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Carisbrooke Castle


Carisbrooke Village Centre

Carisbrooke was the strongest castle on the Island; though it is visible from some distance, it does not dominate the countryside like many other castles.There are traces of a Roman fort underneath the later buildings. Seventy-one steps lead up to the keep; the reward is a fine view. In the centre of the castle enclosure are the domestic buildings; these are mostly of the 13th century, with upper parts of the 16th century. Some are in ruins, but the main rooms were used as the official residence of the Governor of the Isle of Wight until the 1940s, and they remain in good repair.

Carisbrooke was the strongest castle on the Island; though it is visible from some distance, it does not dominate the countryside like many other castles. There are traces of a Roman fort underneath the later buildings. Seventy-one steps lead up to the keep; the reward is a fine view. In the centre of the castle enclosure are the domestic buildings; these are mostly of the 13th century, with upper parts of the 16th century. Some are in ruins, but the main rooms were used as the official residence of the Governor of the Isle of Wight until the 1940s, and they remain in good repair.zz`zz


View from the keep From 1100 The castle remained in the possession of Richard de Redvers’ family, and over the next two hundred years his descendants improved the castle with stone walls, towers and a keep. This was until 1293, when Countess Isabella de Fortibus, the last Redvers resident sold it to Edward I, after which the government was entrusted to wardens as representatives of the crown. In the reign of Richard II it was unsuccessfully attacked by the French (1377) The castle was reputedly saved by local hero Peter de Heyno who shot the French commander. Anthony Woodville, Lord Scales, later Earl Rivers, obtained a grant of the castle and rights of Lordship in 1467. He was responsible for the addition of the Woodville Gate, now known as the Entrance Gate. Woodville was killed by Richard III in 1483, but his brother Edward Woodville was given control of the castle on the accession of Henry VII in 1485.

The keep was added to the castle in the reign of Henry I, and in the reign of Elizabeth I; when the Spanish Armada was expected, it was surrounded by an elaborate pentagonal fortification by Sir George Carey. Charles I was imprisoned here for fourteen months before his execution in 1649.Afterwards his two youngest children were confined in the castle, and the Princess Elizabeth died there. Most recently it was the home of The Princess Beatrice, daughter of Queen Victoria, as Governor of the Isle of Wight, 1896–1944. It is now under control of English Heritage.[6] The castle is located above, and to the south of Carisbrooke village centre. Carisbrooke was the strongest castle on the Island; though it is visible from some distance, it does not dominate the countryside like many other castles.There are traces of a Roman fort underneath the later buildings. Seventy-one steps lead up to the keep; the reward is a fine

view. In the centre of the castle enclosure are the domestic buildings; these are mostly of the 13th century, with upper parts of the 16th century. Some are in ruins, but the main rooms were used as the official residence of the Governor of the Isle of Wight until the 1940s, and they remain in good repair. Carisbrooke was the strongest castle on the Island; though it is visible from some distance, it does not dominate the countryside like many other castles.There are traces of a Roman fort underneath the later buildings. Seventy-one steps lead up to the keep; the reward is a fine view. In the centre of the castle enclosure are the domestic buildings; these are mostly of the 13th century, with upper parts of the 16th century. Some are in ruins, but the main rooms were used as the official rzesidence of the


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Free parking for approx. 100 cars situated 50 - 100 metres from site. This car park may get full on event days or peak viewing times. Additional off site parking located in the town of Carisbrooke (not managed by English Heritage).Delightful tea room, (Apr-31 Oct) serving a selection of locally produced hot and cold food including sandwiches, baguettes, cakes, hot and cold beverages. Good sized lawned areas suitable for picnics. Benches and picnic tables located outside.Well-stocked shop with locally sourced Isle of Wight products and a wide selection of English Heritage gifts, including books, wines, jams and some Charles I-themed memorabilia.

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12th Century History There has been a fortress at Carisbrooke since at least Saxon times, but the present castle was begun in about 1100, when the Isle of Wight was granted to the de Redvers family. They raised the great stone shell-keep on its towering mound, and after 1262 the formidable Countess Isabella de Redvers extensively rebuilt the whole stronghold. Following the addition of its double-towered 14th-century gatehouse, Carisbrooke experienced its only serious siege in 1377, beating off a French raiding force.

attempt to escape was foiled only when he became wedged in the window bars. After the Spanish Armada passed alarmingly close in 1588, threatening seizure of the Isle of Wight, Carisbrooke was updated as an artillery fortification by surrounding it with ‘bastioned’ outer earthworks, still impressively visible. 1588, threatening seizure of the Isle of Wight, Carisbrooke was updated as an artillery fortification by surrounding it with ‘bastioned’ outer earthworks, still impressively visible.

Most famous among Carisbrooke’s extensive cast of past residents was King Charles I, imprisoned here in 1647-48 after his defeat in the English Civil War. At first comfortably accommodated in the Constable’s Lodging, his plots to renew the war later made him a closely guarded captive: an

Free parking for approx. 100 cars situated 50 - 100 metres from site. This car park may get full on event days or peak viewing times. Additional off site parking located in the town of Carisbrooke (not managed by English Heritage). beating off a French raiding force.


The Wildlife

Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals. With around 10,000 living species, they are the most speciose class of tetrapod vertebrates. All present species belong to the subclass Neornithes, and inhabit ecosystems across the globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Extant birds range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago. Birds are the only members of the clade originating with the earliest dinosaurs to have survived the Cretaceous– Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago.

Modern birds are characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a lightweight but strong skeleton. All living species of birds have wings; the most recent species without wings was the moa, which is generally considered to have become extinct in the 16th century. Wings are evolved forelimbs, and most bird species can fly.Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged,erwrer wow bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals With around 10,000 living species, they are the most speciose class of tetrapod vertebrates. All present species belong to the subclass Neornithes, and inhabitat ecosystems across the

globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Extant birds range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago. Birds are the only members of the clade originating with the earliest dinosaurs to have survived the Cretaceous– Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago. Modern birds are characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a lightweight but strong skeleton. All living species of birds have wings; the most recent species without wings was the moa, which is generally considered to have become extinct in the 16th century. Wings are evolved forelimbs, and most bird species can fly. Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals. Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae)


There has been a fortress at Carisbrooke since at least Saxon times, but the present castle was begun in about 1100, when the Isle of Wight was granted to the de Redvers family. They raised the great stone shell-keep on its towering mound, and after 1262 the formidable Countess Isabella de Redvers extensively rebuilt the whole stronghold. Following the addition of its double-towered 14th-century gatehouse, Carisbrooke experienced its only serious siege in 1377, beating off a French raiding force.

A Family Day Out

There has been a fortress at Carisbrooke since at least Saxon times, but the present castle was begun in about 1100, when the Isle of Wight was granted to the de Redvers family. They raised the great stone shell-keep on its towering mound, and after 1262 the formidable Countess Isabella de Redvers extensively rebuilt the whole stronghold. Following the addition of its double-towered 14th-century gatehouse, Carisbrooke experienced its only serious siege in 1377, beating off a French raiding force.


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