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Department Of Archaeology.

World Archaeology. Made in Sheffield. Undergraduate Studies 1


Understanding Our Past.

Cover photo courtesy of Sarah Cole Photography This publication is available in alternative formats. To request a different format please telephone 0114 222 1303.


Shaping Your Future. ‘Archaeology is a modern discipline offering the fullest and most challenging perspective on human history.’ Sheffield Archaeology

A degree in archaeology from Sheffield equips you with skills: • The ability to use evidence in the investigation of complex questions. • Transferable skills in information technologies and in communication. • Practical skills in the excavation and analysis of material.

Archaeology studies the history of human diversity. It investigates both the distant and recent past. Today, archaeology is as much about how we create our futures, write our histories and live in the world as it is the study of ‘the past’. Archaeology at Sheffield is about big questions: • How did humanity evolve? • Why did humans colonise the world’s surface from their earliest origins in Africa? • Why have human communities organised their lives in such diverse ways? • How have civilisations been created and why have they collapsed? Sheffield students investigate: • The biological history of humans, including their evolution, their genetic complexity, changes in population, and the history of human disease and mortality. • The impact that humans have had on the wider environment, and their interaction with the plants and animals within that environment. • How human societies have changed their economic and political organisations and systems of belief. • The ways people in the past used different technologies to control and understand their world. • How we use the past today.

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Choose Sheffield.

‘Sheffield is a vibrant, multicultural city that will make you feel at home immediately.’ Why Sheffield?

Where will I live?

Sheffield is one of the best places in the UK to be a student. Famous for its nightlife, its culture, and its friendly atmosphere, Sheffield is a vibrant, multicultural city that will make you feel at home immediately.

Most first-year students choose University accommodation. There are 5,000 places available, 95 per cent of them reserved for first-years. All our halls and selfcatering facilities have programmes of social events, and you’ll make friends fast.

Sheffield enjoys a harmony between students and the wider community rarely seen in UK universities. There are plenty of services, shops, cafes, and bars geared towards students. Its first-rate nightclubs, pubs, theatres, galleries, and cinemas are all within easy walking distance of each other – you’ll get to know your way around in no time.

You will usually live in a study bedroom in a hall of residence or a self-catering flat or house. Most of our accommodation is in the leafy suburbs about 1 mile from campus. Each hall has resident staff and services including computer rooms and parking. There are also self-catering complexes close to the city centre, some just minutes from the department.

Our department is located in the popular West Street area of the city, just five minutes’ walk from the main campus and the city centre.

For pictures and prices go to: www.sheffield.ac.uk/housing/new_students

Safest city in the UK (Home Office statistics) Greenest city in England 150 woodlands and 50 public parks Lowest cost of living for students in the UK, of 24 university towns and cities surveyed (The Royal Bank of Scotland) 2


‘Ours is a truly international study environment, in the heart of one of the best student cities in the UK.’ Archaeology and Sheffield At Sheffield, you’ll discover a University education that combines: • Thinking and doing. You will learn to understand current ideas about history and social change. You will learn the practicalities of fieldwork, excavation and material analysis. • Arts and science. Undertaking arts and humanities research and scientific analysis offer different perspectives on the same historical problems. Specialise in either arts or science and you will learn to understand the basics of alternative approaches, and how to combine both perspectives. • Teaching and research. The world is changing rapidly. We all need to learn not just how to gather information, but how to analyse problems and come to fresh conclusions. Learning in an active research environment at Sheffield, you will gain the confidence and skill to undertake original research. We are at the forefront of teaching and research in archaeology. We carefully select staff with exceptional abilities. We have our own purpose-built laboratories and student study space, and we are committed to delivering the practical experience you need. The atmosphere in our department is friendly and informal. You’ll be assigned a personal tutor who will provide guidance and support throughout your time with us. 3


Academic Staff.

‘Your learning supported by dedicated, enthusiastic and knowledgeable academic staff.’ Umberto Albarella Archaeozoology

Dawn Hadley The Vikings, gender

Gianna Ayala Geoarchaeology, Italian prehistory

Paul Halstead Archaeozoology, Neolithic and Bronze Age Greece

John Barrett Archaeological theory, British prehistory John Bennet Linear B texts, Bronze Age Aegean Maureen Carroll Epigraphy and commemoration, Roman Europe Andrew Chamberlain Human osteology, palaeodemography Michael Charles Environmental archaeology, prehistory of western Asia Peter Day Ceramic technology, Aegean prehistory Roger Doonan Ancient metallurgy, craft specialisation, European Prehistory

Caroline Jackson Glass – in ancient Egypt, Roman and medieval Britain Robert Johnston Landscape archaeology, Bronze Age Britain Glynis Jones Archaeobotany, DNA and isotope studies

Mike Parker Pearson Funerary archaeology, later prehistory of Britain Paul Pettitt Human origins, Upper Palaeolithic art Patrick Quinn Ceramic analysis Jane Rempel Ancient Greek colonies, northern Black Sea Susan Sherratt Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Aegean and East Mediterranean

Kevin Kuykendall Early hominids – in South Africa

Hugh Willmott Material culture studies, archaeology of glass

Colin Merrony Geophysical surveying, landscape archaeology

Marek Zvelebil Mesolithic societies, transition to farming

John Moreland Archaeology and texts Pia Nystrom Biological anthropology, primates

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Degree Courses.

‘Our distinctive programmes provide a solid grounding in current archaeological research and its application.’ Courses to Suit You

Dual Honours with Archaeology

As a well-resourced department with a large number of academic staff, we can provide comprehensive and wide-ranging curricula for both BA and BSc degrees.

On all of our dual honours degrees, teaching is divided equally between the two departments concerned. You’ll take core modules within each department and then choose your options according to your developing interests. A programme coordinator within each department provides support and advice throughout your degree.

Our expertise allows us to explore both science and humanities based approaches, and our department is recognised globally for teaching and research which straddles both disciplines. Like our graduates our approach has come to characterise modern archaeological practice both in academia and in wider professional practice. From a very early point in the degree programme students will find themselves engaged in real research alongside staff on cutting edge projects of international importance. Whether this is on expeditions to explore exotic locations or in the laboratory undertaking detailed study, you will be learning through a blend of expert guidance, inquiry into real problems and will be supported by our passionate community of scholars and students who are furnished with copious field and study resources.

Single Honours Archaeology We offer three single honours degrees, Archaeology BA, Classical and Historical Archaeology BA, and Archaeological Science BSc. Each programme allows the student to specialise in particular subject areas. There is also the opportunity to take optional modules, including those from other departments. 5


Fieldwork

Students can choose to increase the range of their fieldwork experience by volunteering on archaeological projects during the Easter and Summer vacations, and by taking one of the work-based learning opportunities offered in the department: Skills for Work Certificate, Third Year Work Placement, or the Year in Industry.

Archaeology is a hands-on subject. Understanding how people once lived requires archaeologists to explore the material evidence. Fieldwork is the primary way in which basic archaeological data are created. A broad grounding in the techniques of archaeological fieldwork is vital to enable students to develop the skills necessary to undertake a career in professional archaeology. Our department has a strong commitment to practical training for all students.

The Archaeological Society (Arc Soc) Arc Soc organises informal evening lectures and discussions, usually followed by visits to the much-loved Red Deer pub, just round the corner from the department.

At Sheffield, you will combine your library studies with field survey, excavation and laboratory analysis. You will receive all the guidance and supervision you need to develop these practical skills.

As well as regular social events, there are weekend trips to sites such as Hadrian’s Wall and Stonehenge. The society provides a good opportunity to socialise with other students, lecturers, and members from other departments with converging interests.

All of our students are trained in field observation in their first year. By the beginning of Level three, everyone is expected to have worked on a departmental excavation. A compulsory field course provides the opportunity for students to acquire or improve basic field skills. More broadly, training in fieldwork techniques is delivered through a variety of both compulsory and optional modules, delivered both in the UK and overseas.

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BA in Archaeology.

‘Our department is at the forefront of teaching and research in archaeology.’ About the Programme (F400)

Programme Structure

The BA in Archaeology has produced outstanding graduates for over four decades, with many now occupying important positions in academia and the wider profession.

Our BA in Archaeology provides you with: • a broad coverage of human developments from hominids to modernity at a global scale; • a further detailed understanding of the prehistory and early history of Western Eurasia; • the opportunity to specialise in a range of special subjects that address significant issues of our human past and their relevance to questions of origin, identity and belief in the present.

The curriculum is designed to give you an excellent foundation in all aspects of World archaeology. It allows you to build on this with specialist modules, ranging from human osteology to cultural resource management. The course is exceptionally flexible and any aspiring archaeologist will find a range of optional specialist modules to suit their interests.

In the first year you will acquire a global perspective on human origins and world civilisations. In the second year you will focus on specialist options and the history of archaeological thought. In the third year you will choose from an extensive choice of specialist topics and undertake a piece of original research hand-in-hand with an academic supervisor.

The integration of theory and practice in our teaching and research is one of the keys to our success. Teaching extends to the field with participation in worldwide, research-led excavations which form an enjoyable and essential part of our degree programmes. You will also gain an awareness of the links between science and the humanities.

Part Time Study This programme is also available on a part-time basis. It allows students to study for a Single Honours Degree over a period of six years, with each level taking two years to complete. Application to the part-time programme is not currently via UCAS. For details see: http://www.shef.ac.uk/archaeology

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BA in Classical & Historical Archaeology. ‘Providing a detailed insight into the world’s major historic civilisations.’ About the Programme (QV84)

the student with an excellent foundation in classical civilisation and the historical world whilst allowing them to later specialise in numerous times and places.

The BA in Classical and Historical Archaeology is the ideal degree for the student interested in the classical and historical world.

The integration of theory and practice in our teaching and research is one of the keys to our success. Teaching extends to the field with participation in worldwide, research-led excavations which form an enjoyable and essential part of our degree programmes. You will also gain an awareness of the links between science and the humanities.

The archaeology of the classical and historical periods is an important part of our understanding about the past. Archaeology plays an increasingly dominant role in the analysis of ancient Greece, Rome, and the medieval worlds of the Mediterranean and Europe. This programme will provide you with an understanding of how this aspect of the past bears heavily on our lives and institutions today. The curriculum is designed to provide

Programme Structure Our BA in Classical and Historical Archaeology provides you with: • a broad coverage of human developments on a global scale; • a further detailed understanding of the classical and historical worlds of the Mediterranean, Europe and the New World; • the opportunity to specialise in a range of subjects that address significant issues of our classical past and their relevance to the emergence of the institution and values evident in the modern world. In the first year you will acquire a global perspective on key societies and world civilisations, in the second year you will focus on specialist options and the history of archaeological thought, and in the third year you will choose from an extensive choice of specialist topics and undertake a piece of original research hand-in-hand with an academic supervisor. 8


BSc in Archaeological Science.

‘The opportunity to apply science-based investigations to questions of origin, identity and belief.’ About the Programme (F410)

The integration of archaeological theory and scientific practice in our teaching and research is one of the keys to our success. Science teaching extends to the field with opportunities for participation in worldwide, researchled excavations. Equally, Sheffield has some of the best research and teaching laboratories in the world and you will have ample opportunity to use these in your studies. Such occasions will allow you to better understand the position of science-based approaches in modern archaeological projects and allow you to appreciate the composite nature of the skill-set demanded by contemporary archaeology.

Archaeological science uses the principles of biology, chemistry and physics to investigate all aspects of the human past. It is a multidisciplinary subject which integrates scientific methods with social interpretation. The curriculum is designed to produce critically aware graduates who are equally capable of evaluating archaeological issues as they are of identifying and undertaking scientific approaches to develop new understandings of the human past. The teaching and integration of theory and practice is one of the keys to our success, with fieldwork forming an essential, and very enjoyable, part of all our degree programmes.

Programme Structure Our BSc in Archaeological Science provides you with: • a broad coverage of human developments from hominids to modernity at a global scale; • a further detailed understanding of the prehistory and early history of Western Eurasia; • the opportunity for specialised study of significant issues in our human past and of the application to this end of various branches of the physical and biological sciences. In the first year you will acquire a global perspective on human origins and civilisations. In the second year you will focus on specialist options which draw on the principles of Biology, Chemistry or Physics whilst examining the history of archaeological thought. In the third year you will choose from an extensive range of specialist topics and undertake a piece of original science-based research hand-in-hand with an academic supervisor. 9


Dual Honours Degrees.

‘Study Archaeology with a related subject, including opportunities for language placements abroad.’ About the Programmes

The integration of archaeology with other areas is one of the keys to our success. Archaeology is a broad subject which shares common ground with a number of other disciplines, both in the intellectual questions they seek to address and in the techniques they employ in order to answer them.

Our dual honours degrees give you the opportunity to draw on the resources of two centres of excellence to enhance your historical knowledge and transferable skills. These degrees link us with the following subjects: Biblical Studies BA (VV46) Biology BSc (CV14) French BA (VR41) German BA (VR42) Geography BA (VL47) Geography BSc (VF48) Hispanic Studies BA (VR44) History BA (FV41) Slavonic Studies BA (VR47) The aim is for you to learn and develop through both independent and collaborative study. You will learn how to think, build your ideas, and express them effectively to a wider audience.

Programme Structure Our dual programmes provide you with: • a broad coverage of human developments and diversity throughout the world • the opportunity to combine the study of archaeology with centres of excellence in complementary disciplines. This includes language(s), that enable an understanding of the culture and history of a particular region of Europe • the ability to enhance your historical and linguistic knowledge and understanding • the opportunity to specialise in a range of special subjects that address significant issues of our human past and their relevance to questions of origin, culture, identity and belief in the present In the first year you will acquire a global perspective on archaeology. In the second year you will focus on specialist options and the history of archaeological thought. If you are taking a dual with a language, you will also have a year abroad between your second and final year. In your final year at Sheffield, you will choose from an extensive choice of specialist topics and undertake a piece of original research hand-in-hand with an academic supervisor.

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Your Degree. Your Choices. ‘We offer a large range of modules, with options to explore your own interests.’ About the Modules

Third Year Aegean Archaeology and Texts Aerial Photography in Archaeology Archaeology Summer School (Czech Republic) Archaeology, Ethnicity and Nationalism Archaeozoology Dark Age Britain Environmental Archaeology Human Evolution and the Hominid Fossil Record Neolithic and Bronze Age Britain Optical and Geophysical Surveying in Archaeology Palaeolithic Archaeology Primate Evolution and Behaviour Rome: Capital, Hinterland and Periphery Swords and Sorcery: Northern Europe 1000 BC-AD 500

Modules are offered in various combinations depending upon your chosen degree. Some are required courses, some are optional. In the case of dual degrees, archaeology options are combined with those from the partner subject area. Module details can be found here: http://shef.ac.uk/archaeology/current Typical courses are: First Year Archaeology in the Field Archaeology in the Laboratory European Classical Civilisations The Origins of Humanity World Civilisations

Outcomes By the end of Level 1, you should understand the nature and formation of archaeological evidence and its relevance to the study of prehistory and early history.

Second Year Archaeological Materials Archaeology and Text Archaeology of the Graeco-Roman World Bioarchaeology Early Historic Europe Early Prehistoric Europe Experimental Archaeology From Households to Empires Introduction to Biological Anthropology Later Historic Europe Later Prehistoric Europe Reconstructing Landscapes Research Skills in Archaeology Thinking Through Archaeology

By the end of Level 2, you should understand how archaeological knowledge is generated, and have a detailed knowledge of key aspects of the European prehistoric and early historic past. At Level 3 you have more opportunities to specialise. By the end of Level 3, you should have a detailed knowledge of key issues in archaeology, the ability to manage your own learning and to undertake original analysis (in the form of a dissertation).

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Your Career.

‘Our graduates are skilled, experienced, confident and capable of pursuing successful careers in many different professions.’ Careers in Archaeology

Recent graduates have followed careers in: • Financial services • Retail and administraton • Health Service • Information technology • Environmental work • Journalism • Teaching • and, of course, Archaeology

About 5,000 people in Britain earn their living as archaeologists - in universities, museums, archaeological units, heritage parks, or working for either national or local government. Our commitment is to produce first-class graduates who recoup their investment in their degrees. We aim to ensure that: • You are taught by academics of international standing in research. • You succeed in gaining the best possible degree through an environment of first-rate teaching and stimulating degree programmes. • You are supported in your personal and skills development. • You are given work experience opportunities and contact with potential employers. • You develop the confidence and communication skills that will make you an asset to employers.

Our graduates hold positions across the archaeological profession, including commercial units, national and local government, the charitable sector and many university departments. While the majority follow careers in British archaeology, Sheffield graduates work all over the world including the USA, Canada, France, Norway, Greece, and Australia.

We are particularly proud of our graduates. Sheffield graduates are confident in their knowledge of the subject area, critical and creative thinkers who are capable of working in teams or individually, and expert in the effective communication of their work. Our graduates are highly valued wherever they choose to build their futures. Employers recognise that, in addition to a rigorous academic training within an unusually broad-based framework, a degree course in archaeology also provides students with a variety of skills and the ability to work as part of a team.

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Contact Us.

‘We look forward to welcoming you to our friendly department here in Sheffield.’ Contact Information

Admissions

To find out more about undergraduate courses, please contact:

We normally invite applicants to one of our Open Days. This provides the opportunity both for us to meet you, and for you to see Sheffield and the department for yourself. Contact the department for details.

Mrs Joanne Mirfield Department of Archaeology The University of Sheffield Northgate House West Street Sheffield S1 4ET

Information for Disabled and Dyslexic Applicants The University of Sheffield welcomes disabled students and is committed to responding effectively and appropriately to their additional support needs. Admissions tutors will look primarily at academic suitability, and discussions regarding additional support will remain separate.

Telephone: +44 (0)114 222 2900 Email: archaeologyundergraduates@sheffield.ac.uk www.sheffield.ac.uk/archaeology For a University of Sheffield prospectus visit: www.sheffield.ac.uk/prospective

This publication is available in different formats. To request an alternative format telephone: +44 (0)114 222 1303.

UCAS application forms are available by email: app.req@ucas.ac.uk

Copyright © 2009 The University of Sheffield Design by New Start Publishing This publication has been printed using clean vegetable oil-based ink, on paper which is sourced from European Union FSC grade forests where more trees are planted for the future than are felled each year; all paper is processed using Elemental Chlorine Free technology.

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information given in this publication, but the University can accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions. University courses are continually reviewed and revised and there may be some changes between the date of publication of this brochure and the time you begin your course.

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Contact: Department of Archaeology University of Sheffield Northgate House West Street Sheffield United Kingdom S1 4ET T: +44 (0)114 222 2900 F: +44 (0)114 272 2563 E: archaeologyundergraduates@sheffield.ac.uk www.sheffield.ac.uk/archaeology This publication is available in alternative formats. To request a different format please telephone 0114 222 1303. 14


Archaeozoology