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Gonzalez beats trustee

HERE’S TO 150

By TARYN WHITE THE ZAPATA TIMES

After 16 years on the Zapata ISD school board, Zachary Garza, 58, will be stepping down from his Precinct 4 seat to make way for Diego Gonzalez, 54, who defeated him in Tuesday’s election, 385 to 177. “It feels great to win by as much as I did,” Gonzalez said. “I worked really hard going door to door to get people out to vote for me.” Although Gonzalez has no strong platforms he plans on taking to the board, he is happy to rely on the other board members to show him the ropes. “I plan on getting my feet wet and learning from the other board members to know exactly what I have to do,” Gonzalez said. “But I know I will only vote for things I truly believe in.”

“I plan on getting my feet wet and learning from the other board members.” DIEGO GONZALEZ

Gonzalez, a Zapata native, said his years of experience working in the banking industry and his work as an operator for an oil and gas company will help him to be an asset to the board. A 1974 graduate of Zapata Independent School District, Gonzalez is proud to be given the

See GONZALEZ | PAGE 11A

Photo by Ulysses S. Romero | Laredo Morning Times

Irene M. Cortinas credits her faith and the American Cancer Society.

Cancer Society lends a hand (Editor’s note: United Way is funding 25 agencies with its 2008-09 campaign. This is the first in a series on the agencies and the people they help.)

By CHRISTINA ROSALES LAREDO MORNING TIMES

Irene Cortinas was no stranger to cancer when she was diagnosed with it in May 2008. It didn’t take away from her initial shock but she knew all she could do was hope for the best. After her mother died of bone cancer and her husband of lung cancer, 55-year-old Cortinas said she felt resilient and was able to

overcome the alarming diagnosis quickly. “God has a perfect plan for all of us,” Cortinas recalled thinking when the doctor told her she had stage two cancer. “All that happens in our lives is for the greater good.” Cortinas felt a lump in her left breast on May 6. She went straight to her primary care physician who referred her to Dr. Gary Unzeitig, a breast cancer surgeon. In June, the one-and-ahalf inch tumor was removed. She had two weeks to recuperate before oncologist Eduardo Miranda told her that she

Residents inaugurate park to kick off sesquicentennial By ZACH LINDSEY THE ZAPATA TIMES

he residents of Zapata came out en masse to witness the dedication of a new park in remembrance of Zapata County’s sesquicentennial. The dedication was part of a four-day long celebration, starting with a drug-free pep rally at the Zapata County Courthouse. Today’s events will feature a parade through town, a musical per-

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formance by Zapata’s own Intocable and Sunday will see festivals in Falcón, Lopeño and San Ygnacio. Friday’s events included performances by the Zapata High School’s nationally recognized Mariachi Halcón, Dalia’s Dance Academy and a performance of the National Anthem by Zapata High School student Ashley Flores. County Commissioners, veterans and local lawyers celebrated the history of Zapata. The new Zapata County Sesqui-

centennial Park was created by the Zapata County Sesquicentennial Committee. “The committee was appointed by the Commissioners Court to plan for the celebration,” said County Judge Rosalva Guerra. “Some of them remember the centennial.” History was on everyone’s lips, but the park was meant to memorialize not just the history of Zapata,

See 150 | PAGE 7A

Photos by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

TOP: Zapata County residents participate in the dedication of the Zapata Sesquicentennial Trail Park on Friday morning. ABOVE RIGHT: Reynaldo Uribe, of San Ignacio, former county treasurer and tax collector/collector for Zapata County, looks at a marker of the officials that served during his tenure, from 1970-1973. Uribe was recognized as one of the oldest living public officials. ABOVE LEFT: Arabella Gonzalez Bishop and her husband, Darwin, listen to speakers during Friday’s ceremony. Bishop, who has been an educator for more than 50 years, was recognized for the longest service to education in Zapata.

See CANCER | PAGE 11A

A LAKE VIEW

Republic of the Rio Grande started in Revilla f things had gone according to plans out of a Guerrero Viejo (Revilla) meeting, Zapata and Laredo probably would have similar bronze statues honoring two Antonios. One was named Antonio Zapata and the other, Antonio Canales Rosillo. History tells that Antonio Zapata (1800-1840) and Antonio Canales (1802-1851) were key Federalist partisans in opposition to the post-San Jacinto dictatorship of Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Rio Grande frontier history of

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ODIE ARAMBULA the Zapata region has recorded Canales and Zapata as key to the insurgency against the Centralist Mexican government that led to

the short-lived government of the Republic of the Rio Grande. In January 1840, Canales-led insurgents grouped down rural roads and villages in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon to take on a larger Centralist army in Monterrey. It was part of a strategy to get Nuevo Leon backers to join partisans in Tamaulipas and Coahuila to support the establishment of a separate government away from Mexico and the now Texas republic. To this end, Canales, a lawyer, earlier had advanced the proposi-

tion of a republic — the Republic of the Rio Grande — as a buffer between Mexico and Texas. A series of bad turns at the approach to Monterrey prompted Canales and his troopers to dig in at the Bishop’s Palace — the Obispado — on high ground. Zapata and his men, on the other hand, moved on to run into stiff opposition. He took heavy losses as some of his cavalry deserted to the Federalists. Zapata’s Centralists forces returned to safer grounds closer to the Rio Grande.

The general from Guerrero (Zapata) and about 50 of his men, however, returned to the battlefield and were caught near a village in Coahuila in the Battle of Morales on March 24, 1840. Some of the men denounced the rebellion of the Federalists, but 23 did not. Zapata and the 23 were tried by a military tribunal, convicted of treason and executed at Monclova, Coahuila, on March 29, 1840. History tells that Bacilio Benavides, a strong Laredo proponent of the Republic of the Rio

Grande movement, was outraged when he learned that Zapata’s head had been put in a sack and taken to his native Guerrero to be exhibited on a pole for three days. In relating the events of the Centralists’ actions, historians in later years reminded the Mexican nation that Father Hidalgo and two of his closest allies had suffered the same fate in Coahuila for conspiring for the independence of Mexico from Spain.

See LAKE VIEW | PAGE 11A


Zin brief AROUND THE NATION | IN BRIEF

WHAT’S GOING ON SATURDAY,NOV.8 „ A parade at 10 a.m. kicks off today’s sesquicentennial events. The carnival and festival,including food booths,team roping and a cookoff, open at noon at the Zapata County Fair grounds.A fireworks display is scheduled for the evening,with music by Induccion,Grupo Vidal,Costumbre and Topaz and a concert by Zapata County Goodwill Ambassadors Intocable. For more information, call 765-9920.

SUNDAY,NOV.9 „ The Lopeño Festival gets under way at 8 a.m. in Lopeño with an almuerzo regional (regional breakfast) and historical reminiscing. „ At 9 a.m., it’s the Falcón Festival at Falcón with a visual historical presentation, exhibits,a continental breakfast,dedication of the Falcón Community Park (showcasing the antique bridge), followed by a Mass at Santa Ana Mission and lunch with musical entertainment. „ At 1 p.m., the San Ygnacio Festival gets under way in San Ygnacio.There will be a Mass at Nuestra Señora del Refugio Mission.At 2 p.m.,there will be a flag and country ceremony, a historical view of San Ygnacio,a Pillars of the Community presentation honoring citizens making a difference, a tribute to local veterans and a tribute to all veterans. Entertainment will be provided by Dalia’s Dance Academy and Victory Starrz, Benito Hernandez-Aquario Norteño and Jorge Roel y Grupo Potrillo.

MONDAY,NOV.10 „The Hawk Baseball Booster Club will meet at 5:30 p.m. today at Hawk Baseball Stadium. Parents of players are encouraged to attend. „ Marine Detachment 601 is having a formal renaming dedication at 10 a.m. today at Hidalgo Boulevard and 22nd Street. The new name will be 1st Sgt. Antonio “Tony” Gutierrez Memorial Detachment 601.

WEDNESDAY,NOV.12 „ From 8 a.m.– 1 p.m.today,the Ruthe B.Cowl Rehabilitation Center will be having a Cleft Palate Clinic for patients needing to consult with a specialist. If you are interested in consulting with Dr. Peter Wang, call (956) 722-2431 for an appointment and more information. Zapata and other Laredo area residents are welcome.

THURSDAY,NOV.13 „ McJunkin Redman Corp. will have a ribbon cutting ceremony today at 11:30 a.m., followed by lunch at noon and then festivities open to the public.The company also will be doing business all day long.

FRIDAY,NOV.14 „ La Rancherita KJJS 103.9 FM will have a ribbon cutting ceremony today at 11:30 a.m. at a location to be announced. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

NOV.18-22 „The 2008 Wal-Mart FLW Series FishOff is set for Falcon Lake.The lake will play host to top-ranked National Guard Western Division and BP Eastern Division pros from the 2008 season. For more information, visit www.FLWOutdoors.com To become a sponsor, call the Zapata Chamber of Commerce at 765-4871. To submit an item for the daily calendar, send the name of the event, the date, time, location and a contact phone number to editorial@lmtonline.com

TUESDAY,NOV.25 „ From 8 a.m.– 1 p.m.today,the Ruthe B.Cowl Rehabilitation Center will be having a Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for patients needing to consult with a specialist. If you are interested in consulting with Dr. J. Edeen, call 722-2431.

SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

By TOM KRISHER and JEFF KAROUB ASSOCIATED PRESS

Publisher, William B. Green . . . . . . . . . . . .728-2501

Photo by David Zalubowski | AP

The GM logo hangs over an unsold 2009 Acadia sport utility vehicle on the lot at a GMC Truck dealership in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo., on Sunday, Oct. 12. General Motors Corp. on Friday said it lost $2.5 billion in the third quarter and warned that it could run out of cash in 2009.

ning early next year as it slows production at 10 of its assembly plants. The news came hours after Ford Motor Co. said it lost $129 million for its third quarter and will cut about 2,260 more white-collar workers in North America as the industry tries to weather the worst economic downturn in decades. As U.S. and global economies have rapidly deteriorated, auto sales have nearly shut down. Wagoner had said in a statement earlier that the third quarter “was especially challenging for the auto industry.” “Consumer spending, which represents close to 70 percent of the U.S. economy, fell dramatically, and the abrupt closure of credit markets created a downward spiral in vehicle sales,” he said.

U.S.govt presses N.Y. appeal on detainee photos

Jury finds courthouse gunman guilty

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — A judge on Friday spared a man from prison time for his role in the dehydration death of a toddler who was deprived of food and liquids for at least a week. Despite criticism from the victim’s mother, who cried throughout the sentencing hearing, New Haven Superior Court Judge Richard Damiani sentenced Robert Patterson to five years’ probation in the death of 23-month-old Amari Jackson. Charges of manslaughter, cruelty and and risk of injury to a minor are pending against Robert Patterson’s sister Sharon Patterson, who police say was primarily responsible for the little boy’s death in February.

NEW YORK — The U.S. government has asked an appellate court to reconsider its decision ordering the release of 21 pictures of detainees in Iraq and Afghanistan. In court papers made public Friday, the government says the photos must be withheld to protect American troops. In September, a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the U.S. to give the pictures to the American Civil Liberties Union. Now the government is asking the full appeals court to hear the case. Federal officials say the release of the pictures would pose a grave risk of inciting violence and riots against American troops and coalition forces.

ATLANTA — A man who escaped from custody during his rape trial and launched a deadly courthouse shooting spree that claimed the lives of a judge and three others was convicted of murder Friday more than three years after the rampage. Brian Nichols, 36, could face the death penalty for killing a judge, a court reporter, a sheriff’s deputy and a federal agent in the violence that began at the Fulton County Courthouse in the heart of downtown Atlanta. Nichols had confessed to the killings, but claimed he was legally insane and gripped by a delusional compulsion that he was a slave rebelling against authority. —Compiled from AP reports

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SUBSCRIPTIONS/DELIVERY (956) 728-2555 The Zapata Times is distributed on Saturdays to 4,000 households in Zapata County. For subscribers of Laredo Morning Times and those who buy LMT at newstands.The Zapata Times is inserted inside. The Zapata Times is free. The Zapata Times is published by Laredo Morning Times, a division of The Hearst Corporation, PO Box 2129, Laredo,Texas 78044. Phone (956)728-2500 The Zapata office is at 1309 N. US Highway 83 at 14th Avenue,Suite 2; Zapata,TX,78076.Call (956) 765-5113 or e-mail thezapatatimes@att.com

The Zapata Times

Today is Saturday, Nov. 8, the 313th day of 2008. There are 53 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Nov. 8, 1923, Adolf Hitler launched his first attempt at seizing power with a failed coup in Munich, Germany, that came to be known as the “Beer-Hall Putsch.” On this date: In 1837, Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, a college exclusively for women, opened in South Hadley, Mass. In 1889, Montana became the 41st state. In 1932, New York Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover for the presidency. In 1933, President Roosevelt created the Civil Works Administration, designed to create jobs for more than 4 million unemployed people. In 1960, Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kennedy defeated Vice President Richard M. Nixon for the presidency. In 1966, Edward W. Brooke, R-Mass., became the first black candidate to be elected to the U.S.

DALLAS — A woman who killed her 10-month-old daughter by cutting off her arms with a kitchen knife is being released from a state mental hospital. Dena Schlosser killed her baby, Maggie, in 2004 and was found not guilty by reason of insanity two years later during a second capital murder trial. She’ll be released into outpatient treatment within the next month, Collin County prosecutor Curtis Howard told The Dallas Morning News in Friday’s online edition. A court on Thursday ordered her release during her annual commitment hearing, deeming her mentally stable enough to leave the hospital.

SAN ANTONIO — The Army has agreed to investigate a disproportionate cluster of suicides among recruiters in an East Texas battalion, as well as alle-

Conn.man get probation in boy’s fatal dehydration

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Woman who cut off baby’s arms to be released

Army to investigate recruiter suicides

TODAY IN HISTORY CONTACT US

Senate by popular vote. In 1988, Vice President George Bush won the presidential election, defeating Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis. Ten years ago: U.S. Rep. Bob Livingston, R-La., predicted he would succeed Newt Gingrich as House Speaker. (However, Livingston later resigned before he could become speaker after admitting to marital infidelities.) Five years ago: A suicide car bombing of a housing complex in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, killed 17 people. Front-runner Howard Dean became the first Democratic presidential candidate ever to reject taxpayer money and avoid the accompanying spending limits, saying he had to act to compete against President Bush’s cash-rich campaign. O n e y e a r a g o : The Senate confirmed President Bush’s nomination of Michael Mukasey to be the new attorney general, 53-40. President Bush suffered the first veto override of his seven-year-old presidency as the Senate enacted, 79-14, a $23 billion water resources bill despite his protest that it was filled with unnecessary projects. Domini-

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AROUND TEXAS | IN BRIEF

GM reports $2.5B 3Q loss, might need cash DETROIT, Mich. — General Motors Corp. reported a $2.5 billion loss in the third quarter and warned Friday that it could run out of cash in 2009 if the U.S. economic slump continues and it doesn’t get government aid. GM also said it has suspended talks to acquire Chrysler. While it didn’t specifically name the automaker, GM said it was setting aside considerations for a “strategic acquisition.” “While the acquisition could potentially have provided significant benefits, the company has concluded that it is more important at the present time to focus on its immediate liquidity challenges and, accordingly, considerations of such a transaction as a near-term priority have been set aside,” the company said in a statement. Privately held Chrysler said it won’t comment on GM’s statement, but added it remains focused on returning to profitability. GM said its cash burn for the quarter accelerated to $6.9 billion, and government aid will be “essential” because of the slow economy and credit crisis. If companies run out of cash, generally they can sell assets, cut costs or file for bankruptcy protection to keep creditors at bay while they develop a financial reorganization plan. But in a conference call with reporters and analysts, GM Chairman and CEO Rick Wagoner said the company will “take every action we possibly can” to avoid bankruptcy. “We’re convinced that the consequences of bankruptcy would be dire,” he said, adding that the company will use every source of funding it can. “We need to find a way to get through this, and that’s really our focus.” The company also said it will indefinitely lay off about 3,600 workers begin-

ON THE WEB: THEZAPATATIMES.COM

gations by other soldiers and family members that they were pressured to cover up serious problems in the battalion, Army Secretary Pete Geren said. Seventeen Army recruiters have committed suicide nationwide since 2001, but four of them were from the Houston Recruiting Battalion, which recruits soldiers from East Texas. A fifth Houston-area soldier killed himself, but he was assigned to the Army’s Future Soldier Training Program.

FEMA head says housing is top issue after Ike GALVESTON — Finding housing for the thousands of Texans displaced by Hurricane Ike remains the government’s top priority, the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency said Friday. “Our top three priorities are housing, housing and housing. We are going to stick with it until we are done,” FEMA Administrator David Paulison told reporters after a closed door meeting with southeast Texas officials. —Compiled from AP reports

AROUND THE WORLD | IN BRIEF

Photo by Ramon Espinosa | AP

A person climbs out from under the rubble of a school after it collapsed in Petionville, Haiti, on Friday.The concrete school building collapsed during classes, killing at least 30 people and injuring many more students.

Mexico detains former senior police official

U.S.official: Taliban sought wedding party deaths

MEXICO CITY — Mexico says a former senior police official is under investigation for ties to drug gangs. The revelation comes amid growing evidence of high-level corruption within security forces that are battling the cartels. The federal Attorney General’s Office said Friday that Rodolfo de la Guardia Garcia has been placed under house arrest for 40 days. Investigators are looking into the possibility that he had leaked information to the Sinaloa cartel. He served as a senior official in the federal police from 2003-2005. The announcement was part of the Mexican government’s socalled “Operation Clean House,” an effort to weed out corruption that came to light after a reputed Sinaloa drug lieutenant was arrested in January.

KABUL, Afghanistan — Taliban fighters held a wedding party captive and fired on U.S. forces in an attack designed to draw U.S. airstrikes on civilians and stoke anti-American sentiment, a U.S. official said Friday citing “firsthand” reports. The official declined to give further details of the reported events leading to the U.S. bombing Monday in the southern Afghan village Wech Baghtu, where dozens of civilians and insurgents were killed. But such a tactic by the Taliban could mean significant complications for U.S. forces and allies — forcing them to break off attacks and pursuit of extremists in populated areas for fear that the Taliban would try to maximum civilian casualties. —Compiled from AP reports

STEPPING DOWN can singer-songwriter Juan Luis Guerra swept the Latin Grammy Awards, taking home five musical honors, including album of the year, record of the year and song of the year. Today’s Birthdays: Actress June Havoc is 96. Actor Norman Lloyd is 94. Jazz singer Chris Connor is 81. Singer Patti Page is 81. CBS newsman Morley Safer is 77. Singer-actress Bonnie Bramlett is 64. Singer Bonnie Raitt is 59.Rock musician Porl Thompson (The Cure) is 51. Singer-actor Leif Garrett is 47. Actress Courtney Thorne-Smith is 41. Actress Parker Posey is 40. Rock musician Jimmy Chaney is 39. Actress Roxana Zal is 39. Singer Diana King is 38. Actress Gretchen Mol is 35. Actress Tara Reid is 33. Country singer/former “American Idol” contestant Bucky Covington is 31. Actress Dania Ramirez is 29. Actress Azura Skye is 27. Actor Chris Rankin is 25. TV personality Jack Osbourne (“The Osbournes”) is 23. Thought for Today: “Man is born to live, not to prepare for life.” — Boris Pasternak, Russian author (1890-1960).

Photo by Lauren Victoria Burke | AP

In this Sept. 11 file photo, Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.Va,waves a flag during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington in remembrance of the Sept. 11 terrorists attacks. Byrd, the longest-serving senator in history, is stepping down from his cherished post as chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.


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SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

TOP STUDENTS ATVILLARREAL

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Building gets name of WWII veteran By TARYN WHITE THE ZAPATA TIMES

Courtesy photo/Villarreal Elementary | Special to the Times

Villarreal Elementary recently honored its Students of the Week for Oct. 31. Shown top row, left to right, are Alex Garcia,Abraham Tovar, Mario Alaniz,Albert Navarro, Marco Zamora, Isela Gonzalez, Rebecca Villarreal, Lendy Salas,Julissa Escobar Sandra Hernandez, Selisa Ramirez and Jessie Cavazos; middle row, left to right, are Alexandar Diaz, Elaine Leyva, Erik Chapa, Coral Yanez, Melanie Briones, Sarai Resendiz Francisco Flores, Miguel Garcia, Carlos Davila, Odalys Gutierrez, Brenda Thatcher and Priscilla Rangel; and bottom row, left to right,Angel Torres, Priscilla Elizondo,Jose Esquivel, Ricardo Licea, Martin Navarro and Madison Lozano. Not pictured are LeRoy Alaniz and Julia Madrigal.

JUST SAY‘BOO’TO DRUGS

Courtesy photo/Villarreal Elementary | Special to the Times

Continuing with the Red Ribbon Campaign, students from Villarreal Elementary joined in a Halloween Costume Parade by saying “BOO”to Drugs.The students were also treated to a Halloween Festival and a scary hunted house. Costumes teachers and administrators included: top row, left to right, Elsa Martinez, Teresa Collett, Claudia Garza and Elida Hernandez; middle row, left to right, Domingo Castañeda,Zarah Santes, Carmen Zavala and Principal Gracie Gracia; bottom row, left to right, Norma Zamora and Maricela Salinas

The Marine Corps League will dedicate the Marine Corps League building to World War II veteran 1st Sergeant Antonio “Tony” Gutierrez on Monday. The dedication ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. at Hidalgo Boulevard and 22nd Street. Gutierrez, who was killed in a car crash on Sept. 10, 1985, at the age of 61, is remembered by his six daughters and wife Emma C. Gutierrez, 80, and friends for his ongoing patriotism and his love of life. “In the late sixties he organized young men in the area to join the Marines,” said Rafael Ramos, a member of the Marine Corps League. “It is because of him that there is a Marine Corps influence here.” Gutierrez was one of the few Marines present on the USS Missouri when the Japanese formally surrendered Sept. 2, 1945. “He used to tell us stories from his time fighting in World War II,” said Alma GutierrezTreviño, the eldest of Gutierrez’s six daughters. “He would tell us about his experiences and different things he did.”

After returning from the war, Gutierrez immersed himself in work, family and helping the community. “He was a very hard-working man who loved his family and did a lot for the community,” Treviño said. According to Treviño, Gutierrez worked closely with the Boy Scouts and would take scouts camping and hiking. “He was there for a lot of those boys who didn’t have a father of their own,” Treviño said. From Gutierrez’s work as a mail carrier with the post office many people knew him as the “whistling mail man.” “He used to whistle everywhere he went because of how happy he was,” Treviño said. Treviño described how much he was loved and is missed by the entire community. “When we had the wake after he died so many people attended that we couldn’t even close the doors,” Treviño said. (Taryn White can be reached at 728-2568 or at twhite@lmtonline.com) Carmen Ramirez - Rathmell, D.D.S.

“Let your smile be a sign of happiness & good health”

1520 Corpus Christi Street Telephone (956) 726-0160


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SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

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OTHER VIEWS

COLUMN

Consider origins of Veterans Day t the stroke of the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 the roaring guns fell silent. Our holiday that marks the end of “The Great War” is now called Veterans Day, yet it’s worth taking a moment to recollect when it was called Armistice Day and meant more than midnight madness sales at department stores. Thirty million soldiers were killed or wounded and another 7 million were taken captive in that war. Never before had people witnessed such industrialized slaughter. Congress responded to a universal hope among Americans that such a war would never happen again by passing a resolution calling for “exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding…inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.” Later, Congress added that November 11 was to be “a day dedicated to the cause of world peace.” While it is a good thing to honor the country’s military service veterans, the original intent of Armistice Day — promoting peace — has gotten lost over the years. One veterans’ organization is trying to recreate that original intent. Its name, appropriately enough, is Veterans For Peace. Of the many veterans’ organizations in the U.S., Veterans For Peace (VFP) exists specifically to carry out the original purpose of Armistice Day. With 120 chapters across the country, the St. Louisbased organization has as its chief goal “to abolish war as an instrument of national policy.” Founded in 1985 at the height of the Reagan administration’s support for the “contras” in Nicaragua and death squads else-

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MIKE FERNER where in Central America, VFP includes men and women veterans of all eras and wars — cold or hot — from World War II through the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. One of the things of which the organization is most proud is helping form Iraq Veterans Against the War in the summer of 2004, but Elliott Adams, VFP’s president and a former paratrooper who served in Vietnam, will quickly tell you they are not interested in repeating that accomplishment. “I’ll be happy if this generation of veterans is the last,” he says. Having seen the reality of war and understanding its true cost, VFP members will tell you that war is not the answer. However, coming to that conclusion is as much a spiritual journey as a political one, they acknowledge, because making peace in your heart can sometimes be as difficult as making peace in the world. One of the simple truths on which Veterans For Peace is founded states, “Our collective experience tells us wars are easy to start and hard to stop.” With a weary nod of the head the doughboys of WWI, shivering in the soggy, rotten trenches of Europe in November 1918, would surely have agreed. (Mike Ferner is a national board member of Veterans For Peace and author of “Inside the Red Zone: A Veteran For Peace Reports from Iraq.”)

COLUMN

Bush trying to get in final tricks By TOM TEEPEN COX NEWS

s if it hadn’t damaged the commonweal enough through eight years of favoring commercial interests over public interests just about every time they have collided, President Bush’s crew is working feverishly to get in a slew of last-minute licks before the clock runs out. Federal bureaus, agencies and so on are rushing to change rules and regulations by administrative order in time to immunize them against easy reversal by the incoming administration. Up to 90 changes are afoot that would lower product safety requirements, increase air pollution, ease drinking water standards, revive damaging mountain-top strip mining and, of course, overall batter the environment, which the Bushies have been regularly beating up for fun and political profit through two terms. We owe much of our awareness of what’s up to The Washington Post, which at the git-go of the Bush presidency gave itself the largely thankless task of keeping tabs on the bureaucracy, where much of the government’s work gets done without public notice and whose mis- and malfeasances rarely rock the news cycle even when they are exposed. (What will we do for such knowledge when newspapers, grievously ailing, die off? The blogs, Web sites and other newmedia gimcrackery aren’t interested, couldn’t afford the staff even if they were and, anyway, often revel only in being fiendishly biased. But that’s a ponderation for another day.) Bush salted government offices with partisan commissars assigned to watch department heads for any sign of apostasy from the conservative party line or animus toward its supportive financial interests. Science was quashed when it proved inconvenient. Appointees who misunderstood the game and took their titular duties seriously

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were booted; Christine Whitman at EPA was an early-warning dead canary. So now the Bureau of Land Management has filed notice it wants to lease 9.5 million previously protected acres in eastern Utah for oil and gas drilling — land the bureau itself had earlier classified “wilderness quality.” Never mind that the industry already is sitting on vast tracts of land and seabed it has never developed. The Justice Department’s antitrust division — for eight years unable to find a single case - has published guidelines which would hold that monopolies need leave only some pitiful remnant of floundering competition in order to be free of antitrust prosecution. The National Marine Fisheries Management Service is publishing rule changes that would lift the environmental review requirements for some fisherymanagement decisions. The list goes on, of course — one item could shield shipping data from antiterrorist oversight — but there is a small glint of hope. It rests, perversely, with the Bush administration’s amazing record, all policy matters aside, of plain, old-fashioned incompetence. The Clinton administration had rushed through regulations that had been in the works for years so late in the day that the requisite period to secure them hadn’t expired before Bush took office. He canceled them wholesale on his Inauguration Day. To protect against the same fate, Bush’s Office of Management and Budget sent out a memo last spring urging that all new rules and regs be wrapped up by November 1. But this is an administration unable to learn from its own example. There is at least small hope in the fact that the sound of paper still being desperately shuffled is loud. (Reach Tom Teepen, a columnist for Cox Newspapers, at teepencolumn@earthlink.net)

YOUR OPINION Obama,Democrats don’t deserve a united America; they didn’t support Bush during his tenure To the editor: To the local and national Democrats who are asking people to give their Democrat “messiah” a break now that he has won the election, I say no way. Did the Democrats ever give President Bush a break after the 2000 or 2004 election? I say this to the Democrats: I, just like Pontius Pilate, have now washed my hands of this

messiah and have thrown him back to his mob. Whenever bad news hits — and it will — the messiah and the Democrats will be blamed. When the messiah is tested by the Russians or the Iranians, and he fails the test, the messiah and the Democrats will be blamed. I will chant “Obama lied, people died” just as they did during President Bush’’s term.

When the messiah completes the socialization of the USA, I will chant “I told you so.” This conservative will be laying in waiting ready to pounce on the messiah’s mistakes. This conservative will not unite behind the messiah and instead will do whatever it takes to oppose him even in a time of national security crisis

just as the messiah and the Democrats did during the last eight years. All the problems of the country are now in the messiahs and the Democrats’ hands. They will not be able to blame the GOP anymore when they mess it up. I will see you in 2012 at the voting booth, messiah. Signed, Omar W. Cantu

With election over,it’s time to move forward together regardless of party affiliation To the editor: Now that the election is over, Republicans have a goodly meal of crow to get down. But we Democrats and liberals have something to swallow as well — our resentments. This needs to be a time of forgiveness and reconciliation, not a time for recrimination and settling old scores. We’ve got plenty to be angry about. It was an ugly campaign, full of religious and racial slurs and mendacious smears about

Obama being radical, communist, pro-terrorist, anti-American, racist against whites, not a “real American,” etc. And there are plenty of dirty secrets left in the Bush administration, including illegal wiretapping, U.S. attorneys, Cheney’s secret energy meeting, Valerie Plame, the leadup to Iraq and so on, not to mention six years of Democrats being shoved out the door every time a decision was to be made.

There is such a thing as justice. And if the economy was strong and we were in a position to quickly and gracefully pull out of Iraq and Afghanistan without worrying about the enemies we might leave behind, a case could be made for pursuing at least some of the worst sins of the Bush administration and the McCain campaign. But with things as they are, we don’t have time or resources to spend on retribution. We need to move forward.

Fortunately, these were exactly the themes of Presidentelect Obama’s victory speech — unity and moving forward. As an African-American, a stepchild, and the son of an immigrant, Obama has had a lifetime to learn how to forgive insults and petty injustices. His focus is on the future, and ours must be as well. Of course, forgiving is not the same thing as forgetting. Signed, John Maxstadt

American moves forward on some fronts; local folks need to increase tolerance,too To the editor: People wept. Faces smiled. And the world breathed a sigh of relief. It’s not just that America shut the door on neo-conservatism, jingoism and took a giant leap toward reconciling its racist past, it’s also that under the Republicans, America ceased to be the beacon of freedom and promise of hope for all mankind. America is back. To those who resisted — and many still do — this bold transformation, I wish you’d jump on in. The water’s fine. But the new day is not without its dark clouds. Around the nation numerous states put various social propositions on their ballots. Overall, a woman’s right of choice won. In states such as California and South Dakota, voters trounced aggressive antiabortion propositions. Colorado tried but failed to pass a measure that would legally define a fertilized egg as a person. This sounds as if it would go over well in Laredo, where we like

our salsa hot and our mothers young. I’m not saying I mind seeing a 17-year-old mother of two; it’s just that I’d like to think the gal knew her options going in. Many Laredoans rail against sex ed, contraceptives and anything that might give women just a little deciding power over their lives. One fellow Laredoan responded to my last letter to the editor, which in small measure defended the right of choice, by citing passages from Matthew 18 in which Jesus defends “the little ones.” I’m glad this gentleman brought up that verse. It’s a beautiful verse. But when we consider the people of Roman-occupied Palestine had no possible way of understanding human reproduction as we do now, had no knowledge of gametes or meiosis, than it’s very hard to believe the Gospel writers here refer to anything but a viable person. Jesus, in Matt 18, it talking about children — flesh and blood, out-of-the-womb chil-

dren, the kind who run, jump, and breath air. He is not talking about an egg. But while choice won on Tuesday, civil rights lost. Arizona, Florida, and Arkansas all voted to ban gay marriage. Usually one of the most progressive states of the union, California surprised everyone with its narrow passage of Proposition 8, which outlaws such unions. There’s irony here. Many observers correlate the 52 percent approval of Prop. 8 with high African American turnout. According to exit polls, African Americans voted overwhelmingly (70 percent) in favor of the ban. The fact that America elected its first African-American president on the same night it denied equal rights to another portion of its citizens shows just how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go in realizing the more perfect union. The rights of gay and lesbian Americans are poised to be-

DOONESBURY | GARRY TRUDEAU

come the civil rights battle of the 21st Century. In many ways it already is, and this is not without consequence to Laredo, a notoriously insular and intolerant community. Let’s not forget, this is the town that blasted one of its own over a simple change to a street name. We’re slow to change, but it does happen. My generation has witnessed tolerance for different lifestyles increase. When our grandparents sustained Laredo, nobody talked about homosexuality. During our parents’ time, they whispered. Now, more gay Laredoans are living openly, but they still face the ignorance of machismo bigotry from time to time. Increasing tolerance never comes easy for a self-isolated community like ours, but through education and open communication, this town can modernize its thinking, and build bridges of understanding. Hopefully those bridges can be better than our roads. Signed, Miguel Herrrera IV


Zlife

SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

MISS MANNERS | BYJUDITH MARTIN

The tipping point of tipping DEAR MISS MANNERS — My friend, who is from Norway, where they don’t tip, had his hair cut. He offered his credit card to pay for it, and the haircutter pointed to the tip part and said he was suppose to fill that out. I MARTIN said he could put a “0” in or not go back to this hair establishment. Do you have any advice for him? He has lived in this country 25 years, but he goes back to Norway every year, and he doesn’t believe in tipping. GENTLE READER — Tell your friend that he doesn’t have to believe in tipping. All he has to do is to tip. Miss Manners abhors the tipping system. But she tips without fail. If the service is bad, her redress is not to cut t h e t i p b ut to c o m p l a i n to management. This is because she knows — as your friend should have discovered after 25 years in this country — that in certain job situations, expected tips are calculated into the otherwise low wages. It is her strong feeling that to build the service cost into wages and pricing would benefit everyone. Nice people are often in a state of anxiety about how much to tip, and not-nice ones often shirk their responsibility. Notnice service people may use embarrassment to provoke greater tips, and nice ones are financially penalized. If your friend wants a tip-free haircut in the United States, he should ask to have it done by the owner of the business. Owners

are not supposed to be tipped, although they are only too eager nowadays to encourage their clients to do so. See what Miss Manners means about its being a system that brings out the worst in everyone? DEAR MISS MANNERS — Is it acceptable to correct one’s elders, and how does one politely do so? My uncle referred to the president of Venezuela as “Cesar Chavez”; my aunt pronounces salmon “SAL-muhn”; my mother-in-law told her young granddaughter (my niece) that “peruse” means to lightly skim over written materials. No one likes a know-it-all, but I cringe when I hear someone making a mistake, although I certainly don’t want to embarrass anyone or come across as rude. In the above examples, I said nothing to my mother-in-law and uncle, and kept repeating “SAMuhn” to my aunt, but she never got it. GENTLE READER — To go around correcting others is to cause embarrassment, make oneself unpopular and, as you have noticed, fail to make any impression on the person you attempted to correct. Cringing seems a small price to avoid all that. However (and if you have faith in Miss Manners, you knew there would be a however), you can question them. To your uncle, you might have said, “Hugo? Wasn’t Cesar the civil rights organizer? Remember ‘No grapes’?” To your aunt, “Do they pronounce the L where salmon comes from? I’ve always heard it SAM-uhn.” And to your motherin-law, “I thought it was the opposite — am I wrong?”

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Siriano style takes over By STEFANIE CHARLES LAREDO MORNING TIMES

The air was filled with anticipation as Christian Siriano’s fashions took center stage at Joe Brand on Thursday afternoon. With the designer in tow, Laredo’s chicest “ladies who lunch” flocked to the store for a premiere glimpse of Siriano’s Spring ‘09 collection. The “Project Runway” season four winner showed off his collection in the name of fierce style. “I’m very familiar with his collections and impressed by his selection of fabulous fabrics,” said Veronica Castillon. “I’m a big fan of the show (Project Runway). My daughter used to tape it so I could watch it every week.”

The collection Siriano’s collection is a compilation of sports and eveningwear that would satisfy the needs of any fashionista. The neutral pallet of grays is accented by pops of orange and a vibrant green. Organza is the staple fabric, laser-cut and pleated in the most ornate way, adding an air of simplicity and style that any woman of any size can wear. His premiere collection, Siriano, fuses his academic background of working under Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood with his own natural style, producing a line of clothing so subtle that each piece is an art form. “This is his first collection ever being sold to the public and his first in-store trunk show with this collection,” said Terri Deutsch of Joe Brand. “Joe Brand is actually the only store in Texas where you can find his line.” Despite being thrust into the spotlight for a yearlong of “firsts,” Siriano hasn’t lost his

Photo by Ricardo Segovia | Laredo Morning Times

Designer Christian Siriano strikes a pose in front of a display of his spring collection during his trunk show at Joe Brand on Thursday. The 22-year-old was the season four winner of “Project Runway.” sense of humility and personable demeanor.

Making his way As designer, he has worked his way from imagining and constructing elaborate costumes for a hair salon in Annapolis, Md., to working under the famous Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood in London. As a rising star in the fashion industry, Siriano travels to various universities and cities, speaking at media events to fund his passion for design. “I’m constantly traveling, doing events, in order to raise funds for my company,” Siriano said. “It’s fun meeting people and go-

ing to new places.” Finding the time to design while away from his company and his home in New York City, Siriano simply develops ideas for designs as they come. “Ideas pop into my head all the time; while I’m on an airplane, I can sketch and then develop the design,” he said. “I can usually come up with different pieces just based off a blouse or a simple piece.” After establishing his name in the fashion industry, Siriano was approached by Puma to do big endorsements with their sportswear line. “I basically take Puma clothes and reconstruct them into a more evening look that’s chic, like with what I did for singer Estelle’s al-

bum release,” Siriano said.

In the works With loads of upcoming projects — including designing a couture collection for the film “Heloise,” starring Uma Thurman — Siriano has deals in the works to launch lines of shoes and handbags, as well as one of makeup. Siriano is not your average 22-year-old — packing ambition and a great love of fashion, he is taking on an industry that is fickle and harsh at times. But given his fierce sense of style and humility, there’s no question why he was crowned “his generation’s next Marc Jacobs.”


Zentertainment

SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

ON THE WEB: THEZAPATATIMES.COM

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Laredoan leads cast of critically acclaimed ‘August Evening’ By KIRSTEN CROW LAREDO MORNING TIMES

It’s all in the boots. That’s what first caught the eye of “August Evening” director Chris Eska when he stumbled upon Laredo native Pedro Castañeda Jr. at an audition for his $40,000 independent film. Only Castañeda wasn’t there as an actor looking for his shot. He was unassumingly working on the technical equipment as a computer networking and systems analyst. “I told him I was there to work, not for the auditions, but he said, ‘You have the look I’m looking for, and if you don’t mind, just read the script and let me know,’ ” Castañeda said. “I read the script, and it was really interesting. It talked about migrant workers and the Latino family in a good light.” Now, for a man who shied away from the spotlight most of his life, Castañeda appears to be a natural-born actor as he plays the critically lauded role of an aging migrant worker, Jaime Esparza, in the acclaimed, award-winning independent film “August Evening.”

A surprising turn Castañeda, a 54-year-old Martin High School graduate, is the first to admit that he never

dreamed of being bathed in the spotlight. Raised himself as the child of migrant farmworkers, Castañeda always pursued the career of his choosing, first in biology, then in medicine. When navigating the horizon caught his fancy, Castañeda earned his pilot’s license. He later became an entrepreneur and owner of his own business in computer networking and systems analyst — and co-owner of a tow truck company. Acting was never a consideration. In fact, his one-time stage experience prior to his big screen debut was as a trembling Christmas tree during a seasonal play at Lamar Middle School about four decades ago. “My knees were shaking all over the place,” he said. “I think that’s what traumatized me for the rest of my life. I hated speech class.” But for five weeks, Castañeda set aside his fears and spent 12 to 14 hours each day on the sets in San Antonio and Gonzalez. And to his surprise, he enjoyed it. Castañeda didn’t have to look hard for inspiration: He vividly remembers the effects of a migrant lifestyle on his parents, Margarita Castañeda and the late Pedro Castañeda Sr. “I could see it in their faces when my dad would come home

and my mom would come home — the hardship, how they would talk amongst themselves about what they would do next,” he said. “Some of the sets were very similar — out of luck or coincidence — to some of the places we would stay. I got a little emotional about it. … But I tried to channel some of the feelings when I was younger, or the feeling of my parents when I could see they were struggling. But the whole thing felt comfortable — it wasn’t strange to me.” Specifically, Castañeda looked to his father’s visage when playing the role of a “hardworking man, a strong man that wants to get his children ahead.” “(Jaime is) kind of like my dad,” he said. “He knew it was hard work, but he wanted to give us that.”

The awards Still, he never thought anything would come of his foray into the dramatic world. But soon, the reviews, praise and awards were rolling in, much to the astonishment of Castañeda. The biggest, by far, was his November nomination for Best Male Lead in Film Independent’s Spirit Awards. “I didn’t even know what that was,” he said. “I said, ‘What does that mean?’ and (Eska) said, ‘Well, it means you’ll be up against

Photo by Yasu Tanida | Special to the Times

Pedro Castañeda as “Jaime” in “August Evening.” Philip Seymour Hoffman and Don Cheadle … . And if you win, you’re going to have to go up in front of these A-listers and everyone watching on TV.’ ” He paused to laugh, before adding: “That’s when my hands started sweating.”

It was a surreal ceremony, Castañeda noted. For a guy who prefers rice and beans, the spread of wines, champagnes and cheeses was slightly daunting, while his fellow guests were larger than life in some respects. One of his favorite actresses, Marisa

Tomei, sat mere feet from him, while Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt dined a few tables down. “You really go to La La Land; they’re treating you like a king, you know?” he said. “It was Mr. Castañeda this, Mr. Castañeda that.”

get-one promotion.

tion this month. Sponsored by the LCC art department, the exhibit will be launched with a reception Wednesday from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the LCC Art Teaching Gallery on the Fort McIntosh Campus. Refreshments will be served and each artist will offer a brief gallery talk during the reception. Admission is free and open to the campus body and public.

ENTERTAINMENT BRIEFS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Intocable gets touchable Zapata County will continue its Sesquicentennial Celebration on today with an itinerary jampacked with activities for the entire family. At 10 a.m., there will be a parade along U.S. 83, and beginning

at noon, there will be a carnival, live music, plenty of food and team roping at the Zapata County Fairgrounds.

History plays out “I Never Saw Another Butterfly,” a play about a child’s survival of the Holocaust, will be performed at the Laredo Little The-

atre, 4602 Thomas Ave., at 8 p.m. tonight and 3 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $5.

Venegas fever The Laredo Entertainment Center and Global Groove London are proud to announce a special event at the LEC – Julieta Venegas’ “El Presente” Tour is scheduled to kick-off the holiday

season the day before Thanksgiving, Wednesday, Nov. 26, at 8 p.m. Tickets for the concert go on sale at 10 a.m. today at the LEC box office and all Ticketmaster outlets. Ticket prices are $80, $60 and $40, with a special holiday ticket available at only $20. The first-ever special will be available Saturday only: All tickets, except the top price level, will be available in a buy-one

Drawn to abstraction The abstract works of two noted Texas artists — Roberta Buckles, of San Antonio, and Joyce Howell, of Kingsland — will share the limelight at Laredo Community College during the showing of the “Abstract Realities” exhibi-


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

THE ZAPATA TIMES | 7A

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Zapata County Judge Rosalva Guerra, center, holding the sissors, county officials and sesquicentennial celebration committee members prepare to cut the ribbon Friday morning for the dedication of the Zapata County Sesquicentennial Park.

Continued from Page 1A but the occasion of the celebration of another 50-year anniversary of the county. “It only comes once every 50 years,” Guerra said, with a smile on her face. Amid discussion of Zapata’s past, local lawyer Jamie Gonzalez Jr., reflected on Zapata’s present. “We now have a new courthouse, a new activity center, a paved street, this beautiful park and the latest and greatest schools with the best technology,” Gonzalez said. “It is our job to ensure that the new generations in Zapata be educated and become great leaders. We will need them to record our history and confront the challenges that will come.” County Commissioner Joe Rathmell described a time when a drought left the ruins of Old Zapata exposed, and how his grandfather and others walked the streets of Old Zapata, trying to remember the way the buildings looked. “I remember, just from my parents, especially my mom, even up to today, she gives us history lessons,” Rathmell said. “There’s a lot of teaching done in the families. There’s not a lot of books on the history of Zapata.” But he said that those ruins don’t make Zapata. “The answer can’t be an attachment to old buildings,” he said. “Zapata is its people and their spirit.” Rathmell warned the oil and gas resources now plentiful in Zapata will one day diminish, but today is “a good time to be in Zapata.” Locals designed the new park, which features a pavilion, benches, a walking path and podiums with the names of Zapata County public officials dating back to the founding. “We had estimates for $42,000 and built it for $15,000,” said retired teacher Omelia Zapata. The white benches, a signature feature of the park, were all donated. The committee had hoped for 50. They got more than 100. The other benches will start showing up around the town. (Zach Lindsey can be reached at 728-7538 or zach@lmtonline.com)

Photo by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

Zapata County War Veterans Triso “Tito” Amesquia and Paula Kent of Post 486 were some of the veterans on hand at Friday’s dedication ceremony for the Zapata County Sesquicentennial Park.

Hector Lopez Jr., right, of Zapata, poses with W. Eugene George, author of “Lost Architecture of the Rio Grande Borderlands” and his wife Carolyn on Friday morning at the dedication of the Zapata County Sesquicentennial Park.


ZFrontera AGENDAEN BREVE SERVICIO SOCIAL

NUEVO LAREDO – Hasta dos mil Motociclistas de Canadá, Estados Unidos y México, se sumarán al “Moto Rally Fronterizo Gobernador 2008”. Las inscripciones fueron el viernes en Nuevo Laredo, de forma gratuita, donde se realizó una convivencia y concierto a cargo del grupo Moderato. El recorrido inicia el sábado. Serán 360 kilómetros de recorrido estando el banderazo programado para las 10 a.m. en la Explanada Esteban Baca Calderón. La meta es en Matamoros viajando por toda la Carretera Ribereña Lauro del Villar. El contingente estará encabezado por el Gobernador de Tamaulipas, Eugenio Hernández Flores, y los presidentes municipales fronterizos, Ramón Garza Barrios, de Nuevo Laredo; Guerrero, Olga Juliana Elizondo; Mier, José Iván Mancías Hinojosa; Miguel Alemán, Servando López Moreno; Camargo, José Correa Guerrero; Díaz Ordaz, José Guadalupe González Vázquez; Reynosa, Oscar Luebbert Gutiérrez; Río Bravo, Roberto Benet Ramos; y, Matamoros, Erick Silva Santos. “La logística y seguridad han quedado establecidas a lo largo de la ruta”, dijo en conferencia de prensa Garza Barrios. “Oficiales de seguridad garantizarán que los visitantes disfruten de su es-

CULTURA

Por MIGUEL TIMOSHENKOV

„ LAREDO — El pianista Michael Schneider ofrecerá una clase en el Laredo Community College el sábado a las 6 p.m.en el teatro Guadalupe and Lilia Martinez Fine Arts Center. Patrocinado por Artisan Piano,la clase es gratuita para estudiantes avanzados-intermedios y superiores,pero se requiere inscribirse con Rebeca Gonzalezde Anderson escribiendo arebeca.anderson@sbcglobal.net. „ LAREDO — Pase la tarde en el Planetario Lamar Bruni Vergara de Texas A&M International University y explore “The Zula Patrol: Under the Weather” a las 6 p.m., “Seven Wonders” a las 7 p.m. y “U2 Fulldome Experience” a las 8 p.m. del sábado Los boletos tienen costo de 5 dólares general y 4 dólares para niños, estudiantes, personal y exalumnos de TAMIU. „ LAREDO — La Laredo Asian Association realizará su Asian Night el sábado de 6:30 p.m. a 10:30 p.m. el sábado. La gala incluirá comida, un desfile de moda étnico y bailables. „ LAREDO — La música del compositor FranzLiszt será interpretada por el pianista Michael Schneider durante el segundo Sauter Pianoforte Recital en el Laredo Community College. Patrocinado por Artisan Piano,el recital dará inicio a las 4 p.m.del domingo en el teatro Guadalupe and Lilia MartinezFine Arts Center.La entrada es gratuita yabierta a la comunidad.

TIEMPO DE ZAPATA

DEPORTES

Para informar acerca de eventos y actividades envíe el nombre, fecha, hora y dirección, y un número de contacto a tiempo@lmtonline.com

EN INTERNET: THEZAPATATIMES.COM

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Recorrerán en moto franja fronteriza

„ CIUDAD MIER — A las 11 a.m. del sábado se realizará la colocación de la primera piedra de la Casa Club del Adulto Mayor e Inauguración de la Fuente de Acceso Sur en instalaciones del CEDIF (Calle Allende/América). „CIUDAD GUERRERO — Alas 10:30 a.m. del sábado, el Gobernador de Tamaulipas, Eugenio Hernández Flores realizará el corte de listón de la Escuela de Medicina “José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara” en la Colonia centro. Igualmente se recorrerán las oficinas administrativas. „ LAREDO — El Laredo Noon Optimist Club tendrá una venta de platillos el sábado de 11 a.m. a 2 p.m. en el estacionamiento del Commerce Bank ubicado en San Dario y Mann Road. La donación por platillo es de 5 dólares. Las ganancias se destinarán a actividades juveniles como becas, la Liga Peqeuña y la semana de agradecimiento juvenil. Servando Maldonado es el encargado de la venta de platillos. „LAREDO — La Biblioteca Pública de Laredo tendrá la venta de otoño de Libros Usados de Frineds of the Library, sábado y domingo en la Laredo Public Library(1120 East Calton Road).Las ganancias se destinan a dar apoyo en proyectos especiales para servicios de la biblioteca. „ LAREDO — El sábado es la segunda Feria anual de Atención a Servicios para Veteranos de 10 a.m. a 2 p.m. en el Kazen College center del Laredo Community College. Varias agencias ofrecerán información,terpia de masaje y obsequios de parte de los Laredo Bucks, comida y más. La entrada para veteranos y su familia es gratuita. Más información llamando al 764-5768. „LAREDO — La Laredo Animal Protective Society tendrá su PetFest el sábado. El evento, una campaña para adopción de mascotas se realizará en PETCO (5410 San Bernardo Ave.) del mediodía a las 4 p.m. La cuota de adopción es de 70 dólares para perros y 45 dólares para gatos e incluye servicio como vacunas y desparacitación. Más información llamando a LAPS al 724-8364.

„ LAREDO — Continúa el sábado el torneo de vóleibol del Distrito M Región IV en el Gimnasio Maravillo del Laredo Community College. El pase para un día para adultos es de 6 dólares,yde 3 dólares para estudiantes con identificación del colegio.La entrada es gratis para menores de 12 años y mayores de 65. Más información llamando al 721-5326. „ LAREDO — Las inscripciones para participar en la carrera anual de 10K del Guajolote, en su emisión 29 se llevará a cabo la mañana del Día de Acción de Gracias. Este año la carrera será el jueves 27 de noviembre a las 9 a.m. frente a Hamilton Trophies. Si tiene preguntas, favor de llamar a Hamilton Trophies en el (956) 7249990 ó (956) 722-9463. También puede acudir a 1320 Garden y en Hamilton Jewelry (607 Flores) ó llamando al (956) 722-9015.

SÁBADO 8 DE NOVIEMBRE DE 2008

POR MIGUEL TIMOSHENKOV TIEMPO DE ZAPATA

tancia en la región fronteriza”. La Policía Federal Preventiva, la Policía Especial de Tamaulipas, Policía Ministerial, Seguridad Ciudadana, Seguridad Vial y Protección Civil se han cordinado con la Secretaría de Seguridad en el Estado para los servicios de seguridad .

Miguel Alemán Hoy sábado el contingente viajará hasta Reynosa, pero aproximadamente a las 2 p.m. se espera que arriben a Miguel Alemán donde López Moreno dijo que el mandatario tamaulipeco entregará recursos para obras, antes de partir rumbo a Camargo sobre el Libramiento “Manuel Cavazos Lerma”. Las familias de Miguel Alemán podrán apreciar el paso de los más de 2 mil motociclistas y su estancia en los terrenos de la Expo-Fiesta. El alcalde dijo que el contingente motorizado entrará a Miguel Alemán proveniente de Ciudad Mier y que tras desplazarse por la carretera tomarán el libramiento 5 de Junio rumbo a los terrenos de la Expo-Fiesta. Ahí, el gobernador y los motociclistas tendrán un descanso, en el que disfrutarán de comida y música. La gente que desee observar el paso de los motociclistas lo podrán hacer en el libramiento 5 de Junio, pues el contingente se desplazará por esta arteria hasta

llegar a la calle Décima, a fin de tomar la avenida Miguel Hidalgo para pasar por el pleno centro de la ciudad. El domingo 9 partirán a partirán hacia Río Bravo, pasarán por Nuevo Progreso y terminarán en Matamoros, meta del Moto Rally, donde se rifarán entre los participantes cinco motocicletas Harley Davidson y una BMW de 800 centímetros cúbicos al término de la travesía.

Derrama económica Hoteleros y prestadores de servicios dijeron que esperan importante derrama económica. Rogelio Armenta García, director municipal de Turismo, dijo que hoteleros reportaban una gran cantidad de reservaciones. “Creemos que los hoteles van a estar a reventar y el beneficio inmediato del evento va a repercutir en el turismo”, dijo Armenta. El organismo de motociclistas “Mañoso Ryder”, con 37 clubes en todo el país, participará en esta travesía motorizada. Ramiro Villarreal Ramírez, dirigente nacional de dicha organización de motociclistas, informó que tienen presencia en 18 estados de la República Mexicana. También se espera la presencia de clubes de moticiclistas en San Antonio. (Puede localizar a Miguel Timoshenkov llamando al (956) 728-2583 o escribiendo a timo1@lmtonline.com)

Foto de cortesía/archivo | Gobierno de Miguel Alemán

Bomberos realizan con alumnos maniobras de rescate durante un simulacro de incendio en el laboratorio de química de la Escuela Secundaria General Adalberto J.Arguelles, el 28 de octubre.

Aplican técnicas en simulacro ESPECIAL PARA TIEMPO DE LAREDO

MIGUEL ALEMÁN — A fin de actuar de forma adecuada en caso de emergencias, el Gobierno Municipal realizó la movilización de ambulancias a la Escuela Secundaria General Adalberto J. Arguelles, en la Colonia Educación, donde se realizó un simulacro de incendio. Hasta el lugar llegó el equipo de bomberos, e involucraron a un grupo de alumnos para realizar las maniobras para sofocar el incendio del laboratorio de química, y rescatar a los alumnos que sufrieron intoxicación para brindarle los primeros auxilios y trasladarlos en ambulancias. El evento se llevó a cabo el 28 de octubre a donde acudió la

Preparan llegada de nuevo Obispo NUEVO LAREDO — La Iglesia Católica ha cuidado cada detalle para que el segundo obispo de la Diócesis de esta ciudad, Monseñor Gustavo Rodríguez Vega arribe a las 4:30 p.m. del miércoles 19 de noviembre a su primera Celebración Eucarística en el cargo. Su primer contacto con la feligresía está agendado en la Parroquia de Santo Niño, para desplazarse en desfile por la Avenida Guerrero, hasta la Catedral del Espíritu Santo. En conferencia de prensa del jueves, el presbítero Rogelio Lozano, la profesora Elda Elizondo, el presbítero Alberto Monjarás y el portavoz de la Diócesis Miguel Ángel Castellano, explicaron que el representante de su Santidad Benedicto XVI, presidirá la entrega de la Diócesis. “Estaremos reunidos para recibir al Obispo. Nos sumaremos en oración y después continuaremos con el desfile”, dijo Monseñor Lozano. “Están programados varios contingentes en el recorrido al sur hasta llegar a la Catedral”. A las 6 p.m. iniciará la Celebración Eucarística. Al concluir la misa está prevista una verbena

popular para convivir y ser anfitriones de los más de tres mil asistentes de otras Diócesis. El Obispo Rodríguez Vega asumirá los retos de continuar trabajando por fortalecer la Diócesis, a través de los 18 años que se ha trabajado en comunidad y entrega como en su momento lo hizo el obispo Ricardo Batty Urquidi, dijo Elizondo. En la Diócesis están identificadas 34 parroquias con 60 presbíteros, su jurisdicción en Tamaulipas es Nuevo Laredo, Ciudad Mier, Ciudad Guerrero y Ciudad Miguel Alemán. En el estado de Nuevo León, Paras, Vallecillo, Anahuac, Lampazos, Villaldama, Bustamante y Sabinas, Hidalgo. El Obispo Rodríguez Vega es presidente de la Comisión Episcopal de la pastoral social “Caritas” a nivel del Episcopado Mexicano. Tiene una relación muy especial con las Casas del Migrante, la labor de la pastoral penitenciaria, y es coordinador general de la Caritas Mexicana, coordinador de Justicia y Paz, así como de la Comisión de los enfermos de VIH. En la conferencia de prensa se dio a conocer que el nuevo Obispo ha expresado su deseo de oficiar misa diaria a las 8 a.m. en Catedral del Espíritu Santo y

Invitan a fiesta en Falcon ESPECIAL PARA TIEMPO DE ZAPATA

Foto por Miguel Timoshenkov | The Zapata Times

Se han impreso varios posters con la imagen de Monseñor Gustavo Rodríguez Vega, nuevo Obispo de la Diócesis de Nuevo Laredo, a fin de darle la bienvenida el 19 de noviembre. cada domingo a las 7:00 p.m. Los retos y dificultades que se presentan en la vida de la comunidad serán atendidos por el obispo y la iglesia, explicaron Lozano y Monjarás. “Habrá experiencia pastoral,

Operarán cataratas

con sensibilidad social se atenderá cada tema de la comunidad”, dijo Lozano. (Puede localizar a Miguel Timoshenkov llamando al (956) 728-2583 o escribiendo a timo1@lmtonline.com)

Miembros del Falcon Committee para la celebración del Sesquicentenario del Condado de Zapata han enviado invitaciones a aproximadamente 200 descendientes de familias quienes vivieron en Old Falcon antes de 1953. La mayoría de estos descendientes de Falcon ya han respondido y hecho reservaciones para asistir a este muy anticipado evento local. Todos los residentes que actualmente viven en Falcon también participarán en las festividades de Falcon las cuales se realizarán el domingo 9 de noviembre. La dedicación del Falcon Community Park iniciará a las 9:30 a.m. seguido de la ceremonia de izamiento de bandera y un tributo a 36 veteranos nacidos en Falcon. Una Misa especial continuará en Santa Anna Mission a las 11:30 a.m. También de interés es la presentación de un video histórico preparado por Amanda Thelma Salinas y Gladys Salinas. Se disfrutarán selecciones musicales de las décadas de los 1930 y 1940 así como artículos utilizados por ancestros el domingo en el Falcon Community Center.

Analizan cálidad del agua en Tamaulipas

ESPECIAL PARA TIEMPO DE LAREDO

MIGUEL ALEMÁN — Gracias al apoyo del Sistema para el Desarrollo Integral de la Familia (DIF, por sus siglas) Tamaulipas, en esta ciudad se beneficiará a decenas de personas con problemas de cataratas. El jueves, Sandra Isela Garza de López, presidenta del Sistema DIF Miguel Alemán, supervisó la valoración de decenas de personas que padecen esta enfermedad. Personal del Sistema DIF Tamaulipas, apoyado por el voluntariado local, realizaron las tareas de valoración y diagnóstico de cada uno de los pacientes en las instalaciones de la Casa Club del Adulto Mayor. Garza de López expresó que este beneficio se trae a Miguel Alemán “gracias al apoyo (del DIF Tamaulipas), quien envió al equipo de profesionales tras la solicitud que hicimos al darnos

Presidenta del Sistema para el Desarrollo Integral de la Familia, Sandra Isela Garza de López quien se reunió con la directora del plantel, Silvia Benítez, para ser testigos del simulacro, donde los alumnos pudieron aprender a tomar las medidas de prevención y evacuación del área siniestrada. Durante las acciones, la comisión de prevención integrada por alumnos de diferentes niveles, aplicaron las medidas de seguridad para acordonar el área y rescatar las personas en un conato de incendio en el laboratorio donde se manejan productos químicos. De acuerdo al reporte oficial, los alumnos manejaron con mucho tacto y responsabilidad el equipo de rescate y apaga fuegos en una área restringida.

Por MIGUEL TIMOSHENKOV TIEMPO DE ZAPATA

Foto de cortesía | Gobierno de Miguel Alemán

La Presidenta del Sistema DIF, Sandra Isela Garza de López, segunda de derecha a izquierda, sonríe mientras personal del DIF Tamaulipas le desmuestra la forma de evaluación para cataratas en adultos mayores. cuenta de que en la región hay muchas personas que padecen esta enfermedad”. Las intervenciones quirúrgicas se harán completamente gratis en los próximos días y los beneficiarios sólo tendrán que cubrir una módica cantidad para cubrir los exámenes previos. La presidenta del Sistema DIF Miguel Alemán expresó que se hizo la invitación a Ca-

margo, Mier, Díaz Ordaz y Guerrero, a fin de aprovechar este gran apoyo que auxilia a la gente necesitada de cada uno de estos municipios. Cabe destacar que la mayor parte de las personas afectadas por cataratas son adultos mayores, quienes señalan que han dejado de hacer muchas actividades al estar limitados de la vista.

NUEVO LAREDO — El sector salud de Tamaulipas es regulador para que las Comisiones de Agua municipales respeten procesos bactereológicos y normatividades sanitarias de agua potable para el consumo humano. “El gobierno federal no quiere riesgos de salud para la población”, dijo Raúl Terrazas, del área de Epidemiología de la Secretaría de Salud del estado , en la reunión de gerentes operadores y técnicos de las Comisiones de Agua en los 43 municipios del estado celebrada el jueves en esta ciudad. Terrazas dijo que en el caso de la COMAPA-Nuevo Laredo, se hacen llegar a tiempo los reportes, se envían informes de monitoreo y se cumple con las normatividades. La Secretaria de Salud Federal detectó qué la calidad del agua

a nivel nacional estaban reportando deficiencias, aunque no se detectó este hecho en los estados del norte, se refería específicamente en el Centro y sur de México, pero aún así dispuso aplicar normas de calidad. El Gerente de COMAPA, Carlos Montiel Saeb, hizo una retrospectiva de las dos plantas potabilizadoras y tratadora de aguas residuales. Dijo que tienen capacidad para potabilizar hasta 2.200 litros por segundo y el consumo es de 1,900 o un poco más. En la planta potabilizadora suroeste se procesan 400 litros por segundo, pero invertirán para alcanzar 600 litros por segundo, permitiendo cumplir con la demanda del servicio en el futuro. Montiel informó que el proyecto de una potabilizadora al oeste de la ciudad se canceló, para invertir en la ampliación de la planta suroeste.


Zbusiness

SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

Crude steady after 2 days of sharp drops By MARK WILLIAMS ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Oil prices were sedentary Friday after this week’s giant sell-off despite a government report showing the unemployment rate hit a 14-year high last month and predictions from an international energy agency that put the price of crude at $200 per barrel by 2030. Light, sweet crude for December delivery rose 27 cents to settle at $61.04 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. But the contract dropped below $60 in overnight electronic trading for the first time 19 months. The U.S. Labor Department said Friday that the country’s unemployment rate hit 6.5 percent in October as another 240,000

jobs were cut, matching the worst jobless rate since March 1994. So far this year, a staggering 1.2 million jobs in the U.S. have disappeared. The job losses are yet another sign that the country is in a recession and that consumers and businesses will cut back on energy use. Most industry experts, however, believe that the decline in crude prices will not last. The International Energy Agency on Friday nearly doubled its forecast for the price of oil over the next 20 years, citing rising demand in the developing world as well as surging costs of production. According to a summary of its World Energy Outlook, the IEA hiked its forecast for the price of a barrel of oil in 2030 to just over

$200 in nominal terms, compared with its forecast last year of $108 a barrel. Measured in constant dollars, the IEA forecasts oil at $120 a barrel in 2030, up from last year’s forecast of $62. Jim Ritterbusch, president of energy consultancy Ritterbusch and Associates, said neither number had much influence on traders Friday. “That jobs report was definitely lousy, but yesterday’s decline in the (crude) market baked that bad number into yesterday’s trade,” he said. On Thursday, benchmark crude prices fell 7 percent for the second time in as many days. As far as the IEA number, “they are looking out to 2030 and oil traders are focused on the next couple of hours,” Ritterbusch said.

ON THE WEB: THEZAPATATIMES.COM

9A

Fears of a Dem crackdown lead to boom in gun sales By DENA POTTER ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIDLOTHIAN, Va. — When 10-year-old Austin Smith heard Barack Obama had been elected president, he had one question: Does this mean I won’t get a new gun for Christmas? That brought his mother, the camouflage-clad Rachel Smith, to Bob Moates Sports Shop on Thursday, where she was picking out that special 20-gauge shotgun — one of at least five weapons she plans to buy before Obama takes office in January. Like Smith, gun enthusiasts nationwide are stocking up on firearms out of fears that the combination of an Obama administration and a Democratdominated Congress will result in tough new gun laws. “I think they’re going to really

try to crack down on guns and make it harder for people to try to purchase them,” said Smith, 32, who taught all five of her children — ages 4 to 10 — to shoot because the family relies on game for food. Last month, as an Obama win looked increasingly inevitable, there were more than 108,000 more background checks for gun purchases than in October 2007, a 15 percent increase. And they were up about 8 percent for the year as of Oct. 26, according to the FBI. No data was available for gun purchases this week, but gun shops from suburban Virginia to the Rockies report record sales since Tuesday’s election. “They’re scared to death of losing their rights,” said David Hancock, manager of Bob Moates, where sales have nearly doubled in the past week and are

up 15 percent for the year. On Election Day, salespeople were called in on their day off because of the crowd. Obama has said he respects Americans’ Second Amendment right to bear arms, but that he favors “common sense” gun laws. Gun rights advocates interpret that as meaning he’ll at least enact curbs on ownership of assault and concealed weapons. As a U.S. senator, Obama voted to leave gun-makers and dealers open to lawsuits, and as an Illinois state legislator, he supported a ban on semiautomatic weapons and tighter restrictions on all firearms. Gun advocates take some solace in the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled 5-4 this summer to strike down the District of Columbia’s 32year ban on handguns.


10A | THE ZAPATA TIMES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

Umphres-Moffett key to growth

Courtesy photo

These are some of the 35 cellophane-wrapped bundles found Thursday, in compartments of the utility bed.The bundles contained 529 pounds of marijuana, with an estimated street value of $426,000. The bust was made by Border Patrol agents in Zapata.

BP agents seize 612 pounds of marijuana SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

More than 500 pounds of marijuana were seized by Border Patrol agents assigned to the Zapata station Thursday. The case was one of two seizures reported by Laredo Sector agents. A total of 612 pounds of marijuana were confiscated Thursday. The seizures bring the total marijuana seized during the past week to nearly 12,000 pounds. Since Oct. 1, Laredo Sector agents have seized 24,977 pounds of marijuana, compared to the 5,076 pounds seized during the same period last year. “Our agents are becoming more skilled at detecting the methods used by drug and alien smugglers. Our technology is providing the agents with a greater tactical advantage. And our intelligence resources, especially our cadre of informants, are providing better, more accurate information on the

organizations attempting to conduct illegal activities within the Laredo Sector. Those are some of factors leading to our increased seizures,” said Laredo Sector Chief Patrol Agent Carlos X. Carrillo. Agents assigned to the Zapata station made the larger of Thursday’s seizures at an immigration checkpoint near Chihuahua. The agents performed an immigration inspection on the driver of a white Dodge pickup that stopped at the checkpoint. The agents became suspicious when they noticed the driver was acting very nervous as they questioned him about his immigration status. The agents also detected a strong odor of marijuana near the truck’s utility bed. The agents referred the truck for a secondary inspection. During that inspection, a Border Patrol canine alerted agents toward the bed. Agents searched the truck and found 35 cellophane-wrapped bundles in compartments of the

utility bed. The bundles contained 529 pounds of marijuana, with an estimated street value of $426,000. The driver, the truck and the marijuana were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration. Also Thursday, agents assigned to the Laredo North station stopped an attempt to smuggle 83.3 pounds of marijuana past the immigration checkpoint on Interstate 35 north of Laredo. As agents conducted an immigration inspection of the driver of a Toyota pickup, a Border Patrol canine alerted toward the rear of the bed. The bundles contained marijuana with an estimated street value of $66,640. The driver, truck and marijuana were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration. To report suspicious activity such as drug and/or illegal immigrant smuggling, call the Laredo Sector Border Patrol toll-free at (800) 343-1994.

Subscribe to the Laredo Morning Times at (956) 728-2550

BY DORA MARTINEZ

COLUMN

Peggy Umphres-Moffett, a Zapatan, has done a terrific job helping the community prosper by serving as president of the Zapata Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Development Center, in which she gained recognition for her merits. Among the accolades her work has helped bring in was the naming of Zapata as one of the top 10 Micro Cities of the Future by Foreign Direct Investment magazine. That was the result of a judged competition; FDI researchers took more than six months to select the top 10 shortlists of the cities of all sizes with the best strategies and resources of economic development. As part of the selection process, nine judges received nominations from 108 cities on more than 60 criteria for business investment projects. Zapata includes a new border crossing into Mexico, major highway improvements and a strategy for growth and invest-

ment that also includes logistics, air transport, alternative energy, eco-tourism and security. Umphres-Moffett said these will be a major and significant recognition for the city of Zapata. This is the first time cities in the United States, Canada and Mexico have competed directly against one another in FDI’s Cities of the Future research. In September, local leaders hailed the arrival of a $1.5 million grant to help set up an advanced technology center in Zapata. It will not only boost educational opportunities but also spur economic development in the region. Umphres-Moffett was glad to hear Zapata will finally benefit by bringing needed Internet access to families that otherwise go without and offering noncredit courses for residents and business owners in subjects such as computer literacy. She also stated a key aspect to the stratgegic plan is securing a

satellite campus of Laredo Community College. She said that by working with Blas Castañeda, LCC chief external affairs and economic development officer, state Rep. Ryan Guillen, state Sen. Judith Zaffirini and U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar, Zapata County has been able to raise $4.5 million for the campus. She also believes in rural South Texas, where the capacity building of our workforce is the biggest challenge, the community college will start with an enrollment of 500 students, some of whom will be dual-enrolled at the local high school. One of the most important features, she said, would be an oil and gas industry training program. Peggy Umphres-Moffett is and will be the orgullo, or pride, of our city. (Dora Martinez is a native of Zapata who was publisher of Hispanic News in San Antonio for 21 years. She can be reached at thezapatatimes@att.net)

THE BLOTTER ASSAULT Sheriff’s deputies responded to the 700 block of Ramiro Avenue on Sunday in response to an assault involving a juvenile.

RECKLESS DRIVING Police charged a person(s) with reckless driving and public intoxication at about 2 a.m. Sunday near the intersection of 4th Street and Roma Avenue.

ACCIDENT INVOLVING DAMAGE TO AVEHICLE Authorities said a juvenile was detained Sunday near the intersection of Carrizo and Monterrey lanes in connection with an accident involving damage to a vehicle.

BURGLARY OFA HABITATION A complainant told police at about 9 a.m. Monday a home in the 500 block of

Lincoln Street was burglarized.

PUBLIC INTOXICATION n Sheriff’s deputies arrested a person(s) at about 8 p.m. Monday in Glenn Street on the charge of public intoxication. n Authorities responded to a Valero gas station parking lot at about 2 a.m. Tuesday and arrested a person(s) for public intoxication.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

THE ZAPATA TIMES | 11A

OBITUARIES LAZARO GARCIA

SAN YGNACIO — Lazaro Garcia, 84, passed away Oct. 31, 2008, at Laredo Medical Center in Laredo. Mr. Garcia was a World War II veteran, a former school board member and retired from the Zapata County Appraisal Department. Mr. Garcia is preceded in death by his wife, Alicia L. Garcia; son, Lazaro M. Garcia; parents, Eugenio Garcia and Librada C. Garcia; brothers, Oscar Garcia, Jose Orlando Garcia and sister, Irma Treviño. Mr. Garcia is survived by his daughters, Lilia A. Garcia and Liza G. (Rafael) Martinez; grandchildren, Gina (Steven) Payne,

Michelle (Daniel) Lerma, Antonio Arredondo Jr., Selyna Y. Martinez, Daniel R. Martinez, Rhoel E. Martinez, and D’Leeza Martinez; greatgrandchildren, Iris Garza, V.J. Payne, Carlos Lerma, and Jo’Ellie A. Martinez; sisters, Delia Treviño and Rebecca (Enrique) Lerma; and numerous nephews, nieces, and many friends. Visitation hours will be held Monday, Nov. 3, 2008, from 6 to 9 p.m. with a rosary at 7 p.m. at Rose Garden Funeral Home. A funeral Mass will be held Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008, at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Refuge Mission in San Ygnacio. Interment will follow at the Panteon del Pueblo with full Military Honors by the American Legion Post 486 Color Guard. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.rosegardenfuneralhome.com Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Rose Garden Funeral Home, Daniel A. Gonzalez, Funeral Director, 2102 U.S. Hwy. 83, Zapata.

Fishing tourney to be televised nationally LAREDO MORNING TIMES

FLW Outdoors East-West Fish Off is coming to Zapata Nov. 20-22, with tournament officials and participants expected to come to town as early as Nov. 18. The Falcon Lake tournament, part of the Wal-Mart fishing series, will be broadcast nationally on Fox Sports News as well as via an Internet Web cast. “The Zapata County Chamber of Commerce and FLW Outdoors East-West Series Fish Off are teaming up to bring one of the biggest, most popular tournaments to our very own town of Zapata,” said Jose F. “Paco” Mendoza Jr., the chamber’s executive director. Registration for the tournament will be from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 19, with a pre-tournament meeting at 6:30 p.m., at the Zapata County Community Center, 601 U.S. 83. A Texas fishing license is required for fishing in Texas waters, and a Mexi can license is required for Mexi-

can waters. The lake is off limits Nov. 3-14 and on Nov. 19 , a c c o r d i n g to t h e FLW Web site. The catch limit is five, with a size limit of 14 inches. Weigh-in will take place at Lake Falcon Park’s public ramp, a half-mile south of Veleno Bridge. Mendoza said the chamber is accepting sponsors for the event; sponsors will have the opportunity to promote their businesses on a national as well as local level. “Helping with as much as possible will ensure that your business gets the recognition it deserves,” Mendoza said. The levels of sponsorship include: platinum, $500; gold, $450; silver, $350; and bronze, $250. The chamber also is seeking local people to help out. “Volunteers are welcome to participate and take part in this exciting and entertaining event,” Mendoza said. “Help us in making this tournament a great success!” For more information, call the chamber’s office at 765-4871.

LAKEVIEW | Continued from Page 1A Canales’ retreat from Obispado, meanwhile, ended in a resounding victory for the Centralist forces. History tells that Canales and some of his men ran for distances in their retreat to get way from certain death at the hands of the enemy. History recounted his crossing the Rio Grande at Ciudad Mier, reaching the ranch of sympathizers near his home. History says that it was at this rural spot that he and key followers from Tamaulipas, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Villa de San Agustin de Laredo outlined plans for the Republic of the Rio Grande. History recorded Canales’ announcing the Republic of the Rio Grande in November 1838, and in quick order the project had endorsements from Guerrero, Santa Barbara, Burgos, Mineral de San Nicolas, Ciudad Victoria, Morelos, Laredo, Monclova, Mier and Reynosa. Laredo was designated the capital, headquartering in a citizen’s home that stands today on Zaragoza Street property occupied by La Posada Hotel. J. B. Wilkinson wrote in his book, “Laredo and the Rio Grande Frontier,” that Guerrero became “the temporary seat of government.” The decision to temporarily shift operations to Guerrero was the availability of a printing press. None was available in Laredo. Students

of history find it hard to believe that letter press in the New World appeared in Mexico shortly after Hernan Cortez conquered the Aztecs, as noted in the “Book of Knowledge” and “History of Printing.” Historian Rodolfo Gonzalez de la Garza, however, claimed the leadership of the Republic of the Rio Grande relocated to Guerrero for reasons of security. It’s not clear how long the operations stayed in Guerrero, but they eventually came back to Laredo. The first and only president was Jesus Cardenas. Named commander in chief of the army was Antonio Canales Rosillo. There were four council representatives, Juan Nepomuceno Molano for Tamaulipas, Francisco Vidaurri y Villaseñor for Coahuila, and Manuel Maria de Llano for Nuevo Leon. Elected secretary of the council was Jose Maria Jesus Carbajal. Manuel Nina was named quartermaster general. An issue of endless debate through time has been the intended boundary of the Republic of the Rio Grande. Seb Wilcox, Laredo historian who discovered and preserved the Laredo Archives, said the view depended on where people lived. The founders of the new republic claimed it this way: The previous boundaries of

the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas. Most of Texas then was part of the state of Coahuila before San Jacinto. Residents of the Republic of Texas claimed the southern boundary to be the Rio Grande. People living north of the Rio Grande insisted that the Tamaulipas northern boundary was the Nueces River, not the Rio Grande. Interestingly, after the Battle of Morales, in March 1840, the government of the Republic of Rio Grande moved operations to Victoria. That’s where it remained until the Federalists group folded, less than a year after they declared independence. Canales’ most prominent booster in Laredo was the aforementioned Don Bacilio Benavides, who was serving as alcalde of Laredo when Texans won independence at San Jacinto in 1836. Canales traveled widely throughout Texas, lobbying Anglo-Texans and MexicanTexans for support for the Republic of the Rio Grande. The Canales army included close to 140 Texans and 100 Native American volunteers (Indians). The rest were citizens of the Republic of the Rio Grande. (To reach Odie Arambula, email oarambula@stx.rr.com)

GONZALEZ | Continued from Page 1A honor to serve the district where he went to school. “I am happy that I have been given the privilege to serve my alma mater,” Gonzalez said. “And I will do it to the best of my ability.” Gonzalez added that he was a little nervous about being a board member, just because it is something he has never done before.

“It is like playing a sport: You get butterflies in your stomach till you go out there and make your first tackle,” Gonzalez said. “I will probably have butterflies in my stomach until the first couple of minutes of my first board meeting.” (Taryn White may be reached at 728-2568 or twhite@lmtonline.com)

CANCER | Continued from Page 1A would need six chemotherapy treatments followed by radiation. “He said it was not life threatening, which I thank God for that,” Cortinas said. “It was caught on time.” After getting her first few treatments of chemotherapy, Cortinas began to lose her hair. “It’s very devastating at first but then you just say you’re going to bounce back and you’re going to live through this,” Cortinas said of her initial reaction to losing her hair. “It’s just a stage you go through but it makes you stronger.” She decided she would go to the American Cancer Society for a wig and some hats and scarves. “When my husband passed away, I was introduced to their organization and we had some lung cancer support groups,” said Cortinas who is a reimbursement supervisor for Laredo Entertainment Center. “I knew about them offering support. So now that it happened to me, I stopped by for a wig.” The American Cancer Society is a national organization that provides support and resources for individuals who are fighting cancer and loved ones who may need support in the experience of the disease. There’s a

chapter in Laredo. Cortinas said she has always supported the American Cancer Society in whatever way she can, especially the Relay for Life, a major fundraiser for the organization. “I participate in it as part of the Laredo Medical Center group,” she said. “It’s an all-night thing and we gather funds for them as a group. Sooner or later everybody is struck with that, maybe not in our immediate family but somebody we know.” While her experience with cancer has just begun compared to other women who continue to fight breast cancer, she encourages them to be strong and keep the faith. The new grandmother and mother of three children said she is blessed to have a family that has supported her every step of the way. Cortinas said the American Cancer Society has “very helpful and compassionate people.” “You know that they’re always available if you need their support,” Cortinas said. For more information about the American Cancer Society, call 723-7933 or stop by the office at 9114 McPherson, Suite 2520, in Laredo. The Laredo office also serves Zapata County.

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12A | THE ZAPATA TIMES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008


The Zapata Times SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

ON THE WEB: THEZAPATATIMES.COM

Sports&Outdoors XC teams Hawks end with loss in regional 7 33 meets today By DENNIS SILVA II

The Zapata Hawks’ 2008 football season came to a close on Friday night. Hidalgo handed Zapata its fifth consecutive defeat to end the season, winning by a score of 33-7. The Hawks were outscored 172-93 in their last five games after starting the season 5-0. The Pirates improved to 6-4 overall, 4-3 in District 32-3A play. The Hawks scored their fewest points of the season en route to finishing the year 5-5 overall, 2-5 in district. David Solis got Zapata on the board first on a 6-yard run in the first quarter. It was his second touchdown of the season. But that would be all from the Hawks

By DENNIS SILVA II THE ZAPATA TIMES

The Zapata boys’ and girls’ cross country teams will be competing in San Antonio today at the regional cross country meet. At the District 32-3A meet in Hidalgo last week, the boys beat Progreso by 14 points and the girls beat La Feria by three points to earn the regional trip. The top three teams and top 10 individuals at today’s meet will advance to the state meet in Round Rock. Coach Mike Villarreal said the newly realigned district helped the Hawks achieve their goals. “We’re ready to test ourselves,” he said last week. “Being part of this new district was the best thing for our athletic program. It’s a new district where new stan-

GARCIA

SERNA

as the Pirates went on to score 33 points. Zapata had no answer for Hidalgo quarterback Steve Pedraza, who HIDALGO scored two touchdowns via the run and passed for two more. He scored on runs of 1 and 48 yards, respectively. He passed for touchdowns of 40 and eight yards. The Pirates compiled 451 yards of total offense to the Hawks’ 225. Hidalgo presented a balanced attack that Zapata had trouble defending, while the Hawks managed the majority of their offense on the ground. Zapata misses the postseason after qualifying as bi-district playoff finalists in 2007.

ZAPATA

THE ZAPATA TIMES

dards and new records must be retained to continue our Hawk pride and tradition.” The boys will be led by senior Raul Serna, who will be assisted by Keith Cobb, Juan Alavardo, Danny Garcia, Jerry Chapa, O.J. Quintanilla and Luis Olvera. The girls will be led by threetime district champ Michelle Garcia. She will be joined by Marlena Garcia, Amber Guzman, Maritza Garcia, Alba Jasso, Kristina Garcia and Gloria Jaurgeui.

‘Spaceman’ blasts way into Hall By JIMMY GOLEN ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — The Boston Red Sox shipped off Manny Ramirez this summer when they tired of the free-spirited slugger’s eccentric ways. Bill “Spaceman” Lee knows the feeling. “I think Boston kind of got fed up with Manny,” Lee said Friday night before he was inducted into the team’s Hall of Fame. “A prophet in his own time is not well-received in this town.” Lee was honored by the franchise that sent him away, along with 1995 AL MVP Mo Vaughn and Mike Greenwell.

Other inductees Also inducted were pitchers Wes Ferrell and Frank Sullivan, infielder Everett Scott, scout George Digby and executive Ed Kenney Sr. The team also recognized two memorable moments: Ted Williams’ homer in his last at-bat, and Curt Schilling’s bloody sock outing in Game 6 of the 2004 AL championship series. Schilling’s performance helped end an 86-year title drought, bringing to Boston the World Series title that eluded Vaughn, Greenwell and genera-

Photo by L.M. Otero | AP

Texas Rangers escort Texas football coach Mack Brown, bottom left, through a throng of students on the field after Texas Tech upset No. 1 Texas 39-33 in an NCAA college football game in Lubbock last Saturday. The now-No. 5 Horns (8-1) play Baylor (3-6) today.

LEAVING THE FIELD IN DEFEAT By JIM VERTUNO ASSOCIATED PRESS

BILL‘SPACEMAN’ LEE tions of other Red Sox players. “I wish I played here when these guys were here,” said Vaughn, who had his own issues with the previous Red Sox ownership. “They’re doing it the right way. It’s fun to be on the side where we’re making the right decisions and it’s working out. When I was playing, it was always the Yankees or someone else.” Lee came close to ending the drought in 1975, nursing a 3-0 lead over Cincinnati in the sixth inning of the seventh game of the

USTIN — A week ago, Texas coach Mack Brown said style points don’t count. They do now. After losing at No. 2 Texas Tech and falling from No. 1 to No. 5, Brown’s Longhorns now are left watching how the round-robin in the Big 12 South plays out and whether they will still have a shot at the Big 12 and national titles.

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Final three games They also have to take care of their own business the final three games, starting Saturday with Baylor (3-6, 1-4).

Style points count because the Longhorns (8-1, 4-1) not only need to win, they need to do it in convincing fashion so the pollsters in the complicated Bowl Championship Series system like what they see. Texas is still the highest-ranked team with one loss in the BCS standings.

Panning out “There are a lot of games still left to be played, and a lot of things are going to pan out,” Texas quarterback Colt McCoy said. “If we put ourselves in the position we need to be, and we win the rest of our games, we’ll be fine.” Will they? If the Big 12 South comes down to a three-way tie, BCS standings are part of the tie-breaking formula. Any little

edge will count and the next three weeks promise to be a circus of calculating wins, rankings, strength of schedules, etc. Anybody watching Texas’ schedule over the last month certainly looked at Baylor as the breather after four straight games against ranked opponents. Then the Bears nearly upset No. 13 Missouri last weekend, losing 31-28 on a field goal late in the fourth quarter.

Beating Texas “Anybody who saw that game,” Texas center Chris Hall said, “knows the ‘gimme’ part of this week went right out the window.”

See TEXAS | PAGE 2B

See LEE | PAGE 2B

Cellar dwellers? Pick a reason or two

CHAMPIONS

By JAIME ARON ASSOCIATED PRESS

Courtesy photo

The Zapata Middle School Lady Merlins eighth-grade “A”team beat the Progresso Red Ants on Oct. 27 to become co-district champions. In the bottom row, left to right, are Krinsina De Ldon,Adnrea Vasquez,Janette Campos and AbbyAguilar.In the top row,left to right, are Jeana Jasso, Liana Flores, Coach Ana Villarreal and Alyssa Jo Gutierrez.

IRVING — Jerry Jones was so sure this was going to be a memorable season for the Dallas Cowboys that he invited HBO’s cameras to training camp. Might as well capture every moment. Jones had every reason to be optimistic. The Cowboys were coming off a 13-win season and returned every significant player, most locked up for years with gaudy contracts. He also salted the roster with more talent, two first-round picks and a gamble that Adam “Pacman” Jones would be on his best behavior. With a $1.1 billion stadium rising and big-time events lining up for dates to play there, Jones’ 20th season in charge seemed certain to be a success in every way. So, why isn’t it? Why are the Cowboys a mediocre 5-4 and spending their

When a home loss to Washington followed, Dallas might have benefited from an earsplitting, accountabilitydemanding rant. bye weekend holding down last place in the NFC East? Why are they gathering up what’s left of their optimism and essentially putting it all on next Sunday’s game at Washington? Theories are plentiful, so take your pick. It’s probably the combined weight of several factors that’s dragged Dallas from Super Bowl favorite to wild-card hopeful to ... well, there’s no telling how things might wind up. Especially if quarterback Tony Romo’s return from a broken finger isn’t the big fix the Cowboys are counting on.

Blame it on wade Coach Wade Phillips’ soft touch was exactly what this team needed after four years of Bill Parcells. Now it might be part of the problem. This theory dates to January, when Phillips built in enough free time around the first-round playoff bye for Romo and some guys to visit Mexico. The trip became even more memorable when Dallas lost to the New York Giants. Phillips could’ve then sent the team into the offseason with a scolding, noting they had 13 Pro

Bowlers and couldn’t win a single playoff game. Instead, he essentially wished them a good trip to Hawaii with a day-after review of “I certainly feel like the best team lost the game.” The same back-patting tone came through in August, when HBO filmed Phillips praising his team for winning the last-ever preseason game at Texas Stadium — as if that’s a feat for a team with legitimate championship aspirations. All seemed well when the Cowboys started 3-0, convincingly winning at Cleveland, beating Philadelphia in a shootout, then winning at Green Bay. When a home loss to Washington followed, Dallas might have benefited from an earsplitting, accountability-demanding rant. The club certainly was ripe for a ripping a week later when it was fortunate to beat lowly

See COWBOYS | PAGE 2B


Zscores CHL NORTHERN CONFERENCE Northeast Division W LOTL Pts GF GA Oklahoma City 6 0 2 14 27 14 Bossier-Shreveport5 1 0 10 30 12 Mississippi 3 4 0 6 20 26 Tulsa 1 3 1 3 12 30 Northwest Division W LOTL Pts GF GA Colorado 8 1 0 16 41 29 Rapid City 2 1 4 8 30 27 Wichita 3 5 0 6 23 30 Rocky Mountain 1 6 0 2 15 35 SOUTHERN CONFERENCE Southeast Division W LOTL Pts GF GA Rio Grande Valley5 0 0 10 21 9 Laredo 5 4 0 10 29 25 Texas 4 1 1 9 22 17 Corpus Christi 2 5 0 4 28 29 Southwest Division W LOTL Pts GF GA Odessa 5 2 1 11 37 20 New Mexico 3 4 1 7 34 38 Arizona 3 5 0 6 25 32 Amarillo 2 6 0 4 17 38 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for loss in overtime or shootout. Overtime or shootout losses are only denoted in the OTL column, not the loss column. Thursday’s Game Odessa 5, Laredo 2 Friday’s Games Rapid City at Amarillo Tulsa at Bossier-Shreveport Rocky Mountain at Mississippi New Mexico at Wichita Texas at Oklahoma City Odessa at Rio Grande Valley Corpus Christi at Arizona Saturday’s Games Rocky Mountain at Bossier-Shreveport Odessa at Texas Mississippi at Wichita New Mexico at Oklahoma City Rio Grande Valley at Laredo Amarillo at Tulsa Corpus Christi at Arizona Rapid City at Colorado Sunday’s Game Bossier-Shreveport at Texas

NFL All Times EST AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 5 3 0 .625 168 150 N.Y. Jets 5 3 0 .625 208 187 Buffalo 5 3 0 .625 182 169 Miami 4 4 0 .500 171 163 South W L T Pct PF PA Tennessee 8 0 0 1.000 199 103 Indianapolis 4 4 0 .500 167 177 Jacksonville 3 5 0 .375 160 172 Houston 3 5 0 .375 196 213 North W L T Pct PF PA Pittsburgh 6 2 0 .750 178 116 Baltimore 5 3 0 .625 171 137 Cleveland 3 6 0 .333 172 194 Cincinnati 1 8 0 .111 125 236 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 5 4 0 .556 224 251 San Diego 3 5 0 .375 224 199 Oakland 2 6 0 .250 107 201 Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 126 223 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants 7 1 0 .875 226 129 Washington 6 3 0 .667 171 168 Philadelphia 5 3 0 .625 220 144 Dallas 5 4 0 .556 216 219 South W L T Pct PF PA Carolina 6 2 0 .750 174 127 Tampa Bay 6 3 0 .667 200 147 Atlanta 5 3 0 .625 177 154 New Orleans 4 4 0 .500 216 195 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 5 3 0 .625 223 173 Green Bay 4 4 0 .500 210 178 Minnesota 4 4 0 .500 182 188 Detroit 0 8 0 .000 137 239 West W L T Pct PF PA Arizona 5 3 0 .625 234 184 Seattle 2 6 0 .250 151 210 San Francisco 2 6 0 .250 171 230 St. Louis 2 6 0 .250 125 235 Sunday’s Games Seattle at Miami, 1 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Chicago, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Detroit, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m. Carolina at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:15 p.m.

Open: Cincinnati, Dallas, Washington, Tampa Bay Monday’s Game San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13 N.Y. Jets at New England, 8:15 p.m.

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Boston 4 1 .800 — Toronto 3 1 .750 ½ New York 2 2 .500 1½ New Jersey 1 2 .333 2 Philadelphia 2 4 .333 2½ Southeast W L Pct GB Atlanta 3 0 1.000 — Orlando 3 2 .600 1 Miami 2 2 .500 1½ Charlotte 1 3 .250 2½ Washington 0 3 .000 3 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 4 0 1.000 — Cleveland 3 2 .600 1½ Milwaukee 3 2 .600 1½ Chicago 2 3 .400 2½ Indiana 1 2 .333 2½ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB Houston 3 1 .750 — New Orleans 3 1 .750 — Dallas 2 2 .500 1 Memphis 2 3 .400 1½ San Antonio 1 3 .250 2 Northwest W L Pct GB Utah 4 0 1.000 — Denver 1 3 .250 3 Minnesota 1 3 .250 3 Oklahoma City 1 3 .250 3 Portland 1 3 .250 3 Pacific W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 4 0 1.000 — Phoenix 4 1 .800 ½ Golden State 2 3 .400 2½ Sacramento 1 4 .200 3½ L.A. Clippers 0 5 .000 4½ Friday’s Games New York at Washington, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Washington at Orlando, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Indiana, 7 p.m. Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Toronto at Charlotte, 1 p.m. Utah at New York, 3 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 8 p.m. Golden State at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

NHL All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers 11 4 1 23 44 34 New Jersey 7 3 2 16 35 30 Pittsburgh 7 4 2 16 37 33 Philadelphia 4 5 3 11 44 45 N.Y. Islanders 4 8 1 9 34 45 Northeast Division W L OT Pts GF GA Buffalo 8 2 2 18 38 25 Montreal 8 1 1 17 37 24 Boston 7 3 3 17 39 33 Ottawa 6 5 2 14 37 33 Toronto 5 5 4 14 41 51 Southeast Division W L OT Pts GF GA Carolina 7 4 2 16 39 39 Washington 6 4 2 14 36 38 Tampa Bay 4 4 4 12 27 33 Atlanta 4 7 2 10 35 49 Florida 4 6 1 9 25 35 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 8 2 2 18 44 39 Chicago 6 3 3 15 42 34 Nashville 6 5 1 13 38 42 Columbus 5 6 2 12 39 45 St. Louis 5 6 0 10 34 35 Northwest Division W L OT Pts GF GA Minnesota 7 3 1 15 30 25

SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 8,2008

Calgary Vancouver Edmonton Colorado

7 5 1 15 38 38 7 6 0 14 45 38 6 6 1 13 34 41 5 7 0 10 37 42 Pacific Division W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 11 2 0 22 45 29 Anaheim 9 5 1 19 49 46 Phoenix 5 5 0 10 25 28 Dallas 4 6 2 10 35 50 Los Angeles 3 6 2 8 27 31 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss or shootout loss. Friday’s Games Ottawa at Carolina, 7 p.m. Montreal at Columbus, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Detroit, 7 p.m. Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m. Montreal at Toronto, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Florida at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m. Dallas at San Jose, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m. St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Atlanta at Carolina, 3 p.m. Calgary at Chicago, 7 p.m. Edmonton at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Florida at Anaheim, 8 p.m. San Jose at Phoenix, 8 p.m.

NCAA Football Top 25 No. 1 Alabama at No. 15 LSU, 3:30 p.m. No. 2 Texas Tech vs. No. 8 Oklahoma State, 8 p.m. No. 3 Penn State at Iowa, 3:30 p.m. No. 4 Florida at Vanderbilt, 8 p.m. No. 5 Texas vs. Baylor, Noon No. 6 Oklahoma at Texas A&M, 3:30 p.m. No. 7 Southern Cal vs. No. 21 California, 8 p.m. No. 8 Oklahoma State vs. No. 2 Texas Tech, 8 p.m. No. 9 Boise State vs. Utah State, 2 p.m. No. 10 Utah (10-0) beat No. 11 TCU 13-10 Thursday. Next: At San Diego State, Nov. 15. No. 11 TCU (9-2) lost to No. 10 Utah 13-10 Thursday. Next: vs. Air Force, Nov. 22. No. 12 Ohio State at Northwestern, Noon No. 13 Missouri vs. Kansas State, 7 p.m. No. 14 Georgia at Kentucky, 12:30 p.m. No. 15 LSU vs. No. 1 Alabama, 3:30 p.m. No. 16 Ball State (9-0) beat Northern Illinois 45-14 Wednesday. Next: at Miami (Ohio), Tuesday, Nov. 11. No. 17 BYU vs. San Diego State, 2 p.m. No. 18 Michigan State vs. Purdue, Noon No. 19 North Carolina vs. No. 22 Georgia Tech, Noon No. 20 West Virginia vs. Cincinnati, 7 p.m. No. 21 California vs. No. 7 Southern Cal, 8 p.m. No. 22 Georgia Tech vs. No. 19 North Carolina, Noon No. 23 Maryland (6-3) lost to Virginia Tech 2313 Thursday. Next: vs. No. 19 North Carolina, Saturday, Nov. 15. No. 24 Florida State vs. Clemson, 3:30 p.m. No. 25 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville, Noon Monday’s Scores SOUTHWEST Valdosta St. 38, S. Arkansas 16 Tuesday’s Scores EAST Buffalo 37, Miami (Ohio) 17 Wednesday’s Scores MIDWEST Akron 47, Toledo 30 Ball St. 45, N. Illinois 14 Thursday’s Scores SOUTH S. Car. St. 56, Howard 0 Virginia Tech 23, Maryland 13 FAR WEST Utah 13, TCU 10 Schedule (Subject to change) Friday, Nov. 7 EAST Penn (4-3) at Princeton (3-4), 7 p.m. FAR WEST Nevada (4-4) at Fresno St. (5-3), 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8 EAST St. Francis (0-8) at Cent. Conn. St. (5-4), Noon Towson (3-6) at Delaware (3-6), Noon Columbia (1-6) at Harvard (6-1), Noon Maine (6-3) at Massachusetts (6-3), Noon Louisville (5-3) at Pittsburgh (6-2), Noon Syracuse (2-6) at Rutgers (3-5), Noon Yale (4-3) at Brown (5-2), 12:30 p.m. Marist (3-6) at Georgetown (1-7), 12:30 p.m. Fordham (4-4) at Holy Cross (5-3), 12:30 p.m. Colgate (7-2) at Lehigh (3-5), 12:30 p.m. Lafayette (6-2) at Bucknell (4-4), 1 p.m. Dartmouth (0-7) at Cornell (3-4), 1 p.m. Richmond (6-3) at Hofstra (3-6), 1 p.m. Stony Brook (3-6) at Iona (3-6), 1 p.m. Sacred Heart (8-1) at Monmouth (5-4), 1 p.m.

Albany (6-3) at Robert Morris (4-5), 1 p.m. Duquesne (2-6) at Wagner (3-6), 1 p.m. N.H. (7-1) at Villanova (6-2), 3:30 p.m. Cincinnati (6-2) at West Va. (6-2), 7 p.m. Notre Dame (5-3) at Boston College (5-3), 8 p.m. SOUTH Samford (4-4) at Ga. Southern (5-4), Noon Georgia Tech (7-2) at N. Car. (6-2), Noon Georgia (7-2) at Kentucky (6-3), 12:30 p.m. San Diego (6-2) at Davidson (3-5), 1 p.m. Winston-Salem (2-6) at Del. St. (3-5), 1 p.m. Morgan St. (6-3) at Norfolk St. (3-6), 1 p.m. Arkansas (4-5) at South Carolina (6-3), 1 p.m. Wyoming (3-6) at Tennessee (3-6), 1 p.m. Presbyterian (4-5) at Charleston South. (45), 1:30 p.m. W. Carolina (3-7) at Elon (7-2), 1:30 p.m. Fla. A&M (6-3) at N. Car. A&T (3-7), 1:30 p.m. Liberty (7-2) at VMI (3-5), 1:30 p.m. Prairie View (7-1) at Alabama A&M (4-5), 2 p.m. Jackson St. (4-4) at Alabama St. (2-6), 2 p.m. App. St. (7-2) at Chattanooga (1-8), 2 p.m. Bethune-Cookman (6-2) at Hampton (5-3), 2 p.m. SE Missouri (3-6) at Murray St. (3-6), 2 p.m. Sam Houston St. (3-4) at Nicholls St. (2-4), 2 p.m. E. Illinois (4-5) at Tennessee St. (7-2), 2 p.m. Tenn.-Martin (7-2) at Auburn (4-5), 2:30 p.m. Jacksonville St. (6-3) at Tenn. Tech (3-7), 2:30 p.m. Texas St. (4-4) at SE Louisiana (4-5), 3 p.m. The Citadel (3-6) at Wofford (6-2), 3 p.m. N.C. State (2-6) at Duke (4-4), 3:30 p.m. Marshall (4-4) at East Carolina (4-3), 3:30 p.m. Clemson (4-4) at Florida St. (6-2), 3:30 p.m. Coastal Car. (4-5) at Gardner-Webb (5-4), 3:30 p.m. Alabama (9-0) at LSU (6-2), 3:30 p.m. La.-Monroe (3-6) at Middle Tenn. (2-6), 3:30 p.m. W. Kentucky (2-7) at Troy (5-3), 3:30 p.m. Southern Miss. (3-6) at UCF (2-5), 3:30 p.m. Virginia (5-4) at Wake Forest (5-3), 3:30 p.m. North Texas (1-8) at Florida Atlantic (3-5), 4 p.m. Savannah St. (3-4) at Edward Waters (27), 5 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-8) vs. Grambling St. (72), 5 p.m. Ark. St. (4-4) at Fla. International (3-5), 7 p.m. UTEP (3-5) at Louisiana-Lafayette (5-3), 7 p.m. Northeastern (2-7) at William & Mary (62), 7 p.m. Stephen F.Austin (4-5) at McNeese St. (53), 8 p.m. Florida (7-1) at Vanderbilt (5-3), 8 p.m. MIDWEST Wisconsin (4-5) at Indiana (3-6), Noon Purdue (3-6) at Michigan St. (8-2), Noon Michigan (2-7) at Minnesota (7-2), Noon Ohio St. (7-2) at Northwestern (7-2), Noon Illinois (5-4) vs. W. Michigan (7-2), Noon Dayton (8-1) at Butler (6-2), 1 p.m. Indiana St. (0-9) at Youngstown St. (2-8), 1 p.m. Morehead St. (3-5) at Drake (4-4), 2 p.m. Bowling Green (4-5) at Ohio (2-7), 2 p.m. Illinois St. (3-5) at S. Dakota St. (5-4), 2 p.m. Jacksonville (5-3) at Valparaiso (2-6), 2 p.m. Kansas (6-3) at Nebraska (5-4), 2:30 p.m. W. Illinois (5-3) at S. Illinois (6-2), 3 p.m. S. Oregon (3-5) at South Dakota (4-4), 3 p.m. Penn St. (9-0) at Iowa (5-4), 3:30 p.m. Missouri St. (3-5) at N. Iowa (7-2), 5:05 p.m. Kansas St. (4-5) at Missouri (7-2), 7 p.m. S. Utah (3-5) at North Dakota (5-3), 8 p.m. SOUTHWEST Baylor (3-6) at Texas (8-1), Noon Army (3-6) at Rice (6-3), 3 p.m. Memphis (4-5) at SMU (1-8), 3 p.m. MVSU (2-6) at Texas Southern (2-5), 3 p.m. Oklahoma (8-1) at Texas A&M (4-5), 3:30 p.m. Northwestern St. (6-3) at Cent. Ark. (7-2), 5 p.m. Tulane (2-6) at Houston (4-4), 8 p.m. Oklahoma St. (8-1) at Texas Tech (9-0), 8 p.m. FAR WEST Iowa St. (2-7) at Colorado (4-5), 12:30 p.m. San Diego St. (1-8) at BYU (8-1), 2 p.m. Utah St. (2-7) at Boise St. (8-0), 2 p.m. E. Wash. (3-5) at N. Colorado (1-7), 2:05 p.m. Stanford (5-4) at Oregon (6-3), 3:30 p.m. Weber St. (8-2) at Idaho St. (0-9), 3:35 p.m. Hawaii (4-5) at New Mexico St. (3-5), 4 p.m. Montana (8-1) at Portland St. (3-5), 4:05 p.m.

Sacramento St. (4-5) at UC Davis (5-4), 5 p.m. Arizona (5-3) at Washington St. (1-8), 5 p.m. Montana St. (5-4) at N. Arizona (6-3), 5:05 p.m. Colorado St. (4-5) at Air Force (7-2), 6 p.m. Oregon St. (5-3) at UCLA (3-5), 6 p.m. Arizona St. (2-6) at Washington (0-8), 7 p.m. N.C. Central (2-6) at Cal Poly (6-1), 7:05 p.m. Louisiana Tech (4-4) at San Jose St. (6-3), 8 p.m. California (6-2) at Southern Cal (7-1), 8 p.m. New Mexico (4-6) at UNLV (3-6), 10 p.m.

NCAA Men’s Basketball Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ preseason college basketball poll, with first place votes in parentheses, 2007 - 08 records, total points based on 25 points for a first place vote through one point for a 25th - place vote and last year’s final ranking: W - L Pts Pvs 1. North Carolina (72) 36 - 3 1,800 1 2. Connecticut 24 - 9 1,661 16 3. Louisville 27 - 9 1,638 13 4. UCLA 35 - 4 1,487 3 5. Pittsburgh 27 - 10 1,319 17 6. Michigan St. 27 - 9 1,311 18 7. Texas 31 - 7 1,259 7 8. Duke 28 - 6 1,250 9 9. Notre Dame 25 - 8 1,243 15 10. Gonzaga 25 - 8 1,162 24 11. Purdue 25 - 9 1,099 20 12. Oklahoma 23 - 12 987 — 13. Memphis 38 - 2 977 2 14. Tennessee 31 - 5 920 5 15. Arizona St. 21 - 13 645 — 16. Marquette 25 - 10 592 25 17. Miami 23 - 11 570 — 18. Southern Cal 21 - 12 414 — 19. Florida 24 - 12 403 — 20. Davidson 29 - 7 347 23 21. Wake Forest 17 - 13 312 — 22. Georgetown 28 - 6 311 8 23. Villanova 22 - 13 256 — 24. Kansas 37 - 3 233 4 25. Wisconsin 31 - 5 196 6 Others receiving votes: Xavier 154, UNLV 143, Baylor 128, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 112, Syracuse 83, Kentucky 75, Ohio St. 64, LSU 31, Texas A&M 30, Washington 19, West Virginia 17, Alabama 16, BYU 16, Virginia Tech 16, Siena 13, Arizona 11, Clemson 11, Vanderbilt 11, Washington St. 11, Temple 10, Va. Commonwealth 8, Butler 7, Creighton 7, New Mexico 3, Cleveland St. 2, Stanford 2, UAB 2, American U. 1, CS Northridge 1, Drake 1, Miami (Ohio) 1, Saint Joseph’s 1, San Diego 1.

Golf PGA-Children’s Miracle Network Classic Friday’s Par Scores At Walt Disney Resort Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Purse: $4.6 million Magnolia Course, 7,516 par 72 (36-36) Palm Course, 7,010 par 72 (36-36) Second Round Scott Verplank 64-64-128 -16 Steve Marino 65-66-131 -13 Troy Matteson 63-68-131 -13 Robert Gamez 65-67-132 -12 Tag Ridings 66-66-132 -12 Robert Garrigus 65-67-132 -12 Ken Duke 66-67-133 -11 Jason Gore 66-67-133 -11 Kevin Streelman 64-69-133 -11 Tom Pernice, Jr. 66-67-133 -11 Bob Estes 70-63-133 -11 Scott Sterling 70-63-133 -11 Matt Jones 70-64-134 -10 Martin Laird 68-66-134 -10 Bo Van Pelt 68-66-134 -10 Tommy Gainey 68-66-134 -10 Tim Petrovic 67-67-134 -10 Tim Wilkinson 68-66-134 -10 Jeff Overton 67-68-135 -9 Kirk Triplett 65-70-135 -9

MLS Playoff Glance All Times EST Conference Semifinals (Two-leg Aggregate Score Series) All Times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE Columbus vs. Kansas City Saturday, Nov. 1: Columbus 1, Kansas City 1, tie, series tied 1-1 Saturday, Nov. 8: Kansas City at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Chicago vs. New England Thursday, Oct. 30: Chicago 0, New England 0, tie, series tied 0-0 Thursday, Nov. 6: New England at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Houston vs. New York Saturday, Nov. 1: Houston 1, New York 1, tie, series tied 1-1 Sunday, Nov. 9: New York at Houston, 3

p.m. CD Chivas USA vs. Real Salt Lake Saturday, Nov. 1: Real Salt Lake 1, CD Chivas USA 0, Real Salt Lake leads series 10 Saturday, Nov. 8: Real Salt Lake at CD Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m.. Conference Championship EASTERN CONFERENCE TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE TBA MLS Cup At Carson, Calif. Sunday, Nov. 23: Eastern Conference vs. Western Conference, 3:30 p.m.

Transactions BASEBALL American League TEXAS RANGERS—Exercised their 2009 option on INF Hank Blalock. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Named Dominic Chiti special assistant to the general manager. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with RHP LaTroy Hawkins on a one-year contract and RHP Chia-Jen Lo on a minor league contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Named Bill Castro pitching coach. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Named Benny Looper assistant general manager, player personnel; Chuck LaMar assistant general manager, player development and scouting; and Mike Ondo pro scouting coordinator. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Named Perry Hill first base coach. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Exercised their 2009 option on OF Brian Giles. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS—Purchased INF Hector Bernal from Yuma (GBL). Released RHP Chris Thompson. PENSACOLA PELICANS—Exercised their 2009 option on INF Osmany Masso. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS—Traded OF Chad Gabriel to Reno (GBL) to complete an Aug. 13 trade. WICHITA WINGNUTS—Signed INF Michael Thompson. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS—Named Gary Carter manager. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Fired assistant general manager Pete D’Alessandro. Named assistant coach Larry Riley assistant general manager. NEW YORK KNICKS—Named Allan Houston assistant to the president for basketball operations. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined N.Y. Giants DE Justin Tuck $7,500 for his hit on Dallas QB Brooks Bollinger in a game on Nov. 2. Fined Jacksonville DT John Henderson and Cincinnati G Andrew Whitworth $10,000 each for fighting and Henderson an additional $5,000 for illegal hands to the face in their game on Nov. 2. Fined Pittsburgh LB LaMarr Woodley $10,000 for slamming Washington QB Jason Campbell to the ground in a game on Nov. 3. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed G Matt McChesney from the practice squad. Waived G Evan Mathis. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Agreed to terms with CB DeAngelo Hall. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Placed C Brandon Sutter on injured reserve. Recalled F Michael Ryan from Albany (AHL). COLORADO AVALANCHE—Recalled F David Jones from Lake Erie (AHL). DALLAS STARS—Activated D Sergei Zubov from injured reserve. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS—Assigned F Boyd Kane and F Nate Raduns to Philadelphia (AHL). Traded D Steve Eminger, RW Steve Downie and Tampa Bay’s 2009 fourthround draft pick to Tampa Bay for D Matt Carle and San Jose’s 2009 third-round draft pick. SAN JOSE SHARKS—Assigned LW Jamie McGinn to Worcester (AHL). Recalled G Thomas Greiss and LW Brad Staubitz from Worcester. COLLEGE JUNIATA—Announced the resignation of football coach Darrell Alt, effective Nov. 10. SUSQUEHANNA—Named Katie Botkins assistant softball coach. TOWSON—Suspended men’s basketball senior F Tony Durant from the season opener, senior F Junior Hairston for the first three games of the season and freshman F Rick Brown for the first five games of the season for violation of team rules. WEST TEXAS A&M—Announced the resignation of quarterbacks coach and men’s golf coach Ryan Leaf. Named Jimmy Jameson men’s interim golf coach.

TEXAS | Continued from Page 1B Baylor hasn’t beaten Texas since 1997 and really hasn’t even been competitive. But even though they are one loss away from their 13th consecutive losing season, the Bears seem to have found new energy behind first-year coach Art Briles and freshman quarterback Robert Griffin. “If you don’t believe in yourself, no one else will. And right now, we are fighting for ourselves and trying to make other people believe in us as a football team,” Briles said. Brown sees a bit of Vince Young in Griffin. Not necessarily as a player

who could lead Baylor all the way to a national championship, but one who can inspire his teammates and befuddle opponents with big plays and razzle-dazzle on the field. “What he does for them is what Vince did for us as a freshman (in 2003),” Brown said. “Baylor has become a legitimate factor in this league with one guy at quarterback. ... He’s changed the face of their program.” Griffin has passed for 11 touchdowns and didn’t throw his first interception until last week against Missouri. He set a major college record for

most passes at the start of a career (209) without an interception. “They are a different Baylor team and they are way better,” Texas defensive tackle Lamarr Houston said. “They are a lot tougher than they used to be.” But how tough is Texas? The Longhorns looked like the toughest and best team in the country as they fought for wins over Oklahoma and Oklahoma State and romped over Missouri. Texas now has a loss and two of its best players and leaders, defensive end Brian Orakpo (knee) and receiver

ON THE WEB: THEZAPATATIMES.COM

2B

SPORT SHORTS Donations welcomed to help LBJ’s Luis Godines Laredo LBJ junior varsity football player Luis Godines is still in a San Antonio hospital in intensive care after suffering a head injury in a game last Wednesday. A Compass (former LNB) bank account has been opened under Luis Jesus Godines. Funds are greatly appreciated to help pay for the medical expenses, any amount helps. To make a contribution, contact the bank at 7231151. The account number is 2014208047. For more information contact coach Oscar Villaseñor at 473-5117.

29th annual Guajolote 10K Run Registration for the 29th annual Guajolote 10K Run is being held now through Thanksgiving morning. This year’s race will take place on Thanksgiving day, Thursday, Nov. 27, at 9 a.m. in front of Hamilton Trophies. If you have any questions, please call Hamilton Trophies at (956) 724-9990 or (956) 7229463 or come by 1320 Garden. Registration will also be taking place at Hamilton Jewelry at 607 Flores or call them at (956) 722-9015.

Third annual A.L.S.5K run The thirrd annual A.L.S. 5K run will be today at 8 a.m. Registration will be 7-8 a.m. at TAMIU in front of Killam Library. It will benefit the A.L.S Association. Donation is $10. There are divisions ranging from 14 and under, to 60 and over.

Baseball camp The City of Laredo invites all to a baseball camp that will be for everybody ages five to 20. It will be held today from 9:30 a.m. to noon at Veterans Field. For more information, contact 754-4689.

Nixon Girls’Soccer Steak Plate Sale The Nixon Girls’ Soccer Booster Club will be holding a steak plate sale today at the Nixon Annex from 11 a.m. through 2 p.m.. Plates will be $5.

American L.L.Minor Tournament American Little League will sponsor a minor (910 years old) tournament through Sunday. Entry fee is $150 per team. All leagues are invited. For more information, contact league president Rudy Valdez at 251-5668, vice president Ricky Esqueda at 645-5134 or Cesar Saucedo at 286-9050.

N.W.L.L recruiting volunteer coaches Northwest Little League is currently signing up volunteer coaches for the upcoming 2009 season. Any one interested in coaching or for more information please call 771-9231.

T.L.L.District 34 League Presidents’meeting Quan Cosby (back) will likely be game-time decisions whether they’ll play against Baylor. McCoy who had part of the inside of his upper lip ripped open against Texas Tech, said the Longhorns should be ready to play the rest of the schedule while keeping an eye on who else is winning and losing in the Big 12 South. “We’ve played a ridiculously hard schedule,” McCoy said. “Our goals are still there. The only thing we can control now are ourselves and winning out. That starts this week.”

Texas Little League District 34 League Presidents will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 11 at San Martin de Porres Church’s CCD Education Center Room #3 at 7 p.m. Several important items will be discussed.

12-and-under Future Majors Youth Gobbler Tournament The tournament will be held Nov. 13-15 at Al King Field. Fee is $175. For more information, contact 333-5959.

NW Little League baseball camp

COWBOYS | Continued from Page 1B Cincinnati at home. Instead, Phillips praised his guys for being “the best walkthrough team I’ve ever been around.” Any surprise that a sloppy, turnover-filled loss at Arizona came next? Romo got hurt late in that game and Dallas is 1-2 since. But the Cowboys also were in a 1-2 slide when he was healthy.

Blame it on wades defense The self-proclaimed “Mr. Fix-it” might need a new blueprint. The Phillips 3-4 he installed last season produced pressure up front and some timely turnovers, items that tend to go hand-in-hand. This season, despite DeMarcus Ware’s 10 sacks, the Cowboys haven’t

consistently pressured quarterbacks. Lately, they’ve tried so hard to get a head start that they keep getting flagged for jumping offside, turning third-and-long into third-and-short, or sometimes into first downs. Turnovers? Dallas had zero interceptions the first four games and zero by cornerbacks the first eight games. The Cowboys have allowed at least 30 points four times after doing so twice last year. Two of those scorefests came in games Romo missed, which is when they really needed the defense to step up. Absences can only be a slight excuse. Safety Roy Williams played only a few games, but some would say that’s a good thing. Cornerback Terence Newman has hardly played, too, but Pacman filled in for much of Newman’s absence. Since he’s been booted, Dallas turned to first-round pick Mike

LEE World Series before Red Sox second baseman Denny Doyle threw away a double play relay and Tony Perez followed with a two-run homer. The Reds won 4-3, and Boston’s championship quest continued. “If they had turned that double play in ‘75, I would have been mayor,” Lee said. And if that happened, he riffed, he would have banned cars from the city, making parking lots unnecessary, depriving Boston real estate developer Frank McCourt of the money he used to buy the Los Angeles Dodgers and

Jenkins and mid-rounder Orlando Scandrick, both considered an upgrade from the veteran backups used last season. Losing linebacker Anthony Spencer for several weeks meant more playing time for Greg Ellis, but he seemed to be doing fine. “We’re trying to do the best that we can to win,” Phillips said. “Part of that is analyzing what needs to be done, and part of it is getting the players to do it.” It’s worth noting that the defense kept Tampa Bay without a touchdown in the lone Romo-less victory. That tide-stemming win may have saved Phillips’ job.

What happened to the boywonder? Then again, who would Jones have put in charge? Jason Garrett, the of-

fensive coordinator and presumed coach-in-waiting, hasn’t exactly earned a promotion. While many of the offensive problems can be traced to a shaky line, the NFL’s highest-paid assistant either hasn’t brought out the Cowboys’ best or hasn’t masked their weaknesses. The most glaring detail is Terrell Owens going nine weeks without a single 100-yard game. He had exactly 100 yards over the three games Romo missed. “I know I am a playmaker,” T.O. said. “I’ve always been that and I still consider myself that. I think it shows when I get my hands on the ball, things happen. We have to get back to some of those things.” Jones traded for Roy Williams to try freeing T.O. from double coverage. Williams hasn’t been much of a difference maker yet, but that should change once Romo returns.

I ever saw.” Ramirez, who was traded to Los Angeles in a deal that brought Jason Bay to the Red Sox, batted .396 with 17 homers and 53 RBIs in 53 games with the Dodgers. They beat the Cubs in the first round of the playoffs but lost to eventual World Series champion Philadelphia; Boston beat the Los Angeles Angels in the first round before losing to the Tampa Bay Rays for the AL pennant. “I’m not saying anything bad about Jason Bay or Canadians, because I married two of them, but there’s no

Border Olympics plate sale The Border Olympics has a plate sale fundraiser on Saturday, Nov. 15, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Civic Center parking lot. Donation is $5 for a plate with sliced brisket, sausage, rice and beans. Goyo Lopez is the Border Olympics president. The Border Olympics board will meet at 2 p.m. on Saturday after the plate sale.

Amigos Billiard League The league is sponsoring a benefit pool tournament for Roger Riojas. The tournament will be on Nov. 15 at Hal’s Landing at 2 p.m. It will be $25 per person. First through fourth place winners will get a trophy with t-shirts. For more information, contact Jaime Gonzalez at 235-7508 or Arturo Banda at 771-5323.

Hands Across South Texas Thanksgiving 10K

| Continued from Page 1B

acquire Ramirez from the Red Sox. The World Series MVP in 2004 who helped the team win it all again in ‘07, Ramirez had worn out his welcome by take time off with mysterious ailments and shoving the team’s 64year-old traveling secretary in the clubhouse. “You pick up the traveling secretary and you dust him off,” said Lee, who was traded to the Montreal Expos after he fell out of favor with Red Sox manager Don Zimmer. “You’re going to see his (Ramirez’s) number on the wall sooner or later. He’s the greatest

Northwest Little League will be hosting a baseball camp for kids ages 5-12 years old on Nov. 15 at Father McNaboe Park from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The camp will consist of batting, fielding, and pitching. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. and the registration fee is $25. Camp participants will receive a t-shirt. Limited space available to pre-register please call 956-771-9231.

doubt you beat the Phillies” with Ramirez, Lee said. Lee amused legions of Red Sox fans and alienated perhaps as many others with his offbeat antics and outspoken views while pitching in Boston from 1969-78. He said Friday he liked President Bush better “when he partied,” and encouraged President-elect Obama to find Osama bin Laden and make peace. “The first thing he ought to do is go to Afghanistan, find him and bury the hatchet,” Lee said. “If he does that, he’s my man. We’ve got enough people dead.”

The run/walk will be held on Thursday, Nov. 27 at 603 Shiloh Drive. Registration starts at 7 a.m. and the race begins at 8 a.m. All proceeds go to benefit Thanksgiving meals for the less fortunate families in Laredo. For more information, contact Delia Mendez at 712-3363 or 285-6362.

Mike’s Barrio Ball Turkey Shootout 4-on-4 Double Elimination tournament Mike’s Barrio Ball Turkey Shootout 4-on-4 Double Elimination basketball tournament will be held on from Nov. 29-30 at 3 Points Pavilion located at Jarvis and Cortez. For more info, call Mike at 220-5968.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

THE ZAPATA TIMES | 3B

HINTS BY HELOISE Dear Heloise: Thank you so much for your recent mention of how the sour economy is affecting INNOCENT PETS who are being given up or not adopted. Your own love for animals is wellknown, and your reach to loyal readers is unsurpassed. It is devastating to learn HELOISE of cats, dogs, bunnies, birds and others being left behind in empty apartments or houses when people move out, or surrendered to already-crowded shelters or simply dumped. If people cannot adopt an animal, they might consider donating pet food or supplies like cat litter to a local shelter for distribution. Some shelters are offering pet owners help, like a food bank for pets. I keep hoping veterinarians will give people a break, even a small discount, on basic services. My vet recently lamented that people are just skipping routine health services for their pets, citing economic hard times. Kathy Blumenstock, Germantown, Md.

DILBERT

HOROSCOPES | BY FRANCIS DRAKE ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You feel restless, edgy and nervous today. Don’t worry about this. Something prickly is going on in the subconscious part of your chart. But it’s gone by tomorrow. (Whew!) TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A friend will surprise you today, or you might meet someone who is a real character. Either way, something bizarre and unexpected is coming your way. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Bosses, parents, teachers and VIPs might act rather strangely today. You’ll certainly be surprised by somebody’s behavior. (Actually, this person could be shocked by you!) CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Surprise news catches you off guard today. At least it’s interesting. Travel delays and interruptions to publishing and the media are likely. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Unexpected gifts or goodies might come your way today. On the other hand, the fair share that you were expecting might be less or nonexistent. Horrors!

VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Partners and close friends surprise you today. People are feeling independent and a touch rebellious today. Someone might even try to shock you. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Unexpected interruptions will take place at work today, possibly due to computer crashes, power outages, fire drills or staff shortages. Just grin and bear it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Parents must be extra vigilant about their children today, because it’s an accident-prone day for your kids. Romance might hold a few surprises for you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Surprise company might drop by today. Expected company might not show. Minor breakages could occur at home today. It’s all a bit of a crapshoot. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) This is a mildly accident-prone day for you; therefore, slow down and be more aware. Take your time doing everything. Be alert. (The world needs more lerts.)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) You might lose money today; you might find money. Stay on top of your bank account and your cash. Keep track of your possessions. It’s a dicey day. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) You feel rebellious and restless today. You want to break free from any kind of boring, routine thing you might be doing. You want adventure and change! (Be careful — this is a mildly accident-prone day.) YOUR BORN TODAY You are success-oriented. You like to win. In turn, challenges intrigue you. Because of this, you are extremely goal-driven in your approach to whatever you do. Privately, you are serious about a lot of things. (The human psyche intrigues you.) Partnerships are important to you right now. Next year, a major choice must be made. Birthdate of: Milton Bradley, game publisher/education advocate; Rickie Lee Jones, singer; Gordon Ramsay, celebrity chef.

Zclassified REAL ESTATE

HOMES FOR SALE

61

HOMES FOR SALE

61

413 Chevy Chase (Del Mar C) 2,600SqFt, 4bd/3ba, Pool, Remodeled, Tile, Appls, $265,000 Call 725-7373

CONDOS FOR SALE 64 1 Condo $55,000. HOMES FOR SALE

61

Has your family outgrown your home? Good news! Your dream home is just a trade away! Call me, Eddie Rendon (956) 763-8207

Must Sell, Moving Out, negotiable, 2bd/1.5ba, 2803 Bayard. Brand new, south Laredo. For sale by owner.

Call Dr. Rendon 011-52-867-714-1502 or 011-52-867-715-011

LOTS FOR SALE

70

403 Matamoros in San Ygnacio Texas w/small stone bldg. $28K LRED 726-4754

Norte, Central y Sur de Laredo Casas Disponibles de 3 a 5 recamaras para mudarse el dia de HOY. Facil de Calificar. Financiamiento Disponible. Llame HOY, al 956-237-2041 O a 956-717-0958 Con Adriana Moya Tijeriana

Let me help you by putting you in your new home like if you are paying rent. You can choose a home from 3, 4 & 5 bedrooms. You can even choose the area where you want your family to grow up. Call Javier Garcia today @ 956-235-4641

North Laredo. 1.3 Acres on Loop 20 near TAMIU, next to Khaledi Heights on Blue Quail St. $12.50 Per SqFt Neg. Call Dr. Rendon 011-52-867-714-1502 or 011-52-867-715-0118

Great Location-New Spacious Homes 3 Bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage approx. 1400 sq.ft. paying closing cost. Monthly payment $1100.00 Call Jesus @ cell 956-740-2542 office 956-724-9756

LOTS FOR SALE

70

HELP WANTED

122

HELP WANTED

122

Owner Fin. Lots Payments incl. taxes @ $300/m (Built Homes Only) 728-0008; 744-3583

50 acre ranchland in El Indio Tx. Fenced, Water, hunting game $180,000. Call 830-776-1654 147 Acres LaSalle County cabin Elect. deer, hogs, dove, quail $2330 acre 956-740-4849

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 82 Fully equip. restaurant/ catering LEC Arena area Appx. 3,500 SF/(956)235-2999

HUNTING LEASES

85

Trophy Bison hunt $3500 www.ghostapacheranch.com or 214-929-0823

RENTALS

4 bedroom 2 bath approx. 1,500 sq.ft. home on a 10,000 sq.ft. lot for only $117,990 I will also help you with your closing costs let me worry about your credit. Call Luis Calderon @956-725-1965 or @ my cell 956-645-8977

AVISO IMPORTANTE! 2 NUEVAS COMUNIDADES AL NORTE DE LAREDO Cerca de centros comerciales Hospital de los Doctores y de Escuelas, financiamiento y programa de trade in disponible hableme para una Cita De Hoyos 635-6702

122

602 Codorniz (Rancho Viejo Sub), 2/2, dinning room, CAH, stove, & ref. Corner Lot! $800mthly/$500dep. 722-8556

Manufacturer’s Rep 169 year old lubrication company needs straight commission. bilingual, experienced closer to take over profitable territory near Laredo, Texas. Industrial Agricultural, Commercial accounts. Applicant must be able to start immediately. Call Roy Cranek 979-758-1675

ON THE WEB: THEZAATATMES.COM

UNFURNISHED HOUSES 100

MISCELLANEOUS

TRANSPORTATION

2bd/1ba, inclosed garage, Riveroaks Sub. $650/mo + $500 dep. Call after 5pm 645-8837

ACREAGE FOR SALE 76

ROOMS FOR RENT 106 Furnished room for 1, refrig, a/c, mic ro,downtown, $365/m $180/d ultilities pd. 206-9281.

Las Palmas Health Services, LLC has immediate openings for: • LVN - Full Time • LVN - Part Time • QA - Nurse We offer excellent wages, good working environment and a competitive benefits package, must have experience in home health. Interested individuals may fax their resume to (956)583-4521 or call for more information at (956) 583-4520 or 1(866)561-5055.

HELP WANTED

122

HELP WANTED

Furnished w/all bills paidW/D. $400mth.$150 dep 1111 San Eduardo. 725-7373

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 120 Commercial land, behind United Rental, $800 mo. + dp. Water pd. 1yr. contract 725-7373

UNFURNISHED HOUSES 100 HELP WANTED

2 NEW SUBDIVISION IN NORTH LAREDO FROM THE $150’S & UP. RESERVE YOUR HOMESITE TODAY WITH ONLY $500.00 IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE. FOR MORE INFO. CALL ANTHONY CARABALLO @ 333-3844

BY PHONE: (956) 728-2527

122

Need Gauger for Webb & Zapata Co. exp. with gauging & computer knowledge. Please e-mail resume to: hpgldo1@stx.rr.com or call (956)286-3985.

HELP WANTED

Accepting Applications for Experienced Equipment Operators/Pipe Layers/Laborers for Utility Construction. Pickup/Return applications from La Posada 1000 Zaragoza Street Laredo, TX. 78040

PETS & SUPPLIES

GARAGE SALES

134

128

4 mo. Old, Male Yorkie Terrier Teddy Bear Face. $400 763-1847 or 729-8964 Margie

$150 Deer Chihuahua (F) 1.5yr old Call 237-0914

190

Skeeter Bass Boat ‘84, 15ft., 40hp., trolly motor, $2,850 OBO Call:(956)220-7665.

612 Chaparral, Fri & Sat 8am-2pm, TV, Computer, Furniture & Misc Items. 7am-3pm Fri , Sat. & Sun 4014 Chickasaw Ln., (Cheyenne Sub) XL & XXL Men Clothing, Furniture, Household Items. Furniture & Home Interior Church Rummage Sale in St. Pete’s basement. Sat. 8am-12 1510 Matamoros &Santa Maria Friday & Saturday- All Day 101 Lynn Lp. Electronics, Clothing Furniture Garage Sale Friday Nov. 7 & Saturday Nov. 8, 8am - noon, 2716 Anejo Drive

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 194

ARTICLES FOR SALE 136 3 pc Entertainment Center, White Wash, Lights, Holds Wine Glasses, Glass door, 6.5 X 7.5 $300 Call: 206-1831

200 gallon Fuel Tank with diesel fuel pump $400 OBO Call 744-8511 50’ Screen Toshiba, 36’ Sony TV , Sony Stereo 300 watts and Leather Living Room w/reclining chairs and w/table. $1400 Call 251-3131

Electrical AC welder 110/120 volts $175 OBO Call 744-8511 Lamps $5 each Call 251-4410 PETS & SUPPLIES

BOATS

3 Family Sale! 8a-12p 3909 Puebla (Los Presidentes) Elect., houseware, ect.

Laredo Country Club Membership $5000 Call 956-337-6050 Medical bed in Perfect condition $65 OBO Call 724-5995 Recamara Kg Sz c/Colchones $375 obo 724-5995

American Pit Bull puppies, dewormed, 1 Mo $100 712-8324 or 236-4614

Stove $60 Call 251-4410 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 138

Miniature Pinscher Female ,3mths.Parents on site. $100 ea. Call 771-1479

1881 BEHR Brother upwright piano. Good Condition. $1500 OBO Call 220-6286

7 tires P23575R16 $35 Call 251-4410

TRUCKS FOR SALE 198 Isuzu Rodeo LS ‘99, a/c, V6, good paint, good stereo, alarm, 79,000mil. $3,500 OBO MUST SELL! Call: 645-7464. 02 Ford Ranger XLT, 75K Miles, Clean, A/C, Stereo. $6500 OBO Call 337-3808

‘99 F150 4Dr Loaded $4500 OBO Call 956-334-4661 CARS FOR SALE

200

‘01 Ford Taurus 6 cyl. A/C, CD, All Power, 85K mi. Alloy Wheels. $2950 Call 744-0125 1995 BMW 740 IL, 82,600 mi., Loaded, clean title! Excellent Condition, Must see! $7,500 OBO Call 763-8207 1999 Chevy Camaro. Black, v-6. auto. $2,700. Call 242-9482 2005 G6 Fix Pontiac, sunroof, leather seats, auto. a/c, $5900 OBO Call 220-8252 ‘03 Intrepid. Buenas condiciones, 124,800 millas, 6cyl. $4500. 956-645-4369

‘51 Chevy 12,800mil., Perfect body & engine. $14,500 Call 728-1565 ‘98 Pontiac Sunfire convertible, good condition, 3month XM radio, gas saver 4 cyl. $3500 OBO 693-0153 or 728-1607 Dodge Stratus ‘01, R/T, 5spd. manual, 84k mi., $3,500. Call:(956)251-2536 Dodge Stratus ‘04,sport, 6cyl., auto, a/c, 2dr. $5,800 OBO. Call 726-9870 or 242-8100 ad#83006139, jose\66. Jetta ‘06 (blue) Auto., All power, A/C, 23Kmil., $9,800 Call 722-0428 or 334-5348 PT Cruiser ‘06 (maroon) Factory Warr., 13Kmil., $8,200 Call 722-0428 or 334-5348


4B | THE ZAPATA TIMES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008


In Zapata, a history of struggles By ZACH LINDSEY ZAPATA TIMES

apata is a county that struggled through both physical and intellectual battles to become the peaceful group of communities it is today, officials say. A hundred and fifty years ago, Zapata County was created by an act of Texas Gov. Peter Hansborough Bell, but the settlements in the area go back much longer than that. “This county included communities that had already been in existence for 100 years: Falcon, Lopeño, Zapata, Ramireño, San Ygnacio and others,” said local attorney Jaime Gonzalez Jr. “Zapata changed locations at least twice that I know, and changed names at least four times.” The community of Zapata has been known as Habitación, Bellville and Carrizo. In 1898, the name of the town by the river was changed to Zapata. The community’s roots go back to 1750. Even after Zapata’s landscape had been described as “barren, with little or no water, scanty grass … and unfit for settlement for lack of an adequate water supply” by Capt. Miguel de la Garza Falcón, according to the Handbook of Texas Online, there were already settlers in the region. Those settlers had been granted tracts of land, called porciones, by the King of Spain.

Z

Courtesy photo/ ‘Town of Old Zapata’ by Jo Emma B. Quezada

This historic photo show an aerial view of old Zapata before Falcon Lake was created. The Rio Grande is in the background.

Looking back on 50 years ago By JASON BUCH ZAPATA TIMES

When Zapata County celebrated its centennial celebration 50 years ago, the new community of Zapata’s streets were still unpaved, very few people lived there and it rained all three days of the festival, Hector F. Lopez recalls. Lopez and his family had moved to Zapata five years earlier when the old community of Lopeño was flooded by the creation of Falcon Lake. He’ll be speaking at new Lopeño’s sesquicentennial celebration Sunday. “It was raining for three days; I can always remember that,” Lopez said. “I hope we

won’t have any rain Sunday.” A lot has changed in the communities of Zapata County since Lopez, a retired teacher and former Justice of the Peace, was born 81 years ago. He ran a cantina in Lopeño before the flood, where he sold beers for 20 cents. “Who could have ever thought I would drink beer for $2 at the American Legion when I used to sell it for 20 cents,” Lopez said. “That’s a great change in the economy when I can afford the $2 and at that time I couldn’t afford the 20 cents.” The county this weekend celebrates the 150 years that have passed since the Texas Legislature formed Zapata County out of parts of Webb and Starr counties Jan. 22, 1858.

Since then, the most momentous occasion in the county’s history has been the damming of the Rio Grande and the creation of Falcon Lake, Lopez said. The lake forced most of the county’s communities, which were situated on the Rio Grande, to move to higher ground. “If it had not been because of Falcon Lake, we might still be living along the Rio Grande without the facilities we enjoy in the new town sites,” Lopez said. “In old Zapata, we didn’t have complete water service,” he said. “We didn’t have an adequate education facility, as we now have. If you were to have seen the schoolhouses in

See LOOKING | PAGE 6

Each tract ran at a 90-degree angle from the river, so that every family had access to water. “Most of the old famiGONZALEZ lies here in Zapata can trace their ancestors to one of these old families,” Gonzalez said. “I am a 13th-generation from Zapata, and I can trace my history to Porción 21.” At Saturday’s sesquicentennial celebration, Gonzalez introduced the audience to generation 14: his daughters and their cousins. The first struggles the early people of what would be Zapata dealt with were famines, droughts and raids by native Indian tribes.

Kidnapped by Indians Gonzalez described how his own great-grandfather was kidnapped in 1861. “My great-grandfather was 6 months old, and his older brother was 11,” Gonzalez said, adding his great-grandfather was treated well because of his tender age. He was raised by the chief of the tribe. But his greatgrandfather’s brother was treated as a slave. After 10 years of life with the Indians, when many of the men

See HISTORY | PAGE 5

Zapata celebrates 57 years of business SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Zapata celebrated its oldest businesses Friday as part of its weekend sesquicentennial celebration. The oldest continually operating business is Eloy Insurance Agency. It was established in 1951 in old Zapata by Eloy Gutierrez. The first office was was located at the Rex Motel. In 1953, the insurance agency moved to its present location, at U.S. 83 and Third Avenue. The original building was demolished in 1984 to build a new office. Fernando Gutierrez bought the business from his father in March 1972. Before that, Fernando had worked for the business for 11 years. An Army veteran, he served from 1961 to 1964. That year, he returned

to Zapata to work for his father. Fernando’s wife, Elma, has assisted her husband in managing the business since 1973. The family has five children: Leticia, Rose Maria, Fernando Jr., Eloy and Carlos Felipe. The oldest business still owned by the same family started as a meat market and is today a clothing store. It was started by Juventino Zapata in 1950 as the Lone Star Meat Market in old Zapata. An Army veteran, Zapata served during World War II. He was wounded in action and at one point was a prisoner of war. He and his wife, Alejandra, were married Nov. 11, 1947. They have four children: Oralia (Juan Gerardo) Garza, Yolanda (Jose Ricardo) Solis, Juventino (Maria Nuri) Zapata

Jr. and Javier (Deborah) Zapata. In 1954, when the Rio Grande was dammed to create Falcon Lake, the business relocated to new Zapata, and Juventino continued to operate it until 1980. When he retired in March 1980, the business was taken over by his daughter and son-in-law, Oralia and Juan G. Garza. They are the present owners. The business is now Lone Star Western Wear, and it relocated to its present location, 1308 U.S. 83, in 1982. In May 1993, Juventino’s son, Javier V. Zapata, opened a new business at the old Lone Star Meat Market location, 1010 Jackson, called Zapata Feed and Ranch Supply. It’s now owned and operated by Javier and his wife, Deborah.

Photo by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

Juventino and Alejandra Zapata, original owners of the Lone Star Meat Market, smile as they’re recognized as one of the oldest businesses in the county. The meat market is now a clothing store, which is run by the Zapatas’ daughter and son-in-law.


2 | THE ZAPATA TIMES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

Post office causes change to Falcon SPECIAL TO TIMES

The community of Ramireño, founded in 1800, changed its name to Falcon in 1915 to avoid confusion with another town of the same name when the community got its first post office. Falcon was named after Doña Maria Rita de la Garza Falcon, mother of prominent early citizen Don Tomas Ramirez Falcon. The International Falcon Dam and Reservoir were named after the original community of Falcon. The small community was only three miles upstream

from the dam site, which flooded in 1953, covering their stone and mortar homes. The citizens moved to higher ground in August of that year. They took with them the bridge constructed in 1921 that spanned the Rio Grande, and it served in the new Falcon until it became hazardous. In 2000, the bridge was moved to the Falcon Community Park as a historic monument. Residents are raising funds to restore the bridge. Falcon will be commemorating its own history Sunday as part of Zapata County’s sesquicentennial celebration this weekend.

Photos by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

ABOVE: After a severe drought lowered the level of Falcon Lake in 1983 to expose most of old Guerrero, which had been inundated in 1954 when the lake was created, history buffs were able to wander through the ruins. At left is the old gazebo on the plaza, still surrounded by concrete benches. At right is the main church, Nuestra Señora del Refugio. RIGHT: Receding waters of Falcon Lake in this 1983 photo uncover the ruins of the primary school in old Guerrero on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. The water sparkling in the background is the Rio Salado.

Subscribe to LMT call (956) 728-2550


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

THE ZAPATA TIMES | 3

Law enforcement, fire see many changes By NICK GEORGIOU THE ZAPATA TIMES

Thanks to a technological boom, a lot has changed for Zapata County law enforcement during the past 50 years. “Today we might ask how (law enforcement) did their job, but at the time everyone was in the same situation,” said Angel Garza, former Zapata County commissioner. Prior to the 1980s, sheriff ’s deputies had to buy their own pistol, badge, flashlight and several other crucial items they needed to perform their job well. “It’s been a big change since when I was a deputy,” said Zapata County Sheriff Sigifredo Gonzalez, who served as a deputy from 1976 to 1979. “We had to use our own vehicles and our own fuel.”

Formerly volunteer The same problems existed with the fire department, said Garza, a former volunteer fire fighter in San Ygnacio. Compared to the ’70s, when firefighters weren’t even paid, the department has grown exponentially, said Zapata County Fire Chief Juan J. Meza. He cited the fact that it now has a force of 33 paid employees, 18 of whom are firefighters. It also has four arson investigators and four fire inspectors. “Everyone is certified and helping out the community,” said Meza, who began working for the department in 1973 at the age of 20. “We’ve changed 100 percent.”

First sheriff’s car Around 1985, the county, for the first time, bought a car for the sheriff’s office. “I remember it was March because we were hoping they would arrive in time for the second weekend in March when the

San Ygnacio honors its veterans SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

San Ygnacio has numerous Purple Heart recipients from three wars. A memorial with their names has been donated by Oswaldo H. and Juanita G. Hernandez. The recipients include: World War II +Guadalupe Gutiérrez (Army) +Alfredo Antonio Salinas, 2 (Navy) Reynaldo Uribe (Army) Rodolfo Salómon Uribe (Navy) Fernando S. Vela (Army) Korea Enrique “Henry” Gutiérrez (Marines) Israel “Ike” Gutiérrez (Marines) Vietnam Alberto J. Arámbula (Army) Eduardo I. Benavides (Army) +Abel A. García (Marines) Manuel A. Garza (Army) Filiberto Solís Jr. (Marines)

county parade happened,” Garza said. “Boy, everybody was very happy.” Around the same time, the county bought MEZA a car from the Texas Department of Public Safety in Austin for about $1,000 to give to the constables. “It’s amazing,” said Garza, 64. “We kept that car for about 10 to 12 years.”

Insurance tough Besides having to spend their own money on items they used for the job, sheriff’s deputies and the volunteer fire fighters also had hardly any benefits. And considering deputies had to use their own vehicle for the job, insurance was hard to come by. “The reason why we survived was because we were all on the same boat,” Garza said. “We got used to the times. And now I’m very happy today that Zapata has great benefits for retirement and life insurance. “The deputies, they have the best we can give them.”

Who are you? While serving as a justice of the peace, Garza recalled an incident where someone was speeding through San Ygnacio and a sheriff’s deputy decided to follow him for about five miles north of town. When the deputy managed to pull over the driver over, he approached the vehicle and flashed his badge and gun. The man, unsure of who exactly the deputy was, showed the deputy his rifle. “They had no insignia on the doors and it was difficult for us to stop people,” he said. “They were used to the hard times and they

did their best. Some of peace officers, they were on duty 24/7. “I remember it was very difficult when GONZALEZ the new system came in and they were on duty eight hours a day.” Since working as a deputy in the late 70s, Sheriff Gonzalez said one of the most notable changes over the years is the respect shown toward authority. “People demand more for us. The respect is no longer there the way it used to be,” he said. “We’re seeing a lot of increase in the decline of values and morals in the community as a whole. “It’s a changing of the times.”

Always the best In terms of staffing, the sheriff’s office has grown from having seven deputies in the 70s to having about 28 patrol officers today. Garza said that despite the perceived challenges law enforcement faced in Zapata County several decades ago, everybody was happy because they were getting the best at the time. “Today, perhaps, we say, ‘How did they do it without a cell phone?’ But nobody had a cell phone. When I was a JP in San Ygnacio, we didn’t even have phones at home.” (Nick Georgiou may be reached at 728-2582 or nickg@lmtonline.com)

For medical info, read TZT’s

HISTORY COMES ALIVE

Photo by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

In this September 1983 file photo, members of Webb County’s Heritage Foundation pause inside the Nuestra Señora del Refugio Church at old Guerrero during a severe drought that uncovered the city ruins.Old Guerrero was flooded when Falcon Dam was opened in 1954, creating Falcon Lake. Shown left to right are the late Rose Treviño, photographer and historian; Carol Gunter (now Berler), director of the foundation; Chuck Owen, retired pastor and civic leader; and the late Jim Parish of Laredo Morning Times.


4 | THE ZAPATA TIMES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

TAKING A LOOK BACK AT

OLD ZAPATA Courtesy photos/ 'Town of Old Zapata' by Jo Emma B. Quezada

The Bluebonnet CafĂŠ was a popular eatery in old Zapata. It relocated to U.S. 83 in new Zapata when Falcon Lake was created, inundating old Zapata.

The Ramirez Market and Grocery was one of several corner stores in old Zapata.

The two-story Texas Hotel in old Zapata had gas pumps available for the convenience of its customers.

Stores in old Zapata often served multiple purposes, such as the City Furniture & Hardware Co.

The Zapata County Hospital treated patients in old Zapata.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

THE ZAPATA TIMES | 5

CONNECTING U.S.AND MEXICO

Courtesy photo/ ‘Town of Old Zapata’ by Jo Emma B. Quezada

Courtesy photo/Webb County Heritage Foundation | Special to the Times

AT LEFT: This undated photo shows the international bridge across the Rio Grande that linked old Zapata and old Guerrero, before Falcon Lake was created. The crossing was free, as it is now, but authorities on both sides of the river have checkpoints as you enter their respective countries. ABOVE: In this photo, believed to have been taken in 1954, the waters of the newly created Falcon Lake rise slowly, reaching up toward the international bridge.The new international bridge is about 40 miles south of this point, connecting Falcon with new Guerrero, which was moved down river after Falcon Lake was created.

HISTORY | Continued from Page 1 from the tribe went to war, his great-grandfather’s brother stole a horse, and the two escaped. They were found by soldiers in Encinal and were returned to their parents. “My great-grandfather did not know much Spanish, but he knew the Indian dialect well,” Gonzalez said. “In order to survive, the locals here had to have guns, and they built beautiful homes, not because they were elaborate but because they looked like forts,” Gonzalez said. He encouraged residents of Zapata County to visit San Ygnacio and some of the old ranches in the area that have preserved the old homesteads.

Politics After famine, drought and American Indian raids, the people of young Zapata had to deal with another problem: the unstable political situation of Texas. “It wasn’t simply about picking who would be president in the next election,” Gonzalez said. “It was about, where would Zapata be? Would they be a part of the Spanish empire? The French? Mexico? The Republic of Texas? The Republic of the Rio Grande? Texas? The Confederacy or the United States of America?” It was that unstable political situation that gave birth to Zapata’s legendary namesake, Col. Jose Antonio de Zapata. Jose Lopez of Laredo, who traces his roots to the original settlers of what is now San Ygnacio, told a story about Col. Zapata before the days of the Republic of the Rio Grande. According to the story, Zapata was hunting bandits on his horse when he was shot in the leg with an arrow. The arrow pinned him to his saddle. The wound barely slowed Zapata down; he snapped the arrow off, dismounted his horse and killed the leader of the bandits with his bare hands. Lopez, author of “The Last Knight (Don Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara Uribe, a Texas Hero)” is an Air Force veteran who now lives in University City with his wife, the former Cordelia Jean Dancause.

Battle over Falcon Dam The battle that parents and

Photo by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

Jose Lopez, who traces his roots back to the early settlers of San Ygnacio, speaks to the crowd Friday at Zapata Sesquicentennial Park, part of the weekend festivities marking the 150th anniversary of Zapata County. Lopez told lively tales about the rich history of Col. Jose Antonio Zapata, the community’s namesake. Courtesy photo/ ‘Town of Old Zapata’ by Jo Emma B. Quezada

The Rex Hall and Rex Theatre were popular attractions in old Zapata. They were once located on Texas 16. grandparents of Zapata residents fought in 1953 didn’t have the gunpowder or the brutality of the early frontier, but it was just as hardfought. “Falcon Dam … became the first intellectual battle that we had,” Gonzalez said. Although he called the United States “the greatest country in the world,” Gonzalez also believes that the government of our country took the land to establish Falcon Dam without giving just compensation for the people who lived there. Many of them had been in the area for 200 years, and they stayed on their property until the floodwaters were at their door. “Two-hundred-year-old forts and Catholic churches were considered obsolete buildings with little value,” Gonzalez said. “The compensation that our families received (was) so little that they couldn’t afford to come buy a piece of land and build a house in this new community.” At first, many families in the area lived in tents. But the old families of Zapata persevered, just as their colonial forefathers had. “Our families moved to this new town where we are today, to start a new town, a new community and a new beginning,” Gonzalez

said. “They came and they built homes, they built businesses and they built schools, and that con-

struction has gone on until today.” (Reach Zach Lindsey at 7282538 or zach@lmtonline.com)


6 | THE ZAPATA TIMES

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2008

CELEBRATING ZAPATA’S OLDEST RESIDENT

Photo by Cuate Santos | Laredo Morning Times

Zapata honored its rich heritage during a four-day sesquicentennial celebration Nov. 6-9, including an award for its oldest resident, Nicolassa Gonzalez Gutierrez, who is more than 100 years old. Mrs. Gutierrez could not attend the ceremony; her family accepted the award on her behalf. Shown, left to right, are three of her children, Rosaura, Derly and Elodia, receiving the award from Roberto Montes, chairman of the Sesquicentennial Committee.

LOOKING | Continued from Page 1 Zapata before the lake, and if you were to see the modern buildings of high schools and elementary schools in the new town sites, you could acknowledge the great difference in education. “And we actually have one of the best systems of education because we have the facilities here … the school systems have a lot of land. The county has a lot of land here in the new town sites. “The streets are in correct order, but not in old Zapata, where you have to go from one corner to the next. Everything changed drastically after Falcon Lake.” The move to higher ground brought about changes in the economy and government as well, Lopez said. “In society, I can say that I never thought that I could be speaking English with my friends when I was a teenager in Lopeño,” he said. “I never thought that I could be drinking a cup of coffee in an air-conditioned restaurant, and I never thought in Lopeño that I

could be drinking a coke for a $1.25, as we drink it in the American Legion, when I was in Lopeño. “I never thought of that. It is a change in society. In economy, the same thing. I never thought that I could earn $50 in 15 minutes because I was a JP and I officiate weddings and they pay me $50. “I used to go picking cotton in Robstown, in Orange Grove. I used to pick up 100 pounds of cotton for 50 cents (per) 100 pounds. The most I could pick in one day when the product was good was 300 pounds at fifty cents a hundred, so $1.50 per day was more than enough in comparison to our way of living in Lopeño.” Lopez served in the Army, taught for 26 years and served as a justice of the peace for 29 years. His father was a justice before him, known as Don Aurelio. His family has run a department store and a restaurant in the community of Zapata. He is descended from the Lopez family that set-

tled Lopeño in 1767. He’ll celebrate the county’s sesquicentennial Sunday in his hometown. “I’m going to be awful happy to be the main speaker in regard to the sesquicentennial,” he said. “In particular, I will also be awful happy to be the speaker at the community where I was born and raised, in Lopeño.” About 100 acres of his family’s land remain above the lake’s shores that they still have mineral rights to. About 300 acres are underwater. “There’s a lot of persons actually receiving benefits from oil and gas production,” Lopez said. “But in my statements (Sunday), I will state that one of the natural resources better than any other one is the people of Zapata and the people of Lopeño. Nice, peaceloving people, which I will emphasize Sunday in my presentation in Lopeño.” (Jason Buch may be reached at 728-2547 or jbuch@lmtonline.com)


<DATE>

LAREDO MORNING TIMES | 1B

Zapata Cover

CLASSIFIED REAL ESTATE

HOMES FOR SALE

61

HOMES FOR SALE

61

413 Chevy Chase (Del Mar C) 2,600SqFt, 4bd/3ba, Pool, Remodeled, Tile, Appls, $265,000 Call 725-7373

CONDOS FOR SALE 64 1 Condo $55,000. HOMES FOR SALE

61

Has your family outgrown your home? Good news! Your dream home is just a trade away! Call me, Eddie Rendon (956) 763-8207

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Call Dr. Rendon 011-52-867-714-1502 or 011-52-867-715-011

LOTS FOR SALE

70

403 Matamoros in San Ygnacio Texas w/small stone bldg. $28K LRED 726-4754

Norte, Central y Sur de Laredo Casas Disponibles de 3 a 5 recamaras para mudarse el dia de HOY. Facil de Calificar. Financiamiento Disponible. Llame HOY, al 956-237-2041 O a 956-717-0958 Con Adriana Moya Tijeriana

Let me help you by putting you in your new home like if you are paying rent. You can choose a home from 3, 4 & 5 bedrooms. You can even choose the area where you want your family to grow up. Call Javier Garcia today @ 956-235-4641

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Great Location-New Spacious Homes 3 Bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage approx. 1400 sq.ft. paying closing cost. Monthly payment $1100.00 Call Jesus @ cell 956-740-2542 office 956-724-9756

70

HELP WANTED

122

HELP WANTED

122

Owner Fin. Lots Payments incl. taxes @ $300/m (Built Homes Only) 728-0008; 744-3583

50 acre ranchland in El Indio Tx. Fenced, Water, hunting game $180,000. Call 830-776-1654 147 Acres LaSalle County cabin Elect. deer, hogs, dove, quail $2330 acre 956-740-4849

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 82 Fully equip. restaurant/ catering LEC Arena area Appx. 3,500 SF/(956)235-2999

HUNTING LEASES

85

Trophy Bison hunt $3500 www.ghostapacheranch.com or 214-929-0823

RENTALS

4 bedroom 2 bath approx. 1,500 sq.ft. home on a 10,000 sq.ft. lot for only $117,990 I will also help you with your closing costs let me worry about your credit. Call Luis Calderon @956-725-1965 or @ my cell 956-645-8977

AVISO IMPORTANTE! 2 NUEVAS COMUNIDADES AL NORTE DE LAREDO Cerca de centros comerciales Hospital de los Doctores y de Escuelas, financiamiento y programa de trade in disponible hableme para una Cita De Hoyos 635-6702

122

602 Codorniz (Rancho Viejo Sub), 2/2, dinning room, CAH, stove, & ref. Corner Lot! $800mthly/$500dep. 722-8556

Manufacturer’s Rep 169 year old lubrication company needs straight commission. bilingual, experienced closer to take over profitable territory near Laredo, Texas. Industrial Agricultural, Commercial accounts. Applicant must be able to start immediately. Call Roy Cranek 979-758-1675

UNFURNISHED HOUSES 100

MISCELLANEOUS

TRANSPORTATION

2bd/1ba, inclosed garage, Riveroaks Sub. $650/mo + $500 dep. Call after 5pm 645-8837

ACREAGE FOR SALE 76

ROOMS FOR RENT 106 Furnished room for 1, refrig, a/c, mic ro,downtown, $365/m $180/d ultilities pd. 206-9281.

Las Palmas Health Services, LLC has immediate openings for: • LVN - Full Time • LVN - Part Time • QA - Nurse We offer excellent wages, good working environment and a competitive benefits package, must have experience in home health. Interested individuals may fax their resume to (956)583-4521 or call for more information at (956) 583-4520 or 1(866)561-5055.

HELP WANTED

122

HELP WANTED

Furnished w/all bills paidW/D. $400mth.$150 dep 1111 San Eduardo. 725-7373

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 120 Commercial land, behind United Rental, $800 mo. + dp. Water pd. 1yr. contract 725-7373

UNFURNISHED HOUSES 100 HELP WANTED

2 NEW SUBDIVISION IN NORTH LAREDO FROM THE $150’S & UP. RESERVE YOUR HOMESITE TODAY WITH ONLY $500.00 IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE. FOR MORE INFO. CALL ANTHONY CARABALLO @ 333-3844

LOTS FOR SALE

122

Need Gauger for Webb & Zapata Co. exp. with gauging & computer knowledge. Please e-mail resume to: hpgldo1@stx.rr.com or call (956)286-3985.

HELP WANTED

Accepting Applications for Experienced Equipment Operators/Pipe Layers/Laborers for Utility Construction. Pickup/Return applications from La Posada 1000 Zaragoza Street Laredo, TX. 78040

PETS & SUPPLIES

GARAGE SALES

134

128

4 mo. Old, Male Yorkie Terrier Teddy Bear Face. $400 763-1847 or 729-8964 Margie

$150 Deer Chihuahua (F) 1.5yr old Call 237-0914

190

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612 Chaparral, Fri & Sat 8am-2pm, TV, Computer, Furniture & Misc Items. 7am-3pm Fri , Sat. & Sun 4014 Chickasaw Ln., (Cheyenne Sub) XL & XXL Men Clothing, Furniture, Household Items. Furniture & Home Interior Church Rummage Sale in St. Pete’s basement. Sat. 8am-12 1510 Matamoros &Santa Maria Friday & Saturday- All Day 101 Lynn Lp. Electronics, Clothing Furniture Garage Sale Friday Nov. 7 & Saturday Nov. 8, 8am - noon, 2716 Anejo Drive

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 194

ARTICLES FOR SALE 136 3 pc Entertainment Center, White Wash, Lights, Holds Wine Glasses, Glass door, 6.5 X 7.5 $300 Call: 206-1831

200 gallon Fuel Tank with diesel fuel pump $400 OBO Call 744-8511 50’ Screen Toshiba, 36’ Sony TV , Sony Stereo 300 watts and Leather Living Room w/reclining chairs and w/table. $1400 Call 251-3131

Electrical AC welder 110/120 volts $175 OBO Call 744-8511 Lamps $5 each Call 251-4410 PETS & SUPPLIES

BOATS

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American Pit Bull puppies, dewormed, 1 Mo $100 712-8324 or 236-4614

Stove $60 Call 251-4410 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 138

Miniature Pinscher Female ,3mths.Parents on site. $100 ea. Call 771-1479

1881 BEHR Brother upwright piano. Good Condition. $1500 OBO Call 220-6286

7 tires P23575R16 $35 Call 251-4410

TRUCKS FOR SALE 198 Isuzu Rodeo LS ‘99, a/c, V6, good paint, good stereo, alarm, 79,000mil. $3,500 OBO MUST SELL! Call: 645-7464. 02 Ford Ranger XLT, 75K Miles, Clean, A/C, Stereo. $6500 OBO Call 337-3808

‘99 F150 4Dr Loaded $4500 OBO Call 956-334-4661 CARS FOR SALE

200

‘01 Ford Taurus 6 cyl. A/C, CD, All Power, 85K mi. Alloy Wheels. $2950 Call 744-0125 1995 BMW 740 IL, 82,600 mi., Loaded, clean title! Excellent Condition, Must see! $7,500 OBO Call 763-8207 1999 Chevy Camaro. Black, v-6. auto. $2,700. Call 242-9482 2005 G6 Fix Pontiac, sunroof, leather seats, auto. a/c, $5900 OBO Call 220-8252 ‘03 Intrepid. Buenas condiciones, 124,800 millas, 6cyl. $4500. 956-645-4369

‘51 Chevy 12,800mil., Perfect body & engine. $14,500 Call 728-1565 ‘98 Pontiac Sunfire convertible, good condition, 3month XM radio, gas saver 4 cyl. $3500 OBO 693-0153 or 728-1607 Dodge Stratus ‘01, R/T, 5spd. manual, 84k mi., $3,500. Call:(956)251-2536 Dodge Stratus ‘04,sport, 6cyl., auto, a/c, 2dr. $5,800 OBO. Call 726-9870 or 242-8100 ad#83006139, jose\66. Jetta ‘06 (blue) Auto., All power, A/C, 23Kmil., $9,800 Call 722-0428 or 334-5348 PT Cruiser ‘06 (maroon) Factory Warr., 13Kmil., $8,200 Call 722-0428 or 334-5348

The Zapata Times 11/08/2008  

The Zapata Times 11/08/2008

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