenge® STEM Team Competition, the Soap Box Derby Mini-Car Program and Soap Box Derby STEM Summer Camps. The derby’s track is now open for corporate events and other outside activities. Reserve through the Derby office.

AKRON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AKRON MARATHON SERIES Since the Akron Marathon started 14 years ago with 3,775 participants, events and community support have grown, resulting in the Akron Children’s Hospital Akron Marathon Series with three events, over 20,000 participants, 4,000 volunteers and 120,000 spectators. All together, the group of three runs is called the Rubber City Race Series. Events include an 8K & 1 Mile, Half Marathon & 10K, and the Akron Marathon, Half Marathon, & Team Relay, the Kids Fun Run and the Health & Fitness Expo.

CLEVELAND BROWNS STADIUM

Summa Field at InfoCision Stadium

ranked PGA players. Bridgestone has extended its title sponsorship of the World Golf Championships event that will keep the $8.75 million tournament in Akron through 2018.

DERBY DOWNS

MEMORIAL ATHLETIC AND CONVOCATION CENTER (KENT STATE UNIVERSITY)

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FIRESTONE COUNTRY CLUB

Derby Downs, in east Akron, has been the home of the All-American Soap Box Derby since 1936. Each July, hundreds of children from across the United States and several countries meet for a week of fun and competition at the original gravity games. National Geographic and USA Today called it an “icon” of Americana and a great stop on any family vacation. FirstEnergy Corp. became the Derby’s title sponsor in 2012. The Derby’s Education Program uses the tools and values of Soap Box Derby® racing to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) to students in an engaging way. The education program began in 2010 and has rapidly grown; more than 350 classrooms in the United States use the program. It

The home of the NFL’s Cleveland Browns, the Stadium opened in 1999 on the site of the old Municipal Stadium on Lake Erie’s shore. To keep traditions going, the new playing field runs east to west, just like the old one, and the infamous “Dawg Pound” can still be found on the east side of the stadium. The stadium has acquired some new neighbors over the years, though— notably the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and the Great Lakes Science Center.

PROGRESSIVE FIELD Home of the American League’s Cleveland Indians, this world-class facility was created expressly for baseball and designed specifically for Cleveland. This urban ballpark and Cleveland landmark offers a fan-friendly facility with an intimate environment. The 35,225 seats in the ballpark are angled toward home plate, and bullpens are raised above the field so fans can watch the pitchers warm up. Go Tribe!

QUICKEN LOANS ARENA This high-tech arena is the home of the NBA’s World Champion Cleveland Cavaliers, the AHL’s Cleveland Monsters, and the AFL’s Cleveland Gladiators and host to the best entertainment in the region. The “Q” welcomes nearly 1.5 million fans to 200-plus events each year, including world-class concerts and family shows. g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


GREATER AKRON PARKS

Cuyahoga Valley National Park

THE GREAT OUTDOORS THERE’S A REASON WHY VISITORS COME FROM ALL OVER THE REGION TO VISIT GREATER AKRON’S PARKS AND RECREATION AREAS

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reater Akron is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts. Outdoor exercise suddenly becomes seamless on the newly finished 34-mile Bike and Hike Trail, part of Summit Metro Parks. The Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail is a destination point for bikers, joggers—and those who just want to stroll on the paved, shaded path that follows the route of the canal. Our Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP), the only national park in Ohio, is among the top 10 most visited national parks and was voted among the top nationally to visit by CNN in 2016. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. It draws nearly as many visitors each year as Yosemite National Park and many more than the White House. The CVNP is accessible from several highways, including I-77, I-271, I-80 and State Route 8. The winding Cuyahoga River forms the backbone 20 1 6 -20 1 7

of this park of nearly 33,000 acres. Some 250 historic structures, including residences and farms, are located in the park, in addition to the nationally significant Ohio & Erie Canal and the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railway. Brandywine Falls is a favorite spot of park visitors. The 60-foot falls were carved by Brandywine Creek, and a boardwalk lets one see the waterfall head-on. Also visit the smaller, quieter Buttermilk Falls and Blue Hen Falls when you’re in a more contemplative mood. In addition to the CNVP, there are dozens of other spectacular parks in the region. We’re sure you’ll enjoy discovering your own special spot. Your happy place is closer than you think.

SUMMIT COUNTY Summit Metro Parks manages 14,100 acres devoted to natural resources and recreation. The system maintains 16 developed parks and 125

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GREATER AKRON PARKS miles of trails, including the 34-mile Bike & Hike Trail and 22.4 miles of the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail. District-wide attendance in 2015 was nearly five million visits. Annually, an estimated 50,000 people enjoy the park’s Fall Hiking Spree. The park system also coordinates the awardwinning Spree for All, a hiking series for people of all abilities, as well as the Summer Biking Spree, a go-at-yourpace pedaling tour of sections of the multi-purpose trails. In the summer of 2015, the system launched its Running Spree, a program similar to its Hiking Spree and a reflection of its position as official training partner of the Akron Children’s Hospital Akron Marathon Series (which ends with the Akron Marathon). The county parks have always been a popular location for runners and walkers. And, on average, more than 30,000 visitors enjoy programs and hikes led by naturalists each year. In July 2015, Summit Metro Parks took over the 811-acre Nimisila Reservoir in southern Summit County and 200 acres of surrounding parkland from the state. Stay tuned for improvements. One of the most popular parks in Summit County is F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm (1828 Smith Rd., Akron). The 104-acre Nature Realm is managed by Summit Metro Parks and features a 10,000-square-foot visitor center that includes interactive exhibits of animals and plants native to our region. It’s a great outdoor classroom for kids. There are also several gardens, observation decks, two ponds, hiking trails and a tall-grass prairie. Adjacent to the Nature Realm is Sand Run Metro Park (1350 Sand Run Pkwy., Akron), which features a soccer field, several hiking and jogging trails and areas for sledding and ice skating. There’s even a par-course trail that guides visitors through a workout. One pavilion and one open-air shelter can be reserved. The small Old Portage Shelter is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Hampton Hills Metro Park (2092 Theiss Rd., Akron), which opened in 2016, is the first mountain bike trail in Summit Metro Parks, nearly seven miles long. As the expansion continues beyond 2016, the Hampton Hills Mountain Bike Area will have up to 16 miles of trails to explore by bike. The area is for mountain bikes only, and helmets are required. Pedestrians and pets are prohibited. 30 E x p e r i e n c e

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Combined with the expanding East Rim Trail in Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which will eventually reach 10 miles long, Akron is set to become a regional destination for the sport. Deep Lock Quarry Metro Park (5779 Riverview Rd., Peninsula) includes a picnic area, fishing access to the Cuyahoga River and access to the Towpath Trail. The 1.2-mile Quarry Trail takes visitors through the forest to the old quarry. Historic millstones are scattered along the way. The 34-mile Bike & Hike Trail (various trailheads in Stow and surrounding areas) is the longest trail managed by the Summit Metro Parks. This paved trail follows the course of the old Akron, Bedford & Cleveland Railroad, which was the longest electric railroad of its kind when it was built in 1895. Silver Creek Metro Park (5000 Hometown Rd., Norton) offers lake swimming, hiking and bridle trails,

Hampton Hills Metro Park

pedal boat rental, fishing docks and the Pheasant Run Shelter. Admission is charged for entrance to the summer swimming area, and the shelter must be reserved. The bathhouse includes restrooms, changing areas and lockers. Lifeguards are on duty, and a first-aid station and snack stand are available. The park includes picnic sites adjacent to the beach, a children’s play structure and a walkway for wheelchair access to the water’s edge. Fishing is permitted within designated areas along the lakeshore. Liberty Park (9999 Liberty Rd., Twinsburg), in the northeast corner of Summit County, is a 3,000-square-mile joint venture of Summit Metro Parks and the City of Twinsburg. Together they purchased woodlands, pastures, wetlands and pristine walls of sandstone that are more than 80 feet tall in some places. A six-foot-tall black bear greets visitors to the new Liberty Park Nature Center. The bear’s tracks are found in the concrete walkway that leads to the $3 million facility. The building includes 3,900 square feet of space. Nearby is a picnic shelter, an outdoor amphitheater, a campfire area, a plaza surrounded by

ponds and two new hiking trails. Silver Springs Park (5070 Stow Rd., Stow) is home to Bow Wow Beach, an off-leash park. It includes more than seven acres of enclosed land with grassy hills and a sandy beach that surround a three-acre lake with a jumping dock just for Fido. The beach area is closed in the winter, but dogs can still run around all year or try the agility course that was built by volunteers. Portage Lakes State Park (5031 Manchester Rd., Akron). Eight lakes encompass 2,034 acres at Portage Lakes State Park in south Akron. Boating, swimming and fishing are popular. The park’s wetlands attract waterfowl and shorebirds. 68 nonelectric and six electric campsites are available. Two tepees are available from May through October. Canoeing and pontoon boats can be rented at nearby businesses, or you can bring your own. Virginia Kendall State Park (Trowel Rd., Peninsula). Home to the Ritchie Ledges and the Happy Days Visitor Center, Virginia Kendall has long drawn visitors to its towering sandstone walls, which were the prehistoric edge of Lake Erie. The park was developed for visitors during the Great Depression by the Civilian Conservation Corps, which built four shelters designed to harmonize with the surrounding natural patterns. The City of Akron Recreation Bureau provides dozens of facilities throughout the city, from community parks to recreation centers, sledding hills, a skating rink, soccer and softball fields, a dog park and swimming pools (akronohio.gov/cms/recreationbureau).

MEDINA COUNTY Medina County Park District, formed in 1965, maintains more than 20 parks. It holds programs all year, ranging from a fall foliage tour to stargazing parties and geocaching. Its Wolf Creek Environmental Center (6100 Ridge Rd., Sharon Center) is a 104-acre park wildlife habitat with meadows, forests, deep-water ponds, a pine plantation and wetlands. Medina City Parks and Recreation Department maintains numerous parks in the city. Memorial Park (E. Homestead Dr.) has a pool, pavilion, play structure, nine-hole disc golf course and dog park on its 10.5 acres. Fred Greenwood Park (W. Sturbridge Dr.) has 38 acres and includes a splash pad that is open Memorial Day through Labor Day (medinaoh.org/government/ departments/parks). Wadsworth has an extensive park g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


system, including 14 neighborhood parks and the spectacular Memorial Park. Wadsworth Memorial Park includes a fishing pond, paved walkways and shelters. A softball field, two tennis courts and a sand volleyball court are located near the Kaleidoscope community playground, a 14,000-square-foot wooden play area built by the community.

We’re Your Back Yard

Go out and EXPLORE!

PORTAGE COUNTY In 2014, the Portage Park District passed a levy that brought in $1.6 million a year for improvements and expansion. Portage Parks manages 1,300 acres and 14 miles of hike and bike trails, connecting communities across Portage County and with other regional trail systems. The district currently has 10 parks that provide year-round recreational opportunities (portageparkdistrict.org). Towner’s Woods Park (2296 Ravenna Rd., Franklin Township) is a naturally diverse 175-acre park that is the site of a 2,000-year-old Hopewell Indian mound. It has hiking trails, picnic shelters, sledding hills and a nationally known cross-country ski trail. Havre’s Woods Park (5555 New Milford Rd., Ravenna) provides 33 acres of woodland and recreational grounds including soccer and softball fields, playgrounds, picnic facilities, a shelter and a Vita Course with fitness stations. Fred Fuller Park (off Middlebury Rd., Kent) is made up of 56 acres that border and traverse the Cuyahoga River. It has a ball field complex, a shelter, a playground area, restrooms and a concession stand. A nature trail travels along the edge of the river the entire length of the park and connects to the John Brown Tannery Park on Stow St. West Branch State Park (5708 Esworthy Rd., Ravenna) has picnic areas and shelters, hiking trails, fishing and hunting areas, trails for snowmobiling and cross-country skiing, a boat ramp, boat docks, a campground and a swimming beach. Nelson-Kennedy Ledges State Park (State Route 282, Garrettsville) provides a thrilling experience to visitors with its rugged cliffs and diverse plant life typical of a more northern climate. A day-use park, the ledges are popular with seasoned hikers and picnic lovers who just like a spectacular view. Tinker’s Creek State Park (10303 Aurora-Hudson Rd., Streetsboro) has cross-country skiing areas, hiking trails, a picnic shelter and a lake for ice fishing.

Hiking Biking Programs Swimming Wildlife Fishing Sledding

FOUR SEASONS OF FUN 330-865-8065 | summitmetroparks.org | #summitmetroparks

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SHANE WYNN

GREATER AKRON ARTS

Akron Art Museum

ARTS TO PLEASE ALL FROM ART WALKS TO THE HOME OF THE WORLD-FAMOUS CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA . . . AKRON’S ART SCENE IS HARD TO BEAT

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here are no gaps in Greater Akron’s art offerings. We cover it all—from indie rock to art that shocks. We’re the birthplace of the Grammy-winning blues-rock duo, The Black Keys. Our art museum, which boasts a stunning collection of modern and contemporary art, unites an historic U.S. post office with a European roof cloud. We have Shakespeare in the garden and poetry slams in the park. You get the idea. Here’s a sampling of the creative mojo in the entire Greater Akron region.

ARTSNOW ArtsNow (artsnow.org) was created as a direct result of the Summit County Arts and Culture Initiative, which was launched in 2012 under the expert guidance of the GAR Foundation and the Knight Foundation. The funders came together to get a clear understanding of the arts and culture landscape in Summit County. They 32 E x p e r i e n c e

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learned that consumers had to work too hard to find arts and culture offerings and that business values a vibrant arts and culture sector as a key tool for talent attraction and retention—yet business had felt disconnected from the arts. They discovered a central connector was needed for people to engage and connect with arts and culture. ArtsNow was born in July 2015 and launched summitlive365.com a few months later. This free resource is available for community members who want to find out dynamic events happening in the region, individual artists who are available for commission or want to showcase their work and arts/culture organizations. The calendar is organized both by date and kind of event.

OUTSIDE ART Let’s start out on foot or by trolley. On the first Saturday of each month, the Downtown Akron Artwalk features g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


nearly two dozen destinations for art appreciation, shopping, dining and entertainment with offerings that fit every budget. Hand-blown glass, pottery, ceramics, paintings, textiles, jewelry and eclectic housewares all dot the event’s footprint. The participating spaces, exhibitions, food and entertainment all change monthly. The City of Akron’s free trolley service runs the entire route, making shopping convenient and parking painless. Trolley service begins at 5 p.m. and runs through 10 p.m., and destinations open their doors between 5 and 6 p.m. Our art walls have received national attention. People arriving in downtown Akron from the south are greeted with the colorful work of artist Nathan Mayfield, thanks to the Emerging Leaders group of the Downtown Akron Partnership (DAP). Mayfield’s geometric shapes and steel panels decorate an otherwise drab barrier on Broadway near the METRO Transit Center. It joins several other “art” walls in Greater Akron, including the mural by Jessica Lofthus, on Cascade Parking Garage/ PNC Building; the funky, ginormous tat on the outside of Angel Falls Coffee Company in Highland Square and the FDR/WPA-style mural on the Linda Theatre in Goodyear Heights. In Portage County’s Kent, two supports of the Greer Bridge over Haymaker Parkway were painted with a mural in 2012, marking the area

beneath the bridge as the official home to a 40-year-old farmers’ market.

THE MUSIC SCENE Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, the summer home of the world-renowned Cleveland Orchestra, presents classical music most weekends in July and August. It also hosts numerous popular concerts each summer. You can buy seats in the pavilion or sit on a blanket on the grassy hill facing the stage. Picnics are encouraged either way! The recently restored and renovated Goodyear Theater and the adjacent Goodyear Hall re-opened in 2016 and offer a variety of year-round concerts. Jilly’s Music Room in the historic Northside District offers a sophisticated atmosphere, an eclectic light menu, craft cocktails and more than 100 beers, but the highlight of the place is live music from Wednesdays through Saturdays—the best blues, R&B, rock, indie, pop and alt-country bands, both local and national. Musica, which showcases local bands in an old garage in downtown Akron, is undergoing a makeover that promises to transform it into a downtown dance club hot spot. Outside, the Akron Art Museum features jazz concerts in its courtyard on Thursday evenings in its Downtown@Dusk series. Lock 3 Live, next door to the Akron Civic Theatre on Main Street in

TESTIMONIAL

BRAD SAVAGE

downtown Akron, features something for everyone from tribute bands to local rockers. We definitely know how to “Rock the Lock.” Its eight acres of green space provide plenty of room for getting a groove on. Adjacent to Lock 3 is the Lock 4 Lock Bottom Blues & Jazz Club, a free venue to catch popular local acts on Wednesday nights, including Wanda Hunt and the Vernon Jones Blues Cartel. Sunday evenings at Lock 4 feature the best of gospel music. Lock 4 is strictly BYOLC (bring your own lawn chair). So swing low with your sweet chair and visit the Lock Bottom for some heavenly music. Mapleside Farms in the Medina County community of Brunswick holds “Concerts Over the Valley” on Friday nights all summer. The concerts feature tribute and retro bands. Admission is $2 for adults; children 16 and under are free. Kent in Portage County is Ohio’s own music city. It has three primary festivals a year: BeatleFest in February, the Blues Fest in July, and the ’Round Town Music Festival in September. The Kent Stage, which began as a vaudeville theater in 1927, is one of the most popular small venues for touring musicians. Many Rock and Roll Hall of Famers passed through the Kent Stage on their way to international fame. The Stone Tavern and Water Street Tavern are longtime hotspots for live music and food. JBs, an old-time Kent bar, recently opened as the city’s first official gay bar. You can’t mention music in Kent without

91.3 The Summit - WAPS/Akron-Canton, 90.7 The Summit - WKTL/Youngstown, the330.net & WAPS-HD2; Program Director/Radio Specialist Moved from Charlottesville, VA to Akron in 2016.

“O

ur family was excited to relocate to Northeast Ohio because of the opportunities . . . family, career and so many things. The cost of living was favorable, and there’s a lot of people and excellent options for family. We believe that arts, music and culture are important, and Greater Akron offers all of these in abundance. I believe 91.3 The Summit can continue to immerse itself in these areas and help write the arts/music narrative for the future of Northeast Ohio. It is nice to have the amenities of Cleveland in our backyard, but make no mistake—Akron is a World-Class City!”

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GREATER AKRON ARTS TESTIMONIAL

MAC LOVE

ART x LOVE, Chief Catalyst for Creative Intelligence Moved from New York to Northwest Akron in 2015.

“L

ove brought me to Akron, but the Arts make it easy to stay. Akron excels at connecting people in unique and creative ways. As an international artist and branding professional, I’ve been comfortably impressed by the natural surroundings, talent, support and opportunities available here. Dance, theater, music, film, technology and the visual arts are all embraced and celebrated by this community. Akron recognizes the value of creative intelligence and is leveraging it to carve a singular identity and way of life. I feel incredibly fortunate to be part of a such a healthy place to live and work. Simply put, I am proud to call Akron home.”

hearing the name Woodsy’s, the largest independent, family-owned music store in Ohio. (Woodsy’s also has a Medina location.) Stop in, and you just might see one of the touring musicians trying out some new equipment.

The Kent/Blossom Music Festival is an institute for professional music training operated by Kent State University in cooperation with The Cleveland Orchestra and Blossom Music Center, presenting public

We’re a site to see!

Come visit our

two buildings & garden courtyards

filled with works by

Don Drumm studios & gallery 437 CROUSE ST. AKRON 330.253.6268

DONDRUMMSTUDIOS.COM

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SHANE WYNN

500+ artists

performances by distinguished artist faculty and talented young musicians. They hold concerts throughout the year, primarily at KSU’s Center for the Performing Arts. Many of Greater Akron’s communities feature “gazebo” concerts from jazz to pop in the summer. The City of Akron also sponsors concerts in its parks on weekday evenings during the summer. From funk to country, the city parks and you can make beautiful music together all summer long. On four Sundays in mid-summer, the parks play host to the Akron Symphony Orchestra. All city park concerts are free. The Cuyahoga Valley National Park hosts concerts in a range of styles, including country, jazz and swing. The gazebo in the middle of Medina Square hosts family-friendly musicians in a setting almost too quaint to believe. Most performances are free. The Thirsty Cowboy in Medina features country bands and line dancing, so get those boots on. Akron Symphony Orchestra, Akron Youth Orchestras and Akron Symphony Chorus have proudly served the community for more than 60 years. Maestro Christopher Wilkins is the music director. All these groups regularly perform at The University of Akron’s E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall, which seats 3,000. E.J. Thomas also hosts the annual TubaChristmas, a concert of Christmas carols played by hundreds of tuba lovers from the community and led by a man appropriately-named Tucker g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


Jolly. The annual TubaSummer concert is held by the fountain outside of E.J. Thomas, weather permitting.

THEATER Akron Civic Theatre, long recognized among the community’s cultural landmarks, is a restored 1920s Loew’s theater complete with a dazzling ceiling of ever-changing stars and clouds. One of only five atmospheric theaters in the country, the theater was built in 1929 by Marcus Loew and designed by famed theater architect, John Eberson. The interior structure was fashioned after a Moorish castle featuring Mediterranean decor, including medieval carvings and Italian alabaster sculptures. The Civic’s shows include stand-up comedy, musical productions and movie festivals.

with truffles and cakes from Sugar Luv in Cuyahoga Falls and cupcakes from Cupcake Binge in Munroe Falls. Beers include Akron’s Hoppin’ Frog and Thirsty Dog and Cleveland’s Great Lakes and Fat Heads. Cuyahoga Valley Art Center, a nonprofit organization, promotes appreciation of fine and applied arts through exhibits, programs and classes. The City of Kent has several art galleries downtown that show both student and professional work. Ballet Theatre of Ohio

VISUAL ARTS Downtown Akron’s Summit Artspace gallery showcases local artists in several exhibitions annually. The Akron Art Museum maintains one of the top collections of contemporary art in the country. Its building spans three centuries, combining a late 19th century post office with a 64,000-square-foot glass and steel addition completed in 2007 by Viennese architects Coop Himmelb(l)au. It opens its non-exhibition space for public lectures, films and meetings. The Bud and Susie Rogers Garden opened in July 2016 and is open to the public. Executive Director and CEO Mark Masuoka says, “The garden will transform an asphalt desert into an urban art oasis and a new civic commons for Akron.” The City of Akron sponsors the Arts Expo at Hardesty Park each summer. This celebration of creativity is a juried exhibition of artists and crafters who gather each July to sell their wares. Kent State University Museum specializes in fashion design and textiles and has a permanent costume collection encompassing American and European high fashion from the 18th century to the present. Upcoming special exhibits include Magical Designs for Mozart’s Magic Flute and Fashions of Southern Africa. The Nightlight Cinema at 30 N. High St. in downtown Akron is the city’s new indie film theater. It currently seats only 50 but is sold out at almost every showing—twice a day, six days a week. It recently received a grant to expand its seating by 80 percent. The concessions are Greater Akron-centric 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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THE

CLE VE L AN D ORCHESTR A FRANZ WELSER-MÖST

“The Cleveland Orchestra exemplifies the finest kind of effortless virtuosity.” —New York Times

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER MASTROIANNI

“The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the greatest in the world. The playing is perfection.” —London Guardian

Experience the world’s best . . . at home in . Northeast Ohio! Great music performed by the best orchestra, with world-famous artists. A full season of performances year-round — at Severance Hall in Cleveland and during each summer’s Blossom Festival (close to Akron in Cuyahoga Valley National Park). Explore your musical interests with the very best. From symphonic masterpieces to family concerts, today’s pop artists, and more! For tickets and more information visit:

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GREATER AKRON ARTS

DANCE Ballet Theatre of Ohio is the largest classical ballet company in Northeast Ohio. It features a broad classical and contemporary repertoire performed at a variety of venues throughout the year. Cuyahoga Valley Youth Ballet is a pre-professional dance company. The classically trained male and female dancers, ages 8-18, perform original ballets choreographed and staged by professionals. For four weekends each summer, the City of Akron holds the Heinz Poll Dance Festival, including interactive children’s programs, performed by the dancers of The University of Akron Dance Institute. RED Company (real.edge.dance) is a professional modern dance company serving Greater Akron. It was formed exclusively for the development of artistic and creative modern dance and to promote arts awareness and dance education for Greater Akron residents of all ages. It encourages professional and pre-professional dance and musical collaborations. RED holds formal dance performances for the public as well as classes, outreach performances and training. Plans for a permanent center in Akron are underway.

Akron-Summit County Public Library

LITERATURE AND MUCH MORE Akron-Summit County Public Library has a modern downtown Akron location and 17 convenient branches. It was voted one of America’s best, according to Library Journal. The library has a noted author speaker series (e.g. David Sedaris, Anne Lamott) and free or low-cost programs from yoga classes to web design. It has extensive programming for children and teens. The library is a Patent and Trademark Depository Library and, as such, offers access to resources from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in several formats, including full images of

patents granted since 1790. The library is part of the SearchOhio consortium, which allows customers to borrow materials from 17 library systems in Ohio. It also houses a core collection of materials on grant proposal writing, foundations and fundraising and holds classes on the subjects. The library is e-reader and audiophile friendly, too. Download and return. New this year: the Microbusiness Center, which provides accessible business training, educational resources and individualized direction to entrepreneurs, students and established business owners.

Sharing Our

The Greater Akron Chamber (greaterakronchamber.org) sponsors an annual awards program to recognize member businesses in Summit County for their support of arts and culture. The award is presented in collaboration with Summit County’s ArtsNow. The first award was given in late 2015 to Braun & Steidl Architects for restoring and repurposing numerous historical buildings, creating new designs and providing strong leadership and volunteer roles in Summit County arts organizations. Nominations are welcome from all Greater Akron Chamber members, and self-nominations are permitted. Forms are due in November.

A Family Story

Events • Tours Exhibits • Family Fun • Home of F.A. Seiberling, Goodyear Co-founder • 6th Largest Historic Home in the Nation • 70 Acres of Historic Gardens and Grounds • Playgarden and Butterfly Habitat 714 N. Portage Path Akron, OH 44303 330.836.5533

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SHANE WYNN

OUR BUSINESS FOCUS

Downtown Akron

FROM RUST CAME INNOVATION LOCAL INDUSTRY HAS QUIETLY TRANSFORMED FROM RUST BELT TO HIGH-TECH

M

any believe Ohio is “the heart of it all.” But for years after tire making and other manufacturing left, we weren’t sure what “it all” was. We knew this much: we could surrender to the role of the decrepit Rust Belt or transform. We chose transformation. While it’s been neither fast nor easy, it’s been real. By leveraging our expertise in material science, high-end research and production, we ignited innovation and collaboration. We are now the buckle of “The Trust Belt.” We can’t claim credit for that “Trust Belt” moniker. It came from a conference in summer 2015 put on by the Site Selection magazine people to celebrate the re-making of the industrial Midwest into a broad-based economic powerhouse.

ADVANCED MATERIALS Our knowledge of materials is deep, but it’s also broad. From the days of 38 E x p e r i e n c e

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clay sewer pipe manufacturing through the tire era to today’s spectrum of high-technology materials, Greater Akron has had a knack for making the basics better and creating the new. With the new Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company headquarters—along with the Bridgestone Americas Technical Center on Akron’s south side and Hankook Tire Akron Technical Center in Green—tires remain part of our future as well as our past. (Tires are still made here but only for NASCAR cars. In fact, NASCAR would be at a standstill without us.) But brainpower has replaced brawn as our primary driving force. Labs with high-tech equipment have replaced factory floors. We still like rubber and plastics, called polymers, which are strings of molecules that go into everything from gum to more sophisticated adhesives. Our research into advanced materials has profound ramifications at every level, literally, including a single human g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


ADVANCED MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY Greater Akron—with its long history of manufacturing—maintains a great respect for and interest in industries that make things. More than 600 metalworking, electronics, machining and polymer-linked manufacturing companies currently call the area home, producing everything from artificial joints to everyday household products. About 14 percent of workers are employed in manufacturing here, according to figures published in spring 2014 by the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Our skilled labor pool, research centers, universities, strong leadership and natural resources provide our companies with a unique combination of ingredients for success.

BIOMEDICINE For years, Greater Akron’s tire companies focused on keeping people safe on the roads. That has proven to be the foundation for entirely new types of lifesaving technologies. The healthcare industry accounts for 17 percent of Greater Akron’s employment. Greater Akron is a key part of Northeast Ohio’s worldrenowned, $14 billion healthcare industry. From 2000 to 2012, the

SHANE WYNN

cell and the well being of the planet. From nanotechnology-based adhesives to liquid crystal biosensors, we’re changing our region and the world one innovation at a time.

Downtown Akron

research expenditures here by medical institutions and universities have nearly doubled, growing to more than $660 million. Five leading medical and educational institutions joined together to create the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron. Initially fueled by a grant from the Knight Foundation in 2008, the Institute provides support for healthcare providers and biomedical researchers who are pushing the evolution of human health through materials, processes and devices. The Institute is aligned with regional biomedical commercialization efforts, including the City of Akron’s Biomedical Corridor and the Akron Global Business Accelerator. The Corridor was created to attract, assist and house biomedical companies devoted to product research, development and manufacturing. Anchored by the area’s three major hospital systems in conjunction with the biomedical, liquid crystal and polymer engineering research programs at The University of Akron, Kent State TESTIMONIAL

LAURA DUDA, APR

University and the Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), the corridor has created fertile ground for breakthroughs in healthcare materials, applications and production. For instance, NicheVision, a graduate of the Akron Global Business Accelerator, is a recognized leader for human identity software development used by forensics and post bone-marrow transplant monitoring labs. It is only one of more than a dozen companies that have found a home and support in the corridor.

RENEWABLE ENERGY Greater Akron has several companies dedicated to creating and harnessing new and renewable forms of energy crucial to our nation’s future. Many of the companies are just a few years old but hold promise for new jobs in Greater Akron and innovations for the world. In 2016, Vadxx Energy opened a $20 million plant on E. Waterloo Rd. in Akron where waste plastic is turned into EcoFuels. It is the first commercial plant of its kind in the nation.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company,
 Vice President, North America Communications Moved from Chicago to Akron in 2016.

“R

elocating to the Greater Akron area has been nothing short of wonderful. As a very welcoming community, Greater Akron offered meaningful ways for me to get involved, almost from day one. The people are friendly, and there’s a tremendous sense of civic pride about the area’s history and its amenities. As a nature lover, I find the Summit Metro Parks are second to none, and Cuyahoga Valley National Park is amazing. There are countless beautiful neighborhoods and towns to choose from—most with a remarkably easy commute. Our move to the Greater Akron area continues to exceed all expectations for my husband and me.”

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OUR BUSINESS FOCUS Sixty tons of plastic a day are creating 300 barrels per day of diesel and naphtha. That’s about three truck trailer loads worth of plastic that will be recycled instead of dumped in a landfill. Vadxx was hatched about seven years ago in the Akron Global Business Accelerator. Rockwell Automation, which has developed plastic-to-energy plants in the United Kingdom, designed the plant and oversaw its construction. RES Polyflow of Akron uses mixed dirty plastic and rubber waste to

create gasoline, diesel fuel, and, most importantly, monomers and solvents used to make polymers that are usually made from crude oil and natural gas. Polyflow believes that adoption of its patented process nationwide would reduce our dependence on foreign oil by 3.5 percent a year and cut greenhouse gas emissions by 70 percent overall. RES Polyflow officials acknowledged that Vadxx is competition but that Vadxx’s entrance into the market means the plastics-tofuel industry is getting more attention as viable recycling.

Echogen Power Systems, in the heart of downtown Akron, is a private company that commercializes waste heat for use by industry and other large consumers. Echogen has developed and is now demonstrating a 10 megawatt electricity production unit with waste heat as the “fuel.” Through the exhaust of a 25 MW gas turbine generator, the power output is significantly enhanced (by up to 10 MW) with no additional fossil fuels (heat only) and zero greenhouse gas emissions. Echogen is also a graduate of the Akron Global Business Accelerator. In 2015, members of the public and Akron city officials came together to dedicate the new Akron Renewable Energy Facility. The facility converts bio solids into electricity and heat and uses what remains after the process to produce pelletized organic fertilizer. The City of Akron has been a leader in the area of bio solid-to-electricity recycling since 2007. That year, in partnership with KB Compost Services Inc. (now KB BioEnergy), the city installed bio-digesters that turned bodily waste into enough electricity to power the wastewater treatment plant. After five years of success, the city renewed its contract with KB BioEnergy to develop a larger bio-digester facility that could accommodate 100 percent of the city’s bio-solid stream. KB BioEnergy invested $32 million for the upgrade and expansion. Now, bio-solids will be generating roughly enough electricity to power approximately 1,600 homes. The power will initially be used to run municipal operations, which will cut down on energy costs for the city while generating additional revenue through the sale of fertilizer.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Collaboration is key in the City of Akron. Companies of all sizes have access to all of the resources they need, while also tapping into Akron’s unique and supportive infrastructure. Many international industry clusters have developed and continue to thrive in our highly collaborative environment.

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The information technology (IT) industry—especially that segment devoted to healthcare—has grown rapidly in Greater Akron in the last few years. The Finland-based 7signal, which launched its U.S. operations in the Akron Global Business Accelerator, helps clients protect their wireless connections and the information that crosses them. It often pinpoints problems before the client knows they exist. It’s the first company to offer quality-assurance solutions across such a wide range, beginning with the devices we use for application-hosting services. The systems have been designed to meet the needs of clients g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


10 LARGEST EMPLOYERS IN THE GREATER AKRON REGION Summa Health

Akron

Medical Health Care Services

11,000

Akron Children’s Hospital

Akron

Medical Health Care Services

4,512

Cleveland Clinic Akron General

Akron

Medical Health Care Services

3,840

Akron Public Schools

Akron

Elementary and Secondary Schools

3,713

Summit County

Akron

Government

3,643

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company

Akron

Tire Manufacturing

3,000

Signet Jewelers Inc.

Akron

Jewelry Stores

2,870

FirstEnergy Corp.

Akron

Utilities

2,468

The University of Akron

Akron

Higher Education

2,342

Manufactures technology for nuclear, fossil and renewable power markets

1,800

Babcock & Wilcox Power Company Barberton

Source: Greater Akron Chamber, 2015-2016 Greater Akron Book of Facts

SHANE WYNN

in critical businesses such as hospital intensive care units.

DISTRIBUTION, WAREHOUSE AND TRUCKING Greater Akron began as a crucial stop on the Ohio & Erie Canal. Its National Road carried pioneers westward, and in the 20th century, it became the birthplace of the long-haul trucking industry. Today, the AkronCanton Airport is one of the fastest growing in the United States. Greater Akron remains vital to the transportation industry, and it’s not hard to figure out why. We’re the gateway to everywhere. The region is within 500 miles of 42 major U.S. cities, making it a natural hub. More than half of the nation’s retail outlets are within a day’s drive of Greater Akron, which explains, in part, why the area is home to more than 150 trucking companies as well as major warehouses and distribution centers.

Quality

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co nstructi o n servi ces SHANE WYNN

Consider this: in the last few years, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company built a 632,000-square-foot headquarters building; a mixed use development is rising around it, and most of the Akron Public Schools have undergone reconstruction or remodeling. And more than $30 million in federal stimulus money has gone into infrastructure projects in the city.

LLC

LLC constructi on servi ces c ons truc tion s e rvic e s

General Contracting | Management Construction Management | Facilities Ma General Contracting | Construction Construction Management || Facilities Facilities Management General Contracting | Management World Headquarters | 175 E. Erie| St.,175 Suite 303 | Kent, OH 44240 | www.MetisConstruction.com | 330.677.7333 World Headquarters |E. 175 E. St.,303 Suite 303 |OH Kent, OH|44240 World Headquarters Erie St.,Erie Suite | Kent, 44240 www.MetisConstruction.com | www.MetisConstruction.com | 330.677.7333

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ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

Keeven White at WhiteSpace’s new headquarters attached to the new Creative Commons

COLLABORATIVE

ECOSYSTEM THE AREA OFFERS A WEALTH OF RESOURCES FOR STARTUPS AND YOUNG COMPANIES

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T

he Greater Akron spirit that boosted many entrepreneurial companies into world-wide industries is supported by a vast, formal network made up of national, state, regional and local agencies, programs and foundations. The networks are known as “entrepreneurial ecosystems,” and Northeast Ohio has “one of America’s best,” according to a report from Entrepreneurial Engagement Ohio (EEO), a statewide initiative to provide entrepreneurial technology education in schools. The building blocks of that ecosystem date back decades. We have a well-educated, highly trained workforce that knows how to make things. We have major research universities with world-renowned expertise in polymer science, engineering, direct marketing, LCD technology, industrial psychology, bio-mimicry, advanced materials, and biomedicine, as well as a medical

school and research and teaching hospitals.

FIRED-UP STARTUPS It’s impossible to outline the region’s entire entrepreneurial ecosystem in a few paragraphs, but some recent major developments have area startups fired up as never before. The Akron Global Business Accelerator, founded in 1983, is one of the longest-operating business incubators in the country. Today, nearly 40 companies employing more than 350 people work in the Accelerator, which is located in a renovated tire factory downtown. The Accelerator offers several programs designed to help entrepreneurs in various stages of developing their companies. The Technology Company Acceleration Program (TCA) provides young technology companies with a suite of services, including coaching g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


INNOVATOR

Tia Ramlow, GreatWork! Employment Services, President “The business incorporated in late 1992, and I joined the fledgling company started by my parents 16 months later when I opened an office in Streetsboro. I took over the management of the company in 1997 when my parents moved to Florida, and I have been working to grow it ever since. Currently, I have five offices in Northeast Ohio: Akron, Canton, Streetsboro, Lakewood and Wadsworth. We partner with over 150 manufacturing and distribution companies to help them identify talent for their production lines, offices and warehouses. Once we locate top candidates, we screen and place them in what usually results in a temporary-to-hire opportunity. “As president, I started as a young professional and was selected as a 30 for the Future and 40 Under Forty honoree. Since then, I’ve had excellent leadership opportunities as a board member in organizations including the Greater Akron Chamber, Summit Educational Initiative, Ohio Chamber SBC, Akron SHRM and the Battered Women’s Shelter. In addition, I’ve been awarded a Cascade Capital Growth Award and went through the Leadership Akron Program. “Entrepreneurs in this region are given the opportunity to engage, connect and grow. The region has strong organizations that support YPs, women owners, minority businesses and startups. I am proud of Akron, the region and the leadership’s commitment to its future.”

from entrepreneurs-in-residence, equity funding, mentoring and grant assistance, and 250,000-square-feet of office, lab and light-manufacturing space. To support early-stage software and internet-based companies, the Accelerator recently opened The Bit Factory, a structured, intensive program for those entrepreneurs developing

products for computers, gaming and mobile devices (apps). The 40,000-square-foot Bits and Atoms Innovation Center will open in downtown Akron in 2017. More than $4.5 million in funding has been secured for the center, which will include high-tech equipment such as 3-D printers and co-working office and collaborative spaces to spark

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innovation by putting like-minded people together. Entrepreneurs and companies interested in learning more or applying for one of the Accelerator’s programs can visit akronaccelerator.com. From 2010 to 2016, Accelerator client companies have secured a cumulative $90 million in investments, created more than 600 high-paying jobs, and

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ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT INNOVATOR

Keeven White, WhiteSpace Creative, Rubber City Clothing Keeven White founded WhiteSpace Creative in 1994 in his spare bedroom, and now has clients such as the Akron Zoo and Akron Marathon. Two years ago he and a partner purchased Rubber City Clothing, a company dedicated to clothing . . . everything Akron! Rubber City Clothing is located in downtown Akron at 18 N. High St. and is dedicated to celebrating everything that makes the Rubber City such a great place to live. “Ideas take root and blossom in places like Akron where resources are high and barriers are low,” White says. White willingly shares his expertise through roundtable discussions and speaker engagements for both students and professionals. Passionate about giving back, he was a member of the 2014 Leadership Akron class and currently serves on several boards including the Area Agency on Aging, Boys & Girls Club of the Western Reserve and Downtown Akron Partnership. generated $185 million in sales. In February 2015, Cleveland-based JumpStart Inc. opened an Akron office, lead by Akron native Tobin Buckner. The nonprofit JumpStart provides intensive assistance to diverse, highpotential, early-stage companies. The Burton Morgan Foundation in 2013 donated $1 million to JumpStart

BUSINESS CONNECTIONS

to aid 1,500 emerging businesses in Northeast Ohio over a three-year period.

CONNECTIONS AND COLLABORATION

Tia Ramlow, chair of the Greater Akron Chamber’s Small Business Council, helps to promote and represent the interests of businesses with 250 or fewer employees within Medina, Portage and Summit counties. The Council recognizes the interests of the small business community in the tri-county area of Medina, Portage and Summit Counties, both within the Greater Akron Chamber and in the general community. The Greater Akron Chamber’s KNOW (Knowledgeable Network of Women) is a personal and professional development program onald Ins Agcy Inc With competitive rates and cDonald, Agent for businesswomen in the Greater personal service, it’s no aham Road 0-929-2500 Akron Region. Established in 2004, wonder more drivers trust With competitive rates and personal service, nmacdonald.net Meghan MacDonald InsFarm Agcy.Inc State KNOW’s mission is to cultivate talent ® rates and With competitive it’s noa wonder more drivers trust State Farm . Meghan MacDonald, Agent Like good neighbor, by reaching out to today’s women ® it’s no personal service, 756 Graham Road Ins Agcy Inc Like good neighbor, Farmand is there. State is there. State WithaFarm competitive rates executives and tomorrow’s leaders Meghan MacDonald Ins Agcy Inc wonder more drivers trust ld, Agent Bus: 330-929-2500 and CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. With competitivebyrates Meghan MacDonald, Agent it’s no ® providing a niche networking personal service, Road www.meghanmacdonald.net . personal service, it’s no 756 Graham Road State Farm 2500 opportunity Bus: 330-929-2500 wonder more drivers trust Like a good neighbor, wonder more drivers trust in a supportive environment Ride with onald.net www.meghanmacdonald.net ® ® ® for women to discuss emerging issues. Meghan MacDonald Ins Agcy Inc State is Farm there.. State Farm . State Farm

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Akron Cleveland Association of REALTORS® 9100 S. Hills Blvd., Ste. 150 Broadview Hts. 44147 (216) 901-0130 akronclevelandrealtors.com Akron Biomedical Corridor 166 S. High St., Ste. 202 Akron 44308 (330) 375-2471 akronbiomedicalcorridor.com Akron-Canton Airport 5400 Lauby Rd., NW North Canton 44720 (330) 896-2376 akroncantonairport.com Akron Development Fund, Ltd. 1 Cascade Plaza, 17th Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 376-5550 Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron (ABIA) 47 N. Main St. Akron 44308 (330) 572-7544 abiakron.org City of Akron, Economic Development Department 166 S. High St., Ste. 202 Akron 44308 (330) 375-2133 akronohio.gov Akron Global Business Accelerator 526 S. Main St., Ste. 129 Akron 44311 (330) 375-2173 akronaccelerator.com ARCHAngels (Akron Regional Change Angels) Network 411 Wolf Ledges Pkwy., Ste. 105 Akron 44311 (330) 972-6015 akronarchangels.com g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


Akron/Summit Convention and Visitors Bureau 77 E. Mill St. Akron 44308 (330) 374-7560 visitakron-summit.org Akron Urban League 440 Vernon Odom Blvd. Akron 44307 (330) 434-3101 akronurbanleague.org BioEnterprise Corp. 11000 Cedar Ave. Cleveland 44106 (216) 658-3999 bioenterprise.com Cascade Capital Corp. 1 Cascade Plaza, 7th Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 379-3160 cascadecapital.org Central Portage County Visitors & Convention Bureau P.O. Box 391 Kent 44240 (330) 697-6350 centralportage.org Community Improvement Corporation (CIC) 1 Cascade Plaza, 17th Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 376-5550 greaterakronchamber.org ConxusNEO 1040 E. Tallmadge Ave. Akron 44310 (330) 630-9970 conxusneo.jobs Development Finance Authority of Summit County 47 N. Main St., Ste. 407 Akron 44308 (330) 762-4776 developmentfinanceauthority.org Downtown Akron Partnership 103 S. High St., Greystone Hall, 4th Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 374-7676 downtownakron.com Greater Akron Chamber 1 Cascade Plaza, 17th Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 376-5550 greaterakronchamber.org Greater Akron Chamber Young Professionals Network 1 Cascade Plaza, 17th Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 376-5550 greaterakronypn.com The Home Builders Association 799 White Pond Dr., Ste. E Akron 44320 (330) 869-6800 akronhba.com

JobsOhio 41 S. High St., Ste. 1500 Columbus 43215 (614) 224-6446 jobs-ohio.com JumpStart, Inc. Cleveland—6701 Carnegie Ave., Ste. 100, Cleveland 44103 (216) 363-3400 Akron—277 E. Mill St. Akron 44308 (330) 777-2066 jumpstartinc.org City of Kent, Economic Development Department 930 Overholt Rd. P.O. Box 5192 Kent 44240 (330) 676-7582 kentohio.org Manufacturing Advocacy & Growth Network (MAGNET) 1768 E. 25th St. Cleveland 44114 (216) 391-7002 manufacturingsuccess.org Medina County Convention & Visitors Bureau 32 Public Square Medina 44256 (330) 722-5502 visitmedinacounty.com Medina County Economic Development Corp. 144 N. Broadway St. Medina 44256 (330) 722-9215 medinacounty.org City of Medina, Economic Development Department 132 N. Elmwood Ave. Medina 44256 (330) 764-3319 medinaoh.org Northeast Ohio Trade & Economic Consortium (NEOTEC) Kent State University Administrative Services Bldg., P.O. Box 5190 Kent 44242 (330) 672-4080 neotec.org Ohio Eastern Regional Office of Governor John Kasich 161 S. High St., Rm. 404 Akron 44308 (330) 643-3392 development.ohio.gov Ohio Employee Ownership Center (OEOC) Kent State University, 113 McGilvrey Hall Kent 44242 (330) 672-3028 oeockent.org

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Ohio Means Jobs—Medina County 3721 Pearl Rd. Medina 44256 (330) 723-9675 medinacountyworks.com Ohio Means Jobs—Portage County 449 S. Meridian St., 1st Fl. Ravenna 44266 (330) 296-2841 co.portage.oh.us Ohio Means Jobs—Summit County 1040 E. Tallmadge Ave. Akron 44310 (330) 633-1050 summitomj.org Ohio Small Business Development Center/Summit Medina Business Alliance 526 S. Main St., Ste. 813 Akron 44311 (330) 375-2111 akronsbdc.org Polymer Ohio 155 Commerce Park Dr., Ste. 8 Westerville 43082 (614) 776-5720 polymerohio.org Portage Development Board 217 S. Chestnut St. Ravenna 44266 (330) 297-3470 portagedevbd.org Rubber Division—American Chemical Society (ACS) 411 Wolf Ledges Pkwy., Ste. 201 Akron 44311 (330) 595-5531 rubber.org SCORE 175 S. Main St., Ste. 204 Akron 44308 (330) 379-3163 akron.score.org Summit County Department of Community and Economic Development Office 175 S. Main St., 2nd Fl. Akron 44308 (330) 643-2893 co.summit.oh.us Team NEO 1111 Superior Ave., Ste. 1600 Cleveland 44114 (216) 363-5400 teamneo.org The University of Akron Research Foundation (UARF) Goodyear Polymer Center, 170 University Circle, Ste. 312 Akron 44325 (330) 972-7840 uakron.edu/research/uarf.dot If you would like to be included in this list in the future, please contact Tammy Grimmett at (330) 237-1246 or grimmett@greaterakronchamber.org.

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YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

30 for the Future former award recipients

MAKING CONNECTIONS THE AREA’S YOUNG PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WORK TOGETHER TO CONNECT AND EMPOWER THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS

G

reater Akron Young Professionals (YP) have many resources. The challenge comes from choosing from so many vibrant organizations. Although each organization has its own unique mission, all are ultimately out to accomplish the same thing—to connect and retain the Greater Akron young professional community.

business and learning, age does not really matter! The mission of the YPN is to attract and retain talent to the Greater Akron region by connecting the next generation of leaders to each other and to the community. For more information, access ypn@greaterakronchamber.org.

Greater Akron Chamber’s Young Professionals Network

For 10 years, the 30 for the Future program has recognized stellar individuals ages 25-39 for their professional and community accomplishments in the Greater Akron region. Nominees submit comprehensive leadership documents, which are thoroughly reviewed by a selection committee. The recipients are honored at an event each fall, during which the audience is introduced to these talented young professionals through video interviews.

The Chamber’s Young Professionals Network (YPN) is an outlet for our next generation of leaders to enhance their potential so they may reach their life goals in this community. Membership in YPN helps young professionals develop new skills, meet with business leaders, provides access to volunteer opportunities and offers discounts to YPN events. Membership is $35 a year and is typically geared for ages 21 to 39, but if you’re passionate about 46 E x p e r i e n c e

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30 for the Future Awards

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Young Professionals of Akron The Young Professionals of Akron (YPA) organization is an inclusive group open to anyone “young” and growing in their careers. YPA is focused on connecting young professionals to each other and to the city through community and social events. Their bottom line: The more young professionals who are invested in Akron, the more likely they are to stay in the area and call Akron home. For more information, access ypaakron.org.

Congratulations to our 2016 30 for the Future recipients!

Downtown Akron Partnership Emerging Leaders

WILLIE COOK, Turner Construction

Downtown Akron Partnership (DAP) Emerging Leaders was established in 2010 to retain young professionals and enhance the Partnership’s mission of building and promoting a vibrant, valuable downtown. DAP includes members 35 years of age and younger from a variety of businesses and organizations. For more information, access downtownakron.com/ emergingleaders.

ROSHEADRA EDWARDS, FirstEnergy Corporation

MELISSA ADAMS, Smithers Information BILL ALBRIGHT, The Adjutant General's Department SUSAN BURNOSKI, Apple Growth Partners KATIE CARVER REED, Akron Canton Regional Foodbank and Fairlawn and Hudson Schools of Music CHIP CLUPPER, County of Summit, Executive's Office

MICHAEL EVANS, Cleveland Clinic Akron General LAVAR JACOBS, Not Just October and Metro RTA WILLY KOLLMAN, The University of Akron JENNIFER L. KRAMER, APR, Kent State University ZACHARY J. MELLION, DMD, MSD, Mellion Orthodontics ERICA MILLEN, FirstEnergy Corporation

Torchbearers Akron Torchbearers Akron was established in 2003 to strengthen the connection between Akron area nonprofits and young people and to further efforts to attract and retain young people to Greater Akron. Torchbearers’ mission is to enhance Greater Akron by identifying, developing and connecting young leaders who possess a passion to serve their community. For more information, access torchbearersakron.com.

SELENA MYERS, Stark State College ELLEN LANDER NISCHT, City of Akron AMANDA PARKER, Brouse McDowell KELLI L. PEIFFER, DO, Montrose Primary Care – PPG KENDRA C. PHILON, Meaden & Moore DAVE RICH, Community Health Center LINDSAY RIDINGER, Summit Education Initiative

Other resources

RICK ROCKICH, Acquire Investments

n United Way Young Leaders Society: uwsummit.org/young-leaders-society

JESSICA LANE ROWAN, Lane Rowan Consulting

n Young Black Professionals Coalition: ybpc.weebly.com

NATHAN D. SARGENT, Summa Health

n Mahoning Valley Young Professionals: mvypclub.com

DIANA L. SELZER, Westfield Bank

n ystark!—Canton Young Professionals: ystark.org

MICHAEL A. SFERRO, Towpath Credit Union CRAIG B. SISAK, MSPT, Summa Health at Home JAMES B. SKAKUN, Bober Markey Fedorovich ADAM SNYDER, Incept EMILIA SYKES, Ohio House of Representatives

SHANE WYNN

DAVID TALENDA, Cohen & Company STEPHANIE TOROK, Robert W. Baird & Co.

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WE HAVE IT ALL IN DOWNTOWN AKRON! EXPERIENCE THE EVENTS, RESTAURANTS, ENTERTAINMENT, RECREATION, ART

Opening 2016 at Lock 3!

Visit akronkids.org for details.

Akron's Wednesday Night Jazz Spot Akron’s family-friendly entertainment venue features weekend concerts, Akron’s largest festivals, community events and the City of Akron’s official July 4th fireworks display!

Enjoy local jazz at Lock 4, located behind the Akron Civic Theatre. Concerts start at 7 p.m. Admission is free.

lock3live.com

Daniel Horrigan, Mayor

Stage

e-magazines Browse full digital copies. One South High | Akron, Ohio 44308 | 330.376.9186 | AkronArtMuseum.org

lock3live.com

Daniel Horrigan, Mayor

Featuring upscale clothing, jewelry, shoes and accessories

GOODWILLAKRON.ORG/BLUE ICE SKATING • SLED HILL • INDOOR PUTT-PUTT

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335 S. Main Street in Akron / 234-200-0130

Akron DOWNTOWNAKRON.COM

g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g #DOWNTOWNAKRON


PHILANTHROPY & VOLUNTEERISM

Team Ethan raising funds to combat Cerebral Palsy

REPAIRING THE WORLD — ONE PERSON AT A TIME

G

reater Akronites are renowned for their generosity of heart, spirit and wallet. Why wouldn’t you want to be part of a community that cares about those in need? When you move across the globe, the country—or just around town, you can find an organization, a neighborhood, a cause that matches your passion. Get connected and participate. That’s the easiest way to get connected. If you see a need that’s not being filled,

you can start your own nonprofit with the help of seminars and classes held across the region by groups such as the Akron Community Foundation, SCORE (Service Corp of Retired Executives), and the Foundation Center-Cleveland. Our three-county region is bountiful with opportunities. You can help existing foundations such as the Akron office of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation (established here), the GAR Foundation and the Medina County Community Fund or get involved in a plethora of service organizations, such as the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank, Hattie Larlham and the County of Summit’s Developmental Disabilities Board, Girl Scouts of Northeast Ohio and Mobile Meals. In fact, there are so many volunteer opportunities in the region that Medina, Portage and Summit Counties established Volunteer Centers, which match an individual’s 20 1 6 -20 1 7

skills and interests with the current volunteer needs of registered nonprofit organizations. Here are just some of the many foundations and thriving volunteer groups that guide participants to help the community and to meet interesting new people: 


Akron Community Foundation
 345 W. Cedar St., Akron 44307
 (330) 376-8522
 akroncf.org. For more than 58 years, the Akron Community Foundation has been helping everyday citizens give efficiently, effectively and permanently to their favorite causes and charities. Once one chooses the cause or the nonprofit, the foundation will make sure charitable gifts reach their target, whatever that may be. They can connect you to like-minded residents and local nonprofits in a personal area of charitable interest. Akron Community Foundation offers a variety of charitable

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PHILANTHROPY & VOLUNTEERISM

We are YOUR

Summit County ReStore FREE donation pick-ups (3-5 day guarantee) Extended shopping hours:

Thursday - Friday 8 AM - 6 PM Saturday 8 AM - 4 PM

OP THE EN TO PUB LIC

Visit HFHSummitCounty.org/ReStore for a list of materials we accept.

Located at 2301 Romig Road in Akron 330-745-9098 | hfhsummitcounty.org/ReStore

Donate. Shop. Volunteer.

hfhsummitcounty.org/ReStore

funds to use during and after someone’s lifetime. An initial gift of $5,000 can start a fund in an individual’s, family’s, loved one’s or company’s name. (You can add to it at any time.) Or, for $25,000, you can start a scholarship fund. The Akron Community Foundation will invest and grow your money, enabling you to make grants in your fund’s name, now and after you’re gone.

Leadership Akron + Torchbearers Leadership Akron 54 E. Mill St., Ste. 201, Akron 44308 (330) 436-5291 leadershipakron.org Torchbearers PO Box 1443, Akron 44309 Admin@torchbearersakron.com
 torchbearersakron.com Leadership Akron (LA) is a comprehensive resource for jumpstarting a connection in Greater Akron by offering a variety of programming to leaders of different ages and career levels. Insight: AKRON, a program designed to expedite the process of networking, learning and getting involved in the Akron community, helps relocated executives become involved. LA helps leaders see beyond their own spheres of influence to the broader needs of the community, empowering them to heighten their efforts to make Greater Akron even better. Each LA class takes on its own philanthropic project, funded by the United Way, to give

Providing Healthcare and If you or a loved one is struggling with mental illness, visit www.cssbh.org

When you shop and donate to Goodwill, you are helping people in our community find jobs. Offering in the area: • Retail Stores and Donation Centers

• Home Pickup Service

• Outlet Store in Akron

• Dell Reconnect Computer Equipment Recycling

• Boutiques in Akron and Kent

• Vehicle Donations

For more information, visit www.goodwillakron.org

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Experience Greater Akron Ad_3.375X 4.875 g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


them firsthand experience in project evaluation and grant making. Torchbearers, an independent affiliate of LA, was founded to strengthen the connection between Akron area nonprofits and emerging leaders, as well as to further efforts to attract and retain young people to Greater Akron. Leadership Akron and Torchbearers continue to leverage their partnership to identify new ways to create win-wins for Leadership Akron, Torchbearers and, most importantly, for the Akron community.

United Way of Summit County 90 N. Prospect St., Akron 44304 (330) 762-7601 uwsummit.org United Way of Summit County is a leader and an effective catalyst in establishing and strengthening collaborations to meet our community’s changing needs. Since 1918, the

community has been legendary in its generosity, contributing nearly $500 million to United Way during these 95+ years. Their goal is to create real social change that leads to improved lives for individuals and families in Summit County. United Way focuses on programs and initiatives that form the foundation of a stronger community— education, income stability and health—to ensure all of our neighbors learn well, earn well and live well. Bridges Summit County is a major collaboration through which United Way of Summit County is advancing the common good. It engages all sectors of the community to understand and address the dynamics that cause and perpetuate intergenerational poverty. The Summit County Reentry Network is another major program that assists adult exoffenders in overcoming challenges to

success, along with reducing the rate of recidivism, increasing community safety and strengthening the local economy.

The Rotary Club of Akron
 4460 Rex Lake Dr., Akron 44319 (330) 664-4512 akronrotary.org The Rotary Club of Akron, which meets every Tuesday at noon at Portage Country Club, celebrated its centennial in 2014. The Club is part of Rotary International District 6630, which is comprised of over 50 Rotary Clubs in Northeast Ohio with over 2,000 district members. Both the Club and Foundation are dedicated to the health and education of Greater Akron’s youth and special needs children as well as providing exchange student programs, youth scholarships and drug awareness seminars. The Akron Rotary Camp for Children

TESTIMONIAL

PAM VALENTINE, BARBARA HILL & JULIE WEAGRAFF

Pam Valentine Girl Scouts of North East Ohio (GSNEO) Community Development Director Moved from Pittsburgh to Akron in 1976. hen I moved to Akron, I thought there would be less to do in a smaller city, but I found that anything you want to do is in Akron! I have met so many good-hearted people who care about their community. I found a good church home: Wesley Temple AME Zion Church took me in and became my family. While working for GSNEO, I’ve met so many people who are passionate about girl issues. My favorite leisure activities have been the summer outdoor concerts, the downtown Akron rib feast and the golf courses.”

“W

Barbara Hill Girl Scouts of North East Ohio, Chief Operating Officer Moved from Japan to Akron in 2015. here’s so much to love about the Greater Akron community—the arts, food, entertainment and of course, the people. After spending a number of years working for Girl Scouts Overseas in Japan and South Korea, I was offered a position with GSNEO in 2015.  One of the first things I noticed about Akron was the cultural diversity and strong sense of community.  Akron has a familiar feeling of the urban industrial area where I grew up, and I am happy to call it home.”

“T

Julie Weagraff Girl Scouts of North East Ohio, Director of Fund Development Moved from Cleveland to Akron in 2016. he Greater Akron community is so warm and welcoming. It doesn’t take long to realize that it is really like a small town where everyone knows each other. Since relocating to work at GSNEO, I’ve experienced such a friendly atmosphere at community events where people go out of their way to make you feel welcome and introduce you to others.  It’s great to see that kind of connectivity, especially when you are new and trying to meet people and learn about the community.”   

“T

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PHILANTHROPY & VOLUNTEERISM

1 IN 7

IN OUR AREA STRUGGLES WITH HUNGER.

6 IN 7

CAN HELP. DONATE • ADVOCATE • VOLUNTEER

We envision a thriving community free of hunger. Learn more on our website, akroncantonfoodbank.org.

with Special Needs, in cooperation with the Akron Area YMCA, offers children and adults with disabilities the opportunity to experience all the friendship, fun and excitement of camp. The Camp is American Camp Association (ACA) accredited and provides a nurturing and enriching atmosphere where children are able to participate in activities that help build self-esteem and physical endurance. Volunteers who work with the campers make a significant impact and create meaningful memories for themselves.

Summit County Developmental Disabilities Board 89 E. Howe Rd. Tallmadge 44278 (330) 634-8000 SummitDD.org Summit County Developmental Disabilities Board (Summit DD) is the community resource that connects more than 4,000 children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families to services that empower them to reach for their dreams. The agency connects people to the rightfit supports and resources to live a good life. Summit DD works to build communities that are welcoming for all through education and outreach.

Habitat for Humanity of Summit County 2301 Romig Rd. Akron 44320 (330) 745­-7734 hfhsummitcounty.org Habitat for Humanity of Summit County’s (HFHSC) mission statement focuses on bringing people together to build homes, communities and hope. They focus on shelter, advocate for affordable housing, promote dignity and hope and support sustainable and transformational development. Their goal is to serve more families through an expanded array of housing products. HFHSC has built over 190 homes and housed over 600 people in need of a safe, decent and affordable place to call home. Through their homeowners program, deconstruction projects, critical exterior repairs program and ReStore®, Habitat has become an organization that revitalizes neighborhoods and cares for the environment. Volunteers can help build homes, assist with office work and work in the ReStore®.

n 200 private providers partner with more tha Summit DD is a proud ource for people are the community res in greater Akron. We er 4,000 abilities, connecting ov with developmental dis rts that po sup h disabilities to the adults and children wit ss. ce ntribute to their own suc empower them to co s .org, filled with resource Check out SummitDD l wil t tha well as stories everyone can use, as ility. ab change your view of

1 E x p Publishing e r i e n Relocation c e G rGuide e a tValues e r Ad_7x4_2016.indd Akron 52 16-Live

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COURTESY OF AKRON PUBLIC SHOOLS

EARLY EDUCATION

HEAD OF THE CLASS

T

he Akron Public Schools (APS) system is the largest in the region. Its Akron Community Learning Center (CLC) project, launched in 2003, is an aggressive $800 million plan to remodel and/or rebuild all district schools. The CLC program is designed for use by the schools during the day and by the community after school has recessed for the day. Thirty CLCs in area schools are currently complete, and three more are underway. The district is dedicated to its diverse student body. It has a wide array of programs to prepare students for bright futures, whatever their backgrounds, interests, talents and dreams. The district considers the needs of students’ families to help ensure that all students are able to get the most out of their education.

Programs include: n Preschools in several elementary schools n Free all-day kindergarten n Free breakfast and lunch for all students APS offers customized educational opportunities designed to fit each student’s needs so he or she can find his or her path to an enriching and fulfilling career. These include: n Special education n Gifted programs n Specialized programs in visual and performing arts n Two dedicated STEM schools (high and middle schools) n AkronReads tutoring program n International Baccalaureate n Pre-engineering n 30+ Career Education programs n Akron Early College High School

THE ELP PROGRAM The Early Learning Program (ELP) provides educational opportunities for children ages 3-5. The program incorporates developmentally appropriate curricula and supplemental 20 1 6 -20 1 7

services while integrating the specialneeds children with typically developing children. Early intervention helps the children learn to interact with others, as the typically developing children serve as peer models for special-needs students.

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program is a rigorous curriculum that meets the highest standards of education in the world. An APS student is now able to follow the IB track from elementary school to high school graduation, the first such complete IB track in Ohio. Akron’s Firestone Community Learning Center High School is one of only 21 high schools in Ohio to offer this prestigious program. Case Elementary School and Litchfield Middle Schools, which feed into Firestone High School, completed their first year in 2015 as IB candidate schools. Aurora High School in Portage County has an IB program, and Indian Trail Elementary School in Stow has an IB primary program similar to Case Elementary in Akron.

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EARLY EDUCATION

CAREER EDUCATION Career Technical Education programs are supported by industry-based standards identified by 30 different business advisory groups. Students can choose from dozens of two-year, accredited occupational training programs that prepare students for college or jobs. Each year, anywhere from 95 to 98 percent of Career Technical Education students pass the Ohio Proficiency Test or the Ohio Graduation Test and earn a high school diploma. Career Technical Education offerings include animal management (veterinary assistance), medical assisting, masonry, hospitality and tourism, culinary arts, HVAC, IT support, software design, auto collision and repair, welding, preengineering for aerospace, business management, machining and more. There are ten Project Lead the Way engineering programs in middle school and high school. There is special support for students age 30 and over. Nearly 700 Career Education students graduate each year with practical skills desired by employers, and 97 percent are either employed, going to college or joining the military immediately after high school. And APS students have access to more than 1,000 different apprenticeships.

THE MILITARY Army JROTC is offered at Kenmore High School, Air Force JROTC at Buchtel CLC High School, U.S. Navy JROTC at Garfield High School and Marine Corps JROTC at East CLC High School.

THE ARTS Nearly 720 students attend Miller South School for the Visual and Performing Arts (grades 4-8) and the Akron School for the Arts at Firestone

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CLC (grades 9-12). In addition, APS boasts a district-wide Orchestra Program that prepares approximately 570 students, grades 6-12. High school students are provided the opportunity to earn an arts endorsement on their diploma, and they have many opportunities to travel and perform internationally and locally at concerts, dance recitals and in a wide variety of music and theater programs.

STEM The National Inventors Hall of Fame School, Center for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Learning middle school is located in downtown Akron in a contemporary building that was once home to the National Inventors Hall of Fame and Museum. The STEM high school is on the campus of The University of Akron in what used to be APS’ Central-Hower High School. STEM students explore solutions to real problems while guided by inventors, business professionals and university faculty members.

AKRON EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL (AECHS) This unique program of the APS allows students to earn two years of college credit free—and on a college campus— while earning a high school diploma. AECHS was included in Newsweek’s 2016 Top Public High Schools list and was awarded a Blue Ribbon by the U.S. Department of Education in 2014.

GREATER AKRON’S PRIVATE SCHOOLS The region has several categories of private schools that offer parents and students a variety of choices. Our Lady of the Elms is the only

all-girls Catholic school in Greater Akron and one of a few in Ohio. It encompasses a co-ed preschool and kindergarten, but it is single gender from grades one through 12. The Elms welcomes girls of all backgrounds and religions. The school has had a 100 percent collegeacceptance rate for more than 20 years and has won The U.S. Department of Education’s Blue Ribbon Award, rated “exemplary.” The Catholic St. Vincent-St. Mary (west Akron), Archbishop Hoban (east Akron), Walsh Jesuit (Cuyahoga Falls) and Christian-based Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy (Cuyahoga Falls) high schools are fierce rivals on the athletic fields, but the schools all stress academic excellence and service to others in the spirit of their particular religious affiliations. Western Reserve Academy, on a 190-acre campus in historic Hudson, is a day and boarding college prep school founded in 1826. Its nearly 400 students come from 23 states and 15 countries. The student-faculty ratio is 7:1, and 87 percent of faculty members have advanced degrees and nearly 17 years of teaching experience on average. College matriculation is 100 percent. The Faith Islamic Academy in Cuyahoga Falls, open since 2002, is for boys and girls in kindergarten through 8th grade. It provides its students with an Islamic academic environment in which they can grow and learn as whole individuals intellectually, spiritually, socially and physically. It works to ensure that students are fully engaged and challenged by the curriculum while being self-reliant, self-disciplined and keen to learn for the pleasure of Allah. It serves a diverse student population whose parents come from many different ethnic and racial backgrounds. Greater Akron has several coeducational Catholic primary schools including St. Hilary School in Fairlawn, which has twice been awarded the U.S. Department of Education’s Blue Ribbon Award, and St. Sebastian Parish School in Akron, which dates back to 1928. St. Vincent-St. Mary School, where basketball star LeBron James attended high school, also has a primary school. Holy Family Parish School in Stow, which has a co-educational K-8 program, won a Blue Ribbon Award in 2012. The Lippman School in Akron is a co-ed, independent school for all children K-8. A global perspective is woven throughout academics, arts and experiential programming. g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


Spring Garden Waldorf School in Copley Township is a K-8 facility located in a remodeled public elementary school. It adheres to the Waldorf educational approach that balances academic subjects with artistic and practical activities. Greater Akron has seven Montessori schools, and they differ somewhat in their approaches to the Montessori method. The Montessori method emphasizes hands-on learning, child-directed learning and collaborative work. Old Trail School in Bath Township is a co-educational country day school, grades Pre-K through 8, founded in 1920. Its 570 students come from more than five counties. Charter schools are publicly funded, nonsectarian schools that operate independently of any school district but are under contract with an authorized sponsor. Most are for profit and serve as an alternative to the traditional K-12 public school system.

MEDINA COUNTY SCHOOLS Medina County includes seven public school districts serving nearly

30,000 students, including Black River, Wadsworth and the largest, Medina City Schools. The Medina County Career Center (MCCC), part of the county school district, offers more than 25 technical career majors covering practically every career field. At MCCC, students can begin earning college credit before stepping foot on a college campus. Many majors provide students access to industry certifications. In 2015, 89 percent of Medina County Career Center seniors planned on continuing their education at a post-secondary institution. MCCC serves students from the Black River, Brunswick, Buckeye, Cloverleaf, Highland and Medina school districts. Students retain an affiliation to a home high school so they can still participate in that school’s activities such as sports and prom. Home-schooled, charter-schooled and students from other districts may apply as space is available. Medina County offers several private school options for elementary and middle school students, including the Medina Christian Academy, Sacred Heart School,

St. Mark Lutheran School, St. Francis Xavier School, Northside Christian Academy, Reimer Road Baptist School, St. Ambrose and the Montessori-based Medina Children’s House.

PORTAGE COUNTY SCHOOLS Portage County has 11 districts. The largest is Kent City Schools, with an enrollment close to 4,000 in 2016. The district consists of five elementary schools, a middle school and a high school. The district has athletic championships in many sports. More than 85 percent of its seniors go on to college. St. Patrick School in Kent, K-8, is the largest Catholic school in Portage County; it has more than 300 students. Children of all faiths attend. Valley Christian Academy in Aurora has an enrollment of more than 300 in grades K-8. The NEOMED campus in Portage County Rootstown Township is home to the tuition free Bio-Med Science Academy, a STEM +M school—science, technology, engineering, math and medicine—founded in 2012.

EDUCATION PROFILES

Today I will find art in science and technology in nature.

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ld Trail School is an independent, coeducational day school for students aged two through grade eight. We take education out from behind desks and into the wideopen spaces of our unique 62-acre campus, located in the beautiful Cuyahoga Valley National Park. We’re committed to a dynamic environment of academic excellence, service learning, and global sustainability. Our students master reading, writing and mathematics while also being taught to question, investigate and consider multiple perspectives before turning their ideas into purposeful actions. They raise their voices to ask bigger questions, explore new spaces, and push themselves farther, ultimately building a lifelong love of learning.

Visit Old Trail School This Fall Drop In

Open House

Parent Information Session

Sunday October 23, 2016 1 - 3 p.m.

Sunday November 6, 2016 1 - 3 p.m.

Wednesday December 7, 2016 9 - 10:30 a.m.

Connect with us

oldtrail.org

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EARLY EDUCATION

EDUCATION PROFILES

ST. SEBASTIAN PARISH SCHOOL Pride, Tradition, Achievement Since 1928

St.Hilary School Developing tomorrow’s leaders today through faith and service, traditional and innovative teaching

Inspiring the Critical Thinkers of Tomorrow

methods, cutting-edge technology and science facilities, 1:1 iPads, three foreign languages, enrichment and extracurricular opportunities, and much more Full-day K-8 school Over $150,000 in tuition assistance awarded annually

If you are looking to experience an exceptional learning environment in a warm, friendly and deeply rooted community atmosphere, look no further than St. Sebastian Parish School. For more information or to schedule your visit today, call St. Sebastian Parish School at (330) 836-9107. Financial Aid is available to those who qualify.

Enroll today for Preschool through 8th Grade!

A Tradition of Excellence in Catholic Education 645 Moorfield Road, Fairlawn

330-867-8720, ext. 343

5 0 0 M U L L AV E N U E A K RO N , O H I O 4 4 3 2 0 330.836.9107 W W W. S T S E BA S T I A N .ORG

st-hilaryschool.org

Developing Tomorrow’s Leaders Today

Inspiring the Critical Thinkers of Tomorrow

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oday’s students must learn not only the traditional basics Relocation Ad 2015 HR.indd 1 6/30/15 12:27 PM ince 1929, St. Sebastian Parish School has been home to that form the core of academics, but also a skill set that will more than 5,800 graduates, combining a long impressive enable and empower them to be leaders in our world. At St. history with a solid Catholic education. We offer a robust Hilary School in Fairlawn, students are challenged to do more, to curriculum, high teacher retention, excellent academic scores be more. This is a place where minds are educated and hearts and an impressive percentage of students who continue, even are enlightened. A place where lives are shaped. A place where after graduation, to reflect the confidence and values developed tomorrow’s leaders are being developed today. during their years at our school. The Parish School’s class of A two-time recipient of the U.S. Department of Education’s 2016 earned more than $375,000 in scholarships and awards, to prestigious Blue Ribbon award, St. Hilary School serves be used at their chosen high school. students in grades K-8. Children of all backgrounds are guided St. Sebastian Parish School continues to focus on the in mastering skills that will enable them to lead our world in the directive outlined in its mission statement of “excellence in years to come. education and commitment to Christ.” When the students The school’s curriculum challenges and accommodates returned to school last year, they were able to explore the students of diverse learning abilities, and its faculty strives to school’s brand new Technology Learning Center. The school cultivate the full academic potential of every student. Enhancing also embarked on a new STEM/STEAM initiative. This year, the core curriculum are classes in Spanish, French, Chinese, students will continue to develop the multi-disciplinary religion, art, music, physical education and technology. Advanced education initiatives with even more hands-on activities that math classes and an arts-based enrichment program are also promote problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The available. All St. Hilary School grade levels consistently rank in school is purchasing an additional sixty Chromebooks to add the top percentiles nationally on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills. to the collection of over 180 iPads and other devices. This Students have the opportunity to participate in service will increase access for all students and encourage the most projects, competitive academic events, extracurricular activities modern methods of learning and teaching. Students will also and sports throughout the school year. A state-of-the-art media be exposed to 3D printing, robotics and coding as they continue center, mobile iPads and laptop computers and SmartBoards in to link these newer technologies across the curriculum. We all classrooms put the school on the cutting edge of technology. will continue to build Catholic Identity through faith education, Students in grades 6, 7 and 8 are provided 1:1 iPads for use in celebration of Mass and the Sacraments and through the service school and at home. Guidance, remedial tutoring, speech and of others. hearing therapy, a nurse-staffed clinic, a daily hot lunch program To tour the school and see how the students are flourishing, and extended care are among the amenities offered. please call (330) 836-9107 or visit stsebastian.org/school. To learn more about how St. Hilary School can help your child become a leader, please call 330-867-8720, ext. 343. 56 E x p e r i e n c e

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SHANE WYNN

HIGHER EDUCATION

The University of Akron

LEARNING FOR A LIFETIME THE UNIVERSITY OF AKRON, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AND NEOMED ARE AMONG SEVERAL NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED UNIVERSITIES IN THE AREA

M

ore than a dozen colleges and universities are located within a commuting distance of Greater Akron that offer a full range of undergraduate and graduate programs. The two largest universities within the Akron radius are The University of Akron (UA) and Kent State University (KSU), which have combined enrollments of more than 66,000 on their main and satellite campuses. These universities interact with the business, industrial and social service communities in many ways—research, special courses, work-study programs, wellness efforts and urban development, among others. The University of Akron, established in 1870, offers more than 300 associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate and law degree programs. UA brings together diverse disciplines in ways that provide students with life-long skills, internships and co-ops, opportunities for academic research, study abroad, on-campus student employment and service 20 1 6 -20 1 7

projects designed for diverse groups of learners, including full-time, part-time and online students, veterans and adults returning to the classroom. UA’s College of Polymer Science and Engineering was the world’s first and remains the nation’s largest and most diverse academic program dedicated to the study of polymers—long chains of molecules that make up mainly rubbers and plastics. It boasts the largest concentration of polymer expertise in the world. UA’s famed College of Engineering, which was founded at the request of Akron area industrialists in 1914, has been the producer of a premier workforce pipeline to strengthen the region’s economy. At the time of graduation in May 2016, nearly 90 percent of engineering grads had already accepted jobs in Ohio. In 2010, UA established the nation’s first baccalaureate program in corrosion engineering. The first graduates of that program received their degrees in May 2015.

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HIGHER EDUCATION TESTIMONIAL

DR. LAKEESHA RANSOM

Dean The University of Akron Williams Honors College Moved from Toledo to Akron in 2015.

“I

t has been a year since I moved to the Akron area, and I am so pleased with my decision to relocate to this beautiful region and to serve The University of Akron students, faculty and staff. I have traveled extensively during my career and throughout my life, and Akron has quickly become home for me. I have met wonderful people who care deeply for this vibrant city, and it is an ideal place to live, learn and work. I look forward to many more years of exploring our world and introducing it to our students, but it’s always nice to come back home.”

About 35 percent of UA’s patents protect discoveries in polymers, not surprisingly. But the patents represent other UA strengths, among them medical technology (20 percent), computers and devices (15 percent) and advanced materials (9 percent). Biomimicry, the development of products based on designs in nature, has become a vital area of commercialization for UA. In 2016, The University of Akron School of Law received top ranking for Intellectual Property Law by preLaw Magazine. The National Jurist Magazine ranked the school seventh in the country for those seeking a career as a prosecutor or public defender and in the top 25 for bar exam preparation. In 2015-16, Above the Law ranked the law school as a Top 50, Top-Tier Law School for the first time based on outcomes involving quality employment, costs of education and alumni satisfaction among others.

Other UA Highlights n The industrial/organizational psychology program is routinely ranked in the top 10 in the nation. n The Online Master’s in Public Health was ranked 18th in the nation for 2014-15 by the nonprofit Public Health Online. n In 2016, Online Accounting Degrees. com identified the Master of Taxation (MTax) degree program as one of the nation’s best values. The new MTax Direct, an online degree, is graduating its first group in November 2016. n The Center for the History of 58 E x p e r i e n c e

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Psychology, founded on the UA campus in 1965, is part of the prestigious Smithsonian Institution Affiliations program. It attracts visiting psychologists from around the world and houses the papers of more than 740 psychologists, along with instruments—some more than a century old—photographs and films. n The “Akron Experience” includes internships and co-ops, academic research and study abroad to enrich the college experience and help prepare students for post-graduation success. n UA students enter the work world with less student loan debt on average than their counterparts at any other Ohio public university.

n More than 200 student organizations encompass everything from academics and hobbies to politics, faith, music and careers. UA’s nearly 200,000-square-foot Student Union is home base for many of those organizations and a popular place to hang out between classes.

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY Kent State University in Portage County, founded in 1910, is a public research university, ranked in the top tier of best national universities by U.S. News & World Report. KSU is one of Ohio’s largest universities, with a total enrollment of more than 41,000 students on its eight continued on page 60

INNOVATOR

Gemma Casadesus-Smith, Ph.D. Kent State University, associate biology professor, College of Arts and Sciences

“In my lab, we’re trying to understand how agerelated events can cause Alzheimer’s disease. My work is not in treating existing illness but in preventing it.” There are two types of Alzheimer’s: age-related and genetic. Casadesus-Smith’s research focuses on age-related Alzheimer’s and the hormones she believes are directly tied to its onset. “Most Alzheimer’s patients, by the time they show symptoms, have had it for 10 or 15 years already. The small changes the disease causes start earlier than we can detect. If we can delay it by five years, we effectively cure 50 percent of cases. People may have Alzheimer’s when they die of old age; but if we delay it enough, they’ll reach the end of their life with full cognitive capabilities. The idea is not to wait until you have Alzheimer’s. It’s to start these therapies now in at-risk populations so that we can mitigate these multiple pathological foci.” g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


Stark State College

INNOVATOR

Thriving through a foam brick “Can we build sustainable, scalable and fast-growing social enterprises that double the income of 10 million people residing in crowded urban spaces by better connecting people, goods, services and capital?” — Former President Bill Clinton

COURTESY OF NEOMED

“Yes,” say four Williams Honors College students at The University of Akron, and they have created a product to prove it. The UA students formed one of the 300 international collegiate teams chosen to answer the challenge issued by Bill Clinton in the regional finals of the annual Hult Prize competition. Now in its seventh year, the Hult Prize competition is often referred to as the Nobel Prize for college students. THRIVE is the name of the UA students’ business model, and the product they introduced looks deceptively simple—a foam brick. But that brick offers the possibility of food, shelter and economic stability with minimal investment. Dr. Lakeesha Ransom, vice provost and dean of the Williams Honors College, who introduced the Hult Prize to the University, mentored and accompanied the team on the trip to Dubai. There, they competed against more than 60 teams from around the world, including those from Cambridge University, the London School of Economics, INSEAD, the Indian Institute of Management and Columbia University. Read the full story at uakron.edu/thrive.

YOUR EDUCATION

same coursework, half the time

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tark State College offers applied technology programs in information technology, health care, advanced manufacturing and other careers in high demand in the region. The College also has transferable programs in business, human and social services, education and more. Currently in the works: Stark State College Akron, a new 50,000-squarefoot education and workforce training center to be built on 11 acres along Route 8. The College is working on a location to offer courses in Akron while the facility is under construction. Stark State has been serving the needs of Akron and Summit County students for decades, with many Northeast Ohio business and educational partners. Visit starkstate.edu or starkstate.edu/akron for current class offerings online, in Barberton and at the main campus in North Canton.

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HIGHER EDUCATION Northeast Ohio campuses coming from 50 states and more than 100 countries. In fall 2014, the University welcomed its highest-achieving freshman class while also setting a new all-time high enrollment on the Kent Campus. This marked the eighth consecutive year of enrollment growth on the Kent Campus. The University also reported the highest retention rate for the Kent Campus. Retention of Kent Campus freshmen increased to 81.7 percent, up from the previous year’s record retention level of 77.6 percent.

The Kent main campus is located on the banks of the scenic Cuyahoga River and combines a friendly smalltown ambience with proximity to metropolitan centers. KSU offers more than 300 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A third of KSU graduates receive degrees in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines. KSU is currently undergoing the most dramatic transformation in its history, “Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future,” which involves the construction of new buildings, facility upgrades and

the establishment of dynamic new living and learning spaces. The University has embarked on a major, multifaceted initiative to make each of its eight campuses everything a world-class, 21st century campus should be. Changes on the Kent campus are mirrored in the incredible $110 million renaissance of downtown Kent. On May 4, 1970, KSU was placed in the international spotlight after a student protest against the Vietnam War and the presence of the Ohio National Guard on campus ended in tragedy. In 2012, KSU opened the May 4 Visitors Center to tell the story of the decade leading up to May 4, 1970, the events of that day and the historical impact. The Center for Peaceful Change, a response to the shootings, was established in 1971 “as a living memorial to the events of May 4, 1970.” Now known as the Center for Applied Conflict Management (CACM), it developed one of the earliest conflict resolution undergraduate degree programs in the United States.

Other KSU Highlights

B R E A K IN G T H E M O LD SHAPING T H E WO R L D MEANS

At Kent State University, we have one of the largest systems in the nation and one of the closest families in the world. Here you’re comfortable being yourself yet empowered to discover what more you can become. Here a strong acceptance by our community leads to a powerful impact in all directions. Here it’s OK to be undecided but unacceptable to not have purpose. Because when you’re not expected to fit a certain mold, you develop exceptional abilities to achieve amazing things.

WWW.KENT.EDU Kent State University, Kent State and KSU are registered trademarks and may not be used without permission. Kent State University is committed to attaining excellence through the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body and workforce. 16-UR-00309-260

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n Kent State adds about $2 billion in income annually to the Northeast Ohio economy through its development of an educated workforce. Kent State has more than 227,000 alumni living and working around the world. n The Liquid Crystal Institute, created in 1965, is the most comprehensive research and educational center in the field of liquid crystals. The applications of breakthrough findings at the Institute have had an impact on the world, from liquid crystal display (LCD) televisions to computer monitors to new electronic devices, like the iPad. Today, the field of liquid crystals is undergoing a quantum leap, beyond information displays into the advanced photonics, sensors, bio and medical molecular devices and smart materials for new energy applications. n The Council of Fashion Designers of America placed Kent State’s Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising in the top tier of fashion education in the nation. The school has programs in Florence, Hong Kong and New York City and affiliations in Paris and London. It was named a top-10 fashion school in the United States by Runway magazine and Fashionista.com, leading voices of the fashion world. n The Wick Poetry Center promotes g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


DISCOVER

THE ULTIMATE EVENT DESTINATION

Located in the center of Northeast

• ballrooms that seat up to 700 guests

Ohio’s health care and university hub.

• intelligent conference or break-out rooms for up to 30 people

Near Akron and just outside of Kent,

• pre-function spaces and layouts for casual networking

the NEW Center provides 177,000

• 350 seat auditorium • executive chef and full catering kitchen

square feet of sophisticated space, amenities, technology and service.

• Sequoia Wellness complete with universal equipment, free weights, pools, sauna, yoga, zumba, basketball court and more

Speak with an event specialist to create a truly unique experience. Call 330.325.6855 or visit newcenterevents.com to learn more.

4211 St. Rt. 44 | Rootstown, Ohio 44272 | 330.325.6850 | newcenterevents.com 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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HIGHER EDUCATION TESTIMONIAL

MARK POLATAJKO

Kent State University, Vice President for Finance and Administration Moved from Dayton to Hinckley in 2016.

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oining Kent State University was like a homecoming for my family. I came from Wright State University, but grew up in Parma, graduated from The University of Akron and Cleveland State University and have lived in Northeast Ohio most of my life. My wife, three children and I are enjoying the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Hinckley Reservation, the many outdoor activities for every season and the abundance of sporting events in the Akron and Cleveland area. As the son of immigrants, my parents instilled in me at an early age the value of education and the opportunities it provides. That’s what fuels my passion for public higher education, and I am thrilled to be a part of Kent State, where our mission is to transform lives and communities.”

educational and artistic opportunities for emerging and established poets and poetry audiences nationally. Established in 1984, the Center is one of only 10 poetry centers in the country and the only one with such a broad base of activities, from elementary school outreach to a nationally recognized book and reading series. In 2014, the Wick Poetry Center moved into its new home on the Lefton Esplanade. n Kent State University Centennial Research Park is a 41,000-squarefoot facility that houses high-tech companies and is the home to the FLEXMatters Accelerator, a broad, public-private high-technology collaboration designed to produce the next generation of advanced materials and to promote economic development. n The Kent State Golden Flashes compete in the Mid-American Conference (MAC). The women’s golf team won the 2015 MAC Championship, winning the event for the 17th straight season, tying the MAC record for consecutive championships. n Kent State is home to Ohio’s first and only accredited aviation flight program and is authorized by the Federal Aviation Administration to offer the only degree program in air traffic control in the country. n Kent State offers Ohio’s only accredited Master of Library and Information Science program. It is 62 E x p e r i e n c e

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ranked among the top 20 graduate schools in the field by U.S. News & World Report, and its children’s librarianship program is ranked 10th.

NEOMED Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) in Portage County trains physicians, pharmacists, researchers and other health professionals in an inter-professional environment. Its nearly 50 partners include universities, hospitals and businesses. The University consists of a College of Medicine, a College of Pharmacy and a College of Graduate Studies. Its integrated, inter-professional curriculum—in which pharmacy students may sit in classrooms with bioethics or medical students—is one of its most distinctive assets. It trains students to be superb scientists, skilled practitioners and compassionate communicators. Its primary aim is to build the pool of talented family practitioners in rural and urban environments typically underserved by healthcare professionals. For several years, the University has been in the midst of a major expansion, most recently dedicating the NEW Center at Northeast Ohio Medical University. Summa Health of Akron began offering on-site, primary care services to the community beginning in 2015. The 177,000-square-foot facility was made possible through a publicprivate partnership of NEOMED, Signet Development and Integrated Wellness

Partners and is a major step in shifting the overall culture of health and wellness for the campus and surrounding community. The NEW Center provides medical education alongside a state-ofthe-art fitness environment, physicians’ offices, advanced practice pharmacy services, conference/event space and more. NEOMED is also home to Bio-Med Academy, a STEM +M (for medicine) high school. Bio-Med students focus on the fundamentals of science, technology, engineering and math—with a medical platform. The idea behind the academy was to provide all students a pathway into healthcare from an early age. The academy was launched in 2012 with 70 students and is already among the highest performing high schools in the state.

STARK STATE COLLEGE Stark State College focuses on affordable, quality higher education that propels students to career success or launches them toward advanced degrees. The College offers more than 230 associate degrees, one-year certificates and career enhancement certificates in business, education, engineering technologies, health, human and public services, information technology, liberal arts, mathematics and sciences. Stark State enrolls more than 12,000 students, about a quarter of whom are from the Akron area. That number is expected to rise significantly g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


when the College opens a planned 50,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility in Akron just off Route 8 with access from E. Market St. The site boasts a convenient downtown location, plentiful parking and access from Metro public transportation. College officials continue to work on potential locations to offer courses in Akron while the facility is under construction. Meanwhile, students can take classes online or at one of four other Stark State locations.

THE OHIO COLLEGE OF MASSOTHERAPY The Ohio College of Massotherapy in Montrose offers programs in massage, sports massage and spa therapy. There are several other vocational and technical schools in the region.

LIFELONG LEARNING Greater Akron offers many alternatives for people interested in attaining valuable career skills at any time, be it right out of high school or for a midlife career change. Many of these alternatives provide area businesses and industries with well-trained workers who have specialized training in areas such as advanced manufacturing, public safety and polymer science. The University of Akron Medina County University Center (MCUC),

centrally located in Medina County, is a good example of community education alternatives. The $9 million, 33,000-square-foot Center is located in Innovation Park, an industrial park designed for high-technology businesses. The Center offers general education courses for adult students, recent high school graduates, post-secondary students and transfer students. Students can also complete the following degrees at MCUC: Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Organizational Supervision and Master in Business Administration. The University of Akron’s College of Applied Science and Technology (CAST) offers nationally accredited associate and baccalaureate degree programs. CAST also offers minors and technical certificates, as well as professional training in firefighting and law enforcement through the Training Center for Fire and Hazardous Materials and the Police Academy. Currently, CAST offers 12 baccalaureate degrees on campus and at a variety of offsite locations in conjunction with various community colleges. These degrees, in the areas of business, engineering and science, computer information and emergency management and homeland security, are designed to build upon

TESTIMONIAL

CAROLYN LANIER

associate degrees and are aligned with the needs of local businesses. The University of Akron’s UA Solutions, formerly Workforce Development & Continuing Education, offers more than 300 classroom and online courses each semester. Noncredit and certification courses are offered as well as customized onsite employee training. The University of Akron’s distance learning network includes 29 distance learning classrooms located on or off the main campus. It connects to hundreds of locations around the world for classes, meetings and conferences. The Akron CNC (computer numericalcontrolled) Training Center was founded in an effort to satisfy the need for qualified machinists for the Akron area and the surrounding community. Their instructors are well-qualified machine operators and programmers who combine experience and knowledge with a passion for teaching, preparing students to succeed in the high-tech world of advanced machining. Other technical and vocational schools include the Herzing University Akron Institute, which has been serving the community for more than 45 years as a provider of hands-on, job-related skills training. It features programs in healthcare, information technology and business administration.

Northeast Ohio Medical University, Chief of Staff and Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Moved from Norwalk, CT to Rootstown in 2016.

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hen I began telling friends in Connecticut about my exciting career opportunity in Ohio, I was met with lots of disbelief “OHIO?!?! Why would anyone move to O-HI-O??” At the time, I was able to only talk about the great new position I was taking on; but now having been here for a few months, I am able to talk with excitement about the fantastic quality of life in the Greater Akron area. We have something for everyone—championship professional sports teams, beautiful parks and trails, theater and symphony, museums, libraries and so much more. I don’t spend hours in heavy traffic and poor road conditions. The cost of living is far superior to the East Coast. There are all kinds of housing options from funky urban lofts to suburban single-family homes. We have great schools, from primary and secondary to world-class colleges, universities and professional schools. It is safe to say, I am firmly committed to the Midwestern way of life!” 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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GREATER AKRON HEALTHCARE

Cleveland Clinic Akron General

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IN GOOD HEALTH GREATER AKRON’S HOSPITAL AND HEALTHCARE NETWORK IS COMPOSED OF MANY OF THE MOST ADVANCED RESEARCH, PRIVATE AND PUBLIC FACILITIES IN THE COUNTRY

reater Akron offers topranking teaching hospitals, world-class Cleveland Clinic hospitals and a designated corridor for biomedical businesses, including some of the leading biomaterials scientists anywhere and commercialization efforts that link the spheres of corporate and academic research, private and public investment and government guidance into one robust ecosystem.

CLEVELAND CLINIC AKRON GENERAL Akron General began as People’s Hospital in 1914. In 2015, the hospital became a full member of the Cleveland Clinic health system. The Akron General McDowell Cancer Institute recently received the Outstanding Achievement Award (OAA) by the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. The award, granted to only 75 cancer programs in the country last year, requires cancer centers to meet 34

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separate criteria of excellent and compassionate care. Cleveland Clinic Akron General earned a “Best Hospitals” rating by U.S. News and World Report for 2016-17. Akron General was nationally ranked in Pulmonology (42). In addition, Akron General ranked as the 9th best hospital in Ohio and held onto its status as the best hospital in Summit County. Ten “high performing” medical specialties noted by the publication were also listed: Gastroenterology and GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Nephrology, Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair, Heart and Bypass Surgery, Heart Failure, Colon Cancer Surgery, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Hip Replacement and Knee Replacement. Cleveland Clinic Akron General also includes Edwin Shaw Rehabilitation Hospital, Partners Physician Group, the Akron General Health & Wellness Centers, Lodi Hospital, Visiting Nurse Services and Akron General g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


TESTIMONIAL

CHRISTOPHER R. DAIGLE, M.D.

Cleveland Clinic Akron General, Bariatric Surgery Moved from Canada to Stow in 2015.

“M

y wife and I are thrilled to call Northeast Ohio home. I choose the word “home” carefully, as Stow (and the Akron area) has become far more than simply a place where we live. After completing my surgical residency in 2013, we made the life-changing decision to move to Cleveland, where I completed a twoyear fellowship in advanced laparoscopy and bariatric (weight loss) surgery at Cleveland Clinic. As fortune would have it, I was recruited to join Cleveland Clinic Akron General in 2015, and we haven’t regretted our decision. The people of this region are remarkably similar to the people where I grew up in Eastern Canada: kind-hearted, hard-working, laid back, salt-of-the-earth type people.  And don’t even get me started on my love of the sports fanaticism in this region! Way to go, Cavs!”

Foundation. In 2013, the American Nurses Association bestowed the prestigious “Magnet” status on the more that 1,000 nurses from Akron General, Edwin Shaw Rehabilitation and Health & Wellness Centers. Akron General joined with Kent State University in 2014 to form a program for the study and promotion of wellness. The Akron General–Kent State University Health and Wellness Research Collaborative develops and promotes evidence-based wellness practices. Teams of wellness investigators represent new models of prevention and new technologies that support wellness and the management of chronic disease. The group hopes to gain a deeper understanding of the behaviors and pathologies of chronic diseases and outline more effective, less drugdependent strategies to deal with them. The centerpiece of the Akron General commitment to wellness is its three Health & Wellness Centers, large outpatient community-based complexes that unite a range of clinical outpatient services (including ERs) with exercise and wellness facilities. At the heart of the complexes, which are in Bath, Stow and Green, are Lifestyles centers, a medically-based fitness program.

SUMMA HEALTH Summa Health is one of the largest integrated healthcare delivery systems in Ohio. Formed in 1989 with the merger of Akron City and St. Thomas Hospital, this nonprofit system now

encompasses a network of hospitals, community-based health centers, a health plan, a physician-hospital group, multi-specialty group practice, research and medical education and a foundation. Summa Health serves more than one million patients throughout its five-county region each year in comprehensive emergency, acute, critical, outpatient and long-term/ home care settings. There are more

than 1,300 licensed inpatient beds on the campuses of Summa Akron City Hospital, Summa St. Thomas Hospital, Summa Barberton Hospital and Summa Rehab Hospital. The system’s workforce of more than 11,000 employees makes it the largest employer in Summit County. Summa is committed to the principles of population health management, using coordinated, patient-centered care to improve the experience of care for individuals,

INNOVATOR

Jennifer Savitski, M.D. Cleveland Clinic Akron General, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Residency Program Director and Medical Director of the PATH Center “In my role as medical educator, I work with physicians who are being trained in the specialty of Obstetrics and Gynecology. We help our residents understand how their practice affects population health and how we can impact significant public health issues like the unacceptably high infant mortality rate in Summit County. As Medical Director of our SANE Program (called the PATH Center—Providing Access to Healing), I oversee services provided to our patients who have experienced sexual assault, domestic violence or elder abuse/neglect. We provide acute medical care and forensic services that are in line with best practices and trauma informed care. We partner with community agencies to ensure all of our patients’ needs are met in a multidisciplinary fashion. We provide services for both men and women, but we felt this was a natural extension of the OB/GYN discipline as we regularly provide care to patients who are victims of sexual and domestic violence and have a keen understanding of the impact of this victimization on all aspects of our patients’ lives.” 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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GREATER AKRON HEALTHCARE TESTIMONIAL

SHANTI AKERS, M.D.

Western Reserve Hospital, Board Certified Pulmonologist with Unity Health Network Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine Moved from Rochester, N.Y. to Cuyahoga Falls in 2015.

“I

enjoy living in Summit County, chiefly because of the friendly, welcoming people and the many activities the area has to offer. From Cuyahoga Valley National Park to swimming at the Cuyahoga Falls Natatorium to seeing a Cleveland Cavaliers game, we like the diversity of experiences available in Northeast Ohio and have really been enjoying our time here.”

improve the health of the community and lower the total cost of care. This is accomplished when a team of clinicians not only work collaboratively in the treatment of the patient, but also in concert with the patient to make real lifestyle changes and implement preventative healthcare measures. To this goal, Summa Health’s Accountable Care Organization (ACO), NewHealth Collaborative (NHC), has been recognized for achieving a significant multi-million dollar savings in the CMS Medicare Shared Savings Program for the second year in a row. The transformation to a population health organization has required many changes for the organization. In April 2016, Summa Health announced an investment of up to $350 million in facility improvements across the system, which will include the construction of a new tower at Summa Akron City Hospital, a new medical office building and significant renovations at Summa Barberton Hospital.

AKRON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL Akron Children’s Hospital was ranked among the best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in 2016 and has earned Magnet Recognition Status for nursing excellence from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. With more than 914,000 patient visits in 2015, it has been leading the way to healthier futures for children and communities through expert 66 E x p e r i e n c e

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medical care, prevention and wellness programs since 1890. It is dedicated to improving the health of children through high-quality patient care, education, advocacy, community service and discovery. Whether it’s a hospital stay, wellness visit, urgent care or specialty service,

it provides needs to all families. The hospital’s dedicated staff includes nearly 740 pediatric providers. The hospital has two campuses in Akron and Boardman and serves patients at 90 primary, subspecialty and urgent care locations in Northeast Ohio and western Pennsylvania. An addition,

INNOVATOR

Dr. Rami Ahmed Summa Health, Simulation Medical Director “When I was completing my medical simulation fellowship at Harvard in 2009, I realized there was no pacemaker simulator available for residents to train on how to place a transvenous cardiac pacemaker, which is commonly used to treat bradycardia—a slow heart rate. My simulation lab manager at the time and I experimented and figured out a way to override a full body simulator using a transvenous pacemaker. We took our discoveries to the vice president of research at Summa Health who got us in touch with a patent attorney. We then ultimately secured a licensing deal with Simulab Corp. in Seattle, Washington. Simulab is now in the process of finalizing the development of the pacemaker simulator, and it should be available for public fall 2016. 
This work is resulting in what will be the first-ever simulator that effectively re-creates this cardiac procedure. The availability to do this procedure on a simulator will likely lead to improvements in future training and advancements in patient care.” g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


5,500+ 1,600+ 750+ 80+ 70+

1

employees volunteers doctors and nurses locations therapy dogs

and just 1 focus: kids. As northern Ohio’s largest pediatric healthcare provider, everything we do revolves around our patients. Learn more at akronchildrens.org.

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GREATER AKRON HEALTHCARE the Kay Jewelers Pavilion, opened in May 2015 on the Akron campus. The $180 million building was designed through the eyes of a child and was tailored toward children and families. For primary care, families can rely on Akron Children’s Hospital Pediatrics network, which includes 26 locations from Ashland to Alliance and Twinsburg to New Philadelphia, with new offices opening in late 2016. The Locust Pediatric Care Group serves as a medical home for children and adolescents. The Group has a unique interest in children with special healthcare needs, international families, foster parents and adopted children.

WESTERN RESERVE HOSPITAL Western Reserve Hospital is Northeast Ohio’s only proudly physician-owned hospital, offering a full range of healthcare options and services reinforced by the shared commitment to patient satisfaction and improved healthcare delivery. Owned and operated by physicians in the community, the hospital is committed to providing the safest, highest quality, lowest cost healthcare available, as well as improving the overall health of the communities the hospital serves. Western Reserve also works closely with local organizations, businesses, schools and first responders to

Summa Rehab Hospital

implement effective, far-reaching programs for families and children. As one of the most prominent collaborations between the city, schools, police and fire departments, “Not Me, I’m Drug Free” is an antidrug campaign that reaches every fifth grader in Cuyahoga Falls and Woodridge schools. The pharmacy at Western Reserve Hospital has also helped in the fight against drug abuse by being the first in Northeast Ohio to dispense Narcan, an anti-narcotic that can be obtained without a prescription to fight drug overdoses. The hospital also strives to improve the overall health of the community with the Doctor’s Order program, which unites Western Reserve with more than 30 local restaurants. This popular program helps people make healthier decisions when dining out by

identifying heart-healthy entrees on each participating restaurant’s menu.

MEDINA HOSPITAL Medina Community Hospital opened during WWII with a modest 35 beds, dual surgical suites, a single X-ray camera, and an emergency room that was little more than a first aid station. The 20,000 square-foot facility had an eight-member physician staff and 30 employees. Today, Medina Hospital is a modern, 171-bed hospital, located on the corridor to the Medina community. The hospital features the latest technology and procedures with more than 300 physicians on the medical staff covering more than 30 areas of specialization. In August 2009, the hospital affiliated with Cleveland Clinic.

INNOVATOR

Akron Children’s Hospital: Family Child Learning Center Uniquely Supports Disabled Children Located in Tallmadge, the Family Child Learning Center (FCLC) is a collaborative effort of Akron Children's Hospital and Kent State University and is a nationally-recognized research and training program. Their staff includes prominent experts who work with young children with disabilities and their families. The Family Child Learning Center is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life of young children with developmental concerns and their families through: n providing family-centered developmental services n offering applied interdisciplinary training to parents, students and professionals n conducting research on the effectiveness of practices and service models for promoting the development of young children n disseminating information regarding quality practices for addressing the needs of young children with developmental concerns and their families n collaborating with related organizations and the early intervention system to encourage continuous improvement in services to families and children n creating opportunities for the growth and development of all staff Each year, FCLC provides services to an average of 150 children and their families, supervision and training for 20-25 graduate and undergraduate students and presentations/workshops for more than 4,000 parents and professionals across Ohio, nationally and internationally. 68 E x p e r i e n c e

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We are all about the patient. westernreservehospital.org 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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GREATER AKRON HEALTHCARE TESTIMONIAL

VALERIE GIBSON, RN

Summa Health Senior Vice President, Chief Operating Officer Moved from St. Clair Shores, MI, to Hudson in March 2015.

“G

rowing up in a Detroit suburb, as well as working in Detroit for most of my career, I felt that moving to Akron would be a pretty easy adjustment. While the adjustment has been easy, I must say Akron has pleasantly surprised me. Akron has a small-town feel but offers the dynamics and amenities of a major city such as unique restaurants and entertainment areas. I was also quite surprised by the rolling hills and national parks in the surrounding area. I love the outdoors and the ability to walk and bike near my home. I am energized by the revitalization plans for downtown Akron and Summa Health’s role in that with the multi-million dollar facility upgrades planned for Summa Akron City and Summa Barberton Hospitals. It’s an exciting time to be living in Greater Akron.”

Caring for you as you care for others. At Summa Health, you are our top priority. Our collaborative culture supports a healthy work-life balance with flexible scheduling, training and development. With many Summa Health hospitals - Akron Campus, St. Thomas Campus, Barberton Campus and Summa Rehab Hospital - as well as several medical centers throughout Summit, Stark, Medina and Wayne counties, there are many opportunities to be part of our amazing team.

Visit summahealth.org/careers.

We are an EOE M/F/D/V and Smoke/Drug Free workplace

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INNOVATOR

NEOMED introduces pharmacy of the future Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) continues to expand its wellness services for the community with the addition of Ritzman Pharmacy, located in the NEOMED Education and Wellness (NEW) Center. Called the “Pharmacy of the Future,” thanks to an innovative, customer-centered approach, Ritzman Pharmacy at NEOMED has a mission to revolutionize traditional ideas of pharmacy by putting the pharmacist front and center and tailoring care to the unique needs of each patient. It further aims to identify healthcare solutions to treat the whole patient, rather than simply providing medications. The pharmacy will focus on education and preventive care, aiming to guide patients to better overall health outcomes. Among its many unique services, Ritzman Pharmacy at NEOMED offers private consulting rooms so customers may receive individualized care from a pharmacist. NEOMED welcomed back Hannah Cross, Pharm.D., a 2013 graduate of NEOMED’s College of Pharmacy. She will not only work behind the counter but will also offer individualized counseling for customers who have questions and concerns about their medications. As a community-based interprofessional health sciences university, NEOMED provides the basis for this unique model. The College of Pharmacy at NEOMED formed Pharmacy Innovations, LLC, to leverage interprofessional education, collaborative partnerships and the expertise of NEOMED to improve the health and well-being of urban and rural communities through advanced pharmacist services. Operating within the NEW Center provides the pharmacy with an innovative healthcare ecosystem to promote positive health outcomes for the community it serves. In this holistic approach to wellness, patients will have access to a medical fitness facility, primary care services, physical therapy, medication management and a teambased philosophy that focuses on the individual’s well-being. The pharmacy offers Made in Ohio products, a full line of Ritzman supplements and a tech bar where customers can ask questions and try

out new health technology. “Education is important to personal health, and it’s a driving principle for Ritzman and NEOMED,” said Charles Taylor, Pharm.D., vice president of academic affairs and dean of the College of Pharmacy at NEOMED. Ritzman Pharmacy at NEOMED is currently open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. COURTESY OF NEOMED

From left: Jason Knight, MD, Gynecology Oncology; Melissa Kirven, MD, OB/GYN; and Mark Davis, MD, OB/GYN

Serving You Better Together Akron General is now part of Cleveland Clinic — which means we are proud to connect you with an even stronger team of experts and even more leading-edge treatments. It means greater access to the world class care you need, and all with Akron General’s uniquely personal touch. See for yourself. Find the healthcare services you need at akrongeneral.org/access.

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TRANSPORTATION

Akron-Canton Airport

I

ON THE MOVE

f you are on the move, Greater Akron has an abundance of convenient, cost-effective transportation methods to meet your needs.

AKRON-CANTON AIRPORT (CAK)

THE CITY BOASTS ONE OF THE MOST TRAVELER-FRIENDLY AIRPORTS IN THE COUNTRY AND AN EASY-ACCESS BUS SYSTEM

Akron-Canton Airport is about 15 minutes south of downtown Akron, and many say has Ohio’s lowest average fares and easy parking and accessibility. CAK is now finishing a $240 million expansion for improvements inside and outside of the airport. CAK is home to five popular airlines—Allegiant (with 2016 flights as low as $44 to Orlando), Southwest, Delta, American and United. In October 2016, CAK launched two new daily non-stop flights on American Airlines to Chicago O’Hare (ORD).

CLEVELAND HOPKINS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CLE) Cleveland Hopkins International Airport offers about 140 nonstop departures to more than 35 markets. CLE hosts nine airlines, providing service to about seven million passengers in 2014. CLE is located just 35 miles from Akron, adjacent to several interstate highways, including I-480, I-71, I-80 and just minutes from I-77 and I-90. 72 E x p e r i e n c e

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AKRON-FULTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Akron-Fulton International Airport, on Akron’s east side—along with 15 other airfields in Greater Akron—serves private pilots and passengers, including corporate jets.

AMTRAK Amtrak has lines/stops in Cleveland and Alliance (which is 36 miles from Akron) for passenger and cargo transport.

AKRON METROPOLITAN REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY (METRO) Akron Metropolitan Regional Transit Authority (METRO) transports nearly six million passengers annually. For those who like to mix their transportation modes, all METRO line-service buses are equipped with bike racks. Also, the fleet is 100 percent wheelchair/ scooter accessible. In 2009, METRO opened the Robert K. Pfaff Transit Center, an eco-friendly facility fueled by geothermal energy to help move passengers more efficiently. Greyhound Bus Lines also operates out of the center, which includes a café, an ATM, a community room and a customer service window. g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


LANDMARKS

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

PRESERVING OUR HISTORY By Dave Lieberth, Chairman, Summit County Historical Society

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reater Akron was the American frontier (Summit, Portage and Medina Counties). Europeans moving west in the 18th century encountered enormous challenges in the Ohio country—unnavigable roads and rivers, dense forests, dangerous animals and Native Americans defending the land that had nurtured their people for centuries. Our topography of plateaus and rolling hills, forests, rivers and lakes dictated the route of the Portage Path, which today is marked by a statue of an American Indian at the big bend of the Cuyahoga River in Akron’s Merriman Valley. By sitting atop the continent’s watershed divide, Summit County was the “high point” of the canal that linked Lake Erie to the Ohio River. Today the Towpath Trail is a 71-mile hiking and cycling route that goes

through the center of Akron, and runs through the 33,000-acre Cuyahoga Valley National Park. The Richard Howe House, once home to the canal engineer, is a federal-style home that is the headquarters for the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition. Greater Akron’s founders remade the land into something they understood, not unlike the towns they knew in New England. Hale Farm & Village, an 1825 frontier home and outdoor living history museum is maintained by Western Reserve Historical Society. Daily life of Ohio’s pioneer days is depicted with demonstrations of American crafts. Medina’s Public Square Historic District is reminiscent of a traditional 19th century downtown, where historic homes and shops have been lovingly preserved. Ravenna’s Lowrie-Beatty Museum rests on a 12-acre site preserved by the Portage County Historical Society, and includes an early pioneer homestead, an 1860s brick home, the John Campbell Land Grant Office, New England type barns and more. Akron’s founding family built the Simon Perkins Stone Mansion, one of the finest examples of Greek Revival architecture in Ohio, depicting life in the mid to late 19th century. The Summit County Historical Society also maintains the 20 1 6 -20 1 7

John Brown House, the home of the abolitionist who launched the Civil War with his raid at Harpers Ferry. Industrialization came to dominate this American heartland. The first of Akron’s great cereal mills was built in 1862. The restored silos at Quaker Square and the nearby Hower House, a 28-room Victorian mansion, recall the era when Akron was the home of the American cereal industry. Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, opened in 1915 by the founder of Goodyear, is one of America’s “castles,” and one of the finest examples of Tudor Revival architecture in America with its 70 acres of landscaped grounds and gardens designed by renowned American landscape architect Warren Manning. In the Gate Lodge of Stan Hywet, in 1935, the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous were first written. Nearby is Dr. Bob’s House, home of AA’s co-founder. Both are landmarks for the global AA fellowship and are open to the public. Akron’s manufacturing prowess extended to lighter-than-air craft, which can still be observed whenever the Goodyear Blimps take to the sky. The Akron Airdock at Fulton Municipal Airport is one of the world’s signature architectural achievements.

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GREATER AKRON COMMUNITIES

Cuyahoga Falls

HOME SWEET HOME IN GREATER AKRON GREATER AKRON IS RECOGNIZED FOR ITS AFFORDABLE, UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOODS

T

he Greater Akron region is not only family-friendly; it’s also affordable and accessible. Here are some details on our larger communities. Statistics come from the U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent census, which comes out every ten years.

COMMUNITY LINKS SUMMIT COUNTY AKRON Population – 199,110; residents under 18 years, 22.9 percent; median household income, $34,359; median home value, $91,800. Akron Neighborhoods The driving time to downtown Akron from the following areas is less than 15 minutes: Northwest – The neighborhood, which includes Fairlawn Heights, is filled with many homes that were originally built for the founders and executives of the city’s rubber companies. Home prices cover a wide range, from about $70,000 to more than $700,000. Near West – This is one of Akron’s most culturally diverse neighborhoods. It is dotted with homes originally built to house rubber workers and soldiers returning from World War II. Highland Square – Between the northwest and near west sections of town, Highland Square has long been a haven for artists, young professionals and older adults who like a walkable neighborhood. North Hill – Italian immigrants first settled in this section of Akron. It is now a community of many ethnic backgrounds, but residents still honor its heritage with Italian markets, festivals and restaurants.

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Other Summit County Communities The driving time to downtown Akron from the following areas averages 20 to 30 minutes:

East Akron – The east side of town is a mix of mid-priced homes built in the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s and contemporary developments geared to the lifestyles of today’s families. Home prices range from $45,000 to $300,000.

Barberton Population – 26,550; residents under 18 years – 23.5 percent; median household income – $35,411; median home value – $96,600. Situated around Lake Anna, a natural glacial lake, blue collar Barberton is a mix of older homes on quiet streets with a burgeoning art district in their downtown.

South Akron – The working-class community known as Kenmore in South Akron was once an independent city, and its residents are still fiercely proud to be Kenmorites. Homes range from $40,000 to $160,000. Ellet – Population, 17,269; median household income, $40,755; median home value, $121,619. Once its own city, Ellet was annexed by Akron but still maintains its own sense of identity. Ellet High School boasts both academic and athletic excellence. The community is home to the Akron Fulton Municipal Airport, the Rubber Bowl football stadium and Derby Downs

Bath Township Population – 9,662; residents under 18 years – 25.7 percent; median household income – $98,485; median home value – $327,100 (unless you’re LeBron James, who built a $9.2 million home here). This affluent community just outside of Akron has a rural feeling; its homes are built on lots of an acre or more.

Goodyear Heights and Firestone Park – These two communities were built in the early 1900s to provide housing for employees near the respective Goodyear and Firestone factories. Homes range from $65,000 to $150,000.

Copley Population – 16,683; residents under 18 years – 26.9 percent; median household income – $70,738; median home value – $182,300. Adjacent to Akron, it is a mix of quiet residential neighborhoods, old-time farms and boutique businesses.

Downtown – Loft apartments and condominiums are more popular downtown. Several new developments are luring suburbanites back to city living. The housing is in all price ranges, depending on the development.

Coventry Township Population–10,945; residents under 18 years – 18 percent; median household income – $47,136; median home value – $128,500. Coventry Township is surrounded by the lakes that make up Portage Lakes State Park, an enormous draw for recreation and entertainment. Many people live around the lakes all year long; others keep summer homes there.

Fairlawn Heights

TESTIMONIAL

KALEY FOSTER

Urban Buzz, Owner Moved from Portage Lakes to downtown Akron in April 2016.

“A

lthough I am a native of Akron, moving downtown has allowed me to be right in the center of the innovation and energy currently taking place here. The concept of ‘Live, work, play and stay.’ is truly alive at the Cascade Lofts. Being able to walk downstairs to my Urban Buzz candle workshop has been extremely convenient, as well as working on the Akron Sustainer project, a shipping container turned into an educational hub, located on the property. Living here has also taught me about sustainable design, such as the reuse of site materials for building renovations, energy efficient appliances and edible landscape. I love the accessibility of the Towpath Trail for running, as well as riding my bike to many events at Lock 3 & 4 or to simply meet friends for dinner. Akron has a rich vibrancy, paired with authentic individuals and a collaborative spirit that is difficult to find elsewhere.” 20 1 6 -20 1 7

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GREATER AKRON COMMUNITIES Cuyahoga Falls Population – approx. 50,000; residents under 18 years – 20.9 percent; median household income – $48,606; median home value – $125,600. The second largest city in Summit County, Cuyahoga Falls offers superior amenities such as low utility rates, a first-class natatorium fitness facility and an award-winning downtown riverfront district. Numerous housing options are available from upscale condos, luxury apartments and quaint bungalows to large homes near the National Park. Fairlawn Population – 7,437; residents under 18 years – 19.4 percent; median household income – $56,087; median home value – $185,700. Fairlawn offers homes in many price ranges, from two-bedroom bungalows to spacious, traditional Colonials close to highways and shopping. Green Population – 25,699; residents under 18 years – 24.1 percent; median household income – $63,402; median home value – $176,300. Green is one of the fastestgrowing cities in the state. Affluent and rural in feel, Green is situated halfway between Akron and Canton. Hudson Population – 22,262; residents under 18 years – 30.1 percent; median household income – $115,144; median home value – $292,800. Historic buildings line downtown’s North Main Street. Hudson is home to Seton Catholic School, Hudson Montessori and Western Reserve Academy. One of the original settlements of the Connecticut Western Reserve, Hudson has a distinct East Coast flavor. Macedonia Population – 11,188; residents under 18 years – 22.3 percent; median household income – $77,866; median home value – $200,500. Along with being halfway from Cleveland to Akron, its proximity to major shopping areas is a draw for many.

WELCOME TO NOHO WELCOME TO NOHO

ABUNDANT

SPACE

Akron, Ohio 44304 AND LIGHT akroncascadelofts.com

AN URBAN

GREEN LIVING SPACE

330.990.6389

Munroe Falls Population – 5,012; residents under 18 years – 20.2 percent; median household income – $68,306; median home value – $167,200. A river runs through it, the Cuyahoga River, to be exact. Munroe Falls is a mature bedroom community surrounded by natural charms. New Franklin Population – 14,227; residents under 18 years – 21.2 percent; median household income – $57,756; median home value – $149,300. Although New Franklin has a rural feel, three major state routes traverse the city, allowing easy access to nearby attractions. State Routes 93, 236 and 619 run through New Franklin, with easy access to State Route 21. Norton Population – 12,085; residents under 18 years – 21.8 percent; median household – $55,252; median home value – $143,400. Norton, one of the oldest communities in the area, is made up mainly of single-family homes. Many of the city’s families have been there for generations. Peninsula Population – 537; residents under 18 years – 20.6 percent; median household income – $81,176; median home value – $257,300. Small and close-knit, the village has many historic homes that have been lovingly preserved, and the Towpath Trail brings lots of visitors to town to bike and hike. Richfield Village and Township Population – 6,165; residents under 18 years – 21.5 percent; median household income – $91,217; median home value – $281,628. Homes are built on large lots; neighborhoods have a rural feel honoring their history as farm communities. Close proximity to the Ohio Turnpike and major highways is a plus.

ABUNDANT SPACE AND LIGHT A NEW URBAN GREEN LIVING SPACE HISTORIC PLACE ON THE TOWPATH ■

21 West North Street

Mogadore Population – 5,212; residents under 18 years – 23.7 percent; median household income – $67,066; median home value – $165,600. Small, historic and familyoriented, Mogadore is adjacent to Akron’s east side. It features modest, older homes, quiet streets and some light industry on main thoroughfares.

book your wedding/business event at our new Trailhead Event Space on the Towpath Trail – Ohio Erie Canalway Lock 15 and the Cascade Valley MetroPark Trailhead. within walking distance from Downtown’s Historic Arts District at Market and Main – the Crossroads of Commerce and Culture

Contact Dan Sarvis, manager, 330-990-6389

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PORTAGE COUNTY Aurora Population – 15,548; residents under 18 years – 24.6 percent; median household income – $79,552; median home value – $260,100. This upscale community between Akron and Cleveland is popular with commuters to both areas. It is also home to a popular outlet mall.

Hudson

Sagamore Hills Population – 10,679; residents under 18 years – 19.7 percent; median household income – $86,766; median home value – $212,700. Sagamore Hills is the gateway to booming northern Summit County. Some historic homes remain and are accompanied by newer developments, including several condo developments. Silver Lake Population – 2,651; residents under 18 years – 20 percent; median household income – $93,641; median home value – $217,000. If you like the water, check out Silver Lake, a quaint village that developed around two lakes. This quiet bedroom community has upscale homes and more moderately priced offerings. Springfield Township Population–14,644; residents under 18 years – 19.8 percent; median household Income – $47,397; median home value – $121,000. Springfield Township is located southeast of Akron. Springfield Lake, located in the center of the township, is one of the few natural lakes found in Ohio. Boating and fishing activities are popular. Stow Population – 34,837; residents under 18 years – 22.7 percent; median household income – $63,834; median home value – $168,800. Stow is well-suited to raising children, with plenty of play areas and kid-friendly city events. Apartments and condominiums are also available for singles and smaller families. Tallmadge Population – 17,537; residents under 18 years – 21.6 percent; median household income – $60,181; median home value – $167,100. This city, anchored by its famous traffic circle, is made up of mainly single-family homes in the middle price range. Large green spaces help maintain a country feel, while there is easy access to downtown Akron. Twinsburg Population – 18,795; residents under 18 years – 25.4 percent; median household income – $69,662; median home value – $205,800, mid to higher-priced homes. The City of Twinsburg, in northern Summit County, was so named because its founders were twin brothers who married sisters. It is one of the fastest-growing communities in Ohio with a mix of small industry and midpriced family homes.

Brimfield Population – 3,343; residents under 18 years – 24.2 percent; median household income – $57,589; median home value – $162,900. Named after a community in Massachusetts, Brimfield is a township. It still is considered a rural area, although some major retailers have recently developed in the area. Garrettsville Population – 2,660; residents under 18 years – 22.3 percent; median household income – $43,043; median home value – $159,900. Founded as a mill town, the village is the quintessential town. It has many Victorian and Colonial homes. Kent Population – 28,904; residents under 18 years – 14.1 percent; median household income – $26,696 (this includes students); median home value – $145,100. Home of Kent State University, The Davey Tree Expert Company, Smithers-Oasis, AMETEK and Kent Displays, the city has long drawn artists and writers. It also has a large park system, which includes fifteen parks and nature preserves. Ravenna Population – 11,724; residents under 18 years – 22.5 percent; median household income – $33,523; median home value – $115,600. One of the Western Reserve’s first communities, Ravenna maintains its historic charm in its quaint downtown. Parts remain rural in feel, but most neighborhoods are well established. Rootstown Population – 8,045; residents under 18 years – 24.7 percent; median household income – $58,110; median home value – $174,200. This community is home to the Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), which was built on an old homestead. It is still considered rural, with a wide variety of housing options. Streetsboro Population – 16,028; residents under 18 years – 22.3 percent; median household income – $60,740; median home value – $147,500. Streetsboro’s proximity to major highways and its location between Akron and Cleveland has made it a popular spot for many businesses and commuters. More than 400 companies call Streetsboro home. Suffield Population – 6,320; residents under 18 years – 21 percent; median household income – $62,037; median home value – $167,200. The township is a longestablished, tight-knit rural community; some of its families date back generations.

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GREATER AKRON COMMUNITIES

COST OF LIVING INDEX Composite 100%

Grocery Items 12.95%

Housing 28.99%

Utilities 10.02%

Transportation 11.98%

Health Care 4.07%

AKRON OH

98.3

117.3

104.1

96.5

99.2

88.6

Los Angeles CA

139.6

114.0

210.2

106.9

131.0

108.4

Denver CO

108.9

101.4

128.8

90.9

106.7

106.4

Washington DC/ Arlington VA

148.0

116.9

227.6

117.6

108.3

99.8

Fort Lauderdale FL

114.8

95.5

148.3

99.2

106.9

95.8

Atlanta GA

98.2

104.9

86.8

105.2

102.3

107.5

Chicago IL

118.3

108.9

139.6

96.0

129.2

103.3

Louisville KY

88.7

83.5

75.2

88.0

106.4

88.8

Baltimore MD

116.8

114.2

145.2

102.6

106.9

91.8

St Louis MO-IL

90.2

104.1

70.3

110.4

98.1

95.9

Omaha NE

92.1

93.0

84.0

94.8

94.2

98.9

New York (Manhattan) NY

227.8

128.6

460.1

129.9

130.0

114.8

Portland OR

125.6

111.2

168.9

72.8

104.3

107.2

Greenville SC

92.0

97.1

78.6

96.1

92.1

99.8

Dallas TX

98.6

99.8

87.9

98.5

100.5

104.3

To use the index, compare one city’s index figure as a percentage of another’s. Three or fewer index points do not indicate statistically significant differences. US Average = 100.0. Source: The Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER). 8/2016

Helping Buyers and Sellers make smart real estate decisions for 24 years. Let me help you!

330-472-3614 Steve Spinelli, Realtor

2006 Akron Realtor of the Year 2005 AABOR President Top 5% of Realtors nationally Certified Residential Specialist, CRS Accredited Buyer’s Representative, ABR

“Let ME do YOUR home work!” Website: Stevespinelli.YourKWagent.com Email: Stevespinelli@kw.com 78 E x p e r i e n c e

Grea ter

Akron

LOOKING FOR HELP WITH AGING AT HOME? Contact Mature Services

• Homecare • Employment and • Meals on Wheels Job Training • Mental Health Counseling • RSVP Volunteering 415 S. Portage Path • Akron, OH (330) 253-4597 • www.matureservices.org Mature Services, Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit agency and is an equal opportunity employer and service provider.

g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


MEDINA COUNTY Brunswick Population – 34,255; residents under 18 years – 25.2 percent; median household income – $62,022; median home value – $162,700. About 300 acres of green space keep this thriving community pleasant and peaceful. It has a wide range of single-family homes, apartments and condos. Granger Population – 4,394; residents under 18 years – 27.5 percent; median household income – $86,346; median home value – $258,400. The township offers a rural setting marked by upscale homes. Its location makes it a haven for executives from the Akron and Cleveland areas. Hinckley Population – 7,564; residents under 18 years – 23 percent; median household income – $79,531; median home value – $247,500. Like neighboring Granger, Hinckley Township is an upscale bedroom community serving the Akron and Cleveland areas. Each spring, it marks the return of buzzards with a unique celebration.

Wadsworth Population – 21,567; residents under 18 years – 25.6 percent; median household income – $58,303; median home value – $157,500. Both the City and Township of Wadsworth have boomed in recent years, but the community has worked hard to preserve its small-town charm and boasts boutique and big box retailers. Historic homes, new condominiums and gracious single-family homes can be found there.

Westfield Center Population – 1,081; residents under 18 years – 18.3 percent; median household income – $104,779; median home value – $218,600. Executive-style homes are the norm in Westfield Center. Quiet, rural and small, the community draws from both Cleveland and Akron.

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Medina Population – 26,678; residents under 18 years – 28.3 percent; median household income – $60,650; median home value – $170,200. The City of Medina enjoys a long and rich history that is evident in the restored Victorian architecture of its picturesque Public Square area. Seville Population – 2,154; residents under 18 years – 20.1 percent; median household income – $67,292; median home value – $141,800. This is small town life in Medina County. The village has preserved its heritage as an early Western Reserve community. Historic homes are mixed in with brand new developments.

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ADVERTISER INDEX Advertiser........................................................................Page Akron Art Museum................................................................ 48 Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank....................................... 52 Akron Children’s Hospital..................................................... 67 Akron Children’s Museum.................................................... 48 Akron Digital Academy......................................................... 54 Akron Summit Library........................................................... 48 Akron USA............................................................................ 40 Akron Zoo............................................................................. 24 Beacon Marshall................................................................... 19 BLU Jazz+............................................................................ 35 Canal Place............................................................................ 1 Cascade Lofts/Everett Group............................................... 76 Cleveland Clinic Akron General............................................ 71 The Cleveland Orchestra...................................................... 36 Community Support Services.............................................. 50 Dominion East Ohio.............................................................. 15 Don Drumm.......................................................................... 34 Downtown Akron Partnership.............................................. 48 Goodwill Blue....................................................................... 48 Goodwill Industries............................................................... 50 Greater Akron Chamber....................................................... 16 Habitat for Humanity Summit County.................................. 50 Jilly’s Music Room................................................................ 48 Jumpstart............................................................................. 43 Keller Williams...................................................................... 78 Kent State University............................................................ 60

Live Publishing Company..................................................... 80 Lock 3................................................................................... 48 Mature Services.................................................................... 78 Metis Construction............................................................... 41 Metro RTA............................................................................. 26 NEOMED.............................................................................. 61 The Ohio Light Opera........................................................... 35 Ohio Rideshare..................................................................... 79 Old Trail School.................................................................... 55 Poly-Tech.............................................................................. 19 Rubber City Clothing............................................................ 80 Soap Box Derby................................................................... 22 Stan Hywet........................................................................... 37 Stark State College.............................................................. 59 State Farm Insurance........................................................... 44 St. Hilary School................................................................... 56 St. Sebastian School............................................................ 56 Summa Health........................................................70, Cover 3 Summit County DD.............................................................. 52 Summit County Historical Society....................................... 48 Summit Metro Parks............................................................. 31 Testa Companies..........................................................Cover 2 The University of Akron................................................Cover 4 Western Fruit Basket............................................................ 79 Western Reserve Hospital.................................................... 69 WKSU..................................................................................... 3

Authentic Akron” Clothing, Gifts and More! 18 N. High St., Akron, OH

www.RubberCityClothing.com

80 E x p e r i e n c e

Grea ter

Akron

g r e a t e r a k r o n c h a m b e r. o r g


It’s your health. Let’s own it together. It feels good to own something. Like the road. Karaoke night. Or the dance floor at your sister’s wedding. But what about your health? At Summa Health, we’re empowering you to be your own Chief Health Officer. Beginning with a primary care doctor, coordinating a team of specialists. To help our community get healthy and stay that way. So beginning today, own your health like never before. Because if you don’t, then who will? Schedule an appointment with a Summa Health doctor today.

800.23.SUMMA summahealth.org/ownit

It’s your health. Let’s own it together.


2016 For the sixth

consecutive year the College

of Business Administration made the list of Bloomberg Businessweek best undergraduate programs.

HIT THE GROUND RUNNING AT UA! UA HAS THE #1 RETURN ON INVESTMENT OF ANY NORTHEAST OHIO PUBLIC UNIVERSITY.

$50,000 $50,000 average starting salary of College of Applied Science & Technology Bachelor’s degree grads.

94% of engineering grads participated in a co-op experience.

94%

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PAYS More than eight out of ten University of Akron students gain valuable experience in their field while earning their degree. And it’s the kind of experience that does more than pad a resume – it results in a starting salary $3,500 more than what their peers earn. Learn more at uakron.edu/career.

Experience The University of Akron uakron.edu/visit. The University of Akron is an Equal Education and Employment Institution - uakron.edu/eeo

Experience Greater Akron 2016/2017  

The ultimate guide to relocating across country or across town.

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