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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011


CATEGORY

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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CATEGORY PLACES TO BE

COMEDY

ART EXHIBIT

7:30p, Thu., Sep. 29

OPENING RECEPTION

Outpost Performance Space 210 Yale SE, 505.268.0044

6-8p, Sat., Oct. 1

$20-$25

516 Arts 516 Central SW, 505.242.1445

Tickets: holdmyticket.com

FREE

outpostspace.org ampconcerts.org martinhayes.com

516arts.org

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Kiva Auditorium 401 2nd Street NW 505.768.4575

$35,$50,$75 ticketmaster.com

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Rob Wellington Quigley: A Life in Architecture 7p, Fri., Sep. 30 KiMo Theatre 423 Central NW, 505.768.3524

$15 Tickets: holdmyticket.com aiaabq.org robquigley.com

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trellised dome housing a three-story reading room is the dominant feature of The New Central Library, currently under construction in San Diego. It’s a contemporary twist on Europeanstyle architecture of centuries past, and the latest signature of Rob Quigley, an architect who will be honored for his life’s work by the Albuquerque chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Quigley’s work — noted for its progressive design and embrace of sustainability and community — has garnered more than 60 design awards from the AIA over his 40-year career. A native of Southern California, Quigley bases his practice in San Diego and Palo Alto, Calif. The Life in Architecture lecture is an annual event. Past honorees have included such architects as Antoine Predock and Bart Prince. —ME

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OCT

LECTURE

t’s a bird, it’s a plane — no, it’s the gallery exhibit Superheroes: Icons of Good, Evil and Everything in Between. Curated by Nellie Johnson, the show features several styles of print media, sculpture, video, textiles, photography and murals. Through the use of the superhero archetype, viewers are urged to push their own concepts of what is considered right, wrong and heroic. Live music from Django Rhythm Meat Grinder is part of the opening reception. Featured artists include Esteban Bojorquez, Boneface, Aaron Campbell, David Cudney, Lawrence Getubig, David Gremard Romero, Benjamin Johnsen, Joel Jonientz, Mark Newport, Aaron Noble, Marc Ouellette, Min Kim Park, Dulce Pinzón, Cullen Washington, Jr. and Jolene Yazzie. —JC

SUN

30

SEP

rish-born fiddler Martin Hayes mastered his craft as a young boy in County Clare, and if there’s one fiddler who best captures the spirit of the wild and often lonely landscape of western Ireland, it might well be Hayes. He brings his unique sound — quiet, still, packed with feelings from melancholy to joy — to the intimate space of the Outpost for this show, where he will play with longtime collaborator, guitarist Dennis Cahill. (The two met in Chicago in the 1980s and have been playing together ever since.) Hayes was asked in a 2009 interview about his slow, soft, Clare-style of fiddle playing: “When you have a gentle landscape, you have gentle music,” he said. —ME

7p, Sun., Oct. 2

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Kathy Griffin

THEATRE A Streetcar Named Desire 7p, Thu.-Sat., Sep. 29-Oct. 1; 2p, Sun., Oct. 2 The National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th SW, 505.724.4771

$10-15 nhccnm.org

elebrity gossip, pop culture news and stories from Kathy Griffin’s past that you’re shocked she would tell a room full of people are all part of the comedian’s latest stand-up tour. Griffin’s two Emmy awards, Grammy nomination and accomplishments in television, film, Broadway and print have made her a household name. The multifaceted artist’s sharp tongue and sarcastic humor keeps audiences on their toes at every show. Griffin is no-holdsbarred, discussing everything from politics to her romps in the bedroom. “I’m always listening and watching,” Griffin has said. “My ear is like a boom mic. And judging, frankly. Constantly judging.” —JC

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OCT

Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill

Superheroes: Icons of Good, Evil and Everything in Between

FRI

CONCERT

2

OCT

SUN

1

OCT

SAT

29

SEP

THU

where to go and what to do: september 29 to october 12

FESTIVAL Global Dance Fest Fall 2011 8p, Fri.-Sat., Sep. 30-Oct. 1; Fri.-Sat., Oct. 7-8; Tue., Oct. 18 North Fourth Art Center 4904 4th NW, 505.345.4542

$15-$50 vsartsnm.org

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TELLA!” The infamous name screamed at the top of Stanley Kowalski’s lungs will eternally define one play and one play only: Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire. This Teatro Nuevo México staging will be performed at the National Hispanic Cultural Center and directed by Salome MartinezLutz. The plot follows the rough, working-class Stanley, his wife Stella and her sister, Blanche DuBois, through their tumultuous life in the French Quarter of New Orleans. The lead role of Stanley is played by Albuquerque native Matthew Andrade. The show is presented as part of the Albuquerque Theater Guild’s Tennessee Williams Festival 2011. —JC

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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he highly theatrical strokes and delicate, fluid movements of dancers will hencompass the audience at Global Dance Fest Fall 2011. The theme of the production is “past, present and future.” The “past” is performed opening weekend by New York City-based Eiko & Koma, with special guest Robert Mirabal; the “present” is performed Oct. 7-8 by Desiré Davids/Floating Outfit Project; and “future” is danced Oct. 18 by Faustin Linyekula/Studios Kabako. Eiko & Koma are well known for combining dance and modern art in their expression. They will be performing from their Regeneration series: “Raven” along with “Night Tide” and “White Dance.” —JC


MARQUEE

Craft brews on display at N.M. Brew Fest v. 2.0 BY MIKE ENGLISH

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eer drinkers are not complicated people. Give them good brew and a place to drink it, and they’re happy. Throw in extras — multiple bands playing great music, delicious food and food/ beer pairings, a shaded and grassy venue — and it’s beer heaven. Welcome to the second annual New Mexico Brew Fest and Music Showcase. Hosted by Local iQ, this year’s Brew Fest — again held in the family-friendly Villa Hispana at Expo New Mexico — promises to be FESTIVAL “bigger and better” than last year’s N.M. Brew inaugural event, in Fest and the words of Local iQ senior editor and Music Brew Fest founder Showcase Kevin Hopper. FEATURING:

First off, there BREAKER 1-9, will be more beer. ROSE’S PAWN Nearly every New SHOP, DIE POLKA-SCHLINGEL, Mexico brewery PORTER DRAW, will be on hand KEITH SANCHEZ and ready to pour Noon-6p, Sat., from the freshest kegs, including Oct. 8 Marble, Santa Fe, Villa Hispana, Expo Tractor, Sierra New Mexico 300 San Pedro NE, Blanca, Chama 505.247.1343 River, Second $25 (advance)/$30 Street, Il Vicino, (at gate)/$50 VIP Blue Corn, Santa nmbrewfest.com Fe, La Cumbre, Rio Grande, Mimbres Valley, Nexus, Turtle Mountain, ABQ Brew Pub, Isotopes and Monk’s Ale. Throw in Fort Collins, Colo., brewer Odell Brewing and you have a topnotch beer menu. Expanded beer lines, for both sampling and buying pints, should also make for a smooth delivery of suds to thirsty attendees. “I don’t know what it is about microbrewing, but the industry has really come on strong despite the sunken economy,” said Hopper, who noted that three new breweries opened in Albuquerque this year (Nexus, La Cumbre and Bad Ass Brewery). “It is a very exciting feeling to have them all together pouring at one space.” Next, there will be a bigger emphasis on food. Festival-goers will be able to choose among food offered by a half dozen local food vendors on site, and they’ll also be treated to food and beer pairings courtesy

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

New Mexico Brew Fest and Music Showcase organizers (left to right) Chris Goblet, Francine Hopper and Kevin Hopper toast the booming local microbrew industry, which will be celebrated on Sat., Oct. 8 at Expo New Mexico’s Villa Hispana from Noon to 6p. The festival will feature tastes and pours from numerous New Mexico Breweries, along with local food trucks, beer and food pairings and six hours of live music

of Whole Foods. In the VIP Bier Garden, a new feature at the festival, Edible Santa Fe will hold hourly beer pairing sessions with a number of celebrity chefs, and chef Shawn Weed will serve beer-infused food. (The VIP area will also feature a special batch of beer brewed by Ben Miller of ABQ Brew Pub.) Then there’s the live music. Los Angelesbased Rose’s Pawn Shop will bring its Americana and rockabilly stylings to the Villa Hispana outdoor stage, as will local bands Breaker 1-9 (in a farewell performance), The Porter Draw and Keith Sanchez. Another musical highlight promises to be Albuquerque-based 20-person German pompah band Die Polka-Schlingel, sure to add to the Brew Fest atmosphere. More than 1,500 people turned out for a day of sun and brew at last year’s inaugural New Mexico Brew Fest and Music Showcase. Hopper is expecting an even bigger turnout this year. “Beer, food and music are pretty popular, it turns out. Who knew?” Hopper said.

Local iQ P.O. Box 7490, ABQ., N.M. 87194 OFFICE 505.247.1343 FAX 888.520.9711 • local-iQ.com

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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CATEGORY

A Bair-ly doctored appearance trims years from your look “Women are most fascinating between the ages of 35 and 40, after they have won a few races and know how to pace themselves. Since few women ever pass 40, maximum fascination can continue indefinitely.” — Christian Dior

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ig things are happening here in Fabüchusetts. First of all, I just turned 40. Cue doom music! Cut to Janet Leigh’s Psycho shower scream. Release the black clouds and flies. Storms! Pestilence! Forrrrtyyyy! After much scheming and Googling, I realized I could not, in fact, turn back time. Thus, I decided to face 40 in true Fabü fashion: Gracefully, and with lots of help from a highly skilled doctor. Since this was no time to fool around, I went straight to the top: Bair Medical Spa (8810-F Holly NE, 505.881.1532, bairmedicalspa.com). In 2004, Kristie Bair opened Bair Medical Spa to help women and men improve their health and self-esteem through non-invasive, nonsurgical cosmetic treatments by trained medical professionals. One of those pros happens to be her husband. A lifelong athlete, Dr. Dean Bair has practiced anti-aging medicine for nearly 30 years. He was among the first board-certified physicians to perform mesotherapy in the United States. His body sculpting expertise also includes advanced training in SmartLipo and VelaShape.

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The medical spa’s extensive menu of services also includes skin rejuvenating laser treatments and peels, spider and varicose vein treatments, permanent laser hair reduction, Thermage, customized facials, Latisse and much more. I asked Dr. Bair for his recommendations for my 40-yearold needs. Was it too early? Was I too late? “It’s best to start somewhere in the 30-to-40 range,” Bair advised during our initial consultation. “But it’s never too late.” We settled on injectables and fillers; namely, BOTOX, Juvéderm and Radiesse. If you’re a regular reader of this column, then you know I’ve received injectables and fillers before, but only around the eyes and mouth. Bair also used them in these areas, but surprisingly, the other areas in which he injected them made the greatest difference. “The key here is subtlety,” he said while beginning the nearly pain-free procedure. “Our goal is for you to look a little younger, perhaps, but more like you

just had a great night’s sleep.” I didn’t even realize the areas under my eyes needed a little help. With a bit of filler in the hollows, this was ultimately the area in which I saw the most unexpectedly dramatic results. I immediately looked as if I’d taken a Rip Van Winkleesque nap — joy! Thanks to time and a nasty smoking habit, I also had the beginnings of lines and divots above my upper lip. This was the issue that bothered me most about my appearance. I had a bit of mild bruising that was easily concealed with makeup. Five days later, that troublesome area was completely smooth. I can’t express how relieved I am. It was bothering me that much. Wow, Dr. Bair, incredible. Another Bair Medical Spa perk: Beth O’Leary. This registered nurse is an absolute crackerjack at injections, laser treatments, peels and skin care. Though Bair is the main attraction here, O’Leary has quite a fan-base of her own, as well. I’ve heard her name mentioned among many in my social circle. She spent some time in the room during my treatment, and her suggestions were quite helpful. Bair clearly considers her a peer, not an employee. Results from injectables and fillers last from three months to over a year. Prices vary, but are attainable for most anyone. “Some people think this is something only done in Hollywood, that it’s very expensive and it’s painful. They’re also afraid they won’t look like themselves,” Bair said. “Those are all misconceptions.” As you can see in my before and after pics, I still look very much like myself … even with my new nose. Yep, Bair actually sculpted a new nose for me, in 10 minutes, with absolutely no pain. Dead serious. He used the tiniest bit of filler to fill in the depression (or, as it’s known in my fam, The

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

Before (left) and after: Fabü columnist Lisa VanDyke is fabulous at 40, thanks to a little help from Dr. Dean Bair at Bair Medical Spa. Bair recommends subtle cosmetic treatments for women in their 30s and 40s; namely, injectables and fillers.

Dreaded VanDyke Hump) in my nose. It’s called non-surgical rhinoplasty, and it’s amazing — not to mention quick, affordable and long-lasting (about a year). I fell instantly in love with this procedure. It will become as standard as my annual eye exam, and far less depressing (I’m destined for bifocals next visit — ugh!). Though I’m only a few weeks in, it seems safe to go ahead and officially declare that 40 is, indeed, fabulous. Thanks to my Bair-ly doctored face, I’m extremely happy with my reflection. It’s still me, but a softer, refreshed, more relaxed me. If you’re at or around my neck of the woods age-wise, I strongly recommend a consult with Dr. Bair. You’ll be thrilled that you did. Older? Try Bair’s Liquid Lift; I’ve heard great things. More milestone news. I received a wonderful 40th birthday gift from my beau: A traditional, onbended-knee marriage proposal and lovely vintage (c. 1915) ring. Let the wedding plans begin! Thanks to Dr. Bair, I know I’ll look my best for those bridal portraits. Exciting times ahead for your fearless reporter, dahling. Here comes the bride!


STYLE

Make it work American fashion guru Tim Gunn tells Local iQ how to build a great wardrobe, the intangible elements of style and Santa Fe’s rather “costume-y” style BY JUSTIN DE LA ROSA

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im Gunn could possibly be the busiest man in the fashion industry. The well-known co-host of the reality television show Project Runway, Gunn spent 24 years at Parsons School of Design in New York City, seven of those years as chair of the Department of Fashion Design. In 2007, Gunn joined Liz Claiborne Inc. as the chief creative officer, where he develops and retains creative talent within the company and its numerous brands. Gunn is also the author of two fashion books, with a third on the way. Although America’s favorite fashion consultant has a full schedule, Gunn is currently hosting a touring fashion show with Lucky Brand Store, giving the audience a taste of classic denim fashion. Fans of Gunn will also have the opportunity to meet him Oct. 1, when he swings into Albuquerque for a show and meet-and-greet at the ABQ Uptown Lucky Brand Store. In a recent interview with Local iQ, Gunn talked about his influences, New Mexican fashion and, to borrow his famous catchphrase, “making it work.” LOCAL IQ: You influence many with your fashion and advice, so who influences you when it comes to fashion? TIM GUNN: Well I have to say I learn new things every day and I believe that our own clothes we wear and the way we present ourselves to the world is constantly Tim Gunn, made famous by the long-running reality TV show Project Runway, will visit Albuquerque Oct. 1 for a free fashion show at ABQ Uptown, outside Lucky Brand Jeans. The event gets started at 1 p.m. PHOTO BY THOMAS WHITESIDE

evolving. A major fashion epiphany of my own, a little more than a year ago when I was doing the Smurfs movie, a woman by the name of Rita Ryack really pushed me into an area where I wasn’t altogether comfortable, having to do with a lot of pattern mixing, pocket squares and just things I wasn’t used to doing. She really transformed me. I’m stuck in it now, where I’m mixing patterns all the time and really enjoying it, so I’m always learning something new. I will say I think it’s important to have a fashion icon, someone about whom you could ask, “What would so-and-so do if so-and-so were in my shoes?” I use two people: I use Cary Grant for someone who has great style but is no longer with us, and present day, I use George Clooney. IQ: What can fans expect from the fashion show you will be hosting at the Lucky Brand Store when you come to Albuquerque? GUNN: Well, Leah [Salak] and I do the show together. We’re kind of joined at the hip. We are going to be greeting the show based on the product that’s in the store in Albuquerque. We will be using product from the store and doing what we can to create looks that are inspiring and that are exciting and that people will learn something from. We’re talking about classic denim – that’s certainly what the brand is – and we’re talking about soul. We’re going to be styling the looks that give them something special and that will show the audience how they can personalize these looks. It’s also the only brand we have which has both men and women, which is great.

iQ: Santa Fe was recently named one of the worst-dressed cities in the country by GQ Magazine. What do you have to say about the New Mexican style with pieces like concho belts, bolo ties and leather vests? GUNN: I’ll be really honest, I know I’m going to offend some people by saying this, but I’ll be nothing but transparent. I find it a little costume-y, and I’ve been to Santa Fe several times. I feel it would be like being in Paris and painting a little mustache on yourself and wearing a beret – it just seems a little costume-y to me. IQ: New Mexico is pretty far from the fashion runways of New York. Do you have any advice for people living here for how to stay fashionable? GUNN: I don’t even care about staying fashionable — I care more about looking good. That may be a uniform, maybe something that you wear day in and day out that doesn’t change. It’s a matter of finding what suits your lifestyle, your aspirations (in a manner of speaking), your body type, your coloring, your age — it’s all of those elements. When I talk to women and men about getting their fashion right, it’s not about any particular items, it’s not about the hot trendy thing that just walked down the runway in New York. It’s about three elements that are rather intangible and the elements are silhouette, proportion and fit. Those variables are different with each of us because our bodies are all different. That’s really the key to it, and when you have silhouette, proportion and fit in perfect balance and harmony, you can wear anything and look great. I’m very respectful of where people live, the environments in which they live, the kind of lifestyle that they have and I would never want to change that. I would just want to make it appropriate, make it better, but not change it. IQ: You’re currently working on the follow up to Gunn’s Golden Rules: Life’s Little Lessons for Making it Work. Will Tim Gunn’s Fashion Bible be a good resource for people who have similar questions about fashion? GUNN: I’ve wanted, for many years, to write a fashion history book. The catalyst for wanting to do that was really a reaction to the existing fashion history books which for the most part are so dense they’re unreadable, and it’s academic speak, it doesn’t make sense to anyone else. I wanted something that was accessible and relatable, so it’s a fashion history from the point of departure of what’s in your closet — things that you wear regularly. I hope people are curious about the heritage and lineage of the blazer or jeans or the sweater. There are about 30 items in the book and we trace the heritage and lineage of each one. For the most part each one goes back to Egypt if it’s tailored (and that’s going back about 7,000 years), or Greece and Rome if it’s draped. That’s an overly simplified way of portraying it. It’s been a huge amount of research but also a huge amount of fun and learning. I’m already prepared for a lot of criticism from academics who will say, “You failed to talk about what happened to the Elizabethan collar between 1568 and 1573.” It’s not that I failed; I omitted it on purpose, because, who cares? IQ: New York Fashion Week just wrapped up last week. What were some of your favorite collections you saw? GUNN: I saw most of them online. I was busy with Project Runway and various other responsibilities, and it takes a lot of time to be at the runways. Nina Garcia (fashion director, Elle and Marie Claire Magazines) was my inspiration for going online.

To read the entire interview with Tim Gunn, visit Local iQ’s Profiles section at Local-iQ.com.

SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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HEALTH

Minimize exposure to chemicals, maximize health

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odern living offers a dizzying amount of conveniences. One of the ways we have accomplished this is through our use of chemicals, the modern shortcut to everything from killing weeds in our yard to cleaning our floors. But with this comes an unavoidable exposure to toxins — chemicals that with repeated daily exposure can lead to longterm health damage, including disrupted hormones, certain cancers, chemical sensitivity or unexplained pain or fatigue. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, there are 70,000 chemicals commonly used commercially, but only a small percentage that have been tested for toxicity to the human body. There are a number of things we can do to reduce the daily burden of exposure to toxins at home and in our food. And there are detoxifying regimens and nutrients that can support the body in eliminating what we can’t avoid. First, cut down on exposure where you can: Stop using toxic home cleaners. This switch can save you money, too. Simple remedies like baking soda and vinegar can go a long way to keeping the house clean and sparkling. The common germs in our homes are generally well managed by our immune system and don’t require big-gun cleansers. Eliminate products with bleach, ammonia, formaldehyde, artificial fragrances and colors, and triclosan, a pesticide in body care products linked to cancer, developmental defects and liver and inhalation toxicity. Triclosan is also toxic to wildlife and aquatic life, and is found in high levels in the discharge from laundries, medical facilities and hair salons. Good old-fashioned soap is a great replacement for liquid soaps with anti-bacterial additives. If you want fancy soap, there is quite a niche market of handmade, beautiful and naturally fragranced soaps that won’t hurt you, your children or the frogs and fish in the rivers. Next, eliminate or reduce plastics, especially in cookware, and most importantly when heating

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

food. Heating or even scratching plastic increases the release of chemicals like bisphenol-A (BPA), a known hormonal disruptor. These plasticizers release into food and water, potentially leading to health problems. Transfer any leftovers in plastic or styrofoam into glass or stainless steel containers when you get home, particularly if they are being re-heated. Tiffins offer an easy solution to avoiding plastic without the burden or potential breakage of glasswhile bringing lunch to school or work. Tiffins are stainless steel, stacked containers common in India for carrying lunch or snacks, and they just as easily carry a sandwich or cut fruit while avoiding the waste and chemicals of plastic baggies. Avoid phony foods such as processed and packaged items. Most of these contain chemical preservatives, artificial colors and flavors, fillers, high fructose corn syrup, herbicides and pesticides. These types of ingredients are associated with learning disorders, diabetes, cancers and heart disease. These foods are also significantly lower in their nutritional value and fiber levels than unprocessed foods. Sometimes the advances of modern living promote both quality of life and the number of days we get to enjoy. Other aspects may seem convenient, or have been marketed into mainstream use, but really do more harm than good. Karla runs Salubrio Natural Healthcare (salubrio.net), a private practice, as a licensed doctor of naturopathic and Oriental medicine as well as RN. Her passion is in combining ancient and cutting edge medical approaches to restore and maintain vibrant health.


FOOD

Smooth soups for the beginning of autumn

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he falling temperatures in New Mexico (and it’s about time!) have inspired me to take a look at my favorite fall cream soups and bisques, presented from top to bottom in the accompanying photo.

Hot Vichyssoise The story goes that Louis XIV was so afraid of being poisoned that he had official tasters for all of his food, and sometimes this process took so long that the king was served lukewarm or cold dishes, hence the reason for serving this soup cold. Nowadays, that’s how restaurants still present it. But frankly, it tastes better when heated and treated like a fall soup.

Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. Butter 2 medium Onions, chopped 1 large Leek, chopped 6 cups Homemade chicken stock 3 large Potatoes, peeled and cubed 2-1/2 cups Homemade white sauce 1/2 tsp. Cayenne Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Ground nutmeg for garnish Minced chives for garnish

Method: Heat the butter in a soup pot and sauté the onions and leek until soft. Add the stock and potatoes and simmer for one hour. Transfer to a blender and puree in batches until smooth. Return the soup to the pot, add the white sauce, stir well and simmer, but do not boil it. Add the white sauce and cayenne and simmer the soup for another 20 minutes. Adjust the salt and pepper, ladle the soup into bowls, and garnish with the nutmeg and chives.

Yield: 6 to 8 servings • Heat Scale: Medium

Bahamian Pumpkin Cream Soup This quick, smooth soup with island flavors has great color. In the islands, it’s usually spiced up with chile peppers, so add some if you like. Be sure to garnish it with fresh coconut shavings. Serve it before a seafood entrée or a dish of Jamaican jerk pork.

Ingredients: 1 large Onion, minced 1/4 lb. Butter

2 Tbsp. Flour 3 cups Homemade white sauce 3 cups Homemade chicken stock 3 cups Pumpkin, cooked, mashed 1 tsp. minced Habanero chiles 1 tsp. Salt 1/3 cup Freshly squeezed lime juice 1/4 cup Dark brown sugar 1/2 tsp. Ground ginger 1/2 tsp. Ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp. Ground mace Shaved or grated fresh coconut for garnish In a soup pot, saute the onion in the butter on medium heat until soft, about five minutes. Add the flour and stir until smooth, then add the white sauce. Stir well and slowly mix in the chicken stock and pumpkin. Stir again and add the remaining ingredients. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Garnish with the coconut and serve.

1 Bay leaf 2 Tbsp. Brandy 1/2 cup White wine 4 cups Homemade fish stock 3/8 cup Long grain rice, uncooked 2 cups Water 4 Tbsp. Unsalted butter 1/4 cup Heavy cream Cayenne pepper to taste Salt and pepper to taste

Yield: 4 to 6 servings • Heat Scale: Medium

Method:

Method:

Lobster Bisque Here’s the classic preparation of this deliciously creamy soup. Originally the word “bisque” described any soup containing crayfish, but since around the year 1750, all soups containing a purée of shellfish have been called bisque. Bisque has always been considered a high-class dish and is usually highly seasoned. Serve it as a first course before grilled fish or shrimp.

Ingredients: 1 lb. Raw lobster meat, fresh or frozen, cut into 1/2-inch chunks 1 medium Carrot, chopped 1 medium Onion, chopped 2 Parsley stalks, chopped 6 Tbsp. Butter 1/2 tsp. Dried thyme

In a soup pot, sauté the onion, carrot, and parsley in the butter for five minutes. Add the thyme and bay leaf and sauté further until the vegetables just begin to brown. Add the chunks of lobster meat and stir them around with the vegetables until the lobster acquires a nice pink color. Pour the brandy into a small metal soup ladle and ignite it by holding it over a gas flame (or use a match). When the brandy is actually burning, pour it over the fish and the vegetables, shaking the pot vigorously until the flames die down. Then add the wine. Boil the mixture over a high heat until the

liquid has reduced to less than half. Add the stock and simmer the bisque, uncovered, for about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, boil the rice in the water until tender, about 20 minutes. Add the rice and water to the soup. Purée the soup in a blender until it is absolutely smooth, first on low speed for a minute, then on high. Strain it through a fine-mesh strainer, pushing it down with the back of a soup ladle. Discard what does not go through. Return the soup to the pot. Bring the soup to a boil and skim as necessary. Also skim off any fat that rises to the surface. Boil it, uncovered, until the scum no longer appears. Just before serving, blend in the butter and cream and season to taste with cayenne, salt and pepper. Yield: 6 servings • Heat Scale: Varies Dave DeWitt, a.k.a. “The Pope of Peppers,” is co-producer of the National Fiery Foods & BBQ Show, the co-author of the forthcoming (Fall 2009) Complete Chile Pepper Book and editor of the Fiery Foods & BBQ SuperSite at fiery-foods.com.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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SANTA FE

SANTA FE SCENE ART

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onika Bravo is a New York City-based filmmaker, photographer and video installation artist who creates images through the use of sound, industrial materials and technology, while questioning the notion of mental reality. Bravo’s lecture, Process and Intuition, will consist of a stepby-step description of how her work came to be and the motivation for her creations. Her workshop, The Well, will teach students how to observe the world around them in a deeper sense and get in touch with their inner creativity. One of Bravo’s films, September 10, 2011, will be shown on the the exterior walls of the Santa Fe Art Institute from sundown to sunrise, Sep. 29-30. The Monika Bravo and Greg Sholette Art Exhibition will be shown through the end of October. —JC

Monika Bravo at the Santa Fe Art Institute LECTURE

6p, Tue., Oct. 11 RECEPTION AND DANCE PARTY

7:30p, Tue., Oct. 11 WORKSHOP

10a-4p, Sat.-Sun., Oct. 8-9 Tipton Hall at the Santa Fe Art Institute 1600 St. Michael’s, 505.424.5050

FREE ($10 lecture, $200 workshop) sfai.org monikabravo.com PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

ART

New Mexicans are very familiar with the green chile cheeseburger, and thanks to longstanding Santa Fe roadside diner Bobcat Bite (and many other New Mexican kitchens), it has been thrust on a national stage of late. When in Santa Fe, Bobcat Bite is never a bad decision for lunch.

Santa Fe must-eats These 10 restaurants deserve prominent spots on your go-to list for City Different dining BY PAUL LEHMAN

E

ating your way around Santa Fe can be both a daunting and challenging experience, so Local iQ has tried to make it easier for those of you facing the City Different’s more than 300 eateries. Here are some “must-eat” choices to help you navigate the Santa Fe dining scene.

Mucho Gusto

T

he prints on display in the Contemporary show Contemporary Masters Part II Masters Part II present OPENING RECEPTION a melting pot of 5-7p, Fri., Sep. 30 culture, diversity and inspiration. Zane Bennett Contemporary Art Gallery The exhibition 435 South Guadalupe, features a variety 505.982.8111 of artists, including George Condo, FREE Richard Diebenkorn, zanebennettgallery.com Anish Kapoor, Roy Lichtenstein and Ed Ruscha, among others — all influential figures with a wide gamut of work that supersedes the expectations of gallery viewers and leads them to question what constitutes art. Condo’s unconventional portraitures continue to challenge art aficionados with that mixture of the strange, ironic and beautiful. His representations of humanity are psychologically complex and provocative. University of New Mexico alum Diebenkorn’s artwork perfects abstract expressionism and highlights the beauty of using geometrical shapes. Lichtenstein is well known in American culture for combining art with advertising. His comic-book-esque prints are famous expressions of pop art. —JC

10

839 Paseo de Peralta, 505.955.8402

11a-9p, Mon.-Sat. muchogustosantafe.com This intimate little New Mexican restaurant located in a small shopping center on Paseo de Peralta has no pretensions and serves well-prepared appetizers, soups and main dishes to regulars as well as visitors who discover it for lunch or dinner. Among the appetizers are Taquitos ($9.25), Quesadillas (three types, $10.95), Salsas and Guacamole ($10.95) and Coconut Shrimp ($10.25). Main dishes include Chalupas (three types, $11.95), Fajitas (five types, $13.95-$17.25), Flautas ($11.25), Chimichangas ($11.25) and Stuffed Chicken Breast (“The Bomb,” $14.95).

Geronimo 724 Canyon, 505.982.1500

5:45-9:30p, nightly geronimorestaurant.com This restaurant is probably Santa Fe’s premier eatery for celebrations and visitors. Located on Canyon Road amidst all of the art galleries, and featuring award-winning cuisine, including such starters as Sticky Duck Salad ($14), Escargot ($14),

Crispy French Foie Gras ($18) and Wasabi Sesame Crab Cake ($12). Main courses include the house specialty Peppery Elk Tenderloin ($41), Spicy Pan Roasted Caramel Quail ($32), Olive Seared Diver Scallops ($36) and Grilled Colorado Lamb Rack ($44).

Kohnami Japanese Restaurant 313 S. Guadalupe, 505.984.2002

11a-2p, 5:30-9p, Mon.-Sat.; 5-9:15p, Sun. kohnamirestaurant.com This newcomer to the city’s Asian scene serves Japanese tapas, but mainly features a wide variety of appetizers including Shrimp Shumai (dumplings, $5.95), Soft-Shell Crab ($7.95), Vegetable Tempura ($6.95) and Fried Oyster ($6.95). Main courses include Seafood Tempura ($16.95), Beef Teriyaki ($14.95), Chicken Katsu ($13.95), Vegetable Sukiyaki (old fashioned Japanese stew, $12.95), Bento Box Specials (with miso soup and salad, $8.50), Dinner Box Specials (served with miso soup, house salad, rice, shrimp and veggie tempura, four pieces of California roll, seaweed salad, $15.95) and Katsu Don (deep-fried pork with egg, $12.95).

Sauteed Italian Mushroom and Provolone Tortellini ($20). Mains include Mesquite Grilled Atlantic Salmon ($28), Pan Seared White Miso Sea Bass ($39), Mesquite Grilled Maine Lobster Tails ($38) and Rotisserie Roasted Organic Chicken ($33).

Bobcat Bite 418 Old Las Vegas Hwy., 505.983.5319

11a-8p, Tue.-Sat.; 11a-5p, Sun. bobcatbite.com Home of the nationally-renowned green chile cheeseburger, this family-owned-and-operated country kitsch roadside cabin has attracted crowds of locals and visitors since 1953. It has been featured on the Food Network and in every gourmet magazine for its steaks, chops and super burgers. The short, simple menu includes hamburgers, cheeseburgers with or without green chile or bacon, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sandwich, pork chops, ham steak, rib eye steak and sides of home fries, potato salad, pasta salad or cole slaw. The burgers run $7.40-$10.40, while steaks and dinner items range from $16.55-$23.55.

O’Keeffe Café 217 Johnson, 505.986.2008

Coyote Café 132 W. Water, 505.983.1615

5:30-9p, Sun.-Thu.; 5:30-10p, Fri.-Sat. coyotecafe.com Since 1987, when celebrity chef Mark Miller introduced modern Southwest cooking, this foodie destination has offered exciting tastes, a wide spectrum of wine as well as innovative cocktails. Signature starters include Grilled Lobster and Chilled Heirloom Tomato Consomme ($15), Asian Seared Hawaiian Ahi Tuna and Foie Gras ($22), and

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

11:30a-2:30p Mon.-Sun.; 5:30p-close, Wed.-Sun. okeeffecafe.com Adjacent to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, this was once a billet for Union officers during the Civil War and is a seven-time winner of the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence. The indoor dining room features photographic momentos of the artist’s life in northern New Mexico, and the outdoor terrace is superb in warm weather. The contemporary cuisine is based in classic French


SANTA FE culinary techniques, and first courses include Sauteed Ruby Trout ($12), Roasted Yellow Corn Flan ($12) and Oxtail Strudel ($12). Entrees feature Wild Mushroom Risotto ($22), Pink Horseradish Encrusted Salmon ($27), Braised Boneless Lamb Shank ($28) and Apple Cider Brined Center Cut Pork Chop ($27).

Tonnato (thin roast veal in a tuna sauce, $10). Pizzas include Margherita ($10), Funghi e Tartufi ($13), Frutti Di Mare ($14) and Toscana ($12). Pastas feature Spaghetti Putanesca ($12.50), Lasagna di magro ($13) and Penne Quattro Formaggi (four cheeses, $12).

Raaga

3462 Zafarano, 505.471.6800

544 Agua Fria, 505.820.6440

11a-10p, Mon.-Thu.; 11a-11p, Fri.-Sat.; Noon-9p, Sun. sfcapitolgrill.com The Capitol Grill is a modern and trendy all-purpose sandwich spot, steak house and quality bar where locals, moviegoers and visitors alike can relax in comfortable booths with satisfying portions and good service. Sandwiches include Prime Rib Philly Style ($12.49), Reuben ($12.49), Turkey Cranberry Panini ($9.99) and Chicken Club ($10.99). There’s a Caesar Salad ($8.99) and a Seared Ahi Tuna Salad as well as Habanero Honey Chicken Wings ($8.99), Steamed Mussels ($11.99) and Sweet Chile Calamari ($9.99).

11:30a-9:30p, Sun.-Thu.; 11:30a-10p, Fri.-Sat. raagacuisine.com This is the latest Indian food palace to set up shop in Santa Fe. Chef Paddy Rawal is a master of Northern Indian fare, which incorporates Southwest elements and includes vegetarian and vegan options as well as meat and seafood choices. Everything can be ordered mild, medium or hot and all of the food is fresh and flavorful. Curries include nine chicken varieties (Korma, Zafran, Vindaloo, Palak, Madras, Kadhai, Makhani, Tikka Masala ($13.95-$15.95), lamb curries (four types: Roganjosh, Korma, Vindaloo, Palak, $15.95) and seafood curries ($17.95).

Santa Fe Capitol Grill

Jinja Bar & Bistro 510 N. Guadalupe, 505.982.4321

Pizzeria Da Lino 204 N. Guadalupe, 505.982.8474

11:30a-2p, 4p-close, Mon.-Sat.; 4p-close, Sun. pizzeriadalino.com

A large outdoor patio ideal for summer and fall meals and an inviting Italian dining room make this one of the city’s newer authentic accomplishments with fine pizzas, pastas and salads in the true Italian style. Starters include a complete Antipasto a Modo Mio ($11), Minestrone Rustico ($5.95-$7.95) and Vitello

11a-10p, Mon.-Fri.; Noon-10p, Sat.-Sun. jinjabistro.com This is the original location of Jinja Bar & Bistro and, like the two Albuquerque locations, has a modern, comfortable atmosphere, a long attractive bar and one of the best Asian menus in town. There are lots of tropical drinks and the creative Nuevo pan-Asian specialties are delightful. Try the Vietnamese Shaking Beef Tenderloin in a tangy lime sauce with jasmine rice ($16.95). It’s chic and fashionable with a variety of innovative dishes.

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

Touting the bright flavors that accompany dishes like the fish tacos (left) and the sweet corn chowder (right), it is no wonder Mark Miller’s Coyote Café has become a fixture in the Santa Fe dining scene.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

11


EAT! EAT! DRINK! RINK! ABQ! ABQ! WELCOME TO LOCAL IQ’S ANNUAL EAT! DRINK! ABQ! ISSUE, where our team of food writers compile a list of

all the great places to eat in Albuquerque — from simple taco stands to swanky fine dining havens. This year we’ve done our best to provide a comprehensive guide to just about everywhere you can grab a bite to eat in town, but truthfully, we know we haven’t covered everything (even after checking in with a handful of local celebs). So use this list with a grain of salt, so to speak. You’ll find a fabulous cross-section of local dining establishments in the pages that follow — a snapshot, of sorts, of Albuquerque’s evolving status as a food-savvy city. We also suggest keeping this issue on the coffee table for the next 12 months, because you’re going to need it.

ASIAN

PACIFIC RIM ASIAN BISTRO

MR. POWDRELL’S BARBEQUE HOUSE

ASIAN GRILL 5303 Gibson SE, 505.265.4702

10721 Montgomery NE, 505.271.0920

11309 Central NE, 505.328.0552 5209 4th NW, 505.345.8086

asiangrillabq.com

pacificrimabq.com

mrpowdrellsbbq.com

Asian grill, situated in a strip mall in the International District, is fairly short on ambience, but who cares when the food is this good? Try the large bowl of vermicelli with grilled prawns and pork.

This Northeast Heights Asian restaurant is huge and includes a long sushi bar, a comfortable cocktail bar and a beautiful, serene patio. Diners here can choose from a wide variety of menu items, from sushi to shabu shabu.

Mr. Powdrell left a legacy of fine barbecue that lives on at his Albuquerque restaurants, where slow smoking and a signature sauce have been tantalizing New Mexicans since the 1960s.

STREETFOOD ASIA

801 Yale SE, 505.843.7505 3700 Ellison NW, 505.897.3341 4516 Wyoming NE, 505.299.9864

CHOW’S ASIAN BISTRO 10000 Coors Bypass, 505.899.6889 720 St. Michaels, Santa Fe, 505.471.7120

mychows.com

Chow’s signature dish is a modern gourmet twist on Chinese food. Alongside traditional Asian dishes, the extensive menu features such standouts as Walnut Shrimp (fried shrimp in a sweet cream sauce topped with sugared walnuts) and Lemon Fish (wok-seared, battered basa in a sweet lemon sauce with spicy cucumbers). FAN TANG 3523 Central NE, 505.266.3566

fan-tang.com

Run by the family that owns Chow’s, Fan Tang is one of the city’s newest eateries. The style is elegant-casual, with orders placed at the spacious entry counter and food delivered to your table. The Coffee Chicken — chicken rubbed in fineground French roast and stir fried in a sweet and spicy sauce — is a dining addiction. JINJA BAR & BISTRO 5400 Sevilla, 505.792.8776 8900 Holly NE, 505.856.1413 510 North Guadalupe, Santa Fe, 505.982.4321

jinjabistro.com

Numerous delectable and light Asian-inspired dishes highlight the menu at this trio of eateries, where a thoughtfully designed atmosphere and an emphasis on fine cocktails make for a comfortable hangout. KOKORO JAPANESE RESTAURANT 5614 Menaul NE, 505.830.2061

The no-frills approach of Kokoro is not only a very comforting element for Japanese food lovers who have actually been to Japan, it has earned the restaurant high critical praise as one of the state’s most authentic Japanese eateries. LIGHT & HEALTHY MIRAI EXPRESS 120 Harvard SE, 505.265.5436

WRITTEN BY

Steven J. Westman, Lindsey Little, Jessey Cherne, Jessica Depies and Mike English PHOTOS BY

Wes Naman and Joy Godfrey

12

In the heart of the bustling UNM area is a culinary gem that serves a number of traditional Japanese dishes, such as Shoyu Ramen, tonkatsu, Spicy Tuna Don and a number of not-so-standard (read: enlightening) Japanese dishes.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

3422 Central SE, 505.260.0088

streetfoodasiaabq.com

Asian tapas, dumplings, satay, a noodle bar and specialty teas — there’s something exciting at every turn at Streetfood Asia, where dishes from a wide variety of Asian cities meet the streets of Albuquerque. TAO’S ASIAN BISTRO 3301 Southern, Rio Rancho, 505.962.0168

taochinesebistro.com

The word “tao” is translated as “way” or “route,” and Tao’s Chinese Bistro is the assured path to a tasty cuisine and a peaceful feng shui environment. While chef Johnny Lee serves traditional dishes like sweet and sour pork, the fresh ingredients make for an elevated dining experience. OTHER NOTABLES:

GUANG-DONG CHINESE RESTAURANT 407 W Hwy 550, 505.867.2272

ICHIBAN JAPANESE RESTAURANT 10701 Corrales, 505.899.0095

ichiban-alb.com

BARBECUE

QUARTERS BBQ

thequartersbbq.com

One of the city’s most iconic places to enjoy great barbecue. Family-run, family-friendly, and also a spot for a well-poured cocktail or draft beer. RUDY’S COUNTRY STORE & BAR-B-Q 10136 Coors NW, 505.890.7113 2321 Carlisle NE, 505.884.4000

rudys.com

The red and white checkerboard picnic tables and giant rolls of paper towels at Rudy’s should tell barbecue lovers all they need to know. After all, the home office of this chain is in Texas. However, Rudy’s has grown to become a beloved local institution in New Mexico. If you want a real treat, order the smoked potato, top it with moist brisket and slather the whole thing with barbecue sauce. OTHER NOTABLES:

JOHNDHI’S BBQ 3851 Rio Grande NW, 505.245.3354

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 4000 Barbara, Rio Rancho, 505.892.1914

WHOLE HOG CAFE 9880 Montgomery NE, 505.323.0400

COUNTY LINE BBQ 9600 Tramway NE, 505.856.7477

countyline.com

County Line’s atmosphere — patio dining on the upper flanks of the Sandias — is the perfect complement to its exceptional ribs, steaks and barbecue sauces. THE CUBE RESTAURANT 1520 Central SE, 505.243.0023

thecuberestaurant.com

Barbecue isn’t a type of food that requires a clean and modern atmosphere, but that is what diners get at The Cube. A definite cut above the rest, The Cube offers delectable ‘cue, hamburgers, salads and comfort food, alongside one of the city’s most inventive hot dog rosters. A favorite is the “505 Dog,” wrapped in bacon, green chile and avocado! PEPPER’S OLE FASHION BBQ 303 San Pedro NE, 505.232.7685

Southern fare highlights this Texas-style barbecue joint that is short on atmosphere but big on flavor. Pair sumptuous collard greens and rich sweet potato pie, fried okra, and mac ‘n’ cheese with some of the city’s best smoked meats.

BURGER JOINTS BRGR 301 Central NW, 505.224.2747

brgrabq.com

Located at a busy Downtown corner is a burger joint that doesn’t seem at all like a joint, were it not for the two dozen (mostly local) craft brews on tap. And why limit it to beef when brgr carries kangaroo, bison, lamb and even yak? FIVE STAR BURGERS 5901 Wyoming NE, 505.821.1909

5starburgers.com

Originally established in Taos, local burger fanatics were thrilled when Five Star set up shop in a nondescript strip mall in the NE heights. The food and service here are top notch, but what’s really crazy is that one of the tastiest burgers on the menu is the veggie burger! HOLY COW 700 Central Ave SE, 505.242.2991

Take an old drive-in and make it shiny and new and amazing. That’s what happened this summer in EDO. Mouthwatering flavorful burgers are


WHERE I EAT NOW

LEAH BLACK VJ, MY50-TV

PHO #1

Order the beef noodle soup with well-done or rare steak. I love the broth, and getting to add all the yummy fixins, and it’s a pleasure to be well taken care of by the 13-year-old who seems to run the place. And it’s cheap! If you’ve never had pho, ya gotta try it!

IL VICINO IN NOB HILL

SUMO SUSHI

They’re always super friendly and remember my order. All the rolls are awesome, but I’m a sucker for the Salmon Nigiri with some paper-thin lemon slices on the side. Excellent!

the draw. So is the beer, and the staff, and a simple menu that you will want to eat your way through, visit after visit. LUMPY’S BURGERS 5420 Central SW, 505.833.1300

Write your order on a paper bag? Choose your own raw potato and how you want your fries cut? Eat one of the best 100 percent Angus beef burgers you’ll ever eat? Where to sign up? OTHER NOTABLES:

BURGERS DOGS WINGS 1311 Juan Tabo NE, 505.292.5898

burgersdogswings.com

THE GRILL 4615 Menaul NE, 505.872.9772

CAFÉS CAFÉ GREEN 319 5th SW, 505.842.1600

Owners Kyle and Camila Weaver have built a large following at what has become a Downtown dining must for seekers of fresh, quality ingredients presented in a light, airy atmosphere. Try the truffle oil french fries and any sandwich on the menu or indulge in the sweet and/or savory crepes. A fulfilling and satisfying brunch menu is well worth a weekend visit. DOWNTOWN JAVA JOE’S 906 Park SW, 505.765.1514

downtownjavajoes.com

A comfortable Downtown neighborhood coffee haven that features fresh baked goods along with tasty breakfast and lunch fare. Don’t be surprised to walk in on a classical musical trio or folkie playing in the corner. GOLD STREET CAFFÉ 218 Gold SW, 505.765.1633

With a lot of change happening in Downtown ABQ — places coming and going — Gold Street Caffe remains a delicious

Great staff, delicious locally brewed craft beer and nothing bad on the menu. But my “usual” is the Il Vicino salad. It’s got everything in it and is super-filling. Oh, and make sure you drizzle some of their house-made chile oil on top. Yummy!

little nook where one can enjoy something delectable at either breakfast, lunch or dinner. The spicy sunburst chicken salad is a meal to smile about. THE GROVE CAFE & MARKET 600 Central SE, 505.248.9800

thegrovecafemarket.com

Did EDO give birth to The Grove, or was it the other way around? This local artisan breakfast and lunch hangout serves consistently excellent food and drink, all with a flair tailored to the neighborhood. THE OWL CAFÉ

Southwest. Those looking for a change in scenery will find it in the astute atmosphere and varied tea and treat selections. Insider tip: take your time here; this is anything but a fast food experience. OTHER NOTABLES:

CAFÉ GUISSEPPE 3222 Silver SE, 505 268 1858

cafegiuseppe.com

FLYING STAR Multiple Locations

flyingstarcafe.com

LE CHANTILLY 8216 Menaul NE, 505.293.7057

lechantillybakery.com

800 Eubank NE, 505.291.4900

The Owl is a true ‘50s-style diner that makes its home inside a giant, stuccoed owl, and has been made famous by its green chile cheese burgers spawned at its original location an hour south in San Antonio, N.M. This is a fun place for kids to get their soda-fountain fix and moms, dads and grandfolks to relive the past via a booth-side jukebox. THE RANGE CAFÉ 925 S Camino Del Pueblo, 505.867.1700 4401 Wyoming NE, 505.293.2633 2200 Menaul NE, 505.888.1660

rangecafe.com

What started out in Bernalillo as a breakfast sanctum, has slowly taken root in two Albuquerque locations. Seven days a week, with breakfast, lunch and dinner, the food is fresh and the baked goods are nothing short of incredible — home-style cooking this good usually is. ST. JAMES TEA ROOM 320 Osuna NE 505.242.3752

LATIN AMERICAN GUAVA TREE CAFE 216 Yale SE, 505.990.2599

guavatreecafe.com/gtcwp

This small, friendly and colorful cafe near UNM features Latin American flavors unique to Central and South America and the Caribbean. arepas (corn cake sandwiches akin to gorditas) and aijaco (Colombian-style chicken) are just a couple of the unique tastes that await curious diners. PUPUSERÍA Y RESTAURANTE SALVADOREÑO 1701 Bridge SW, 505.243.8194

Pupusas are thick, white corn masa cakes, patted by hand, stuffed and then grilled. Most of the fillings are familiar to American palates — eggs, beans, salami, spinach. The concept? Not as much, but certainly worth your palate’s time and attention.

stjamestearoom.com

With an always-elegant atmosphere, this nationally ranked tea room is a one-ofa-kind dining experience for restaurant-goers throughout the

OTHER NOTABLES:

HAVANA RESTAURANT 5331 Menaul NE, 505.830.2025

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

13


EAT! DRINK! ABQ! • WHERE TO EAT NOW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

DINERS 66 DINER 1405 Central NE, 505.247.1421

66diner.com

Purely Americana-style diner food, a la 1950s, 66 Diner has stood the test of time. Perky waiters and waitresses in bright turquoise sock-hop outfits diligently serve up tasty dishes, such as chile con queso, chicken fried chicken, meatloaf and thick, rich milkshakes. Go local and order a signature Pile Up (with red and green). MILTON’S FAMILY RESTAURANT 725 Central NE, 505.842.5291

Remember the “I love you honey bunny” diner scene in Pulp Fiction? It could have easily been filmed at this longstanding Albuquerque diner, which serves a huge menu of honest American food at down-to-earth prices, as well as New Mexican and Greek favorites. ROUTE 66 MALT SHOP & GRILL

STANDARD DINER

LA CREPE MICHEL

320 Central SE, 505.243.1440

400 San Felipe NW, 505.242.1251

standarddiner.com

lacrepemichel.com

Standard’s elegant twist on American diner favorites result in a unique food genre (avant garde comfort food?) that oozes old school supper club in a sleek, contemporary setting. Case in point: the bourbon butter burger with truffle fries — anything but standard.

La Crepe Michel offers wellcrafted, authentic French food — soupe l’oignon, escargots, crepes and steak frites — in the heart of sleepy Old Town Albuquerque. Culture clash or merely “le petite Français?” LE QUICHE PARISIENNE BISTRO 401 Copper NW #A, 505.242.2808

laquicheparisienne.com

FRENCH BRASSERIE LA PROVENCE 3001 Central NE, 505.254.7644

laprovencenobhill.com

Known for serving genuine, yet humble French dishes in a very low key atmosphere, this Nob Hill eatery has undergone a quiet shift in recent months. Chef Claus Hjortkjaer — former owner and executive chef of the now defunct Le Café Miche — has taken over the show and put his own personal stamp on the menu. Whether it be coq au vin or cassoulet, delicious French standards abound here.

This Downtown urban bistro has built a loyal local following, many of whom claim that this very accessible but hidden bakery produces the best croissants in town. Locals know best. P’TIT LOUIS BISTRO 228 Gold SW, 505.314.1111

ptitlouisbistro.com

Quaintly reminiscent of a classic, turn-of-the-century Paris bistro, P’tit Louis effortlessly pairs wonderful, classic French fare with a unique 1920s atmosphere. Be sure to make (lunch only) reservations and don’t you dare leave without tasting the escargots.

GREEK/MIDDLE EASTERN MYKONOS CAFÉ & TAVERNA

UNM Area Indian eatery. Add to that Rasoi’s richly colored walls and fabrics, which offer a fleeting sense of cultural escapism. TAJ MAHAL

5900 Eubank NE, 505.291.1116

1430 Carlisle NE, 505.255.1994

mykonoscafeandtaverna-2. com

tajmahalcuisineofindia.com

Greek food can be a welcome respite in New Mexico’s sea of green chile dining scene, and Mykonos offers a large menu of traditional Greek favorites, including nostimos (delicious) baklava.

Though an affordable daily lunch buffet — one that seemingly attracts the entire neighborhood to fill a plate — is the signature of this well-established Indian restaurant, Taj Mahal’s extensive menu is a tempting lure any time of day.

OLYMPIA CAFE 2210 Central SE, 505.266.5222

olympiacafeabq.com

It was 1972 when Spiros and Marina Counelis opened the UNM area’s first Greek restaurant. Close to 40 years later (and now owned by Charlie Akkad) it’s still a favorite to many, likely due to the oversized gyros or over-the-top galaktoboureko (custard baked with pastry). PARS CUISINE 4320 The 25 Way NE, 505.345.5156

parscuisine.us

ITALIAN AMICI 4243 Montgomery NE, 505.884.9900

amiciofalbuquerque.com

TULLY’S MEAT MARKET 1425 San Mateo NE #A, 505.255.5370

Italian tradition means quality meats and cheeses, homemade sausage, healthy sandwiches and, of course, family. The Camuglia clan has been providing all of the above since the 1970s at the only true Italian deli in the city. VIVACE 3118 Central SE, 505.268.5965

vivacenobhill.com

A Nob Hill staple that’s never lost its neighborhood vibe, even while expanding from one room to two. Vivace’s lineup of Italian cuisine includes the ever-popular Rigatoni Garibaldi among many other tasty dishes, along with a stellar roster of Italian wines.

Just about any Italian dish you could desire — pizzas, pastas, paninis, calzones and salads — is on the menu at Amici. Wash it down with a sparkling Pellegrino. Singing “That’s Amore” is entirely optional.

OTHER NOTABLES:

MARIO’S PIZZA & RISTORANTE

TROMBINO’S BISTRO ITALIANO

CARUSO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 5626 Menaul NE, 505.884.3050

NICKY V’S 9780 Coors Suite A, 505.890.9463

nickyvs.com

Fire-cooked kabobs are the specialty at this oasis of Persian/Mediterraneann cuisine located at Jefferson and I-25, an Albuquerque staple since 1984. Relax with a post-meal cup of tea in the samovar bar or a puff of fruit-flavored tobacco in the hookah bar.

2401 San Pedro NE, 505.883.4414

5415 Academy NE, 505.821.5974

mariospizzaabq.com

bistroitaliano.com

SAHARA MIDDLE EASTERN EATERY

1935 Eubank NE, 505.298.7541

2622 Central SE, 505.255.5400

MARTIN HEINRICH

Whether you need an introduction to Middle Eastern cuisine, or you have loved it for years, UNM Area favorite Sahara doles out myriad Middle Eastern flavors. The Shawarma will not disappoint.

Open since the 1970s, this Albuquerque dining landmark claims to “cook like your Italian grandma.” But even if you’re not Italian, you can at least eat like you are at Paisano’s, which offers well-honed dishes like pastas with basil pesto or clam sauce, pizza, paninis, veal, fish, poultry or beef.

U.S. Representative, New Mexico District 1

YANNI’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

SCALO NORTHERN ITALIAN GRILL

3109 Central NE, 505.268.9250

3500 Central SE, 505.255.8781

yannisandopabar.com

scalonobhill.com

This always-bustling Nob Hill fixture continually draws diners in with delectable dishes like the lemony grilled chicken delight Kotopoulo, the parmesan encrusted Grilled Yellow Fin Sole, or the finely tuned service.

From salads to pasta dishes to prime cuts of beef and delicious pesce entrees, this landmark Nob Hill restaurant looks to northern Italian provinces for inspiration. Try the penne con salsiccia or Bistecca (if only for the delightful gorgonzola risotto cake), and be sure to visit the bar for a handcrafted cocktail or to order from the deep and astutely designed wine list.

3800 Central SE, 505.242.7866

CHEZ AXEL 6209 Montgomery NE, 505.881.8104

route66maltshop.com

chezaxelrestaurant.com

Even though it has moved from its original Downtown location to a shiny new, neon-lit Nob Hill location, this unique malt shop still remains on Route 66, and still serves ‘50s-era diner food with style.

Oozing with ambiance, Chez Axel is a romantic place to dine on elegant French favorites like frog legs, snails, flambé and trout Amadine and beef Bourguignon.

OTHER NOTABLES:

LE PARIS FRENCH BAKERY 1439-1441 Eubank NE, 505.299.4141

leparisfrenchbakery.com

saharamiddleeasterneatery. com

WHERE I EAT NOW

Farina Pizzeria & Wine Bar

Brick oven pizza and local beer. It doesn’t get much better than that. Except at Farina, it does. Their local, fresh ingredients and friendly atmosphere make this a perfect place for a quick lunch or to bring my family for dinner. I usually order the Carni Curate pizza and I add green chile, but I’ve found that I never regret straying from my usual to taste one of their creative daily specials. Barelas Coffee House

The people you’ll run into at Barelas warm the heart just as much as the chile does. This is a neighborhood joint at its best — and one of the best ways to feel the pulse of New Mexico politics. My favorite meal here is breakfast: huevos rancheros with red chile. If I’m going big, I’ll also order a side of chicharrónes with warm tortillas

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OTHER NOTABLES:

GYROS MEDITERRANEAN

and butter for the table to share. Café Trang

Located in the heart of the International District, Café Trang is my favorite place for Vietnamese food. My wife, Julie, and I will do our shopping at Ta Lin Market, and then the craving for Ph takes over. We like to bookend our meal with fresh spring rolls and one of their delicious fruit ice creams. You’ll want to beg the folks at this family-owned gem for their recipes, which use slow-cooked meats and authentic spices. We always leave Café Trang feeling happy and healthy.

106 Cornell SE # A, 505.255.4401

Mario’s hand-tossed gourmet pies await any topping you could possibly dream up. This casual Italian restaurant offers large and flavorful calzones, salads and pizzas. PAISANO’S paisanosabq.com

MEXICAN BANDIDO HIDEOUT RESTAURANT 2128 Central SE, 505.242.5366

This UNM area fixture serves genuine Mexican food at reasonable prices in a colorful atmosphere. Bring an appetite for the bottomless chips and salsa and ample portions, and drop by Friday night for a festive atmosphere that often features live mariachi music. CASA DE BENAVIDEZ 8032 4th NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 505.897.7493

The draw at Casa De Benavidez is the lush patio. The not-sohidden bonus? For one, the Sopaipilla Burger. For two, the Sopaipilla Burger. CERVANTES RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 5801 Gibson SE, 505.262.2253

cervantessalsa.com

On one side you have the well-lit restaurant, and on the other the dark red, velvet-covered walls with deep booths. Either way, you get a yummy meal. The South of the Border (SOB) is chicken-fried steak smothered in chile, and goes down quite well with one of the many margarita options.

INDIAN

TORINO’S @ HOME

INDIA PALACE

7600 Jefferson NE, suite 21, 505.797.4491

4410 Wyoming NE, 505.271.5009 10701 Corrales NW, 505.898.4188

torinosfoods.com

1431 Wyoming NE, 505.299.2882

The owners of Torino’s @ Home arrived in Albuquerque from the culinarily savvy environs of Nice, France. Thankfully, they brought along with them a decadent display of savory indulgences. You won’t find many other places that make their own pasta from scratch or host dinner nights featuring genuine Italian food.

elnorteno.com

Authentic Indian food and flavor finds a home in the NE Heights with both a distinctive lunch buffet and dinner menu. RASOI INDIAN KITCHEN 110 Yale SE, 505.268.5327

rasoiabq.com

Satisfying lamb, chicken and vegetarian dishes, from either the regular menu or buffet, are the attraction at this comfortable

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

EL NORTEÑO

A full menu of Mexican-style beef and pork dishes, from Carne Asada to Tamales de Puerco, is rounded out with south-of-theborder seafood servings like Camarones en Salsa Chipotle or Pescado Norteño. The Zuni location is closed, but the food is as good as ever on Wyoming.


EAT! DRINK! ABQ! • WHERE TO EAT NOW JO’S PLACE

TAQUERIA MEXICO

6100-B 4th NW, 505.341.4500

415 Lomas NE, 505.242.3445

The name might strike you as average American, but Jo’s Place is all about contemporary Mexican food. The Mole Pueblo Burger with jack cheese and the Huitlacoche Mexican Mushroom Burger are just two of the creations that you won’t find elsewhere.

Conveniently located in Downtown, this restaurant is the product of a Durango, Mexico family that consistently makes great Mexican food at a pretty price. Go for the a la carte taco varieties or, for something a little different, try the relleno burrito.

MARISCOS ALTAMAR

CORONADO RESTAURANT AND CANTINA

640 Coors, 505.831.1496

ABQ is far from the coast, but you wouldn’t know it when seated at Mariscos Altamar dining on camarones, mojarra and ceviche. Especially after it has been washed down with an icy cold cerveza.

OTHER NOTABLES:

781 Highway 550, 505.867.3939

LOS EQUIPALES 4500 Silver SE, 505.265.1300

losequipales.com

WACO’S TACOS 317 Central NW, 505.848.8226

NEW MEXICAN

EL BRUNO’S CUBA RESTAURANTE Y CANTINA

BARELAS COFFEE HOUSE

8806 4th NW, 505.897.0444

1502 4th SW, 505.843.7577

elbrunos.com

Barelas is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city and Barelas Coffee House is where most locals in the area go on a weekly basis to get their chile fix. Hint: if locals like it, you simply can’t go wrong.

Ever stopped for a bite to eat in Cuba, N.M., on your way to Navajo Lake or the Four Corners area? Most likely you know El Bruno’s. Now, this most-savory New Mexican restaurant has found a home on 4th Street (just north of Paseo del Norte) and given

DURAN’S CENTRAL PHARMACY

non-traveling locals a chance to partake. Recommendation for first-timers: the combo plate with carne adovada and red chile enchiladas. EL PATIO DE ALBUQUERQUE

of it all. Fresh New Mexican fare is served up in a house turned eatery. You quickly understand why, on any given day, folks are waiting on the sidewalk to get their red chile enchiladas.

142 Harvard SE, 505.268.4245

As the Harvard Mall near UNM has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years, El Patio has remained nestled in the middle

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

1815 Central NW, 505.247.4141

durancentralpharmacy.com

This restaurant/pharmacy combination has some of the best red chile around, plus a tasty menu that features handrolled tortillas.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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EAT! DRINK! ABQ! • WHERE TO EAT NOW WHERE I EAT NOW LOS CUATES

SERAFIN’S CHILE HUT 3718 Central SE, 505.266.0029

10500 4th NW, 505.898.1771

4901 Lomas NE, 505.255.5079 8700 Menaul NE, 505.237.2800 750 N. St. Francis, Santa Fe, 505.922.5800

elpinto.com

loscuatesrestaurants.com

Many wedding receptions have been attended at this far-North Valley fave. Compound-like, enormous cottonwoods overhead and a big New Mexican menu sure to please everyone make it a mecca for many.

Slow down on those chips and red chile salsa, because meal portions — everything you could ask of New Mexican fare — are generous here, not to mention that basket of sopaipillas that follows the meal.

Each and every dish packs a punch of spicy New Mexican flavor at this Nob Hill eatery, where the chile rellenos, carne adovada and green chile cheeseburgers are all favorites. Grab a Dos Equis with a lime wedge and hang out on the patio overlooking Central.

LA HACIENDA RESTAURANT & CANTINA

MONICA’S EL PORTAL

TACO SAL

321 Rio Grande NW, 505.247.9625

9621 Menaul NE, 505.298.2210

302 San Felipe NW, 505.243.3131

Old Town is nice this time of year, but often packed to the gills with foot traffic. Locals only tip: on the West Side of Rio Grande in Old Town sits Monica’s, which makes delicious, authentic New Mexican fare that doesn’t require a huge wait.

tacosal.com

SADIE’S DINING ROOM

LOS COMPADRES

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

EL PINTO RESTAURANT

An old town gem for over 70 years, in a 100-year-old structure. Stop by during a daytime stroll for some chips and salsa and a traditional margarita. CECILIA’S CAFE 230 6th SW, 505.243.7070

A restaurant takes the place of an old casita, but the food tastes as if it is coming straight from your grandmother’s kitchen. There are few menus in Albuquerque with items that taste as delicious and homemade as Cecilia’s. LA SALITA 1217 Eubank NE, 505.299.9968

Signatures at La Salita, which translates as “The Sitting Room,” include sopaipillas that never fail to melt on your tongue and chile that makes your mouth water.

6230 4th NW, 505.345.5339 10300 Hotel NE, 505.296.6940

sadiesofnewmexico.com

A cornerstone of Albuquerquean culture, Sadie’s salsa is just one of the purely New Mexican foods on their extensive, filling and always satisfying, menu. SANDIAGO’S MEXICAN GRILL AT THE TRAM 38 Tramway NE, 505.856.6692

Located at the base of the Sandia Mountains, Sandiago’s boasts one of the best views of the city. A giant margarita and a plate of fish tacos make the scenery even better.

serafinschilehut.com

Family owned and cozy, this restaurant has excellent service and flavorful tacos and enchiladas. OTHER NOTABLES:

KATHY’S CARRY OUT

MORNING AND MIDDAY ANCHOR, KOB EYEWITNESS NEWS 4

Breakfast: The Range Cafe

So, it’s kind of misleading to say this is my favorite restaurant considering the fact that I eat one thing and one thing only at The Range: Huevos con Queso. It’s like Eggs Benedict but covered in queso, so how can it not be awesome? I’ve come this close to ordering something else … but I would feel like I’m cheating on my favorite breakfast dish.

823 Isleta SW, 505.873.3472 424 Isleta SW, 505.452.8091 6910 Montgomery NE, 505.883.3040

MONROE’S NEW MEXICAN FOOD 6051 Osuna NE, 505.881.4224 1520 Lomas NW, 505.242.1111

monroeschile.com

RED BALL CAFE 1301 4th SW, 505.247.9438

redballcafe.com

Lunch: The Grove

Pretty much everything on the menu here is awesome. My staple is the Croque Madame but sometimes I stray and order the special on weekends. The Grove never disappoints, especially when you have a Red Velvet Cupcake to start your meal (you won’t regret it). Whenever my friends wanna have girls lunch, this is always my choice. If you go on a weekend, don’t be intimidated by the line. It always moves

quickly and there is always a seat once you order your food. Dinner: Marcello’s Chophouse

I’m not gonna lie. I’ve only eaten here twice because it’s out of my usual price range, but both times it was to die for. I like to start off with oysters and a bowl of lobster bisque. Then it’s the Chophouse Cut Steak and an order of crab legs. For side dishes I love the green chile mashed potatoes, truffled mac ‘n’ cheese and creamed spinach. Creme brulée for dessert. Now that I look at that list … maybe it would be in my price range if i didn’t order so much food?

PIZZA OLD TOWN PIZZA PARLOR 108 Rio Grande NW, 505.999.1949

oldtownpizzaparlor.com

An intimate, neighborly feel fills this Old Town pizzeria, where friendly service is a signature and a lunch buffet offers everything from green chile and pepperoni pizza to tasty calzones. FARINA PIZZERIA & WINE BAR 510 Central SE, 505.243.0130

farinapizzeria.com

Pizza as high art is the best way to describe Farina — Salsiccia, Funghi, Bianca, it doesn’t matter what you order, it’s all amazing.

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ANTOINETTE ANTONIO

A thoughtful Italian wine list and lively vintage/urban atmosphere add to the experience. The Butterscotch Budino seals the deal.

IL VICINO WOOD OVEN PIZZA

BRICKYARD PIZZA

3403 Central NE, 505.266.7855 11225 Montgomery NE, 505.271.0882 10701 Coors Blvd NW, 505.899.7500

brickyardpizza.com

GIOVANNI’S PIZZERIA

2381 Aztec NE, 505.881.2737

921 San Pedro SE, 505.255.1233

ilvicino.com

giovannispizzaalbuquerque. com

Il Vicino has a recipe for success: good pizza, top-notch brewed beer and other tantalizing items for a fan base of patrons. With three thriving locations in town, all that was needed was a place where you can truly test the brew. Enter the new IVB Canteen — loads of fun with frequent live music and a pub menu.

New York pizza is best eaten in New York. New York pizza eaten in New Mexico is best eaten at Giovanni’s. Off the beaten path, yes, but so worth it once you get there.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

IVB CANTEEN

2216 Central SE, 505.262.2216

Lay a foundation of pizza, wings, sandwiches and salads, add a healthy choice of beer and wine, throw in multiple flat-screen TVs and you have a lively eatery that draws a regular UNM area crowd.

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EAT! DRINK! ABQ! • WHERE TO EAT NOW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16

JC’S NEW YORK PIZZA DEPARTMENT 215 Central NW, 505.766.6973

jcnypd.com

Pizza and calzone fanatics unite! The fare served up in this Downtown location tastes like it’s straight from a Manhattan pizzeria. Top it off with cannoli or tiramisu.

SAGGIO’S

SCARPAS

107 Cornell SE, 505.255.5454

5500 Academy NE, 505.821.1885 9700 Montgomery NE, 505.323.0222

saggios.com

Watch the game or just admire the pop culture designs on the walls of this Italian ristorante. Anyone who has set foot in the UNM area knows that Saggio’s is a go-to for pizza and other Italian food. If a slice doesn’t fill you up, be sure to pick up a cannoli — both Saggio’s and Italy’s most famous dessert.

Thin-crust pizzas and flavorful salads define this Italian eatery. Stop by for lunch, and that chalkboard of specials will never fail to impress.

place for a refreshing pause from your Nob Hill wanderings. Choose a draft from a plethora of craft beer taps. OTHER NOTABLES:

MIMMO’S RISTORANTE & PIZZERIA 3301 Coors NW, 505.831.4191

SLICE PARLOR

mimmosabq.com

3410 Central SE, 505.232.2808

SLICES PIZZA

sliceparlor.com

Slice Parlor, newly opened, dishes up generous-sized slices of New York-style ‘za in a casual atmosphere. The bar is a great

102 4th SW, 505.843.9999

slicespizzajoint.com

Monroe’s New Mexican Food

800 Rio Grande NW, 505.222.8718

Sitting in one of the many plush lounge chairs at Q Bar, sipping on handcrafted cocktails, one would never know they were just a five minute walk from the Old Town Plaza. A great escape.

MARBLE BREWERY 111 Marble NW, 505.243.2739

TURTLE MOUNTAIN BREWING CO.

marblebrewery.com

905 36th Place, 505.994.9497

THE BLACKBIRD BUVETTE 509 Central NW, 505.243.0878

blackbirdbuvette.com

Blackbird calls itself a “micro club,” and takes that identity seriously, with a solid lineup of live music and DJs. But this Downtown destination also delivers a fat menu of far-aboveaverage handmade burgers and veggie burgers, as well as sandwiches and salads.

Monroe’s has some tasty Mexican food, set in a simple family style environment. It is close to Albuquerque Little Theatre and you can go in at 6:30p with a party of 20, order full meals, eat, have dessert and still get to the theater before the show starts,

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Taqueria Mexico

This is my newest favorite “roots” fast food find. Tasty chicken quesadillas with a big plop of guacamole. Great burgers and wonderful fresh shrimp cocktail in clamato/cilantro sauce. Also fresh juices — horchata, melon, jamaica (tamarind), etc.

KELLYS BREW PUB

The crowds just keep pouring into Kellys, where house-brewed beers and pub fare, served on an expansive patio in the heart of Nob Hill is a winning combination.

PUBS AND BREWERIES

with time to spare. My favorite is their Chicken-Stuffed Chile Relleno and, of course, sopaipillas. They seem to find the largest chiles anywhere in the state.

Rob O’Niell has strived very hard to offer up some wonderful pub fare with a spectacular beer selection. Add in the best patios around the city (at both locations), and you have something to enjoy on a regular basis.

1690 Rio Rancho SE, 505.892.2026 3908 San Mateo NE, ABQ. 505.883.600 1331 Juan Tabo NE, ABQ. 505.294.0115

CISSY KING

I love the Trout Almandine at Pelicans. I can hardly order anything else, even though I love their Mussels and Blackened Ahi, too. The patio area reminds me of Buzz’s in Kailua (Oahu, Hawaii) … well, except for the view of the ocean at Buzz’s.

oniells.com

Great staff. Great drinks. Great tapas. Great sandwiches and burgers. And the Nob Hill location has a great patio. What’s not to love? Especially the Crawdaddy Cake Sammich with a pint of craft beer.

Q BAR

villagepizzacorrales.com

Pelican’s

geckosbar.com

kellysbrewpub.com

4266 Corrales Rd., Corrales, 505.898.0045

My restaurant choices lately are based on convenience and smaller portions.

3211 Central NE, 505.256.0564 3301 Juan Tabo NE, 505.293.1122

3222 Central SE, 505.262.2739

VILLAGE PIZZA

ALBUQUERQUE RESIDENT FEATURED PERFORMER, THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW

O’NIELL’S IRISH PUB

3500 Central SE, 505.262.1848 5801 Academy NE, 505.821.8291

VENEZIA’S PIZZERIA

venezias.com

WHERE I EAT NOW

GECKOS BAR & TAPAS

THE COPPER LOUNGE 1504 Central SE, 505.242.7490

Top-quality beer is the calling card at this popular tap-roomand-patio hangout, but there’s also a short-but-thoughtful food menu of grilled sandwiches and a little bit more. Try the Chama Chili for the perfect counterpoint to that IPA. NEXUS 4730 Pan American East, Suite D, 505.242.4100

nexusbrewery.com

Several breweries have opened in Albuquerque in recent years, but not many focus on food like Nexus. Fried chicken, frito pie and sweet potato fries make the ale taste that much better.

thecopperlounge.com

NOB HILL BAR & GRILL

What was once the beloved Mori’s Lounge on 4th Street is now the beloved Copper Lounge on Central Avenue. Georgia Chalamidas still serves some of the best sandwiches in town (the Reuben is to die for). Wonderful Greek and New Mexican dishes round out the menu, but it’s hard to go wrong with the heavenly chicken-fried steak.

3128 Central SE, 505.266.4455

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

upscalejoint.com

The beer-steamed clams and dirty burger are to die for, best eaten with an accompanying cheesecake of the day. And the cocktails are skillfully handcrafted, so don’t forget to order one.

turtlemountainbrewing.com

Turtle Mountain boasts a food menu that matches the quality of its beer roster. Wash down a Pecos Pretzel and chile con queso for a little twist of beer heaven. TWO FOOLS TAVERN 3211 Central NE, 505.265.7447

2foolstavern.com

Where is the craic mighty? At Two Fools, for sure. A space that is reminiscent of sitting in a tavern on the Emerald Isle, and the food is sumptuous. Especially worth relishing is the Sunday Irish brunch, or try the naughtiest bread pudding you’ll ever sink your teeth into. OTHER NOTABLES:

ABQ BREW PUB 6601 Uptown NE, 505.884.1116

uptown-sportsbar.com

FAT SQUIRREL PUB 3755 Southern SE, Rio Rancho, 505.994.9503

fatsquirrelpub.com

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EAT! DRINK! ABQ! • WHERE TO EAT NOW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

SANDWICHES AL’S BIG DIPPER 411 Central NW, 505.314.1118

alsbigdipper.com

This hip cozy, Downtown dining spot has quickly built a reputation for tasty custom sandwiches and soups. Try the 505 lunch deal: a grilled cheese sandwich on Fano Bakery bread with a cup of soup for $5.05. BAGGINS GOURMET SANDWICHES

signature Relish focus on quality ingredients and handcrafted feel. Along with stellar sandwiches like The Cubano, Relish serves incredible salads like the Chop Chop.

bacon steak at the community table for a slice of communal paradise.

ST. CLAIR WINERY & BISTRO

THE CORN MAIDEN

901 Rio Grande NW, 505.243.9916

1300 Tuyuna Trail, Santa Ana Pueblo, 505.867.1234

stclairvineyards.com

tamaya.hyatt.com

The view here is fantastic, but the food is decidedly better, with a focus on local ingredients and local history. Native culture meets nouvelle cuisine.

NEW AMERICAN

Prairie Star chef Darren McHale crafts some the area’s most innovative dishes, which pairs well with Sommelier Samuel McFall’s vast wine offerings. This is a great oner night getaway from the city.

Wine pairing has never been tastier. Sirloin steak topped with a madiera and mushroom sauce, or reisling-marinated chicken in a pot pie are just some of the dishes served with award-winning New Mexico wines. Great for groups, parties or romantic dates. Embrace the evening on the patio with live jazz music.

OTHER NOTABLES:

HANNAH AND NATE’S 4512 Corrales, 505.898.2370 6251 Riverside Plaza Lane, 505.922.1155

hannahandnates.com

THE PRAIRIE STAR RESTAURANT & WINE BAR 288 Prairie Star Rd, Santa Ana Pueblo, 505.867.3327

mynewmexicogolf.com

SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT 3310 Central SE, 505.265.9166

This Nob Hill institution serves artfully assembled nigiri and sushi rolls, but stay on your toes: Servings arrive on miniature boats that may just float right by in the sushi bar’s “moat.”

CRISTOBAL’S AT HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE

SUSHI & SAKE

800 Rio Grande NW, 505.222.8766

abqsushiandsake.com

Cristobal’s is a hidden culinary gem located in the not-so-hidden Hotel Albuquerque in Old Town. If you like quiet meals enjoyed in dim lighting, make a reservation now and thank us later.

Still relatively new in the Northeast Heights’ sushi scene, Sushi and Sake’s businesscasual style and extensive menu provide the perfect option for a quick stop at the sushi bar or a meeting over the signature rolls.

5901 Wyoming NE, 505.797.8000

ARTICHOKE CAFE

SAVOY BAR & GRILL

TERRA AMERICAN BISTRO

5900 Lomas NE, 505.262.1451

424 Central SE, 505.243.0200

1119 Alameda NW, 505.792.1700

Sandwich shops around the city get some strong competition from Baggins Gourmet Sandwiches, which offers a variety of lunch items featuring delicious, intense flavors at a reasonable price.

artichokecafe.com

10601 Montgomery NE, 505.294.9463

terrabistro.com

savoyabq.com

There’s a regular group of diners in town who will tell you Pete Lukes is one of their favorite chefs. In this off-the-beaten-path bistro on Alameda Boulevard, close to the Rio Grande, the menu and the specials are always a pure and innovative delight.

OTHER NOTABLES:

As the third arm of the Seasons/ Zinc/Savoy restaurant operation, Savoy is the newest and glistens with charm at every turn. Great service, imaginative dishes and a tasty cocktail program makes Savoy one of the few foodie destinations in the NE Heights. SEASONS

ZINC WINE BAR & BISTRO

2031 Mountain NW, 505.766.5100

3009 Central NE, 505.254.9462

5021 Pan American West, 505.344.9169

An entertaining atmosphere is the signature at Japanese kitchen, where the chefs are performers and a steakhouse and sushi bar both serve delectable fare.

seasonsabq.com

zincabq.com

nickandjimmysrestaurant.com

OTHER NOTABLES:

A New American menu accompanied by a fine wine list and full bar is the recipe at Season’s. That, and a lively atmosphere on the rooftop patio that marks Seasons as a happy hour favorite. The Blue CheeseCrusted Beef Filet will melt in your mouth.

If you’ve been to its sister restaurants Seasons and Savoy, then expect the same combination of classy atmosphere and fine food. Zinc’s style is both urban and old school, industrial and warm, and uniquely Nob Hill. Descend to the cellar bar for an intimate lounge feel with frequent live music.

COMMUNITY CUP 219 Central NW, 505.301.7763

Coffee and homemade pastries are staples, but lunch items such as the Baked Sausage and Pepper Sandwich or the Cajun Salmon Chowder are the real stars at this comfortable Downtown hangout. RELISH 8019 Menaul NE, 505.299.0001 1520 Deborah, Rio Rancho, Suite E (opening soon)

Before Relish arrived in Albuquerque, the sandwich bar was already high. Now, it’s even higher thanks to the

Before EDO was EDO, Artichoke offered fine dining in an elegant atmosphere. The addition of the Artichoke Bar a few years ago only added to the ambience. Roasted rack of lamb with pistachio crust atop Mediterranean couscous pilaf, in a zinfandel sauce — that’s the kind of sophisticated dish that meets your palate at Artichoke. JENNIFER JAMES 101 4615 Menaul NE, 505.884.3860

jenniferjames101.com

Respected chef Jennifer James and her talented staff have forged a small niche of culinary heaven in a Menaul strip mall. Skillfully prepared fresh ingredients in clean, smart presentations are part of it, but dining comes down to flavor, and you’ll find it here. Try the

OTHER NOTABLES:

BLADE’S BISTRO 221 Hwy 165 Suite L, Placitas, 505.771.0695

bladesbistro.com

FORQUE KITCHEN AND BAR 330 Tijeras NW, 505.843.2700Ð

6521 Americas Parkway NE, 505.884.8937

albuquerque.hyatt.com

japanesekitchen.com

LUCIA 125 2nd NW, 505.923.9080

hotelandaluz.com

NICK & JIMMY’S

AZUMA SUSHI & TEPPAN

SURF ’N’ TURF

4701 San Mateo NE, 505.880.9800

PAUL’S MONTEREY INN

I LOVE SUSHI

1000 Juan Tabo NE, 505.294.1461

6001 San Mateo NE, 505.883.3618

Offering a step back in time, one of Albuquerque’s best steakhouses continues giving diners what they crave. Whether you have been coming here since the ‘60s or just discovered it recently, Paul’s is all about peppered steak and monster shrimp cocktails, and sitting in deep booths with a martini in hand. Smiling.

ilovesushiteppangrill.com

INDIGO CROW CAFÉ & BAKERY

OTHER NOTABLES:

4515 Corrales Rd, Corrales, 505.898.7000

7220 Lomas NE, 505.255.1657

indigocrowcafe.com

FINE DINING

THE COOPERAGE cooperageabq.com

MONTE CARLO STEAKHOUSE 3916 Central SW, 505.836.9886

montecarlosteakhouse.com

ANTIQUITY RESTAURANT

JAPANESE AMERASIA & SUMO SUSHI 800 3rd NW, 505.246.1615

With dim sum on one side and high quality sushi on the other, there’s plenty at Sumo/AmerAsia to keep diners drooling. CRAZY FISH 3015 Central NE, 505.232.3474

BIEN SHUR LOUNGE AT SANDIA RESORT & CASINO 30 Rainbow NE, 505.798.3961 or 505.798.3700

sandiacasino.com

Perched high on the top floor of the Sandia Casino hotel, Bien Shur offers one of the more elegant contemporary Southwest dining experiences in the entire city. You’ll be taken in by the remarkable views of the Sandia Mountains to the east, the lights of the city to the west and refined dishes that use fresh, traditional local ingredients.

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

azuma888.com

SUSHI HANA 521 Central NW, 505.842.8700

sushihananm.com

SEAFOOD DESERT FISH 4214 Central SE, 505.266.5544

desertfishabq.com

As Nob Hill tries to grow east of Carlisle, the folks at Desert Fish deserve our thanks for taking a chance with a location on the upper end of the neighborhood. The space is beautiful, the menu is chock full of enticing seafood offerings and the bar is a nice place to set. PELICAN’S RESTAURANT

112 Romero NW, 505.247.3545

themenupage.com/ antiquityrestaurant Romantic, dark, cozy and elegant, this gem features an abundance of Old Town character, where staff pays attention to detail and the kitchen serves some of the best steaks and seafood in the city.

JAPANESE KITCHEN

The space is comfortably small. The sushi is crazy-good. The garlic sashimi has been known to make a person’s head spin — in a good way. Amid the strip of eateries in Nob Hill, this is one not to miss. SAMURAI GRILL AND SUSHI BAR 9500 Montgomery NE, 505.275.6601

abqsamurai.com

Entertainment is part of the nightly routine at this Teppan grill, where every meal is designed to be a delectable representation of fine Japanese fare. The sushi bar is a standout.

9800 Montgomery NE. 505.298.7678 10022 Coors NW, 505.899.2000

pelicansabq.com

Yet another Albuquerque treasure, Pelican’s still has a retro feel when you enter. Coconut shrimp, a platter of oysters or steak and Alaskan king crab legs — it will all make you melt in your chair, and be grateful this restaurant is still around. OTHER NOTABLES:

RAGIN’ SHRIMP 3624 Central SE, 505.254.1544

raginshrimp.com


EAT! DRINK! ABQ! • WHERE TO EAT NOW STEAKHOUSES

OTHER NOTABLES:

OTHER NOTABLES:

THE RANCHER’S CLUB

SALATHAI

MARCELLO’S CHOPHOUSE

1901 University NE, 505.884.2500

3619 Copper NE, 505.265.9330

ABQ Uptown, 2201 Q NE, Ste. 9B, 505.837.2467

theranchersclubofnm.com

salathaiabq.com

THAI

VEGETARIAN

ORCHID THAI CUISINE

ANNAPURNA AYURVEDIC CUISINE & CHAI HOUSE

marcelloschophouse.com

Choice cuts of steak pair well with big, bold red wines, which pairs well with live piano, which pairs well with tall private booths, which pair well with ... well, you get the idea. VERNON’S HIDDEN VALLEY STEAKHOUSE 6855 4th NW, 877.592.7975

thehiddensteakhouse.com

The best steakhouse in town? That’s for you to judge, but there’s no doubt that Vernon’s menu is replete with fine meat and seafood. The welcoming service and warm atmosphere — black plaster walls, thoughtful lighting, cozy dining room and bar — make for a memorable meal. Call for the password.

4300 Central SE, 505.265.4047

orchidthaicuisine.com

Orchid Thai offers a vast menu of traditional Thai dishes made with the freshest ingredients. Dine in the cozy, bustling restaurant or order to go. THAI CUISINE II 4201 Central NE, 505.232.3200

Is it weird that some of the most attentively prepared Thai food is housed in an old Weinerschnitzel? It should be, but after tasting Thai Cusine II’s green papaya salad, Thom-Yum soup or Pad Thai, that initial weirdness suddenly begins to make sense. Cozy food served in a cozy spot.

2201 Silver SE, 505.262.2424 7520 4th NW, 505.254.2424 905 West Alameda, Santa Fe, 505988-9688

chaishoppe.com

This is mecca for chai drinkers, and you can also enjoy vegan baked goods and an Indian food selection unique to Albuquerque and Santa Fe. OTHER NOTABLES:

FEI’S HEALTH CAFE 2114 Central SE, 505.243.3390

CONTINUED ON PAGE 23

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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WHERE I EAT NOW MAGGIE HART STEBBINS CHAIRWOMAN, BERNALILLO COUNTY COMMISSION

La Crepe Michel

Tucked away in a little courtyard in Old Town, this restaurant has been a favorite of mine for more than 30 years — since I first went there with my high school French class. The front room is one of the most romantic places in town when the fireplace is lit, and there’s no better place for classic French food. Definitely not a place for those who worry about butter and calories! There’s always something interesting and tasty on the specials board, but the regular menu has timeless choices such as Crepe Aux Fruits de Mer, good salads, and lots of fabulous desserts. Consistently good, year after year! Baileys On the Beach

I spend a lot of time at Baileys. It’s bright and airy downstairs and the lounge chairs on the rooftop patio are the perfect place to spend a sunny afternoon or watch the sun go down. My children and I walk there for the fish tacos, burgers and salads. Some

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

of the best staff in town — always cheerful and friendly — and speedy with the orders! Scalo Northern Italian Grill

Scalo has to be on everyone’s list of favorites. Perfectly fresh, creative food is consistently good, and the atmosphere is bright and welcoming. It’s always fun to see what’s going on in the bar and upstairs section of the restaurant. Scalo’s community-minded owner, Steve Paternoster, hosts dozens of events every year from fundraisers for local organizations like Dismas House and New Mexico AIDS Services to African dance performances. There’s always something great going on.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

VIETNAMESE SAIGON RESTAURANT 6001 San Mateo NE, 505.884.0706

Fans of homemade Vietnamese food can rarely go wrong here, what with Saigon Restaurant’s 145 menu selections. Editor’s pick: Rare beef pho and vermicelli noodles with tofu. CAFE TRANG

DOG HOUSE DRIVE IN 1216 Central SW, 505.243.1019

What does not rock about this hot spot on old Route 66? The welcoming neon weenie dog just begs you to head on in and order a foot-long chile dog and some fries and a soda pop. This is way more that a throwback — it’s a good, fun, yummy time. 2400 Central SE, 505.266.0550

frontierrestaurant.com

cafetrangabq.com

A landmark almost as notable as the University of New Mexico it sits next door to, Frontier offers delicious New Mexican food and remarkably efficient counter service. Burgers, green chile cheese fries, unparalleled breakfast burritos and addictive sweet rolls — it’s all here.

CAFE DA LAT 5615 Central NE, 505.266.5559

cafedalat.com

MAY CAFE 111 Louisiana SE, 505.265.4448

maycafe.com

SIAM CAFÉ 5500 San Mateo NE, 505.883.7334

A CATEGORY ALL THEIR OWN BAILEY’S ON THE BEACH 2929 Monte Vista NE, 505.717.2880

baileysonthebeach.com Catch some surf in Albuquerque’s university neighborhood at this beachshack-style eatery. Try the mahi mahi kabobs or the spicy mac and cheese, or take a break and sip your mint sun tea while enjoying the views on the rooftop terrace. BRICKLIGHT DIVE 115 Harvard SE, 505.232.7000

bricklightdive.com UNM area residents rejoice: This new option for Italian “street food” provides some especially delicious bruschetta and local New Mexico brews in a casual and lively atmosphere. CHEESE AND COFFEE 2679 Louisiana NE, 505.883.1226 119 San Pasquale, 505.242.0326

A perfect, quaint lunch spot with sandwiches galore. An ideal place for the basic ingredients of a good day: satisfying food and delicious coffee. CHRISTY MAE’S 1400 San Pedro NE, 505.255.4740

christymaes.com

Easy, good, delicious stuff comes out of the kitchen at Christy Mae’s, Monday to Saturday with breakfast, lunch and dinner. Nellie Bea’s chicken pot pie can make anyone feel wonderful. And the Albuquerque turkey sandwich keeps people coming back for more.

Desert Fish Desert Fish is dedicated to providing fresh wildcaught seafood to Albuquerque. Our menu features Pacific Northwest-inspired seafood dishes, including selections from our oyster bar. We use local produce whenever possible. Our bar specializes in freshsqueezed cocktails, regional beers and unique wines.

FRONTIER RESTAURANT

230 Louisiana SE, 505.232.6764

OTHER NOTABLES

Lucia Our chef, Michael Von Blomberg, tempts the palate with innovative combinations of the freshest ingredients, inspired by classic Mediterranean cuisine. A perfect choice for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner.

GOLDEN CROWN PANADERIA 1103 Mountain NW, 505.243.2424

goldencrown.biz

This Mountain Road fixture cooks up the tastiest Mexican-style baked goods in Albuquerque, from biscochitos to empañadas. MILLY’S RESTAURANT 2100 Candelaria NE, 505.884.0707 7308 Jefferson NE, 505.345.9200

Milly’s breakfast is hard to beat. Fluffy pancakes, sweet waffles and crispy bacon tantalize the taste buds and tame the appetite. SOPHIA’S PLACE 6313 4th NW, 505.345.3935

The chef behind Sophia’s — owner Dennis Apodaca — is one of the most dedicated culinary minds to ever call New Mexico home. This makes for a wonderfully kitschy, unassuming restaurant (read: hole in the wall) that serves incredible dishes like pork carnitas huevos rancheros or scallop tacos. TIM’S PLACE 8050 Academy NE, Suite 101, 505.856.1005

timsplaceabq.com

Serving breakfast, lunch and hugs, Tim’s place offers diners a unique, neighborly attitude that will encompass your mealtime. The Rangoon Artichoke Wontons are not to be missed.

— SAMPLE MENU — New Mexico Breakfast Bowl 2 eggs any style, hash potatoes, red or green chile, cheddar cheese.

$9

— ME NU H IGH L IGH TS — Smoked Salmon Caprese

Veggie Omelet Egg whites, bell peppers, zucchini, spinach, tomatoes, green onions, Swiss cheese.

Wild-caught Pacific Chinook salmon, house-made mozzarella, local heirloom tomatoes, fresh basil, 12 year aged balsamic and Himalayan rose salt.

$9

$11

Grilled Caesar Salad Red romaine, manchego cheese, herbed croutons. Add grilled chicken or shrimp.

$8/$10

Steak Diane Local, all-natural flat iron steak, grilled and finished with a wild mushroom, brandy cream sauce. Served with blue cheese potato gratin and fresh local vegetables. Add a 1/4 lb. Dungeness crab cluster for $5.

$25

Pretzel Burger Melted jalapeno cheese sauce, chopped tomatoes on our oversized pretzel dough bun.

$12

Grilled Chicken Carbonara Pasta Pappardelle pasta, roasted pancetta, english peas, fresh herbs, parmesan cheese.

$18

Balsamic Flat Iron Steak Sweet potato frites, pickled peppers, balsamic steak sauce.

$24

Cioppino Dungeness crab, wild-caught shrimp, sockeye salmon, clams and mussels in a savory tomato broth with our own ‘Desert Fish’ spice.

$23

Mustard-Crusted Sockeye Salmon Wild-caught filet baked on a cedar-plank with a poblano sweet potato hash and fresh seasonal vegetables.

$24

Halibut en Papillote Wild-caught filet steamed in parchment with citrus, baby bok-choy, sweet peppers, sake, sesame oil, sesame fried rice and daikon sprouts.

$29

OTHER NOTABLES:

COOLWATER FUSION 2010 Wyoming NE, 505.332.2665

coolwaterfusion.com

COPPER CANYON CAFE 5455 Gibson SE, 505.266.6318

COSMO TAPAS RESTAURANT 4200 Central SE, 505.232.0535

cosmotapas.com

LUNCH MENU NOW AVAILABLE

EZRA’S PLACE

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Sunday 11am to 10pm Friday & Saturday 11am to 11pm

6132 4th NW, 505.344.1917

GOLDEN PRIDE Multiple Locations

goldenprideabq.com

Lucia 125 SECOND STREET NW, ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87102 505.923.9080

www.hotelandaluz.com

Desert Fish 4214 CENTRAL AVE SE 505.266.5544

www.desertfishabq.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Forque Albuquerque’s premier culinary destination, FORQUE features a tastefully constructed selection of regionally infused menu concepts. Each presentation reflects subtle flavors from the unique and distinctive seasoning profile of New Mexico and the southwest.

Japanese Kitchen Steakhouse and

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

Positively 4th Street Three restaurants: Sophia’s Place • Ezra’s Place • Jo’s Place

Two restaurants: A Teppan style steak house and a traditional Sushi Bar. These award-winning restaurants are Japanese owned and operated and have been serving Albuquerque for over twenty years.

— SAM P LE ME N U — Chorizo Flatbread Dates, local goat cheese, pinon nuts, date preserves.

$13

— SAMPLE MENU —

— SAMP L E ME NU —

Egg Rolls

Sophia’s Place

A Japanese favorite, homemade in our kitchen. Voted Best in Albuquerque 2010!

Fresh Cod Tacos

$3.75

With salsa fresca, avocado, crema, rice, beans and side salad.

Local mixed greens, grilled brioche, colorado peaches, Old Windmill Dairy feta, lemon dijon dressing.

Teppan Yaki Chicken

$10

$9

Select cuts of chicken sauteed in butter and sesame seeds. Chicken our way!

Duck Salad

$13.95

Half Roasted Chicken Fingerling potatoes, cippollini onions, chorizo, adobo chicken au jus.

$22

Flat Iron Steak Smoked paprika rub, oyster musrooms, manchegochipotle gnocchi, house-made onion rings, demi-glace.

$28

Basted Cobia Mushroom-asparagus-potato hash, arugula & cherry tomato salad, citrus butter.

$23

Sea Scallops Sweet corn, chorizo, watercress & Granny Smith apple salad

$26

Blue Corn Pancakes Made with maple syrup and pinon butter.

$10

New York Steak and Chicken Delicious New York steak and tender chicken with our special house-made Teriyaki sauce.

$18.95

Teriyaki Salmon A fresh catch! Pacific Ocean’s King Salmon served in our zesty house-made Teriyaki sauce.

$15.95

Sukiyaki Thin slices of beef, oriental vegetables and tofu prepared in sukiyaki sauce.

$14.95

Katsudon Pork or chicken cutlet, onion and eggs prepared in a special sauce. Served with vegetable tempura and sunomono (Japanese salad).

$13.95

Sushi Dozens of types of mouth-watering fresh sushi, prepared by traditional Japanese chefs!

FROM $4 AND UP

Ezra’s Place Duck Enchiladas With tomatillo sauce, black beans, basmati rice and salad.

$13

NY Strip Steak With chipotle butter, roasted garlic potato puree and side salad.

$18

Jo’s Place Huitlacoche Burger “Mexican Mushroom” with fries or salad.

$10

Huevos Rancheros with Guajillo chile.

$10

Assorted homemade scones and p pastries

Sophia’s Place 6313 4TH ST. NW (BETWEEN OSUNA & MONTANO) 505.345.3935

Forque 330 TIJERAS DOWNTOWN 505.843.2700

www.facebook.com/Forque.Kitchen.Bar

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Japanese Kitchen

Ezra’s Place

SUSHI & CUISINE: 6511 AMERICA’S PARKWAY, 505.872.1166 STEAKHOUSE: 6521 AMERICA’S PARKWAY, 505.884.8937

6132 4TH ST NM (IN LUCKY 66 BOWLING CENTER) 505.344.1917

www.japanesekitchen.com

6100-B 4TH ST NW, 505.341.4500

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

Jo’s Place


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Rasoi

Sadie’s of New Mexico

Savoy Bar & Grill

Authentic Indian Cuisine Catering & Delivery for all occasions Daily Lunch Buffet: 11a-2:30p Tuesday & Sunday Dinner Buffet: 5-9p Daily Dinner: 5-9p

Authentic New Mexican cuisine with award winning, hot, flavorable salsa, green and red chile. Generous portions and tasty margaritas are guaranteed to make you happy.

Casual yet sophisticated - Savoy on Montgomery focuses on local, seasonal cuisine. Enjoy wine, cocktails, cold beer and fresh approachable food for lunch, dinner, & happy hour. Savoy has Private Rooms available for your parties and special events.

— H O U S E S PE C IA LTIE S — Tava Machchli Pomfret fish cooked on iron skillet.

— HOUSE SPECI ALTI ES — Brian’s Favorite Rib Eye Steak A 12 oz charbroiled boneless, lean, trimmed Rib Eye served with the works.

$16

Korma Khaskhas Boneless lamb cooked in creamy sauce with poppy seeds.

Sadie’s Burrito Your choice of a grilled ground beef pattie, shredded chicken, spicy beef, beans or carne adovada wrapped in a large flour tortilla and smothered with chile.

— SAMP L E ME NU — Prime Rib Peppersteak Sandwich Spicy tobasco remoulade, gruyere cheese, parmesan fries. Available at lunch and in the lounge bar.

$9

$15

Maharani Jheenga Small shrimp cooked with egg and chopped vegetables.

Roberto Special A grilled hamburger steak generously covered with Sadie’s own chile con queso.

Cored potatoes stuffed with nuts, cheese & raisins.

Cocktail sauce and mignonette.

$2.50 EACH

$15

Dumwala Aloo

Selection of Fresh Atlantic & Pacific Oysters

Brian’s Spicy Carne Adovada Ribs Pork ribs marinated in red chile and baked until tender and juicy.

$12

Baked Local Goat Cheese Prosciutto, toasted baguette, black pepper-cranberry chutney.

$8.75

Kadhi Chaawal Chickpea flour cooked in yogurt with vegetable dumplings, served with rice.

Stuffed Sopaipilla A large freshly made golden brown sopaipilla filled with your choice of beef, shredded chicken or carne adovada and smothered with chile.

$9

Enchiladas Makke Di Roti Indian-style corn flour tortilla with fenugreek leaves.

Made with your choice of cheddar cheese only, spicy beef, shredded chicken or carne adovada.

Seared Ahi Tuna Wasabi mashed potatoes, sugar snap peas, sautéed mushrooms, sake beurre blanc.

$25

Herb Roasted Prime Rib Sour cream mashed potatoes, seasonal fresh vegetables, herbed veal jus. Petite and king cuts also available.

$4

$28

Wood Fired White Pizza Spinach, herb mascarpone, smoked mozzarella, shaved garlic, thin sliced zucchini.

$8

Sadie’s of New Mexico 6230 4TH ST. NW, LOS RANCHOS DE ALBUQUERQUE, 505.345.5339

Rasoi

Sadie’s East

Savoy Bar & Grill

110 YALE BLVD SE, 505.268.5327

15 HOTEL CIRCLE NE, 505.296.6940

10601 MONTGOMERY BLVD. NE, 505.294.9463

www.RasoiABQ.com

sadiesofnewmexico.com

www.savoyabq.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Seasons Rotisserie & Grill

StreetFood Asia

Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

Seasons starts with the freshest ingredients, paired with great wine, great service and a casual elegance. Our menu changes four times a year so we can offer the best each season has to offer.

“At StreetFood Asia, we encourage you to Explore, Experiment, Educate, Entertain, Eat and Enjoy an Exciting, Extraordinary Experience. Our large, one-ofa-kind menu is inspired by the street food of China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Malaysia and Thailand. Each dish is prepared fresh upon order and delivered in the order that it was prepared. Our kitchen is set up with individual cooking stations to mimic the street carts on Asian streets. Each menu item is designed to be shared family-style so that the entire party can sample and enjoy each one.”

A three level bistro in Nob Hill, Zinc features contemporary cuisine with a French flare, plus a lighter menu in the intimate Cellar Bar. Independently owned with an emphasis on local produce, serving weekend brunch, dinner, and tasty bar bites!

Chef-owner, Tai Tok; born and raised in Malaysia Tai Tok was featured on the front cover of the second quarter 2011 of Southwest Restauranteur Magazine Best New Asian Cuisine...LivingSocial About.com Featured in TMZ.com

— SA M P LE ME N U — Deep Fried Calamari Roasted tomato salsa, lemon aioli.

$9.25

— SAMP L E ME NU — Sweet Corn Griddle Cakes Basil goat cheese, balsamic-cherry chutney, arugula pesto.

Onion Soup Gratinee

$8.75

Topped with a toasted baguette and melted layers of gruyere and fontina cheeses.

Parmesan Crusted Chicken Breast

$7

Roasted garlic mashed potatoes, sautéed haricot verts, dijon-thyme pan sauce.

Steamed Black Mussels

$19.75

Basil-chardonnay broth, julienne vegetables, grilled bread.

Pan Seared Atlantic Sea Scallops

$11

Tarragon-orzo pasta, heirloom tomato & arugula salad, peach beurre blanc.

Smoked Trout and Potato Pancakes Crème fraîche and black truffle vinaigrette.

$28

Grilled Local New York Strip Steak Thin roasted garlic mashed potatoes, grilled vegetable skewer, black pepper demi-glace, basil butter.

$31

Two Layer Chocolate Torte & Crème Brûlée

— SAMPLE MENU —

Grilled Pork Loin chop ABQ’S LARGEST SELECTION OF SMALL PLATES

Beijing Street Steamed Dumplings Kuala Lumpur Street Satays Bangkok Street Wok Spicy Calamari

Chocolate sauce, fresh berries.

$6

$11

Seoul Street Kim Chi Fried Rice Tokyo Street Udon Noodle Soup Kuala Lumpur Street Curry Laksa Saigon Street Crispy Noodles Seoul Street Chap Chae

Center cut chop alongside savory strudel of andouille sausage, potato & roasted pepper with garlic spinach; finished with a Marble Red glaze and sweet corn jus.

$22

Seared Flank Steak au Poivre Crusted with black peppercorns and seared in a cast iron pan; buttermilk mashed potatoes, fried mushrooms and onions, espagnole sauce.

$18

Grilled Lamb Strip Sirloin Accompanied by summer vegetable ragoût, baked brie cheese polenta, lamb demi glace and Fresno red chile marmalade.

$24

Seasons Rotisserie & Grill

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Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

2031 MOUNTAIN RD NW ABQ, NM 87104 505.766.5100

3422 CENTRAL AVE NE, 505.260.0088

www.seasonsabq.com

www.streetfoodasiaabq.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

3009 CENTRAL AVE NE, 505.254.9462

www.zincabq.com


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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BALLOON FIESTA

Dawn patrol devotee Local balloon fanatic claims attendance at every Balloon Fiesta from day one BY JESSEY CHERNE

T

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

If ever there was a number one fan of the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, Wayne Prentice — who has been to all 40 installments of Albuquerque’s biggest draw — is that fan.

here are certain tell-tale signs of fall that come every year like clockwork: the spicy smell of green chile wafting through the air, the crisp crunch of leaves underfoot and the budding excitement of the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta. This year, the fiesta celebrates its 40th year. While there are many citizens of Albuquerque and surrounding areas who have attended a great majority of the balloon fiestas, there is unlikely to be anyone as enthusiastic about the event as Wayne Prentice. Prentice, who taught in Albuquerque schools for 38 years and is now retired, has attended every single Balloon Fiesta in the past 40 years. He recounts vividly the very first year of the fiesta that took place at the state fairgrounds in 1972. “The festival was launched in the infield, which is now the parking lot of the state fairgrounds. It was a windy, dirty, blustery day and we were all fighting to see.” Prentice said in a recent interview with Local IQ. He remembers the excitement and nerves of the attendees as the hot air balloons started to veer off into Louisiana Boulevard neighborhoods. Prentice said his favorite part of the fiesta is “the giant party of strangers” that takes place along PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

with his cup of hot chocolate and a burrito. His favorite hot air ballon is the tie-dye balloon, run by his friend Jonathan Wolfe. Wolfe has worked exclusively with Prentice’s son, David, to create death-defying acts involving hot air balloons, such as the “d-bag,” which involves jumping and paragliding from a hot air balloon basket midflight. Prentice has ridden in three hot air balloons and refers to these experiences as being the most peaceful and gratifying adventures of his life. The most exciting of these rides almost ended in a dangerous run-in with multiple cacti. This year, Prentice is looking forward to taking his grandson to Albuquerque Aloft, taking place at Apache Elementary School, to see the hot air balloons up close. Albuquerque Aloft brings the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta to local schools for children that may not normally get to go to the fiesta. Generally two balloons will be inflated on school grounds and, depending on the pilot, take flight from the school for all of the children to see. Prentice said his love for the fiesta keeps him coming back year after year. “The Balloon Fiesta is almost like Christmas in October, it’s just so special and there is nothing like seeing it in person,” he said.


BALLOON FIESTA

Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta Schedule of Events — Oct. 1-9 Dawn Patrol and Mass Ascension 5:45a, 7a, Sat., Oct. 1-9

America’s Challenge Gas Balloon Race Inflation and Launch 2p, 6p, Sat., Oct. 1

Fiesta of Wheels Car Show 9a, Sun., Oct. 2

Balloon Fiesta Pin Trading 11a, Sun., Sat., Oct. 2, 9

Balloon Glow 5:45p, Sun., Oct. 2

Sandia Resort and Casino Flying Competition 7a, Mon.-Tues., Oct. 3-4

Flight of the Nations Mass Ascension Flying Competition 7a, Wed., Oct. 5

Sandia Resort and Casino Flying Competition 8a, Thu., Oct. 6

Special Shape Glowdeo and Fireworks 7a, 5:45p, Thu.-Fri., Oct. 6-7

Sandia Resort and Casino Key Grab Competition 8a, Fri., Oct. 7

Night Magic Glow and Fireworks 7a, Sat., Oct. 8

Farewell Mass Ascension 7a, Sun., Oct. 9

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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CATEGORY MUSIC

L I V E MU S I C

SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Oct. 5 for the Oct.. 13 issue. Please send calendar entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711 a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 USE THIS FORMAT:

Venue Band GENRE Time, Cost List events any time for free at local-iQ.com *Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

Zach Condon recorded his first album in Albuquerque, then saw his musical career take off as the leader of Beirut. The band will bring its Eastern European-inspired sounds and unique instrumental approach to a homecoming show at Santa Fe Community Convention Center on Oct. 7.

Balkan pop

PSYCHEDELIC/POP 9p, FREE

BY CHARLIE CRAGO

using international pop music with Eastern European and Mexican folk music, the sound produced by the band Beirut is quite unlike any other mainstream acts touring today. Fronted by Santa Fe native and former Albuquerque resident Zach Condon, who composes the bulk of the band’s material, Beirut draws on musical innovations often forgotten in modern musical composition. From bedroom recordings to international tours, it isn’t hard to agree that the musical journey Beirut has taken from its conception to present is awe-inspiring.

and A Hacksaw), Condon was able to complete a collection of home recordings for popular release. The collection, entitled Gulag Orkestra, was released in 2006 and was readily accepted by online music communities the world over.

The success of Gulag Orkestra led Condon to other like-minded musicians, and from there, Beirut has taken bloom. “I just assumed there weren’t that many like-minded folks to collaborate with,” he said in the interview. “I was PREVIEW wrong.”

Beirut

Often described using the foreboding moniker “indie,” Beirut seems to Santa Fe Community Convention Center surpass that label through 211 W. San Francisco, melodies with broad That journey started with Condon 505.988.7050 appeal. Not surprisingly, in his Albuquerque bedroom, where $25 much of the early interest he collected and played quirky Tickets: ticketssantafe. in Beirut originated in the instruments, from ukeleles to organs com or 505.982.1234 Balkan and former-Soviet and accordions, with brass and piano beirutband.com states of Europe, a region thrown in. of the world that has had a “I realized I liked some kind of eclectic heavy influence on Condon instruments, and I started asking around,” and his music. The Eastern European influence Condon recalled in a recent interview with the is easily recognizable through Beirut’s use of Austinist. non-traditional instrumentation, highlighted particularly well through those accordions and Where most people in their early ’20s typically ukuleles Condon once gathered in his room. seem content to sit on the sidelines and watch Beirut also incorporates various wind (tuba, life pass by, Condon, 25, was neck-deep by the euphonium) and percussion instruments, as time he was 22. With the help of fellow talented New Mexican musician Jeremy Barnes (A Hawk well as strings.

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Barley Room Bar & Grill The David Kurtz Band ROCK/

Beirut’s Zach Condon journeys from a bedroom in New Mexico to an international music stage and wide critical acclaim

F

THU

7:30p, Fri., Oct. 7

Following the success of Gulag Orkestra, Condon expanded Beirut’s lo-fi sound to include several other musicians, giving the band’s sound a fuller tone. Current members of the band include Perrin Cloutier on accordion and piano, Nick Petree on drums, Paul Collins on bass, Kelly Pratt on trumpet and Ben Lanz plays trombone and tuba. More recently, Beirut witnessed the release of its third studio album in August of this year, The Rip Tide, which, while critically acclaimed, seems to represent a slight divergence for the band. While the Balkan-folk inspired sound is still definitely present, the new album derives from a more pop-oriented foundation than any of Beirut’s previous offerings. Following shows in Europe during early September, Beirut has returned to its domestic roots. Condon will be touring with the full band, complete with horns, tubas and a whole host of other instruments we’ve never heard of before. New Mexicans should be excited about the early October show Beirut has lined up for Condon’s native Santa Fe. Akin to listening to a gypsy on acid going toeto-toe with his accordion, a Beirut show is quite likely to expand a listener’s musical horizons. This isn’t your average radio-filling fodder; this is music expressed in its most primal, base form, as music should be.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

Blackbird Buvette NonResidentials w/DJs Kevin & Pillowtalk 10p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Universal — Original Weekly Dance Party w/CLKCLKBNG & Guests DANCE/ ELECTRO/INDIE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Caravan East The Great Outdoors COUNTRY 8p, FREE Cowgirl Bar & Grill The Bust Tapes FOLK/FUNK/R&B 8p-Midnight, FREE

Effingbar and Grill Karaoki w/Kan-U 9p, FREE Hard Rock Pavilion Blink 182 ROCK/PUNK My Chemical Romance ALTERNATIVE/ROCK Matt & Kim DANCE/POP 5p, $20

Launchpad Nekromantix, The Howlers, and Who Killed Carla 8p, $14 Lotus Temptation Thursdays DJS Al and J-Roc HIP HOP 10p, 21+ FREE, 18+ $10 Low Spirits Adam Hooks and his Hangups 9p, FREE

Marble Brewery Memphis P-Tails BLUES 8-11p, FREE Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson PIANO 6:30-9:30p, FREE One Up Elevated Lounge Latin Tinge Thursdays: Latin Tinge Crew SALSA 5-9p, FREE Outpost Performance Space Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill CELTIC/ IRISH 6:30p, $20-$25

Scalo II Bar Felix y Los Gatos BLUES/CAJUN 8p, FREE St. Clair Winery & Bistro The Peacemakers ACOUSTIC/AMERICANA 6:30p, FREE


MUSIC

LI V E M USIC Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer

Haynes Park — Rio Rancho Oktoberfest Le Chat Lunatique JAZZ/SWING/

8p-midnight, FREE

WESTERN 4p, FREE

Vernon’s Hidden Valley Steakhouse Le Chat Lunatique JAZZ/SWING/

Hallenbrick Brewery The Dregz 7-10p, FREE GiG (Santa Fe) Bruce Dunlap JAZZ GUITAR 8p, $15 Launchpad Mondo Vibrations CD Release Party with Crazyfool, Da Bruddah Project, DJ SydeSwype and hosted by Nick Fury 9p, $5 Legends Theater Rt. 66 Melissa Etheridge 8p, $33-$70 Low Spirits Cowboys and Indian, The High-Lo Tones, and Hopeless Jack & the Handsom Devils 9p, FREE Lotus DJs Justin George, Beufie, Sketch and Amy Lopez, XES HOUSE, TOP 40, 10p, 21+ FREE, 18+ $10 Marble Brewery DJ Boogaloo B ELECTRONICA 8-11p,

WESTERN 6:30p, FREE

Zinc Chris Dracup Band BLUES 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

FRI 30 Barley Room Bar & Grill Mr. Black BLUES/CLASSIC ROCK/FUNK 9p-2a, FREE

Blackbird Buvette Mike Weaver’s Live Jukebox — The Final Live Jukebox for 2010 7p, FREE

Blue Tower Buffalo Thunder R&B with Gimme Sum, 9p Burt’s Tiki Lounge Red Light Cameras INDIE/POP St. Petersberg INDIE The Great Depression ACOUSTIC/FOLK/PUNK 8:30p-2a, FREE

Caravan East The Great Outdoors COUNTRY 8p, $5

Club Warehouse Buffalo Thunder Country Night 9p-close, FREE CoolWater Fusion Restaurant Shane Wallin SOUL/POP/ROCK 6-8p, FREE

Cooperage Soulman Sam & The Soul Explosion ROCK/BLUES 8:30p, $5 Cosmos Tapas Chava and Paid My Dues JAZZ 7-10p, FREE

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Drastic Andrew CD Release Party PROGRESSIVE ROCK 8p, $5

Effing Bar The Electric Edric Project ROCK 9p-1a, FREE

El Madrid Bad Monkey BLUES 9p, $5

FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo PIANO/JAZZ 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Open Mic Night hosted by Shelly 8p-Midnight, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Terri Slack & Beso SALSA 5-8p, FREE DJ 12 Tribe & B-Tre REGGAE/ TOP 40 9p-close, $2-$5

Outpost Performance Space Richard Powdress presents Josef Scott SINGER/SONGWRITER 8p, $10-$15

Prairie Star Wine Bar Patio Cathryn McGill JAZZ/R&B/SOUL 5:30-8:30p, FREE

Santa Ana Star Casino’s Cheenah Lounge Fat City OLD SCHOOL FUNK/R&B/POP 9p-1a, FREE

Scalo II Bar No Exit feat. Chrys Page JAZZ 8:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro Southside Sultans BLUES/SWING/ ROCKABILLY 7p, FREE

Sunshine Theater Arch Enemy, Devildriver, Cthonic, and Skeleton Witch 7:30p, $24 Tlur Pa Lounge Groove City 9:30p, FREE Zinc Felix y Los Gatos BLUES/CAJUN 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

SAT 1 Barley Room Harvey & the Prowlers CLASSIC ROCK/SOUTHERN ROCK 9p-2a, FREE

Blackbird Buvette Journeys in Belly Dance Scheherazade Dance Productions 7p, FREE Close Contact with DeeJay Kevan ’80S/ELECTRO 10p, FREE

Blue Tower Buffalo Thunder R&B with Gimme Sum, 9p Burt’s Tiki Lounge Ya Ya Boom INDIE/POP/ROCK Sabertooth Cavity EXPERIMENTAL/ WESTERN SWING Gusher ROCK

To celebrate the release of her fourth album, Between the Bed Sheets & Turpentine, Seattlebased folk eclectic Carrie Clark will perform on October 10 at R.B. Winnings Coffee Company. All-ages show starts at 7p. No cover.

8:30p-2a, FREE

Caravan East The Great Outdoors COUNTRY Sangre Joven LATIN/SPANISH 8p, $7 Club Warehouse Buffalo Thunder DJ Automatic 9p, FREE Cooperage Tumbao Albuq SALSA 9:30p, $7 Corrales Bistro Brewery Mother Jones SOUL 6-9p, FREE Cowgirl Bar and Grill Atomic Grass BLUEGRASS 2-5p, FREE Bone Orchard AMERICANA ROCK/FOLK NOIR 8p, $5

GiG (Santa Fe) Michael Chapdelaine CLASSICAL GUITAR 8p, $15

KiMo Theater Wagogo WORLD MUSIC/ELECTRIC 7p, $15/Pre-ordered, $20/Door

La Cumbre Brewery The Porter Draw 7-10p, FREE Launchpad Prey for Kali, Distances, and Caustic Lye 10p, FREE

Lotus DJs JRoc, Inspex HIP HOP, DANCE 10p, 21+ FREE, 18+ $10 Louie’s Pub and Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE Low Spirits Los Albuquerque Blues Connection BLUES 9p, $5 Marble Brewery Saltine Ramblers AMERICANA 8-11p,

One Up Elevated Lounge DJ Cut, Huggie, and Big Worm HIP

FREE

Sol Santa Fe Braids, Pepper Rabbit, and Painted Palms 8p, $10 St. Clair Winery & Bistro No Exit w/Chris Page JAZZ 6:30p,

Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriguez Duo JAZZ 6:309:30p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Bill Hearne Trio COUNTRY 3-7p, FREE The Family Coal BLUEGRASS

HOP//R&B 9p-close, $2-$5

Santa Ana Star Casino’s Cheenah Lounge Fat City OLD SCHOOL FUNK/R&B/POP 9p-1a, FREE

Scalo II Bar Felonious Groove Foundation FUNK 8:30p, FREE

FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station The Blue Hornets SKA 9p-12a,

Sunshine Theater Bring Me The Horizon, Parkway Drive, Architects, On Broken Wings, and Deez Nuts 6:30p, $23 Tlur Pa Lounge Groove City 9:30p, FREE Zinc Jackie Zamora Brazilian Jazz Band

FREE

JAZZ/BATUCADA 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

7-11p, FREE

Molly’s Stingrays BLUES 1:30-5p, FREE Group Therapy ROCK 5:30-9:30p, FREE

SUN 2 Church of Beethoven Beethoven: String Quartet No 14 in C Minor, Op 131 10:30a, $15/ general $9/30 and under + fulltime students $5/children 12 and under

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Boris McCutcheon The Townes van Zandt Brunch AMERICANA 123p, FREE Gary Gorence BLUES/ COUNTRY/SOUTHERN ROCK 8p, FREE

El Rey Theater No Bragging Rights MELODIC HARDCORE 7p, $10

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery Felix y Los Gatos BLUES/CAJUN 7-9p, FREE

Launchpad Roñoso, Filthy Still, Arroyo Deathmatch, and Doomed to Exist 8p, $5 CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

35


MUSIC

LI VE M USI C

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

3

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

MON

Low Spirits The Ground Beneath and Mike Got Spiked 8p, FREE Mine Shaft Tavern Gene Corbin AMERICANA 3-7p,

Blackbird Buvette Blackbird Karaoke w/DJ Kammo

FREE

O’Niell’s Pub (Central) Rye Creek FOLK/CELTIC 4-7p, FREE O’Niell’s Juan Tabo Los Radiators 4-7p, FREE St. Clair Winery & Bistro Laura Lee & Co JAZZ 6:30p, FREE St. Francis Auditorium “Horace Silver — The Way It Was!” featuring Tribute Trio with special guests Bobby Shew and Glen Kosture JAZZ 2p, $20 Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Two Wheel Mondays featuring Mike Got Spiked IRISH ROCK The Ground Beneath SOUTHERN METAL Antique Scream PSYCHEDELIC BLUES 8p-2a, FREE

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Cowgirl Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig 9p, FREE Launchpad Bodies of Evidence, Dead On Point Five, Spin Dry Kittens, Kingdom, and Severkill 9p, $4 Low Spirits Milk Drive 9p, FREE Marcello’s Chophouse Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

TUE

4

Barley Room Bar & Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE Blackbird Buvette 2.0 Tuesday NerdCore Hip Hop w/DJ Nonsense HIP HOP 9p, FREE Blue Tower Buffalo Thunder Karaoke 8p, FREE

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Joe Daddy and Hoodoo Jeff BLUES/ DELTA/FOLK 8p, FREE

Launchpad Weedeater, Saviours, Bison B.C., and Fight Amp 9p, $10 Low Spirits Boom Chick, The Scrams and Red Light Cameras 9p, $5 Molly’s Balloon Fiesta Party with Odd Dog BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Two Dollar Tuesdays with DJ 12 Tribe & DJ Flo Fader HIP HOP/R&B/ TOP 40 9p-close, FREE

Scalo II Bar Jazz Jam with Michael Glynn JAZZ 8p, FREE

Sol Santa Fe Chinese White Bicycles: Robyn Hitchcock and Joe Boyd 7:30p, $25

Sunshine Theater Portugal The Man and Alberta Cross 8p, $15 Zinc Rudy Boy Duo BLUES/ EXPERIMENTAL/ROCK 8-11p, FREE

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

WED 5 Barley Room Bar & Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Vinyl & Verses with UHF B-Boy Crew UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8p2a, FREE

Cowgirl Bar and Grill The Cobblers REGGAE/HILLBILLY STOMP/ROCK 8p, FREE

La Cumbre Brewery Rudy Boy Jaramillo 7-10p, FREE Launchpad Revolver and Chateau Marmont 9p, $10

Low Spirits Chamberlin 9p, $7 Marble Brewery Willy J & The Storytellers COUNTRY 8-11p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Jim Almand & Tim Arnold SOULFUL BLUES 1:30-5:30p, FREE

Molly’s The Impalas BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge DJ Hump & The Mash Up King HIP HOP/R&B/TOP 40 9p-close, FREE

Scalo II Bar Cali Shaw Acoustic Showcase with Jenny Gonzalez and Georgio ACOUSTIC 8:30p, FREE

Sol Santa Fe Kyuss Lives!, The Sword, MonstrO, and aftershow party with SuperGiant 6:30p, $22 Sunshine Theater David Crowder Band with Chris August and John Mark McMillan 7:30p, $25-$40

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

UNM Hosptial’s Barbara and Bill Richardson Pavilion Cafe Chamber Music w/Anne Eisfeller, ARTIST-IN-MEDICINE 12-1p, FREE

THU

6

Barley Room Bar & Grill Xander ROCK 8p, FREE Blackbird Buvette KGB Klub 10p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Universal - Original Weekly Dance Party w/CLKCLKBNG & Guests DANCE/ELECTRO/INDIE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Cooperage Corinne West & Kelly Joe Phelps

36

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Albuquerque’s favorite on again/off again “trucker band,” Breaker 1-9, will stage it farewell performance on Sat., Oct. 8 at the 2nd Annual New Mexico Brew Fest, to be held from Noon-6p at EXPO New Mexico’s Villa Hispana. The event will also feature music by Keith Sanchez, Die Polka Schlingel, Los Angeles-based Americana act Rose’s Pawn Shop and The Porter Draw. Tickets are $25 (advance)/$30 (at gate)/$50 (VIP), available at nmbrewfest.com (includes beer tastings from a dozen-plus breweries and commemorative pint glass).

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Jimmy Russell and Mark Dempsey COOL SOUL 8p, FREE

Launchpad Kirko Bangz, Natural Hustlers, Bamboozle, Bill E. Shakes, A Dub, Wrex, Schmilly and Juice 8p, $20 Lotus Temptation Thursdays DJS Al and J-Roc HIP HOP 10p, 21+ FREE, 18+ $10

Low Spirits The Sultans and The Rudy Boy Experiment 9p, FREE Marble Brewery Atomic Balm SOUTHERN ROCK/ CLASSIC ROCK 8-11p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Jim Almand and Tim Arnold SOULFUL BLUES 1:30-5:30p, FREE

Molly’s John Black FOLK 1:30-5p, FREE Blacksmoke Blues Band BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Latin Tinge Thursdays: Latin Tinge Crew SALSA 5-8p, FREE O’Niell’s Juan Tabo Duke City Swamp Coolers 8-10p, FREE

Outpost Performance Space Rudresh Mahanthappa: Samdhi CARNATIC/ELECTRO-ACOUSTIC 7:30p,

$15-$20

Scalo II Bar Chris Dracup ACOUSTIC BLUES 8p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro Todd Tijerina CHICAGO BLUES/ROCK 6:30p, FREE

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

JAZZ/ROCK/FOLK 7:30p, $15/

Zinc Gregg Daigle Band BLUES/JAZZ/

advance $20/door

ROCK 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

FRI

7

Barley Room Bar & Grill Ali Rae Band SOUL/R&B 9p, FREE Blackbird Buvette The Joe Silva Group 7p, FREE The MashUP Test w/Kent 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Flood the Sun Reunion Show INDIE/ROCK/ZOUK Rawwr EXPERIMENTAL/INDIE/PROGRESSIVE

Animals In The Dark INDIE 8p-2a, FREE

Club Warehouse Buffalo Thunder Country Night 9p-close, FREE Cooperage Jose Conde’s Nu Latin Groove SALSA/LATIN 7:30p, $15/advance

$20/door

CoolWater Fusion Restaurant Shane Wallin POP/ROCK 6-8p, FREE Cowgirl Bar and Grill Jaka DANCE/AFRICA 8p, $5 El Rey Theater Unknown Rockstar - DVD Release Party BLUES/ROCK 8p, AdmissionTBA

Hard Rock Pavilion Rockstar Energy Drink UPROAR Festival feat. Avenged Sevenfold, Three Days Grace, Seether, Bullet for My Valentine, and Escape the Fate and more 2p, $20-$70 La Cumbre Brewery Chris Dracup Trio BLUES 7-10p, FREE

Launchpad La Junta, 2bers, and Felonious Groove Foundation 9p, FREE Legends Theater Rt. 66 Jackson Cash Johnny Cash Tribute 8p, $10


MUSIC

LI V E M USIC Lotus DJs Justin George, Beufie, Sketch and Amy Lopez, XES HOUSE, TOP 40, 10p, 21+ FREE, 18+ $10 Low Spirits Wagogo and Mala Mana 9p, FREE Marble Brewery DJ Mario Antonio, Hill-6 & Hugo C ELECTRO/HIP HOP 8-11p, FREE Mine Shaft Tavern CW Ayon ONE MAN BLUES 2-6p, FREE

Open Mic Night hosted by Shelly 8p-Midnight, FREE

Molly’s Steve Kinabrew ACOUSTIC 1:30-5p, FREE

Odd Dog BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE One Up Elevated Lounge Sally Townes BLUES/JAZZ/SOUL 5-8p, FREE DJ 12 Tribe and B-Tre HIP

Santa Ana Star Casino Cheenah Lounge Brown Sugar 9p-1a, FREE Scalo II Bar RB Jazz featuring Sina Soul JAZZ 8:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro Saudade BOSSA NOVA/JAZZ/SAMBA 6:30p, FREE

Sunshine Theater Wayne Static, Kyng, Eye Empire, and One Eyed Doll 7:30p, $20 Zinc Soulman Sam & Soul Explosion R&B/BLUES 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

SUN 9 Blackbird Buvette La Misa with DJ Speed HIP HOP/

HOP/R&B/REGGAE/TOP 40 9p-close,

LATIN GROOVE 6p, FREE

$2-$5

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Boris McCutcheon, The Townes van Zandt Brunch

Santa Ana Star Casino Cheenah Lounge Jagg 9p-1a, FREE Scalo II Bar Glen Kostur Quartet JAZZ 8:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro The DNC Project JAZZ 7p, FREE Zinc Jade Masque SOUTHWESTERN ROCK 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

SAT

8

AMERICANA 12-3p, FREE

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery Cali Shaw ACOUSTIC/SONGWRITER 3-6p, FREE

Launchpad Good As Dead, Lost Lingo, Eleven Eleven, and Video Games 8p, $4 Mine Shaft Tavern The Ruebarbs SOULFUL BLUES 3-7p,

FREE

Blackbird Buvette Magic Saturday w/DJ Magic Pants

O’Niell’s Juan Tabo Bella Luna 4-7P, FREE Sol Santa Fe Yellowman 7:30p, $20 South Broadway Cultural Center The Saddle Cats WESTERN SWING 7p, $15

Sunshine Theater Circa Survive, Maps and Atlases, and States 7:30p, $20 Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

MON 10

$5

Launchpad Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls, Andrew Jackson Jihad, and Into It. Over It 8:30p, $12 Lotus DJs JRoc, Inspex HIP HOP, DANCE 10p, 21+ FREE, 18+ $10 Marble Brewery The Dregz ROCK 8-11p, FREE Mine Shaft Tavern Rose’s Pawn Shop BLUEGRASS/ COUNTRY/ROCKABILLY 8p-12a, $5

Molly’s Kombat Kitty ROCK/METAL/POP PUNK 1:30-5p, FREE East Mountain Allstars Band ROCK 5:30-9:30p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Dj Cut, Huggie, and Big Worm HIP HOP/OLD SCHOOL/R&B 9p-close,

$2-$5

Outpost Performance Space Amjad Ali Khan and Sons INDIAN

Blue Tower Buffalo Thunder Karaoke 8p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Tiki Tuesdays featuring 12 Dirty Bullets INDIE/ROCK 8p-2a, FREE Cowgirl Bar and Grill Lonesome Heroes INDIE ROCK/ FOLK/COUNTRY 8p, FREE

Launchpad After The Burial, Vell of Maya, Misery Signals, Within The Ruins and The Scarlet Ruse 6:30p, $16 Molly’s Acoustic Jam with Rick Rael ACOUSTIC 5:30-9:30p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Two Dollar Tuesdays with DJ 12 Tribe & DJ Flo Fader HIP HOP/R&B/ TOP 40 9p-close, FREE

9p-2a, FREE

Buffalo Thunder America 8p, $20 Club Warehouse Buffalo Thunder DJ Automatic 9p, FREE Cooperage En-joy CUBAN/SALSA 9:30p, $7 Cowgirl Bar and Grill The Cowgirl Bluegrass Jam hosted by Cathy Faber BLUEGRASS 1-4p, FREE The Sticky FUNK/DANCE 8p,

FREE

Scalo II Bar Jazz Jam with Michael Glynn JAZZ

FREE

ALTERNATIVE/ROCK 8p-2a, FREE

Barley Room Bar & Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE Blackbird Buvette Low Life with DJ Caterwaul 9p,

Chris Chickering & John Kurzweg

O’Niell’s Pub (Central) Los Radiators ROCK/FOLK 4-7p,

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Breakstone JAZZ Redbush

11

SINGER/SONGWRITER 8p, FREE

Barley Room Bar & Grill Black Smoke Blues Band BLUES

10p, FREE

TUE

Blackbird Buvette Blackbird Karaoke with DJ Kammo ALL KINDS 9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Two Wheel Mondays featuring Spindrift PSYCHEDELIC ROCK 8p-2a, FREE

Cowgirl Bar and Grill Cowgirl Karaoke Hosted by Michele Leidig 9p, FREE

Launchpad Retox, Ape Machine, Distances, and Night Terrain 9p, $7

Mine Shaft Tavern Kenny Skywolf BLUES 2-6p, FREE

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

8p, FREE

Sol Santa Fe Blizten Trapper, Dawes, and The Smoke Fairies 7:30p, $18 Zinc Sweet and Lowdown JAZZ 8-11p, FREE

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

WED

12

Barley Room Bar & Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE Blackbird Buvette Body Language with Justin O’Brien, Rev Mitton 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Vinyl & Verses with UHF B-Boy Crew UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8p2a, FREE

Cooperage Bulgarika BULGARIAN FIRERY MUSIC 7:30p, $15/advance $20/door

Cowgirl Bar and Grill The Wishing Well Band AUSTRALIAN JAZZ 8p, FREE

La Cumbre Brewery The Deteriorators BLUES 7-11p, FREE

Launchpad Big D and The Kids Table, The Have Nots, and Martial Law 8p, $10

Low Spirits The Great Depression, Double Plow, and Sloan Armitage 9p, FREE

Marble Brewery Jah Branch REGGAE/SKA/JAH LIVITY 8-11p, FREE

Molly’s Bella Luna FOLK 5:30-9:30p, FREE One Up Elevated Lounge Wicked Wednesdays with DJ Hump & The Mash Up King HIP HOP/R&B/TOP 40 9p-close, FREE

Scalo II Bar Cali Shaw Acoustic Showcase with Todd and the Fox ACOUSTIC 8:30p, FREE

Tlur Pa Lounge DJ Cut & Huggy the Entertainer 8p-midnight, FREE

CLASSICAL/SAROD 7:30p, $20-$40

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

37


smart MUSIC

8p, Tue., Oct. 4

W

hen the dreaded Mongol Amjad Ali Khan and hordes swept down into India Sons in the 1500s, they shoved local 7:30p, Sat., Oct. 8 Hindu and Sikh rulers aside, imposed their Outpost Performance Islamic religion and in other significant Space ways, stirred things up for the next few 210 Yale SE, 505.268.0044 centuries. Yet the Mughals (Persianized Mongols) also settled down from their $20-$40 rough nomad ways and, like many other outpostspace.org invaders, developed a taste for the local cuisine and culture, even mastering and contributing to complex Indian musical forms. Ali Khan, himself the son of Ustaad Haafiz Ali Khan, a royal musician in the former Indian principality of Gwalior, is descended ultimately from a court musician of the fabled Mughal Emperor Akbar. Now one of India’s foremost classical musicians, Khan gave his first recital on the 19-string teak and metal sarod when he was only 6 years old. His family established the fretless sarod as one of the essential instruments in classical Indian music. In contrast to the high, sweet tone of the sitar, the sound of the sarod is deep, weighty and utterly entrancing, involving continuous slides of notes, or glissandi, which transport the listener. —Bill Nevins

38

“W

e all get strange and we know it, but we’re cool with it,” sings John Gourley, Sunshine Theater frontman of Portugal. The Man on “Head 120 Central SW, is a Flame,” a track from 2011’s In The 505.764.0249 Mountain, In The Cloud. Gourley is right — we are cool with the strange and audible $15 ecstasy Alaska’s psychedelic indie rockers Tickets: holdmyticket.com continually produce. portugaltheman.com This latest release marks Portugal. The sunshinetheaterlive.com Man’s seventh full-length album in six years, which is quite a feat for any band. One might imagine that putting out material at such a pace would exhaust listeners and result in watered-down versions of the band’s past works. In The Mountain, In The Cloud is a reminder that, when it comes to the integrity of the music, Portugal. The Man makes no compromises, and only makes progress. This celestial-sounding album is packed with grandiose choruses combined with a retro groove and modern flavors (not to mention Gourley’s unmistakable alto vocal stylings) to give listeners Portugal. The Man’s signature sound. New Mexico’s capitol city has been visited by Portugal. The Man on a few occasions in recent years, but this time, the Duke City will have the pleasure of hosting the quintessential American quartet. —Justin De La Rosa

Portugal. The Man

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

I

t can be easy to dismiss a band with high-pitched vocals as being immature, whiny and the dreaded “e” word — emo. While Circa Survive’s front man Anthony Green delivers vocals of the higher octave, the Pennsylvanian quintet turns out a refined and articulate breed of progressive rock. And you couldn’t imagine the band without Green’s powerful voice. Circa Survive The year 2010 saw the release of the band’s third full-length album, Blue Sun., Oct. 9, 7:30p Sky Noise, which was a fresh and Sunshine Theater fulfilling followup to 2007’s On Letting 120 Central SW, 505.764.0249 Go. The band holed up in what they called “The creek house,” in their $20 hometown of Doylestown, Penn., Tickets: holdmyticket.com and diligently crafted the new sound sunshinetheaterlive.com heard on Blue Sky Noise. Circa Survive circasurvive.com manages to maintain its signature ambient sound, but kicks things into high gear with punching bass lines and driving, dueling guitars accompanied by a more matured and aggressive vocal performance from Green. Circa Survive is known not only for its unique musical styling, but for the vivacious and intimate live performances, which it’s now bringing to the Duke City. —Justin De La Rosa


MUSIC

STAGES Barley Room 5200 EUBANK NE, 505.332.0800 barleyroom.com

Blackbird Buvette 509 CENTRAL NW, 505.243.0878 blackbirdbuvette.com

Burt’s Tiki Lounge 313 GOLD SW, 505.247.BURT burtstikilounge.com

Caravan East 7605 CENTRAL NE, 505.265.7877

Cheenah Lounge 54 JEMEZ CANYON DAM ROAD, 505.867.0000 santaanastar.com

Buffalo Thunder

Sunsine Theater

La Cumbre Brewing Company 3313 GIRARD NE, 505.872.0225 lacumbrebrewing.com

Launchpad 618 CENTRAL SW, 505.764.8887 launchpadrocks.com

Legends Theater Route 66 14500 CENTRAL AVE 505.352.7866 rt66casino.com

Marcello’s Chophouse Mine Shaft Tavern

Cooperage

Molly’s Bar

7220 LOMAS NE, 505.255.1657

Cosmos Tapas

546 STATE HIGHWAY 333, TIJERAS 505.281.9911

4200 CENTRAL SE, 505.232.0535 cosmostapas.com

3205 CENTRAL NE, 505.255.2424

Effing Bar & Grill 5300 SEQUOIA NW, SUITE P, 505.263.4314

El Madrid 423 1ST STREET, 505.242.0829

El Rey Theater 620 CENTRAL SW, 505.242.2353 elreytheater.com

Hallenbrick Brewery 3817 HAWKINS NE, 505.342.1073 hallenbrickbrewery.com

Hard Rock Casino Presents The Pavilion 5601 UNIVERSITY SE, 505.452.5100 hardrock. albuquerqueboxoffice.com Haynes Park 2006 GRANDE BLVD, RIO RANCHO, 505.891.7240 GiG Performance Space 1808 2ND STREET, SANTA FE gigsantafe.com

KiMo Theatre 423 CENTRAL NW, 505.768.3522 cabq.gov/kimo

1715 5TH NW thekosmos.org

TLUR P’A Lounge at Sandia Casino

6855 4TH STREET 505.341.0831 thehiddensteakhouse.com

Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro 3009 CENTRAL NE, 505.254. ZINC (9462) zincabq.com

30 RAINBOW NE, 796.7500 sandiacasino.com

2823 2ND NW, 505.764.0249 lowspiritslive.com

2010 WYOMING NE, SUITE B, 505.332.2665 coolwaterfusion.com

319 S. GUADALUPE, SF, 866.477.7075 cowgirlsantafe.com

The Kosmos

Vernon’s

Low Spirits

CoolWater Fusion Restaurant

Cowgirl Bar & Grill

I-40 EXIT 140, 866.352.RT66 rt66casino.com

WEST OF UNM HOSPITAL artsinmedicine.unm.edu

211 GOLD SW, 505.243.0955 LOTUSABQ.COM

Marble Brewery

4908 CORRALES ROAD, CORRALES, 505.897.1036

Thunder Road Steakhouse & Cantina

UNM Hosptial’s Barbara and Bill Richardson Pavilion Cafe

Lotus Nightclub

30 BUFFALO THUNDER TRAIL, SANTA FE, 877.455.7775 buffalothunderresort.com

Corrales Bistro Brewery

120 CENTRAL AVENUE 505.764.0249 sunshinetheaterlive.com

111 MARBLE NW, 505.243.2739 marblebrewery.com 2201 Q NE, 505.837.2467 2846 STATE HWY. 14N MADRID, 505.473.0742

Monte Vista Fire Station One Up Elevated Lounge 301 CENTRAL NW, 2ND LEVEL, 505.242.1966 oneupabq.com

O’Niell’s Pub Nob Hill 4310 CENTRAL SE, 505.255.6782 oniells.com

O’Niell’s Pub Juan Tabo 3301 JUAN TABO NE, 505.293.1122 oniells.com

Outpost Performance Space 210 YALE SE, 505.268.0044 outpostspace.org

Prairie Star 288 PRAIRIE STAR, BERNALILLO, 505.867.3327

Santa Fe Sol Stage & Grill 37 FIRE PLACE, SANTA FE 505.424.3333 solsantafelive.com

Scalo 3500 CENTRAL SE 505.255.8781 scalonobhill.com

St. Clair Winery & Bistro 901 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.243.9916 nmwine.com

St. Francis Auditorium 107 WEST PALACE AVENUE, SANTA FE 505.476.5072 nmartmuseum.org

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Oct. 5 for the Oct. 13 issue. Send entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 505.243.8173, a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 Name of Exhibit/Event Description of exhibit/event VENUE/GALLERY ADDRESS website List events any time @ local-iQ.com

Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

THU

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THROUGH OCT. 3 PERFORMANCE PHOTO BY JOY GODFREY

Originally created in the punk rock scene in the mid-’70s, “zines” have continued to provide artists with limited means a tangible outlet for self-expression. ABQ Zine Fest, organized by Marya Errin Jones (left), Billy McCall (right) and Eric Gamlen (back), aims to celebrate this unique and varied form of independent publishing, and help zine fanatics share information, gain skills and educate attendees.

Zine team The first annual ABQ Zine Fest puts the love of self-published personal expression on center stage BY JESSEY CHERNE

A

ttention all zine-fiends: Albuquerque’s first ever, highly anticipated, ABQ Zine Fest is the place to be for all literary fanatics, lovers and addicts of great writing. For those of you not in the know, a zine is an uncensored, self-published and handmade fanzine magazine with a small circulation base, published with the intent of sharing one’s ardor for writing, ideas or drawings with the world. The zine was originally created in the 1970s through the Punk scene and then brought to light again in the 1990s by the Riot Grrls feminist movement. The beauty of the zine is that it allows the reader to branch out from the internet crutch of blogging and to regain the ability to hold a printed publication in your hands. ABQ Zine Fest will take place over a span of three days and there will be over 20 zine participants at the festival. Each day of the event will feature a variety of zine trades, live music, workshops on zine creation, panel discussions, debate, informal social gatherings with other “zinesters” and sale/bartering of do-it-yourself crafts made by local artists. The second day of the festival will include the First Annual ABQ Zine Fest Olympics (are you ready for Speed Stapling???), hosted by Billy McCall, and there will be other unique games as well. The Dirty Nasty Filthy Zine Reading will take place on Sunday, which is not for the faint of heart or anyone under the age of 18. For those of you who want to know what it is really like to produce your own self-published masterpiece, the 48-hour Zine challenge is for you. The contest is open to anyone attending the festival, alone or in a team, who wants to create and produce their own eight-page zine for the world to experience. The participants will treat the world with a reading from their work on the final night of the fest and share their brilliance with cohorts and other admirers. The awards for top zines include Best in Show, “Zine with the Best Visuals,” Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie I

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FESTIVAL

ABQ Zine Fest 7p, Fri., Sep. 30; 12-10p, Sun., Oct. 2 Cellar Door Gifts & Gallery 147 Harvard Ave SE, 505.750.1471

10-4p, Sat., Oct. 1 Harwood Art Center 1114 7th Street NW, 505.242.6367

7-10p, Sat., Oct. 1 Winning Coffee House 111 Harvard SE, 505.266.0000

Need Some More, “Zine that Makes the Audience Want to Hear More” and the First Annual Bruce Springsteen Award “Zine that Creates a Feeling of Romanticism and Home.” According to ABQ Zine Fest founder Marya Errin Jones, “Albuquerque is home to dozens of zinesters. It seemed like the right time to organize a zine fest, to help bring folks together.” Jones chose to create the zine festival after attending various readings at the Cellar Door Gifts & Gallery in the city’s Bricklight District. “The purpose of this fest is to share information, gain skills, learn from each other, share our passion for the independent impulse, but most of all to have a good time — that’s what we intend to do!”

If you just cannot wait to get started on the zine celebration weekend, check out well known zines including Bitch, Bust, Cometbus, Dazed & Confused, Giant Robot, Girl Crush, and Maximum RocknRoll. Founder Jones’ own zine is entitled Prague: A F*ed-up Travelogue. You can find the more well known zines in bookstores and coffee houses where they are distributed, or just a grab a handful at the ABQ Zine Fest. FREE

abqzinefest.com

“I’m pretty fired-up about zine creation. Writing zines gave me permission to tell my story without hesitation or self-censorship,” Jones said.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

Once In a Lifetime As part of the Albuquerque Theatre Guild’s ongoing celebration of the centennial of the birth of one of America’s most enduring playwrights, Tennessee Williams, local theater group Fusion, in association with the Provincetown, Mass., Tennessee Williams Theater Festival, present the world premiere of this one-act play. 8p, Thu.-Fri.; 2p, 8p, Sat.; 2p, 6p, Sun., $25-$30 THE CELL 700 1ST NW, 505.766.9412

fusionabq.org/thecell.htm LECTURE/DEMO

Jim Denomie: The Art of Social Commentary Jim Denomie, Ojibwe, is a painter who also works with ink and oil pastel drawings, printmaking, photography and found-object sculpture. He’s best known for his unique surrealistic painting styles and cartoonish, “revisionist” depictions of Native American history and themes. 1-2:15p, FREE THE INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN INDIAN ARTS (CLE BUILDING, 2ND FLOOR) 83 AVAN NU PO, SANTA FE, 505.424.2300

iaiamuseum.org THROUGH OCT. 9 ART EXHIBIT

Paintings by Don Romero Don Romero (1948-2011), whose colorful, contemporary paintings depict the desert country and rugged mountains of the land he grew up in, will be featured in a retrospective The Art and Soul of an Artist. Romero taught fine arts for 25 years in Albuquerque Public Schools. 12-9p, Thu.-Sat.; 10a-4p, Sun., FREE ONTRACK GALLERY AND ART SPACE 1719 5TH NW, 505.228.0229

FILM SERIES

Spanish Cinema: El Espiritu de la Colmena The Spanish Film Series presents a provocative tour of Spanish cinema’s


ARTS

AR T S EV EN TS history through a series of movies that weave together the country’s cinematography. All movies are in Spanish with English subtitles

THROUGH OCT. 11 EXHIBITION

Quinto Sol/Sexto Sol

THROUGH OCT. 2 PERFORMANCE

The exhibition focuses on astrological events lining up to create change. Artists who explore this idea include Reducinda Avila, Sylvia Ortiz Domney, Miriam Hernandez, Justine Ortiz, Riti Sachdeva, Regina Araujo Corritore, Elaine Soto and Stan D. Harada.

A Streetcar Named Desire

8a-5p, Tue.-Sat., FREE

7p, FREE NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER BANK OF AMERICA THEATER 1701 4TH SW, 505.724.4777

albuquerque.cervantes.es

Presented by Teatro Nuevo Mexico and featuring a nontraditional casting, this stage version is presented as part of the Albuquerque Tennessee Williams Festival 2011. 7p, Thu.-Fri.; 2p, Sun., $10-$15 NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER 1701 4TH SW, 505.246.2261

nhccnm.org THROUGH SEPT. 30

Poetry + Monsters The art and poetry/prose of Heidi K. Brandow and Omar Ganzo come together for a playful artistic collaboration and fusion of creative styles. 7a-9p, FREE THE RANGE CAFE 925 S. CAMINO DEL PUEBLO, 505.867.1700

hkbstudio.com THROUGH SEP. 30 EXHIBITION

Emily Trovillion: Unstable Leptons The artist says: “I explore a theme of a post-apocalyptic world in which people begin to realize we have to cease damaging our earth.” 10:30a-5:30p, Tue.-Fri.; 11a-5:30p, Sat., FREE WEYRICH GALLERY 2935-D LOUISIANA NE, 505.883.7410

weyrichgallery.com THROUGH OCT. 28

SOUTH BROADWAY CULTURAL CENTER , 1025 BROADWAY SE, 505.848.1320

cabq.gov/sbcc THROUGH OCT. 3 EXHIBITION

Joshua S. Franco: Catching a Ray of Light in the Heartland Joshua S. Franco exhibits his hyper-vivid, highly representational paintings. Experience his unique, whimsical imagination while enjoying the wines of Casa Rondeña Winery. By appt., FREE 1629 CLUB AT CASA RONDEÑA WINERY 733 CHAVEZ NW, 505.550.7220

THROUGH OCT. 1

20 in 2011 Media includes painting, printmaking, drawing, photography and sculpture, and includes works by Clinton Adams, Stuart Arends, Thomas Barrow, William Betts, Christopher Brown, James Casebere, Constance DeJong, Teo González, Frederick Hammersley, Jeff Kellar, David Levinthal, Wes Mills, Robert and Shana Parke Harrison, Scott Peterman, Lorna Simpson, Lisa Solomon, Jennifer Vasher, Tom Waldron, and Johnnie Winona Ross. 11a-4p, Tue.-Sat., FREE RICHARD LEVY GALLERY 514 CENTRAL SW, 505.766.9888

www.levygallery.com

A View With Room Art Exhibition and Sale

THROUGH OCT. 20 EXHIBITION

Open Space Visitor Center has hosted the annual A View With Room art show for five years. All paintings will be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going to support Open Space Alliance 1-4p,

Jon Garcia’s entire set of exploded model renderings for his Wormhole Vesse is the focus of this showcase of his craftsmanship. 10a-6p,

Jon Garcia: Wood-turned Sculptures

FREE

Mon.-Sat.; 10a-8p, Fri., Oct. 7, FREE

OPEN SPACE VISITOR CENTER 6500 COORS NW, 505.897.8831

PALETTE CONTEMPORARY ART & CRAFT 7400 MONTGOMERY NE, SUITE 22, 505.855.7777

cabq.gov/openspace/viewwithroom. html THROUGH OCT. 1 EXHIBITION

Katy Widger: Fine Art Oils and Mix Media Award-winning, original still life oil paintings and cutting-edge fiber art by Katy Widger, New Mexico native artist. 12-8p, Fri.;1-7p, Sat.; 12-6p, Sun.; Appt. Only, Mon.-Thu., FREE THE WATERMELON GALLERY 12220 NORTH HWY. 14

thewatermelongallery.com THROUGH SEP. 30 EXHIBITION

Jeannie Sellmer: New Mexico Landscapes

palettecontemporary.com THROUGH OCT 2 PERFORMANCE

Loot This 1960s British farce follows the hijinks of Hal and Dennis, two young bank robbers who have stashed the loot inside the coffin of Hal’s recently deceased mother. The police investigate, hilarity ensues. 7:30p, Fri.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$15 THE VORTEX THEATRE 2004 1/2 CENTRAL SE, 505.247.8600

vortexabq.org

Jeannie Sellmer’s scenes of rivers, reflections, skies and panoramic views. 10a-6p, Mon.-Fri.; 10a-5p, Sat.; 11a-3p, Sun., FREE SUMNER & DENE 517 CENTRAL NW, 505.842.1400

sumnerdene.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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ARTS EVENTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41 THROUGH OCT. 2 PERFORMANCE

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying J. Pierrepont Finch happens on a book entitled How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, and decides to begin his rise up the ladder. 7:30p, Fri.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., $18-$22 RODEY THEATRE, UNM CAMPUS, 505.453.8844

landmarkmusicals.org THROUGH OCT. 2 PERFORMANCE

A View from the Bridge An ordinary longshoreman is unconsciously in love with his niece, while the niece falls in love with someone else. 8p, Thu.-Fri.; 6p, Sat.; 2p, Sun., $12-$18 MOTHER ROAD THEATRE COMPANY @ THE FILLING STATION 1024 4TH SW, 505.243.0596

motherroad.org THROUGH SEP. 30 EXHIBITION

Vicki Bolen & Jesse Garves Featuring mixed media pieces by Vicki Bolen, while Jesse Garves exhibits pieces of collage and street art. 11a-6p, Mon.-Sat.; 125p, Sun., FREE MARIPOSA GALLERY 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.6828

mariposa-gallery.com THROUGH OCT. 15

Cuatro Hermanos This fall art exhibition presents the artistic skills of the Simpson family, aka Cuatro Hermanos, a family guild of artists. 9a-1:30p, FREE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH 3701 CARLISLE NE, 505.884.1801

THROUGH DEC. 18

An Inquisitive Eye, Seeing Into Prints

Re-Imagining American Identities

unm.edu/-artmuse THROUGH DEC. 18

Sinners & Saints: 15th19th Century Paintings Religious painting from the 15thcentury Renaissance through the 19th-century neoclassical period in Europe and the New World. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

unm.edu/-artmuse

NEW CONCEPT GALLERY 610 CANYON, 505.795.7570

newconceptgallery.com

The Albuquerque Rail Yards Exhibit

10a-4p, Sat., FREE

UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

This show features paintings by Cecilia Kirby Binkley and Linda Petersen, with photographs by Woody Galloway and Steven A. Jackson. 5-7p, FREE

THROUGH NOV. 14 OPENING RECEPTION

1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE

FRAMING CONCEPTS GALLERY 5809-B JUAN TABO NE, 505.294.326

framingconceptsgallery.com THROUGH OCT. 2 EXHIBITION

Belen ART League Fall Art Show Belen ART League’s annual fall art show, with new works by local artists. 12:30-3:30p, Tue.-Sat.; 1-3p, Sun., FREE HARVEY HOUSE MUSEUM AND GALLERY 104 NORTH FIRST, 505.861.0581

516arts.org

Landscapes of the Southwest

unm.edu/-artmuse

Lois Bradley: Influences

Eiko & Koma return to New Mexico and Global DanceFest as part of The Retrospective Project, a three-year retrospective of their 40-year career. 8p, $15-$50

THROUGH OCT. 31 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

SAT New Grounds Gallery (3812 Central SE, 505.268.8952 newgroundsgallery.com ) will hold an opening reception on Sat., Oct. 7 for Emergence: Gravure by Adabel Allen, whose softly hued gravure prints merge drawn and photographic imagery to magical affect. 5-8p, FREE

THROUGH SEP. 30 EXHIBITION

FRI

30

Bryan Goff A life-threatening fall influenced Bryan’s images and poetry. His works are thought-provoking and sometimes whimsical. 10a-6p, Mon.-Sat., FREE HIGH DESERT ART AND FRAME 12611 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.265.4066

highdesertartandframe.com

Creative Conversations: Film Keif Henley, Pat Duncan and Sarah Wentzel-Fisher., discuss exploring the artistic and production processes of film, distribution and audience building. 8:30a, $7-$12

THROUGH OCT. 9 PERFORMANCE

CREATIVE ALBUQUERQUE 115 4TH NW, 505.268.1920

Time Stands Still

creativeabq.org/calendar/index

Sarah, a photojournalist, has returned to Brooklyn to recuperate after being severely injured by a roadside bomb in Iraq. Her ex-boyfriend, James, tends to her recovery in this sharp and often funny drama directed by Matt Heath. 8p, Fri.-Sat., 2p,

THROUGH OCT. 21

Sun., $12-$14 THE ADOBE THEATRE 9813 4TH NW, 505.898.2222

adobetheater.org

1

Reception and Exhibition This exhibition celebrates the 20th century’s greatest contemporary master artists, including George Condo, Richard Diebenkorn, Roy Lichtenstein and Edward Ruscha. 10a-5p, Mon.Sat.; 12-4p, Sun., FREE ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART 435 S. GUADALUPE, 505.982.8111

zanebennettgallery.com LECTURE/DEMO

A Life in Architecture Annual Lecture Series: Rob Quigley AIA Albuquerque hosts a lecture by award-winning architect Rob Quigley, who will talk about his work, his philosophy and vision of architecture, and show slides of his designs. 5:30-9p, $10-$15

In Old New Mexico: A Melodrama Dinner and Dessert The Southwest Rural Theatre Project stages a Victorian-style melodrama set in the Old West. LEISURE BOWL 400 LOMAS NE, 505.717.4494

THROUGH OCT. 29 EXHIBITION

Ife Fidudusola Exhibition An exhibition comprised of batiks, pen and ink drawings, wood collages, fiber art works and bead mosaics. 10a-8p, Mon.-Thu.; 10a5p, Sat, FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY AUDITORIUM 744 LOMA COLORADO NE, 505.891.5013 EXT 3033

THROUGH JAN. 6 EXHIBITION

Young Brides, Old Shirts: Macedonian Embroidered Dress Focusing on the rich textile tradition of Macedonia, this exhibit showcases 27 mannequins dressed in multiple layers. 10a-5p, Tue.-Sun., $9-$20 THE MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MUSEUM HILL, CAMINO LEJO OFF OLD SANTA FE TRAIL, 505.476.1200

internationalfolkart.org THROUGH OCT. 9 EXHIBIT/FAIR

Lighter Than Air Fair

KIMO THEATER 423 CENTRAL NW, 505.242.9800

Highlights of these “downtime” Balloon Fiesta activities include local music, a Navy exhibit featuring an official flight simulator and kid-friendly crafts.

aiaabq.org

6a-2p, FREE ALBUQUERQUE BALLOON MUSEUM 9201 BALLOON MUSEUM NE, 505.280.1684

balloonmuseum.com

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

RECEPTION

20 in 2011 In celebration of Richard Levy Gallery’s 20th anniversary, 20 in 2011 offers a cornucopia of mediums including painting, drawing, photography and sculpture and includes both new projects and older works by 20 different artists. 6-8p, FREE RICHARD LEVY GALLERY 514 CENTRAL SW, 505.766.9888

levygallery.com THROUGH OCT. 2 SPECIAL EVENT

24 Hour Comics Day 2011 Accept the challenge to create 24 comic book pages in 24 consecutive hours. Join 7000 BC. Bring your papers and pens. 12p-12p, FREE

PERFORMANCE

6p, $25 (includes dinner) DISCUSSION

Sat., Oct. 1; 12-5p, Tue.-Sat., FREE 516 ARTS 516 CENTRAL SW, 505.242.1445

vsartsnm.org

Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE

Superheroes is a multimedia, group exhibition about heroes, villains and other less-definable examples of human possibility. It explores the way we absorb these archetypes, and for good or ill, use them to inspire, author and rationalize our behavior. 6-8p,

Global DanceFest Fall 2011

N4TH ART CENTER 4904 4TH NW, 505.344.4542

This photography show seeks to provoke discussion about how we define ourselves as Americans. Drawn from the museum’s extensive collection of photographs, these portraits brings us face to face with the diversity of American life. 10a-4p,

A tour-de-force sculpture composed of bent and twisted oak lumber. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.;

Dead Leg

THROUGH OCT. 1 PERFORMANCE

THROUGH DEC. 18

Lois Bradley’s work incorporates memories of a childhood watching farm women working the land alongside the men by day and gathering at night to create quilts from cast-off garments and scraps of fabric. 10a-6p, Mon.-Fri.;

THROUGH DEC. 18

theatre.unm.edu

unm.edu/-artmuse

THROUGH SEP. 30 EXHIBITION

Superheroes: Icons of Good, Evil and Everything In Between

7:30p, Tue.-Sat., $10-$15

UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

abqrailyards.blogspot.com

The Eccentricities of a Nightingale

EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE UNM CAMPUS, 505.277.4332

Sat.-Sun., FREE

THE KIMO THEATRE ART GALLERY 423 CENTRAL NW, 505.891.5101

THROUGH JAN. 7 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Tennessee Williams’ bittersweet love song to one of his dearest and most desperate misfits, Alma Winemiller. 2p, Sun.; 7:30p, Sat.;

This show provides visitors a chance to view significant prints and printed books from the museum’s permanent collection, which spans the history of printmaking from 1493 to the present. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p,

This unique exhibit features work by photographers from the Flickr Albuquerque/Santa Fe Social Pool and the Enchanted Lens Camera Club. The images capture the empty Albuquerque Rail Yard, little changed since it was built in 1916. 6-8p, Thu., FREE

THROUGH OCT. 8 PEFORMANCE

MEDIA ARTS COLLABORATIVE CHARTER SCHOOL 4401 CENTRAL NE, BLDG. #2, 505.262.2952

24hourcomics.com THROUGH OCT. 2

Arts and Crafts Show All local artists in a variety of media. 9a-4p, Sat. & Sun., FREE HILTON INN I-25 & SAN ANTONIO, 505.514.3107

kaydeeabq.vpweb.com THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITIONS

October Exhibits This month’s exhibits include A Muse, Ford Robbins’ Photos, Men Gallery Artists Group Show, Marcia Petty, 100 Gallery Artists Group Show, Art of the Historic Madrid Area, and Mel Johnson’s People, Etc. 3-5p, FREE THE JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 STATE HWY. 14, 505.471.1054

turquoisetrail.org RECEPTION

Crop Circles: Mysteries in the Fields Paper artist Adele Frances reflects her recent trip to the United Kingdom and her consequent attempts to explore the beauty and mystery of crop circles. 10a5p, FREE SPIRIT IN ART #5 FIREHOUSE, IN GYPSY PLAZA, 505.438.3235

spiritinartgallery.com THROUGH OCT 29 EXHIBITION

Lisa Chernoff, Ming Franz, Jo SchumanNatalie Searl Ceramic, watercolor and photography. FREE PLACITAS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6 MILES EAST OF I-5 ON NM 165, 505.867.8080

placitasarts.org CONTINUED ON PAGE 44


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“Red” by Mark Addison Smith

D

on’t Ask, Don’t Tell, the policy that required Asking and Telling gays and lesbians to remain in the closet 6-8p, Fri., Oct. 7 while serving in the U.S. military, ended Sept. 20. Jessie Rogers, the Harwood Art Center’s design Harwood Art Center and communications manager, explained that this 1114 7th NW, show’s “asking and telling” theme was inspired by the 505.242.6367 emergence of queer storytelling in the national press, harwoodartcenter.org including Dan Savage’s It Gets Better project. Being gay in the U.S. continues to be a political issue, and what better form to express personal and public experiences around sexuality and “coming out” stories than with a group art show? The exhibit features visual and written works by artists from New Mexico, Illinois, California and New York. “Coming out is something that we all do in our lives, regardless of our sexual orientation,” Rogers said. “Coming out is about owning who we are as individuals and members of communities. Everyone can relate to the nervewracking act of unveiling one’s true self.” The opening reception coincides with the Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival again this year. The exhibit runs through Oct. 27. —Cristina Olds

ove, lies and mistaken Barber of Seville identities surround 7:30p, Tue.-Fri.; 2p., Sun., a beautiful young Oct. 9-16 woman under house arrest in Gioachino Rossini’s Barber of National Hispanic Cultural Seville. The comic opera takes Center, Journal Theatre place in Seville, Spain, in the 1701 4th SW, 505.724.4771 17th century and tells the story $10-$75 of Figaro, the barber. Figaro is nationalhispaniccenter.org trying to assist Almaviva to win the affections of the imprisoned Rosina. Figaro and Almaviva feverishly try to outwit Rosina’s captor and various suitors. Throughout the opera, enchanting ballads serenade the tortured love affair portrayed in the performance with hilarious undertones surrounding every twist and turn. There are two acts to the opera, with a libretto by Cesare Sterbini, which is a perfect addition to Rossini’s masterpiece. The show is staged by Opera Southwest, which celebrates its first event at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Stephen Hartley will play the role of Figaro and Heather Johnson will make her Opera Southwest debut singing the role of Rosina. Renowned scenic designer Carey Wong has designed the stage for the performance. —Jessey Cherne

T

he 18 women artists who formed the Luna Project collective in 2003 aim to create one art piece per lunar cycle. The original challenge among a group of friends was to create one autobiographical piece each week, but that proved to be unsustainable. The mission evolved to become an effort to mimic the moon — like the moon, artists wax and wane, and members of the group encourage each other to begin again and keep making art, according to founder Lauri Dickinson. Besides producing art, the members share ideas and feedback with the goal of presenting one group show each year. Drawing from the moon theme, pieces in the upcoming show will reflect the cycles of the earth and explore the mysteries of the universe. “Luna artists present a range “Buffalo God” by Betsy James of abstract and realistic interpretations of nature Recent Work by Luna and culture through painting, mixed media, Project sculpture, and clay,” Dickinson said. Artists in the Recent Word exhibit include: Phyllis OPENING RECEPTION Benia Salazar, Patricia Cohen, Ruth Cohen, 3-6p, Sun., Oct. 9 Cate Eaves, Lauri Dickinson, Mary Dornacker, Oasis Bistro Nance Elsinger, Betsy James, Betsy Kuhn, 4940 Corrales Road, Marta Light, Anna Mafchir, Joani Murphy, Corrales, 505.792.4720 Margy O’Brien, Nancy Rutland, Catherine Scali, Kris Thatcher and Alice Webb. —Cristina Olds

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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THROUGH OCT. 27 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

THROUGH OCT. 11 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Asking and Telling

23rd Old Church Fine Arts Show This event features many of New Mexico’s finest artists, set in the beauty of the Old San Ysidro Church. 11a-5p, Oct. 1 - 8; 11a-4p, Oct. 11, FREE OLD SAN YSIDRO CHURCH 966 OLD CHURCH, 505.301.0042

TUE

4

PERFORMANCE

Poetry Reading with Jim Ferris The author of Facts of Life and The Hospital Poems. 7p, FREE TEATRO PARAGUAS 3221 RICHARDS, 505.424.1601

teatroparaguas.org

WED

5

DIGITAL WORKSHOP/SEMINAR

Producing with Passion: Creating Media That Reflects Your Vision A webinar with Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning filmmaker Dorothy Fadiman. 7-9:30p, $60 Registration: instantpresenter.com

Artists from New Mexico, Illinois, California and New York use art to explore coming out of the closet. 10a-4p, FREE HARWOOD ART CENTER, ESCUELA DEL SOL MONTESSORI 1114 7TH NW, 505.242.6327

harwoodartcenter.org RECEPTION

Nick Harmon: Stripped Nick Harmon’s solo art debut in contemporary art of mixed media-joint compound and color pigments. 5-10p, FREE FRESCO HARMONY 517 CENTRAL NE, 505.400.9313

frescoharmony.com THROUGH NOV. 25 EXHIBITION

This is This: Largely Small Paintings Hudock’s first paintings were backgrounds for his photographs. In This is This, Hudock layers paint onto pages from dictionaries, old maps, photographs, digital prints and bits of trash, then scratches away at the paint to reveal what lies beneath. Mon.-Fri., 2-5:30p, FREE INPOST ARTSPACE AT THE OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE 210 YALE SE, 505.268.0044

outpostspace.org RECEPTION

THU

6

FILM SERIES

Spanish Cinema: “Los Santos Inocentes” The Spanish Film Series presents a provocative tour of Spanish cinema’s history. 7p, FREE

FINE ARTS BUILDING NEW MEXICO EXPO

nmwatercolorsociety.org

Surreal Southwest painter Sam Esmoer gives his fish eye impression of taverns, taco stands and street life. 5-8p, FREE

FRI 7 THROUGH OCT. 23 PERFORMANCE

Dead End Killington Drive: The Jack O-Lantern Murders This dinner theater production features a copycat murderer killing people who reside on the dead end street in a sleepy suburb in Sedona, Ariz. 6:30p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$35 EAST MOUNTAIN CENTER FOR THEATRE, VISTA GRANDE COMMUNITY CENTER 15 LA MADERA, 505.286.1950

emct.org

44

FREE

Angel Dust

enchantedlens.org

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

matrixfineart.com RECEPTION

Emergence: Gravure by Adabel Allen Always the innovator in combining print media, Adabel Allen expertly merges drawn and photographic imagery to create an otherwordly and almost magical quality for her softly hued gravure prints. 5-8p, FREE NEW GROUNDS PRINT WORKSHOP & GALLERY 3812 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.8952

newgroundsgallery.com RECEPTION

Travis Bruce Black: Everything Sing Recent bird and figurative paintings, Everything Sing is his continuation of the over 180 bird paintings he has created in The Chirp series. This show is an exploration of the natural world combined with Black’s often quirky internal world. 6-8:30p,

brightraingallery.com

LECTURE/DEMO

IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 114 CARLISLE SE

MATRIX FINE ART 3812 CENTRAL SE #100A, 505.268.8952

The NM Watercolor Society will be holding a reception for the New Mexico Watercolor Exhibition featuring local artists. 6:30-9p,

albuquerque.cervantes.edu

FREE

Susan Reid’s dot paintings are expressions of energy that translate to the movement and vibration of each piece. The colorful, abstract paintings of Raul Dorn are reminiscent of natural forms. 5-8p, FREE

FREE

THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITION/RECEPTION

Speaker Mark Forte, a photographer, author and professor of architecture at UNM, will share his journey as both an architect and a photographer. 7p,

From Point to Line: Paintings by Susan Reid and Raul Dorn

New Mexico Watercolor Exhibition

NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER BANK OF AMERICA THEATER 1701 4TH SW, 505.724.4777

Architecture, Photography and the Spirit of Place

RECEPTION

MARIPOSA GALLERY 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.6828

mariposa-gallery.com THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITION/RECEPTION

BRIGHT RAIN GALLERY 206 1/2 SAN FELIPE NW IN THE OLD TOWN PATIO MARKET, 505.898.9222

THROUGH OCT. 8 PERFORMANCE

Global DanceFest Fall 2011 Desiré Davids and Floating Outfit Project present a work that is both personal and abstract, Who Is This Beneath My Skin? explores the idea of self interacting with culture and community through dance, photo images and live and fixed video projection. 8p, $15-$20 N4TH THEATER/NORTH FOURTH ART CENTER 4904 4TH NW, 505.344.4542

vsartsnm.org

SAT 8

Day of the Dead Two and three dimensional art works, as well as jewelry, will be exhibited in this annual exhibition. 5-8p, FREE MARIPOSA GALLERY 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.6828

mariposa-gallery.com THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITION/RECEPTION

Interactions: Art In Use New porcelain work by Kathryne Cyman. 5-8:30p, Fri. Oct. 7; 10:30a-5:30p, Tue.-Fri.; 11a-5:30p, Sat.; by appt. only, Mon., FREE WEYRICH GALLERY/THE RARE VISION ART GALERIE 2935 D LOUSIANA NE

weyrichgallery.com

FESTIVAL/FAIR

Placitas Flea Market and Arts & Crafts Fair Great variety and bargains on fine art, crafts, furniture, antiques, collectibles, Hummels, gold/ silver/Native jewelry, watches/ clocks and more. 7a-4p, FREE PLACITAS COMMUNITY LIBRARY 453 HIGHWAY 165

placitaslibrary.com PERFORMANCE

On the Road: A Traveler’s Guide A concert of music about travel in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, performed with voices and period instruments. 7:30p, $9-$16 ST. MICHAEL & ALL ANGELS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 601 MONTANO NW, 505.842.9613


FILM

FILM SHORTS

Actor assist

D

espite biases among some segments of society, love has no gender, race or age. The Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival exemplifies this fact and is proud to announce the ninth-annual edition of this seven-day festival of queer cinema. This year’s event will showcase over 80 feature films, documentaries and shorts from all over the world, all touching on gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender themes. Highlights of the 2011 Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival include: • Absent (Ausente), an Argentinian movie about a young man who develops a manipulative relationship with his older male teacher. • Bite Marks, about a truck driver who is making a delivery of coffins when he picks up a Southwest Gay hitchhiking gay couple. & Lesbian Film • Cho Dependent, Festival a filmed live Fri.-Thurs., Oct. 7-13 performance by Multiple venues, standup comedienne 505.243.1870 Margaret Cho. $10 per movie/$100 • Circumstance, festival pass about a young Iranian closetcinema.org woman’s attraction to her female friend and the class and cultural boundaries she faces. • The Green, about a Manhattan gay couple who must battle suspicion when they move to the Connecticut shoreline. • Wish Me Away, a documentary about Chely Wright, the first country music star to come out as gay. Festival Director Roberto Appicciafoco said he’s especially happy that the festival’s opening night showcases the film Gun Hill Road, the tale of a man who has just been released from prison and is looking to rebuild his relationship with his family. He comes home to discover that his son is now going through the process of regendering into his daughter. The opening night party on Oct. 7 takes place at Bailey’s on the Beach, and after a week of screenings and festivities at a variety of venues, the film festival will come to a close with a party at La Provence Oct. 13. Final details of the festival were being firmed up at deadline. See the festival website for more information. —Jessey Cherne

Director Eldar Rapaport’s Harvest screens on Saturday, Oct. 8 at Guild Cinema.

Duke City DocFest Various Times, Oct. 12-16 KiMo Theatre 423 Central NW, 505.768.3522

$8 per show, $25 opening night, $150 festival pass Tickets: kimotickets.com dukecitydocfest.com

T

Jo Edna Boldin forges a career in N.M. as casting director for Academy Award-winning films BY SARAH PARRO

J

o Edna Boldin likes to help people realize their Hollywood dreams. That she can do it while living and working in New Mexico, she considers a bonus. Boldin has cast actors for virtually every prominent film production in New Mexico in recent years, including No Country for Old Men, Terminator: Salvation, The Book of Eli, True Grit, Swing Vote and Sunshine Cleaning. It’s her job to find the local actors needed to round out a production, typically for smaller speaking roles. And she’s good at it: She won an Atrios Award from the Casting Society of America (of which she is a member) for her work on No Country for Old Men. Boldin has championed young unknown actors like Matthew PROFILE McConaughey and Renee Zellweger in her three-decade career. She Jo Edna recently sat down with Local iQ to Boldin discuss her job as a New Mexico OWNER/CASTING casting director. DIRECTOR

505 Studio Works LLC

Local iQ: How did you get into the 3905 Georgia NE, 505.884.3455 movie business? Jo Edna Boldin: I came into it through being an actor. I did a lot of theater, but at one point I really wanted to break into films and television, so I moved to L.A. to pursue an acting career. iQ: What led you to casting? Boldin: I had kind of burned out on L.A. (with acting), so I actually started my own casting company in Houston, Texas. That was probably about 25 years ago. I’m grateful that the film industry has taken off here in New Mexico so I can work and live here. iQ: Why a casting director over working as an actor? Boldin: I only worked in casting, at first, hoping that it would further my acting career, and as I got more into casting I realized how creative it was. I wanted to take the attention off myself and help other people. It’s almost like being an artist — you add the color and shades and texture to a film. You help with the collaborative effort. iQ: How does the casting process begin? Boldin: I’m a location casting director, and what that means is that I find the actors in the area to be in the film so that (the producers) save money and get the rebate. (ed. note; Boldin is referring to the New Mexico film rebate incentive, which offers a rebate of up to 25 percent of a film’s production costs for money spent in New Mexico). I get the script and I read it and decide if I even want to do it, and I maybe make a short breakdown of what roles are in the script. I send that breakdown out to the (talent) agents. They will electronically submit pictures and resumes of the actors that they want me to

he second annual Duke City DocFest cues up 26 different documentary films, made by both local and nationally known directors and documentarians. The motto of the festival? “Free thinkers who demand the truth … expanding minds one frame at a time.” All of the films chosen for the 2011 festival were picked by a diverse panelist of judges, in order to keep the film selection process fair and the roster of movies varied, according to Duke City DocFest founder and director Jesse Quakenbush. This year’s lineup is filled with award winners. That includes Susan Saladoff’s film Hot Coffee, about Albuquerque’s Stella Liebeck and her experience when a cup of McDonald’s coffee severely burned her lap. The Washington Post hailed Saladoff’s film as a “riveting exposé.”

PHOTO BY JOY GODFREY

Jo Edna Boldin is the owner of 505 Studio Works, a movie casting business based in Albuquerque. Boldin has cast actors for virtually every recent major New Mexico-based film production.

consider, so then I get on my computer I’ll look at it role by role. iQ: Do you work directly with the actors? Boldin: Yes, we schedule the actors, they come in, and we’ll videotape them. Then I narrow it down to the people I feel are worthy to be in front of the director and producer or get a callback. Often it’s a callback in person with the director and producer and me. There will be a live one-on-one, which we tape again, and then they will pick, or we’ll see more people. iQ: What are some of the challenges of your work? Boldin: I’ve chosen to live in New Mexico. It’s a small state. Sometimes I just don’t have enough people to play with, I don’t have enough choices, and that sometimes becomes difficult, because we want a really good actor no matter what. iQ: What do you enjoy most about being a casting director? Boldin: I really enjoy working with actors. I enjoy helping them realize their dream. I make a good living at it, and I enjoy the creative part of it; it’s a very creative process. I get to meet some really great people. Some of the highlights have been working with people who have gone on to do great things. So things like that, where you can really help people — you can open a door for people and help them. I like doing that. I really like doing that.

Ian Cheney’s film, The City Dark, unravels the implications of an artificially lit world where natural darkness and a sky filled with stars is a rarity. Another highlight is Erasing David, about the loss of privacy in the United Kingdom when the government conducts an alarming amount of surveillance of average citizens. Quakenbush will also present his own film The Last Word. This film has been recognized as the first American documentary to prove without a doubt that the State of Texas has executed innocent people. This year’s Duke CityDoc Fest is filled with movies that will urge audiences to think twice about the events they take for granted in their daily lives, all while celebrating the unique form of storytelling that is documentary film. —Jessey Cherne

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

45


BOOKS

Breathing life into the forgotten ghost towns of Historic Route 66

BO O K TA L KS / S I G NI NG S

BY JIM MAHER

AUTHOR READING

46

1

Local Authors and Writers Celebrate Banned Books Week

F

or fans of the nostalgia associated with the original Route 66, this book is a must-have. The author and photographer trace the original route from its beginning in Chicago until its final stop in Santa Monica, Calif., with a side trip up the spur to Santa Fe. The emphasis is on what has happened to many of the quaint and historic places and buildings along the 2,291-mile route since it received its official “66” designation in 1926. The GHOST TOWNS OF photography is excellent, with ROUTE 66 both color and vintage blackand-white pictures to enhance BY JIM HINCKLEY the book’s narrative, which is Photography by Kerrick replete with historical vignettes James and contemporary interviews. Voyageur Press, 2011 Author Jim Hinckley draws Hardcover, 160 pages heavily from Jack Rittenhouse’s $25 1946 Route 66 guidebook, ISBN: 978-0-7603-3843-8 other period guidebooks, travel publications and old AAA directories. At each stop along his journey, the author looks at the site as it was yesterday and today, and at specific “ghost” buildings and nostalgic restorations within that site. The book includes “when you go” directions to each featured site and selected “don’t miss” recommendations. Hinckley has done great research and written a captivating and very easy-to-read story. The outstanding photography and choice of subjects are

SAT

Well-known authors gather to read from their favorite banned books, which range from children’s literature to adult. Authors scheduled to read include Steven Gould, Laura Mixon, Valerie Martinez, Sharon Oard Warner, Dan Mueller, Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, Annam Manthiram, Don McIver, Jennifer Simpson and Merimee Moffitt. 1p ALAMOSA BOOKS 8810 HOLLY AVE NE STE. D, 505.797.7101

alamosabooks.com

bound to bring back memories, even for those who did not live near the original Route 66. For the younger readers, this book provides a glimpse into what life was like in the early days of the automobile vacation era. For anyone interested in the history of America’s main street, or for those looking for an outstanding coffee table book dealing with a true piece of American history that runs right through Albuquerque and into Santa Fe, this is a work you’ll want to own. Looking for a terrific Christmas gift? Ghost Towns of Route 66 is a winner.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

Self-Publishing & Local Authors Fair Authors are invited to bring their books to promote and sell independently. 3-5p PAGE ONE BOOKSTORES 11018 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.294.2026

page1book.com CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Saturday Storytime Explore the magic of books with your children with this weekly reading session. 3:30p BARNES AND NOBLES 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

SUN 2 BOOK TALK/SIGNING

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Schmidt’s Mill

The World Comes to Albuquerque

How well do you know your friends and neighbors? Richard Peck’s newest book poses this question and urges readers to delve a little deeper into their communal relationships.

Editors Kim Vesely, Dick Brown, Tom McConnell and Paul Rhetts will sign their book, which celebrates 40 years of the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta. The book is 185 pages of color photographs, biographical sketches and a comprehensive history of the fiesta. 2p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

1p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller


BOOKS

BO O K TAL K S / S I GNINGS BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Midlife Crash Course: The Journey From Crisis to Full Creative Power UNM School of Medicine professor Gail Feldman discusses the challenges of unexpected life changes and learning resilience in coping with crises. 3-5p BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Hoist a Cold One: Historic Bars of the Southwest Author Melody Groves visited various bars throughout the Southwest to illuminate the culture surrounding the establishments. Photographs and directions entice readers to go visit these forgotten communities. TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

WED 5

SAT

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Aloft!

Fabler’s Legend: Age of Prophecy Book 1

Aloft! is a photographic coffee table book that celebrates the 40 years of memories from the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta. Douglas M. Heller and Bobbi Valentine will be present to sign copies of the book and share their experiences with the fiesta. 1p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

FRI 7 BOOK TALK/SIGNING

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

Smiles, Giggles & Laughs

MON 3

Author and producer Ronn Perea will sign and talk with fans about his book about life on the Route 66 comic club circuit.

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Coyotes Always Howl at Midnight: Tales of a 70s Rancher’s Wife Albuquerque author Audrey KeenHansen details the adventures of life with her family on a ranch. Keen-Hansen never expected that her life would take the turn of taking care of livestock and riding horses with her biologist husband and their three children. 1p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller BOOK CLUB

Stephanie Meyer Book Club Discuss the importance of being on Team Edward of Team Jacob with other Twilight fanatics. 5:30p BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

12p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller BOOK TALK/SIGNING

The Mephisto Covenant Author Trinity Faegen will read from and sign her newest book, which chronicles the story of a girl who is desperate to solve her father’s murder. Romance, danger and intrigue follow the main character. 6p ALAMOSA BOOKS 8810 HOLLY NE STE. D, 505-797-7101

alamosabooks.com

8

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

WICKED BUGS: THE LOUSE THAT CONQUERED NAPOLEON’S ARMY & OTHER DIABOLICAL INSECTS

Out of the World: New Mexico’s Contributions to Space Travel The Land of Enchantment has been host to a multitude of outof-this-world events and scientific contributions. Local author Loretta Hall will discuss some of these occurences in detail.

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

BY AMY STEWART 2011, Algonquin Books Hardcover, 288 pp

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

$18.95

The coming of the Age of Darkness and the struggle between good versus evil is depicted in Kirt Hickman’s new fantasy novel. 1p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505-242-7204

1p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

ISBN-13: 9781565129603

Ocotillo Dreams Poet and fiction writer Melinda Palacio will read and sign her novel about a young woman who is grieving the loss of her mother. Through her grief she discovers the undocumented immigrant community of Chandler, Ariz., and finds love along the way.

BOOK TALK/ SIGNING 7-8p, Wed., Oct. 12 BOOKWORKS, 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

2p

bkwrks.com

ALAMOSA BOOKS 8810 HOLLY NE STE. D, 505.797.7101

alamosabooks.com BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Grouped under headings such as “destructive,” “deadly,” “dangerous” and “horrible,” the bugs in this pleasingly designed little book run the gamut of creepy crawlies. Stewart has written witty, fact-filled tidbits about everything insect-oriented, from the hermaphrodite sex of banana slugs to the plague-inducing vomit of the oriental rat flea. The detailed etchings add a whimsical and authentic edge to the entertaining stories. —CO

Turning NO to ON: The Art of Parenting with Mindfulness

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Dr. Beth Gineris will talk about her newest book, which focuses on assisting parents in the parenting process. Dr. Gineris will help parents learn how to create a sense of structure with their children, without sacrificing the fun and positive attributes of having a child.

Give Refuge to the Stranger Linda Rabben’s book which depicts the evolution of the concept of the sanctuary over a period of thousands of years. She also discusses the importance of immigration and current political debates.

2p

5:30p

PAGE ONE BOOKSTORE 11018 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.294.2026

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

page1book.com

bkwrks.com

SUN 9 Author Readings at Local Food Festival and Field Day Local authors who will participate in this event include Dave DeWitt, Gloria Zamora, Aline Fourier and many others. 5a-10a BOOKWORKS OUT-OF-STORE EVENT GUITERREZ-HUBBELL HOUSE 6029 ISLETA SW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

Slouching Towards Guantanamo The story of living with disabilities and how the outside world views people with disabilities is discussed in poems read aloud by award-winning poet Jim Ferris. ALAMOSA BOOKS 8810 HOLLY AVE NE STE. D, 505.797.7101

alamosabooks.com

TUE

11

READING

Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Times Lou Harmon, Poe aficionado, will recite dramatic readings and historic re-enactments of the famous author’s life and work. 6:30p ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 EXT. 3128

OPEN MIC NIGHT AND POETRY READING

Adobe Walls Hosted by Kenneth P. Gurney this reading will begin with 30 minutes of an open floor poetry reading, followed by a reading from Jules Nyquist. 6:45p PAGE ONE BOOKSTORE 11018 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.294.2026

page1book.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

47


COMMUNITY FRI

THU 29

WORKSHOP

WORKSHOP

Past Life Healing Circle

Hypnosis Certification Training

BENEFIT/FUNDRAISER

Geeks Who Drink: Creative Albuquerque’s Quiz For A Cause Geeks Who Drink and Creative Albuquerque partner to raise money for Creative Albuquerque. Participants are asked to donate $5 per person to Creative ABQ. 8:30p, FREE/$5 Donation COACHES SPORTS GRILL 1414 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.1920

creativeabq.org THROUGH OCT. 1

Rio Grande Community Farm 14th Annual Maize Maze A seven-acre, dinosaur-shaped maze, a children’s activity area, farm stand, food vendors, petting zoo, and pumpkin patch are all offered. 9a-3p, Mon-Thu., 9a-9p, Fri-Sat., 9a-6p, Sun, $7/Adults (12 and up) $5/Children (3-11) FREE/ Under 3 1701 MONTANO ROAD NW 505.345.4580

riograndefarm.org

SAT

1

LECTURE/DEMO

Un Tequila Más Por Favor Global Ambassador of Milagro Tequila and world-renowned Mixologist Gaston Martinez comes to Jazzbah for a one-day Tequila Tasting and Cocktail seminar 12-2:30p, $40 advanced registration

Explore your past lives and find mental, emotional and spiritual healing. 7:30p, $40 THE SOURCE 1111 CARLISLE SE, 505.271.4612

soulresources.net/classes

SUN 2 SPECIAL EVENT

Community Chant/ Mediation Sing to help bring solace, find inner harmony and experience a direct connection with the universal life force and one’s true self. First Sunday of every month. 3-3:30p, FREE HIGH DESERT YOGA 4600 COPPER NE, 505.730.4631

hearhu.org

MON 3 SUPPORT GROUP

Pet Loss Group A group supporting those who have lost or anticipate the loss of an animal companion. 5-6p, $20

FESTIVAL

3rd ANNUAL ABQ INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

Learn communication strategies and tactics that will boost your company morale. 9-10:30a, FREE HISPANO CHAMBER 1309 4TH SW, 505.872.8743

LECTURE/DEMO

In Our Own Voice Speakers share compelling personal stories about living with mental illness. 6:30p, FREE ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE RD. SE, 505.891.5012 EXT 3

Albuquerque Newcomer’s Club Welcome Coffee A great way to make new friends and while signing up for monthly luncheons and speakers, dining experiences, visits to area attractions and more. 10a, FREE

albuquerquenewcomersclub.org

Paint a profound stillness upon the canvas of your mind. What emerges from this is a life of inspired contentment: real happiness. 7-9p, FREE ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM 2000 MOUNTAIN NW, 505.292.5293

meditationinnewmexico.org

WED

5

SPECIAL EVENT

Contestants will have five minutes to wow the judges and with any harp they can pull out of their pocket and any trick they can pull out of their ha: first place, $300; second place, $150; third place $100; fourth place $50. 1-3p, $25 SOCORRO PLAZA, 575.838.6312

socorrofest.com/contest.asp

TUE

11

VCA VETERINARY CARE ANIMAL HOSPITAL AND REFERRAL CENTER 9901 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.265.3087

petlosscounselor@aol.com LECTURE/DEMO

Seton Campfire Tales: An Evening of Storytelling Under the Full Moon David L. Witt will present Lobo, The King of Currumpaw at Seton Castle. Reservation required due to limited seating. RSVP to Patty Nagle at programs@ aloveoflearning.org. 6:30-7:30p, FREE ACADEMY FOR THE LOVE OF LEARNING 133 SETON VILLAGE, 505.995.1860

aloveoflearning.org

WED

12

DISCUSSION

Education Reform: Is It Possible? What Would It Look Like? This distinguished panel addresses the question: is it possible to transform the educational system and improve student learning? Ellen Bernstein, Paul Gessing, Arlie Woodrum and moderator Dick Heath. 7-9p, $10 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER 5520 WYOMING NE, 505.889.0927

Traditional NM Cooking Experience

oasisnet.org/albuquerque

Learn how to make fresh tortillas and calabacitas using freshly roasted Hatch Green Chili. 3p,

Free Health Fair at JCC

FREE THE GREEN HOUSE BISTRO AND BAKERY 3216 HWY 47 SOUTH, 505.866.1936

nmagelessliving.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

Harmonica Contest at SocorroFest

SPECIAL EVENT

5p, FREE

Creating Happiness: The Art of Peaceful Living

FESTIVAL

A group supporting those who have lost or anticipate the loss of an animal companion. 6-7p, $20

Understanding How You Impact the Team

SANDIA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 10704 PASEO DEL NORTE, 505.321.6970

LECTURE/DEMO

8

Pet Loss Group

Food, entertainment, culture, crafts and fun for the family. 10aTALIN WORLD MARKET 88 LOUISIANA SE, 505.508.9225

SAT

WORKSHOP

TUE 4

ABQ UPTOWN, LUCKY BRAND JEAN SHOP, 713.224.9115

soulresources.net/classes

SUPPORT GROUP

JazzbahABQ.com

Style expert Tim Gunn will be at ABQ Uptown celebrating the launch of the Fall 2011 Lucky Brand collection. Following an introduction from Gunn, guests will enjoy a live fashion presentation, music and refreshments 1p, FREE

THE SOURCE 1111 CARLISLE SE, 505.271.4612

petlosscounselor@aol.com

NMRelationshipCenter.com

Tim Gunn presents How to Make it Work at ABQ Uptown

Introductory evening to Soul Resources’ Professional Hypnotherapist’s Certification Weekend. Facilitated by Bob Morrison, DCH, approved instructor by The American Board of Hypnotherapy. 6-10p, PRICE

SUNSET MEMORIAL PARK 942 MENAUL NE, 505.265.3087

JAZZBAH 119 GOLD SW, 505.243.5299

SPECIAL EVENT

48

7

C OM M U N I T Y E V E NT S

FAIR/FESTIVAL

The Jewish Community Center of Greater Albuquerque will host its annual Health and Wellness Fair. 9a-2p, FREE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER 5520 WYOMING NE, 505.348.4521


PLANET WAVES ARIES (MAR. 20-APR. 19) Pause and ask yourself what you’re trying to prove. There is little you can accomplish by conquering anything or anyone, and plenty of damage you can do. While you seem to be past the emotional restrictions and frustrations that dominated your summer, it would be unwise to overcompensate in the other direction. Tamp down any competitive feelings and establish harmony with your environment. People around you will be eager to return the favor. If you push the limits in any situation, you’re likely to encounter a boundary; notice if that happens, and revise your approach. Experiment with things like negotiation, using a more creative method (rather than confrontational) and understating rather than exaggerating. TAURUS (APR. 19-MAY 20) You may be feeling out of your element, but be gentle with others when you feel inclined to blame them for your feelings. There is an easy solution — likely the one you think is too “easy.” But that’s the whole idea: there is a relatively simple and direct approach to what may seem like a complicated or exaggerated emotional situation. Meanwhile, do what you can to keep your emotions in perspective. Ask yourself how important something is before you make a big deal out of it. Don’t look for conflict where there is none. If you look for the common ground you share with others, you’re likely to find it, and that is likely to lead to some rewarding episodes of unexpected growth. GEMINI (MAY 20-JUN. 21) If you have an intuitive feeling, follow it. It may be an idea, caution of some kind; if you think something is worth doing, it probably is. If you have an uneasy feeling about going somewhere, or doing something, take that under advisement. You may run into a situation where the decision you want to make ruffles the feathers of someone because it’s based on no information other than what your inner senses are telling you. Then you’ll have to determine whether you want to have the approval of someone for doing what is wrong for you — or whether you want to miss an opportunity that you know is right. You’ve been here before; you’ve already decided this one. CANCER (JUN. 21-JUL. 22) This is an unusual time in your professional life, and aspects this month seem ready to demonstrate how true that statement is. There are many open doors, and the world’s state of strangeness, confusion and even chaos can work to your advantage. The one thing to be mindful for is false lack of confidence. There used to be a concept called false confidence, but that seems to be the prevailing state of affairs on the planet. It’s also possible to lack faith in yourself when it’s the most obvious thing you should have. The only way to find out if you’re capable of something is to try and see if you can do it. This includes taking concrete steps to improve your income. You have the talent. You also have the guts. LEO (JUL. 22-AUG. 23) You may encounter a mental block when trying to solve a problem, and if that

By Eric Francis • planetwaves. net happens, take a more disciplined approach to your work. There is something to be said for applying yourself to a project every day, even several at the same time. Many have discovered the benefits of discipline in turning creative energy into something tangible and useful. Energy is the one thing you have right now. Focusing your efforts in a way that may seem businesslike or “unartistic” will help you bring in a new vision, one that you’ll be able to sustain yourself with for many years. That’s not going to happen automatically. You cannot catch lightning in a bottle, but you can gather your thoughts and get yourself onto a new level of creative potential. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEP. 22) You know best what is good for your health — the key will be listening to yourself, and following your own advice. We all know how diligently people ignore these things; I don’t suggest you do that. Remember that the most important dimension of health involves your mind. Meanwhile, you may be in a relationship situation that is causing an unnecessary stir in your life. That’s something to watch; making sure that you’re not engaging a tradeoff of sex for chaos. You have the potential for an extremely interesting sexual journey in these years of your life. It can be something that nourishes you, keeps you young and serves to liberate you. If something is demanding too much time, money or energy, really ask yourself whether it’s worth it. LIBRA (SEP. 22-OCT. 23) You’re likely to show up as the voice of reason and the example of maturity in a close personal situation. This is nothing new, but you may have the feeling that someone has an advantage over you based on brute strength. That may be true temporarily, but it’s not going to last long. You have the advantage of persistence, discipline and a sense of balance. Make sure you keep your flexibility. The one risk you run is backing yourself into a corner, closing off your options or taking too hard of a line. You can afford to take a mellow approach to existence, and give any situation a chance to play out in its own way. Remember, no matter how hot under the collar anyone may be, or is trying to make you, time is on your side. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 22) The thing you think is bothering you isn’t — but something else is. You seem nervous with how visible you are, and how far out on a limb you have to go to hold things together. It’s as if the people who actually hold responsibility don’t want to back you up, even though you’ve been left to do their bidding. If you suspect you’ve been set up to take the heat for something, you’re probably correct. The question is, how can you shift responsibility back to where it belongs? The first step will be by taking no heroic measures to set things right. It will take some chutzpah to let things fall apart, but if you stick to your actual responsibilities and don’t take on anything extra, the truth will be obvious when the cookie crumbles. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 22) You must not take a short-sighted approach to long-term plans. However, it would

UNIVERSAL CROSSWORD

seem like something you’ve been wanting to do for a long time is ready to happen. Before you take action, make sure that this opportunity really does match up with the ambitions you’ve been stating for months or years. Once you set things into motion, they’re likely to stay that way, and take on a life of their own. And more people than you will be drawn into the process. You’re on the brink of a decision, so be clear about what you need to know in order to make the choice that is right for you. Once you understand that, the next step is to take the leap — or to walk away from the matter entirely. Be sure that your choices are aligned with your motives. Hesitating will no longer work. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 20) I cannot explain your apparent lack of confidence on something that really should be simple — but maybe you can. What I can tell you is that the core issue is emotional (rather than practical). You may have this idea that your identity is not sufficiently stable to take on the kinds of challenges that are being presented to you. But what exactly do you think builds your sense of identity, your confidence or strength to stand up to the challenges and opportunities of existence? That would be direct experience. At a point it’s necessary to reach beyond what you’ve done in the past, so that you can do something new, or something that exceeds what you thought were your prior limitations. And when you do that, your ideas about “security” must play second fiddle to the fact of being alive. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 19) Life is not a matter of theory — but the great thing about theory is how manageable it is, compared to what actually happens. What actually happens is different than what you might fear happening (that, too, is a matter of theory). That all said, it seems to be time for you to spark up some movement in your life, and your next step should be according to some kind of structured plan. I don’t mean a 100-page business plan; five or six possible steps thought through carefully and written in your notebook would be adequate. Those are different than what will actually happen, but I suggest you work with a mix of about 10 percent theory, 85 percent action and a dash of faith that you’re doing the right thing. PISCES (FEB. 19-MAR. 20) By several measures, you’re in a phase of re-evaluating the events of this very eventful year, and are considering your various plans for the future. That said, there is something that is demanding your attention now. While others are taking a by-the-books approach, presented with this opportunity, you seem more inclined to take a chance and do things your own way. Get used to the fact that there is no certainty, even though others are acting as if there is. It’s precisely the uncertainty factor that is working to your advantage. You have the gift of flexibility, though I will suggest this: you don’t have to work as hard as you think to create one particular goal. You need to apply the right thought and the right effort, but no more.

SOLUTION ON PAGE 50 LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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Put your best foot forward with a tailored resume

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don’t need to spend much time telling you that your resume is a critical part of your job search. However, many professionals don’t understand the difference between resume types and how each one is best utilized. The way you present your information can have a big impact on how you are viewed by employers; so it is important to use the appropriate one for your employment history. There are three main resume types: chronological, functional and combination. Each serves a different purpose, and when used correctly can completely elevate the way a job seeker is positioned. Let’s take a quick look at the three main resume types:

Chronological Resume This resume type is the most common and is one of the easiest to read. It lists your work history at the top and organizes past experience in reverse chronological order, meaning your current or most recent position first. Your work history information should include company title, company description, dates of employment, job title and job duties and responsibilities (and continue on with each prior position). Education and achievements are additional sections of this type of resume. This style is great for candidates who have progressively advanced in their careers or who have a consistent work history.

Functional Resume This resume type groups your past experience into skill categories, rather than organizing by company or dates. Your experience can be divided into sections such as “customer service” or “project management” skills. Here candidates elaborate on their areas of expertise, rather than

the specific positions they have held. Education and achievements can be listed below skills as well. Often times candidates will list their past positions at the bottom, without additional information about the company and dates of employment. Functional resumes offer a great format for candidates who are changing industries or who may have gaps in their resume.

Combination Resume This resume type is a combination of the two types mentioned above. The combination resume begins with a functional section that is followed by a brief chronological listing of past companies and positions held. This resume style is great for candidates who would like to highlight their accomplishments, but also want to inform potential employers about past employment history. Regardless of the resume type you choose, be sure to customize each resume to the employer you are applying to, and always include as many quantifying details as you can (i.e. measurements of how you positively affected past employers). Theresa Maher, a former Albuquerque resident, is Vice President of Media and Editor of Recruiting News for Jobing.com. For the latest Albuquerque job openings be sure to visit the careers section of www.local-iQ.com.

Know the score about credit

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redit Bureau scores are often called “FICO Scores” because most credit bureau scores used in the U.S. are produced from software developed by Fair Isaac and Company (FICO). FICO scores are provided to lenders by the three major credit reporting agencies; Equifax, Experian and Trans Union. The credit score is a number based on an analysis of information contained in a credit report, which provides an indication of how likely a person is to repay his or her debts. The number can range from 300 to 900. FICO scores provide the best guide to future risk based solely on credit report data. The higher the score, the lower the risk. Here is how your credit score is determined: • Your payment history determines 35 percent of the score. How many bills have been paid late, how many were sent out for collection, bankruptcies — these are the kind of things that impact your score. The more recent, the worse the impact. • Outstanding debt determines 30 percent of the score: how much you owe on car loans, home loans, etc., how many credit cards you have and how many of them are at their credit limit. The more cards you have at their limit, the lower your score will be. • The length of time you’ve had credit is a factor for 15 percent of your score. The longer you have had established credit, the better it is for your score. • If you have applied for a lot of loans or credit

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cards, you will have a lot of inquiries on your report. These are bad for your score because it may indicate you are in some kind of financial trouble. The most recent the inquiry, the worse it is for your score. This determines 10 percent of your score. • Another 10 percent of the score is based on the types of credit you have. The number of loans and the available credit from credit cards makes a difference. Looking at this breakdown, the length of time you have had credit is one of the most important parts of your credit score. Your credit cards are what push you into the 700 to 800 point range. The longer you have them in good standing, the higher your score increases. When you close a credit card this will have the opposite effect, this will drop your credit score drastically, because you just closed out all history you have built on this card. Remember a credit card should just be a tool to improve your score. Just make small purchases and pay off the card every month. To learn more about how to settle your own debts, visit creditrescuenow.com and click on the “settlements” tab.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 12, 2011

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Issue141_Sep.29-Oct.12, 2011