Volume 1 Issue 2

Page 1




DIGITAL Volume 1 Issue 2

FILM

JULY 2014

8 Feature interview: kirk aceVedO in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 10 television: the nature of netflix 11 comedy: Mike citera

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MUSIC

12 Feature interview: FOXy shazaM 14 special Feature: skirball cultural center’s sunset concerts

CULTURE

16 Fashion: pauL Van dyk teams with tOMs

18 Feature interview: Lucha 20 21 22 26 27

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VaVOOM’s Liz Fairbairn and rita d’albert restaurant review: Luna Vine  L.a. hidden gems 101: sweetXO Fashion: neXt WaVe beach style Fashion: cLint deMpsey’s JOrg gray Watch photo essay: dtLa arts district Murals Feature interview: circus cLOWn scarlett sullivan

SPORTS

28 Vans us Open OF surFing

18 Lucha VaVOOM 4|

Lucha VaVOOM’s Liz Fairbairn and rita d’aLbert phOtOgraphed FOr the cOVer by JOSE GARIBAY at eL chaVO restaurant in siLVer Lake. Makeup SANDRA ACUNA hair JOCELYN JAMES

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preview 29 athlete of the Month: gyasi zardes

EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

6 Letter From the editor 30 staff picks

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ISSUE

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photo David James/twentieth century Fox

FILM

KIRK ACEVEDO

DAWN of the PLANET of the APES

Shows Off His Edgy Side in

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By Dash Finley


A

nother product of this cynical cin- Serkis), now presiding over a primate enematic age of reboots and re-imag- clave in the forest outside San Francisco. Meanwhile, in the city, a small contininings, 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes seemed from the outset to be a gent of virus-immune humans led by paracash-in designed solely to putt butts in the noid Dreyfus (Gary Oldman) plots their seats through brand familiarity. Instead, au- next move in secret. A scouting group ordiences were treated to a surprisingly cere- ganized by Malcolm (Jason Clarke) abbral summer smash, thus proving the old sconds into the forest to search for a dam adage about books and their covers correct. they hope to utilize as a power plant, but Of course, the film industry is only as things go awry when Acevedo’s character, jaded as its patrons, so when the inevitable Carver, confronts and shoots a young ape. sequel to Rise was announced, a familiar Shifty-eyed and spiteful, Carver sows the question emerged: Could it really improve seeds for all-out war through his unrelenting upon the first one? aggression towards Caesar’s subjects. DeWell, unfortunately for the naysayers, spite this inner darkness, Acevedo the answer is a resounding “yes!” Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is a sophisticated, moving film with a big heart and a lot on its mind. Being that Dawn is something of a high-brow blockbuster, its cast is populated with indie and international thespians, as opposed to buff poster-boys. As such, when the producers needed to find an actor to play one of the film’s human antagonists, they skipped over the long list of stock mustache twirlers and set ox) their sights on Kirk Acevedo, th century F eta/twentie (W a b o k d an authentic New York percaesar an former with major chops. A graduate of NYC’s Labrings a three-dimensional qualGuardia High School of Music & Art and ity to his performance. Performing Arts, Acevedo first broke “You can’t play him bad,” he explains. through playing gangster Miguel Alvarez on “If you’re playing a character who does bad HBO’s prison drama “Oz.” Since then, things, you want to know why he does those Acevedo has made a name for himself with things. The apes killed [Carver’s] family. I roles in shows like “Law & Order,” don’t like when other actors are basically “Fringe,” “The Walking Dead” and the one note and just see red. You, as an actor, “Band of Brothers” miniseries. have to find ways to let it breathe.” Though he has dabbled in film acting, Acevedo’s commitment to the role was with appearances in The Thin Red Line and also aided by the freedom allowed him by Invincible, getting cast in Dawn represents Dawn’s director, Matt Reeves (Cloverfield). perhaps his grandest foray into the cine“Matt was very generous with his acmatic world. tors. I’m someone who does improv a lot,” “There’s a big difference in the medi- explains Acevedo. “He was secure enough ums,” says Acevedo on bridging the gap be- to let me play. He was able to humanize tween the small screen and the silver one. everyone.” “I’m an edgy guy, and edgy plays more on Indeed, though director Rupert Wyatt film. Lighter, lighter‚ that’s what TV is. On did a respectable job on Rise, Reeves truly film, I can be as dark as I want to be; that elevates the material with his sober eye for suits my talents.” character-based drama. This edginess gives Acevedo a chance “Action films are like, ‘Hey, look at to shine in the context of Dawn’s grim story. these explosions.’ We have that too, but we Set 10 years after the Simian flu has deci- also have story. That’s something he was remated mankind’s population, the film ally able to balance,” says Acevedo. catches up with ape leader Caesar (Andy Aside from the commitment to world-

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building on display, Reeves also cultivated an intimate synchronicity with effects house WETA Digital, using the most advanced motion-capture technology to depict the apes at the crux of the story in a realistic manner. Nearly half the film is dedicated to internal strife between Caesar and the mutinous ape Koba (Toby Kebbell)‚ two ostensibly computer-generated characters. Nevertheless, these scenes take on an amazing lifelike sheen through both the mo-cap performances and Reeves’ technical wizardry. Acevedo was impressed by the process, but at times found it challenging. “When [the actors] are in their [motion-capture] suits, it’s great. You use your imagination,” he begins. “Then there are a lot of passes when you’re touching them and shaking hands – one where they load a fake monkey, another where they have these silver balls passing by and [one] when there’s nothing there at all – you’re doing that with nothing. You get used to it, but the first couple of weeks, it’s difficult.” Thus is the struggle of an actor in today's VFX-dominated landscape, but it doesn't seem to be slowing down Acevedo any. Next, he'll be seen in SyFy's upcoming limited series based on the 1995 film 12 Monkeys. “Another simian theme,” he jokes. “It’s post-apocalyptic, too. It’s fun; I love sci-fi. As long as they keep hiring me, I’ll keep doing them!” Another day, another reboot. At times, it can be easy to become jaded by the way Hollywood keeps cranking them out, but as Dawn of the Planet of the Apes proves, there’s no reason remakes can’t be just as emotionally resonant as any original film, so long as the people involved have an affectionate understanding of the property they’re adapting. This concept is not lost on Acevedo, who explains, “I loved the [1968 Planet of the Apes] as a kid. I’ll always remember that great image of the Statue of Liberty sticking up out of the sand. I was a fan.” From a fan to a featured player, Kirk Acevedo and everyone involved in Dawn proves that the magic of cinema can span generations if we simply treat it with respect. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes releases in theaters July 11.

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| 9


TELEVISION

Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright star in the Emmy-award winning 1HWà L[ VHULHV ´+RXVH RI &DUGV¾ 3KRWR FUHGLW 1DWKDQ %HOO 1HWà L[

THE NATURE OF NETFLIX By Mark Mikhail

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hey say the only certain things in life are death and taxes. After reading that “The Killingâ€? has been revived from cancellation for the second WLPH KRZHYHU ,¡P EHJLQQLQJ to question the expression. 1RZ LW¡V QRW XQKHDUG RI IRU VKRZV WR JHW UHQHZHG DI ter being cancelled; “Family Guyâ€? is a great example of a show that was cancelled early on (after its third season) then went on to live a long, prosperous life. Though when it comes to secondcoming successes, the list is rather short. Considering that “The KillLQJÂľ ZDV FDQFHOOHG DJDLQ DIWHU LWV UHVXUUHFWLRQ , Ă€QG LW PLQG ERJJOLQJ that anyone would take yet another chance on the oft disappointing VKRZ 7KHQ , VDZ WKH QDPH 1HWĂ L[ 2YHU WKH SDVW IHZ \HDUV 1HWĂ L[ KDV PRUSKHG LWVHOI IURP D VQDLO mail iteration of Blockbuster Video into the online juggernaut and current model around which TV programs are being shaped. I talk about serialization and current watching habits a lot in my articles because of the fact that now, more than ever, things are changing – binge-watching, online catalogs, revivals, second revivals. It makes me wonder, what is a TV show, really? Would you call “Mad Menâ€? a TV show? Sure. How about “House of Cardsâ€?? Most people would, and it would be hard to disagree. But “House of Cardsâ€? LVQ¡W SDUW RI D QHWZRUN DQG LW GRHVQ¡W DLU ZHHN WR ZHHN ,W GRHVQ¡W KDYH DGV DURXQG LW LW¡V QRW FHQVRUHG ÂŤ ,Q IDFW LV LW HYHQ VWUXFWXUHG the same? Generally TV shows are structured into four acts with a teaser in the beginning, each act separated by a nifty little commercial break. Since the dawn of television, these hiccups have been taken into account, altering how a story might unfold and how certain scenes might lead into others. It also changes how the season as a whole is structured. Traditional shows had to rely on ending episodes on cliffhangers in order WR JHW YLHZHUV EDFN WKH IROORZLQJ ZHHN 1RW DQ\PRUH 7KH 1HWĂ L[ model has completely altered the way shows are written, allowing for

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much broader overarching stories and compelling character relationships that are all thought up at the same time. “House of Cardsâ€? is a show, yes, though it may not quite by TV. $QG WKDW¡V SUREDEO\ D JRRG WKLQJ I suppose the real question to ask is not whether “House of Cardsâ€? or “Orange is the New Blackâ€? are television shows, but rather, is Net Ă L[ D WHOHYLVLRQ QHWZRUN" $JDLQ LW¡V D WULFN\ GLVWLQFWLRQ WR PDNH DQG LW FHUWDLQO\ IHHOV OLNH WKDW¡V ZKDW 1HWĂ L[¡V JRDO LV 1RW WR EH D QHWZRUN but the network. They have no rules to follow, no FCC, no advertisers. Hell, even their ratings are kept secret, as they are under no obligation to share them with anyone. With that kind of power, why ZRXOGQ¡W WKH\ WU\ WR WDNH RYHU WKH ZRUOG" Not only are they paying for their own original programming, but WKH\¡UH EX\LQJ WKH ULJKWV WR ROGHU VXFFHVVIXO VKRZV IURP IRUHLJQ PDU kets, packaging them under their own red banner and presenting it to a whole new market. Most people know ´'HUHNÂľ DV 5LFN\ *HUYDLV¡ 1HWĂ L[ VKRZ WKRXJK WKH SURJUDP RULJLQDOO\ DLUHG RQ &KDQQHO LQ WKH 8. EHIRUH EHLQJ UH UHOHDVHG RQ 1HWĂ L[ IRU WKH 8QLWHG 6WDWHV %HIRUH that, they revived critic darling and fan favorite “Arrested DevelopPHQWÂľ IRU D IRXUWK DQG Ă€QDO VHDVRQ PXFK WR WKH GHOLJKW RI 79 IDQV everywhere. %\ FDWHULQJ WR WKH \RXQJHU DXGLHQFH 1HWĂ L[ LV LQYHVWLQJ LQ WKH IXWXUH FRPPLWWLQJ LWVHOI WR TXDOLW\ DERYH DOO HOVH $IWHU DOO WKH\¡UH WKH RQHV ZKR XVH WKH ,QWHUQHW WKH\¡UH WKH RQHV ZKR ZDWFK WKH VKRZV WKH\¡UH WKH RQHV ZKR ELQJH 7KH IDFW LV WKDW 1HWĂ L[ LVQ¡W VKDSLQJ LWVHOI WR Ă€W LQ ZLWK WKH QHWZRUNV LW¡V VKDSLQJ WKH QHWZRUNV WR Ă€W LQWR 1HWĂ L[ :KR NQRZV PD\EH \HDUV IURP QRZ ZH ZRQ¡W HYHQ KDYH QHWZRUNV DQ\PRUH ZH¡OO MXVW KDYH GLIIHUHQW 1HWĂ L[HV 1HWĂ LL" DQG WKH\¡OO DOO Ă€W LQWR RQH PHJD 1HWĂ L[ WKH 1HWZRU[ ,W¡V IXQ WR WKLQN DERXW WKRXJK DW WKH UDWH WKLQJV DUH moving, we may not have long to dwell on it. We are in the middle of a TV revolution, a renaissance, whatever you wanna call it; change is coming. Big, red, commercial-free change.

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COMEDY

L.A. Comedian Mike Citera

love watching live comedy, knowing that I will be witnessing something dynamic and that the comedians can artfully take the most mundane subject matter and transform it into a three-dimensional world where everything is funny. Comedians have the ability to see between the lines of everyday life and find the nuances that we take for granted. I sat down with L.A. comic Mike Citera, to learn about what it takes to be a success in comedy. Citera tours and headlines clubs all over the country, and it’s clear that comedy is something that came naturally to him. “When I was 15 I did stand-up at a summer camp talent show, and that went fantastic,” he recalls. “I started to go into New York, experimenting at shows and open mics in Manhattan.” Having found his calling at a young age, Citera kept the momentum going while attending Ithaca College in upstate New York and made the move to Los Angeles to devote himself to a full-time career on stage. The move was a natural transition. “The day I got here I was like, ‘Yeah, this is where I want to live,’” he says. “I got off the plane, and I went to In-N-Out, I went to a beach, I went to a comedy club and thought, ‘I love this town, this is me.’” With his boyish charm and good looks, Citera wins audiences over the moment he steps on stage. Watching him perform feels like watching a friend casually tell jokes to another group of friends. Citera is aware of the small steps it takes to win over an audience. “On stage I smile a lot so I always look like I’m happy and having fun, and it makes the audience feel more comfortable,” he admits. “If a comic is smiling and laughing along, it makes them more endearing.” It’s a known fact among comedians that people laugh when they’re surprised. However, a comic has to connect to their audience before surprising them. Once Citera has established that oneness, he takes the crowd for a topsyturvy ride. “I have a lot of stories in my act about reckless things that I did because I just don’t say ‘no’ to stuff. Bad stuff happens, but it’s funny later,” he admits. “At the time it’s pretty disastrous. I wind up on a lot of adventures I shouldn’t be on.” The life of comedian can be rough. Establishing a career can take decades, and once that career is up and run-

ning, comics spend all their weekends touring. It’s a road few can travel, but for Citera, the dedication to his craft pays off regularly. “It’s the most elating feeling in the world to be in a good set where you’re fully connected with the audience, where they’re eating up your every word and they’re in the zone. It’s like having 150 friends listening and hanging out for the 45 minutes you’re on stage. It’s a feeling of ultimate acceptance when all these people you don’t know are just eating up what you say,” he describes. “Even from an audience member’s perspective, when I’m watching somebody amazing on stage really working it, you’re just in awe. It’s such a cool artform because they’re taking you on a journey just by talking, or sitting in a chair or standing with a microphone. It’s very simple. If you go to see a really great show, you get as much out of one person talking as you would at a full Broadway production.” —Ariel Kashanchi

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Photo Credit: Jocelyn James/Living Out Loud LA

On stage I smile a lot so I always look like I’m happy and having fun, and it makes the audience feel more comfortable Mike Citera performs July 15 at Irvine Improv and July 18 at the Comedy Store. For more information, visit mikecitera.com.

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|11


MUSIC

Foxy Shazam: alex nauth, aaron McVeigh, Loren turner, eric nally, daisy caplan and sky White

Photo Credit: Steven King

FOXY SHAZAM Goes Gonzo

incinnati band Foxy Shazam dropped C their fifth studio album, Gonzo, quite un-

expectedly as a free download on their website in April. Gonzo is not only their most raw and unapologetic work to date, according to lead vocalist Eric Nally (who has been referred to as the imagined love child of The Mighty Boosh actor Noel Fielding and Queen frontman Freddie Mercury), it reveals Foxy Shazam’s inner darkness and exposes their most secret thoughts for the world to “take apart.” Gonzo is the band’s first concept album, touching on topics like family, change and fear. Nally ventures into new territory as a songwriter and talks about his struggle to break out of the shadow of his father, on whom he based his onstage persona. “It feels like I’m escalating a steep cave or mapping uncharted areas,” explains Nally. “I wanted to go to those places deep inside myself and write about it. It’s scary to dig inside yourself, find something very personal and give it to the world for everybody to tear apart.” The album dissects Nally’s thoughts about his changing relationship with himself and with his father. “Something changed with my dad as I got older. I love him with all my heart and always will, but there was a point, right before I wrote Gonzo, where I saw something in him I’ve never seen before, and it was scary,” he remembers. “I looked up to him; everything I did on stage and the personality that I brought to the foreground of Foxy Shazam was inspired by him. At

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first it was awesome, but then it started to become something not so awesome.” The energetic singer on stage is docile, sweet and comforting off stage. His honesty is refreshing and his answers candid and vulnerable. “Sometimes after I read what I say [in interviews] I feel stupid for saying it. It’s hard; I don’t think I’ll ever understand myself. But it’s OK, I don’t want to hide behind anything. I want to experience my true life and put it into art,” he shares. “I’m happy to be able to express everything I go through in my music. Once I record it, it’s like a breadcrumb trail that, when I'm old, I can look back at and see what I felt.” The band members – which also include pianist Sky White, bassist Daisy Caplan, guitarist Loren Turner, trumpeter and vocalist Alex Nauth and drummer Aaron McVeigh – admit they have learned the art of simplification. “It seems like everything is much more simple. When we were a young band, I always wanted to make things happen fast. I was looking for something or someone to help me become a famous rock star and bring my music to the world. Now I know that I will do it no matter what,” tells Nally. “There’s no more trying, I just have to be true to what I want. I realized I don't have to look for something out there, there’s something inside me, and it’s been here the whole time.” Foxy Shazam recruited producer Steve Albini, known for his lo-fi engineering, for Gonzo. Despite the prolific list of prominent artists Albini has worked with (Nir-

By Brenda Camberos

vana, the Pixies, Robert Plant), the band wasn’t intimidated; they were well aware of what they were in for when they called on him. “We forgot about all the outside things and focused on the fact that we were doing what we wanted to do, so when we came into the studio I think he sensed that we were 100-percent sure of what we wanted to do,” says Nally. “That made the whole process go smoother. He did what he’s best at and we did what we’re best at, and it worked.” The singer admits that Gonzo is one of their most arduous and most honest efforts, and the band felt the need to donate it to the world. “This is the most genuine energy we’ve put into an album. We wanted to put everything out and take nothing back,” Nally says of releasing the album for free. “Even though we need to make money to support our families, we wanted to make it clear that, for us, it’s about the music and making it available to our fans.” Although they have bared it all on Gonzo, the singer concedes that there’s even more turf to be conquered. “[Their last album, The Church of Rock and Roll,] shows our dynamism, diversity and how many places we can go. The possibilities are endless, and I promise you we will always keep making music.” Gonzo is currently available. Foxy Shazam performs July 31 at the El Rey Theatre. For more information, visit foxyshazam.com.

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MUSIC

SUNSET CONCERTS

T

AT SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER

he 18th annual free community concert series brings a dynamic set of performers to the Skirball Cultural Center this summer, and the fun begins at 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 24. This year’s lineup features Noura Mint Seymali in her California debut July 24; Conjunto Chappotín y Sus Estrellas in their California debut as part of their U.S. premiere tour July 31; the Haden Triplets (Tanya, Rachel and Petra) Aug. 7; the conjunto sounds of Flaco Jiménez and Max Baca & Los Texmaniacs Aug. 14; Yiddish Tango Club Aug. 21; and Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys Aug. 28. “We usually do a series of free summer concerts, and this summer we’re doing six,” says Jordan Peimer, Vice President of Programs for Skirball Cultural Center. “It’s really an opportunity for the community to come together. It’s free, a great time and a great alternative [for this summer]. There are no hassles with parking, it’s a fun atmosphere, you can get up and dance, have food … it’s just a party. There’s some serious music, don't get me wrong, but it’s just a great place for people to hang out together.” The Skirball’s concert series venue is their outdoor central courtyard, an ideal location for summer activities since it’s near the Santa Monica Mountains. Peimer thinks that it’s just the perfect setting.

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“It’s part of what makes it special. The backdrop for the stage is the Santa Monica Mountains themselves,” he says. “You get to see the moon rise. It just makes for a cool atmosphere, informal but fun. You really get to enjoy the environment.” In addition to its idyllic atmosphere, the Skirball has put together a topnotch lineup of world music. “We center on world music, and unlike other venues, we also have an emphasis on both local artists and American roots music. We also bring in artists from all over the world,” says Peimer. “This year, we have [Noura Mint Seymali] coming from Mauritania, northwest Africa, and the Yiddish Tango Club, which has both local and Buenos Aires roots. We also have the California premiere of Conjunto Chappotín y Sus Estrellas, which are this kick-ass tropical group from Cuba that have never toured the U.S. before. They really set the standard of what the tropical sound is.” The folk music trio of the Haden Triplets is comprised of the daughters of legendary jazz bassist Charlie Haden, and they are set to provide an entertaining night of vocal interplay. Leonardo “Flaco” Jiménez, a musical treat on accordion and a five-time Grammy winner, joins with Max Baca & Los Texmaniacs. Both acts are of the conjunto tejano genre.

By Marvin Vasquez

“This summer we’re trying something completely new, and we'll be getting rid of a lot of the seating to make room for a larger dance floor,” says Peimer. “For future summers, we’re looking towards the idea of making that the norm … The thing is, it’s so cross-generational. “You’ll have people in their 80s – especially this one person who has been coming for the last eight years in a wheelchair – and [they’re] out there dancing. Old people are dancing and young people are dancing, it’s one of the only venues where that's happening.” Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys, a traditional zydeco group, close out the series. Over the years, the city of Los Angeles has offered many complimentary music events to its residents. Peimer acknowledges that and is proud to be involved in continuing the legacy. “Los Angeles has a long tradition of free concerts, and I think we’re a big part of that,” he says. “This city has so much to offer, and I’m really happy that the Skirball can be a part of that.”

The Skirball Cultural Center is located at 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. For more information, call (310) 440-4500 or visit skirball.org.

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FASHION F FASHI ASHION

Paul Van Van Dyk Par tners with TOMS on Limited-Edition Collection

By Lupita Woo Woo

Trance icon, Paul Van Dyk is headed into fashion. V for pioneering the trance dance music sub-genre in the early 1990s and is an award-winning visionary in the electronic music. From music venues across with world to a major shoe and eyewear collection with TOMS, Van Dyk is making his mark in the fashion world. TOMS was founded in 2006 by American traveler Blake Mycoskie DIWHU Ă€QGLQJ RXW WKDW FKLOGUHQ LQ D VPDOO YLOODJH LQ $UJ around with no shoes. Wanting to help, Blake created that would match every pair of shoes purchased with a pair of new shoes given to a child in need. We all now know it as One for One. Knowing that this idea could serve other basic needs, was launched. With every pair of glasses sold, TOMS would help give sight to a person in need. Being a world traveler himself, Van Dyk wanted to be a part of this project. So, the German Grammy-nominated DJ, musician and record producer has partnered with TOMS. The shoe and eyewear collaboration IHDWXUHV D JDODWLF LQVSLUHG GHVLJQ ZLWK 9DQ '\N¡V VL 7KHUH¡V DOVR D QRG WR KLV 9DQGLW UHFRUG ODEHO ORJR 9DQ '\N LV H[FLWHG DERXW WKH SDLULQJ ZLWK 7206 laboration with any fashion house. As soon as he learned about the One for One program, he knew he had to do it. His rationale was simple: if you can help, help. The TOMS x Paul Van Dyk shoe collection is available in two dif ent silhouettes: TOMS Classics for men and women at $59 and Paseo Mids for men at $70. The collaboration also features a Beach master eyewear frame, priced at $125. The entire collection is now available at TOMS.com and TOMS retail locations. For more information on Paul V Van an Dyk, visit paulvandyk.com. )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ RQ 9DQ '\N¡V FROODERU Left: The Classics for men and women ($59) Right: The Paseo Mids for men ($70)

Photo credit: Rafael Orellana/Living Out Loud LA

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PHOTOS BY JOSE GARIBAY

CULTURE

Liz Fairbairn and Rita D’Albert

LUCHA VAVOOM

Meet the Ladies behind Mexican Masked Wrestling, Striptease and Comedy Wonder


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magine being transported into a world filled with actionpacked stunts, sexy acrobatics and high-energy comedy. This is the world of Lucha VaVOOM,

a Los Angeles-based production that introduces audiences into a new reality rife with a chaos that’s both harmonious and exhilarating, and incorporates the Mexican art of freestyle wrestling known as Lucha Libre, burlesque and comedy. Living Out Loud LA recently had the privilege of sitting down with the founders of Lucha VaVOOM to learn about how they created a show that transcends categories. Rita D’Albert was the co-producer of the famed burlesque troupe Velvet Hammer when she met special-effects costume designer Liz Fairbairn. The two shared a similar strong work ethic and vision, and decided to join forces to conceive a show that married sex, violence and humor in a format that hadn’t been presented before. Their first show was 12 years ago, and it has become a cultural phenomenon since then. D’Albert recalls the first time Lucha VaVOOM was introduced to the public. “The first time we did it, we didn’t know how it was going to turn out,” she begins. “You couldn’t rehearse it. The ring is set up that day. The wrestlers arrive from Mexico that day.” The show was an overwhelming success with over 750 audience members. Lucha VaVOOM eventually found the perfect home at the Mayan Theater in Downtown where audiences are treated to four shows a year. D’Albert knew immediately that the Mayan was the right fit. “It’s one of those things that happened naturally, and it’s been our home ever since,” she says. “For a show like Lucha VaVOOM to even exist, and the reason why it could have only happened in Los Angeles, is because at the time we started out, Downtown wasn’t booming. There was this beautiful theater and an owner that was willing to take a chance on us and make it affordable for us to do.” Fairbairn describes how they were able to combine the different elements so impeccably: “I would say one of the more stellar parts of our show is the pacing. Before you’ve been able to absorb this bizarre girl climbing a pole, there’s a mini chicken running out.” The show is a non-stop fantasy that begins the moment an audience arrives at the venue. While in line

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to enter, the crowd is treated to a lowrider car parade that drops off the performers – much like the traditional Luchadores custom. D’Albert says, “We really want it to be a treat. From the second you get there, you just forget about everything else and let yourself go and have fun. Just give yourself to this experience.” The Lucha VaVOOM cast, much like the founders and the venue, has a familial feel which D’Albert and Fairbairn have intentionally cultivated, with some cast members even falling in love and coupling up on stage. Jose Ruiz, a member of the Los Calaveras luchadore team, speaks about the first time he connected with his now girlfriend during a performance.

“She plays the Kissing Bandit, and she came onto the stage and kissed me,” he shares. “We’ve been together ever since.” Fairbairn makes sure to encourage the family dynamic within the production. “We try to hire our cast member’s significant other to make it inclusive and to make everybody happy,” she says. With years of production success behind her, D’Albert knows how to cast burlesque dancers who are in line with Lucha VaVOOM’s all-encompassing nature. “Women [in the audience] aren’t put off by the dancers,” she describes. “They’re very skilled and inclusive. They’re girls who are friends with girls. The women we cast are gorgeous and talented, but they’re not predatory.” With a high-caliber roster of wrestlers on the verge of being cast by the WWE and top burlesque dancers, Lucha VaVOOM has also had some of the country’s best comedians hosting the show throughout the years. Comics like Blaine Capatch, Fred Armisen, Patton Oswalt, Greg Proops and Chris Hardwick, just to name a few, have brought their charm to the show. Make sure to join Lucha VaVOOM for their next show, the Sexy Hot Summer Fun Spectacular, taking place July 17 at the Mayan Theater for an amazing summertime outing. For tickets and more information, visit luchavavoom.com.

—Ariel Kashanchi

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CULTURE CUL TURE

Luna Vine Wine B a r Shines C Shin Coozy and Cl Classy in Magnolia Par Par arkk By Pa Paul Zahn

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Taste and learn about new wines at Luna Vine Wine Bar. Photo Credit: Jessie Caballero, jessieshungry.com

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The Ahi Tartare is scrumptious. Photo Credit: Jessie Caballero, jessieshungry.com

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CULTURE CULTURE

LA HIDDEN GEMS 101:

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FASHION

NEXT WAVE

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AMY ROILAND: TOP PLUMERIA SWIMWEAR HAT VINTAGE NECKLACE VINTAGE SHORTS VINTAGE SUNGLASSES VINTAGE

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AMY ROILAND: BUSTIER FOREVER 21 SHORTS FOREVER 21 HAT FOREVER 21 SUNGLASSES VINTAGE

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AMY ROILAND: UNITARD FOREVER 21 SHORTS PINKYOTTO NECKLACE ZARA SCARF VINTAGE SUNGLASSES VINTAGE

CREDITS MODEL: AMY ROILAND AFASHIONNERD.COM PHOTOGRAPHER: MORGAN DEMETER MORGANDEMETER.COM CREATIVE DIRECTOR/STYLIST: JACLYN JOAN KULLBERG ASSISTANT STYLIST: AMANDA SEMRAD ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHER: LORIE WHEELER CALIENTE BIKINI IN CORAL (PAGE 22-23) FURNISHED BY PLUMERIASWIMWEAR.COM

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FASHION

JORG GRAY

Unveils Limited-Edition CLINT DEMPSEY Watch

Clint Dempsey wears his signiture Jorg Gray timepiece

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There aren’t many accessories more popular in the men's fashion world at the moment than a good watch. And in terms of sports, it’s difficult to find a game more popular at the moment than soccer. Fresh off the success and record popularity of the U.S. men’s soccer team at this year’s World Cup, Tustin-based luxury watch company Jorg Gray has teamed with American soccer superstar Clint Dempsey to bring a one-of-a-kind, limited-edition watch inspired by Dempsey himself. In a phone interview with Dani M. Rothenberg, Director of Sales and Marketing for Jorg Gray, he shares several of the inspirations and goals behind the making of the watch – of which only 1,000 were made. “We’re a young American brand based in California,” says Rothenberg. “When we selected our brand ambassadors, we really focused on selecting young Americans who are excelling on a global scale – essentially what we’re trying to accomplish as well.” Aside from Dempsey, the company also has a partnership with 21-yearold San Clemente native Connor De Phillippi, who competes in the Porsche Carrera Cup Germany as a Porsche Junioren driver. In less than six years of existence, Jorg Gray has managed to make a notable imprint on the time piece industry. Rothenberg says that the company’s goal is simple: to make quality watches with top-tier design and to grow alongside their brand ambassadors, such as Dempsey. “The way the brand originally started was as a private label,” he says. “We got our claim to fame when we designed our watch for the U.S. Secret Service, who then gifted it to – at the time – Senator [Barack] Obama, as he was running for President. [It has continued] to be his watch of choice since he’s been in office. So internationally and in the U.S., Jorg Gray’s claim to fame is that it started as the watch of the President, the watch of the U.S. Secret Service, which [it still is] today.” When asked specifically about the reason behind Jorg Gray’s partnership with Dempsey, Rothenberg says, “He’s the captain of the U.S. national team. He’s the face of U.S. soccer, which obviously is a global sport. So everything he represents, down to his actual personality. You know, he’s very bold, very fashion-oriented and he likes to look good.” The watch itself is very soccer-inspired. It comes with a 45-minute time display – which is the length of a half in a soccer game – along with an embossed soccer ball on the case of the watch. It also comes with Dempsey’s signature, as well as his nickname, “Deuce,” on the display of the watch. “We [and Dempsey] kind of went back and forth in terms of the de sign,” says Rothenberg. “He was a big fan of [the color] black, the way we designed the bezel on the watch and then all the way to the soccer ball on the back to the stoppage timer along the side of the watch …Obviously he wanted a chronograph and something that looked very manly and sporty. “He was in love with it [when he first saw the watch, he] couldn’t take it off. [He] ordered quite a few for himself and his friends. I was with him over in England last year when he was still in Totten ham, and he was very proud of the watch.” The watch comes at a retail price of $795 and can be purchased locally at Feldmar Watch Co. (9000 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles) or online at feldmarwatch.com/timepieces/Jorg-Gray/. For more information, visit jorggray.com. -Francisco Reyes

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CULTURE D*FACE dface.co.uk (917 3rd Street)

RISK riskrock.com, REVOK revok1.com, ABEL (7th and Santa Fe)

TRUSTO trustocorp.com (3rd St. and Traction)

BACKDROPS OF THE CITY

PHOTO CREDIT: OLIVER NOWLIN

STR EET ART: DTLA AR TS DISTRICT

ARYZ aryz.es, DAVID CHOE davidchoe.com (7th St. and Mateo)

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US Open of Surfing SPORTS

Returns to Huntington Beach 2013 VAN DOREN BMX Invitational

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SURF LEGEND Kelly Slater

them tearing down the stop sign,” Burt Etheredge, a store employee of the HB Easyrider shop, told NBC Los Angeles. “As soon as that stop sign came down, I knew that stop sign was coming through the window. And sure enough, two seconds later, it did.” Event organizers issued a statement via Facebook saying that they were very saddened and disappointed by the riots. This year aims to start things off with a clean slate, eliminating music performances and focusing on the surfing, skateboarding and BMX riding. The US Open of Surfing brings top surfers from around the world to compete for one of the largest prizes that the industry offers in hopes of becoming dubbed “the world’s greatest surfer.” The list of US Open of Surfing champions has included Kelly Slater, Rob Machado, Andy Irons, Julian Wilson, Stephanie Gilmore, Carissa

Moore, Courtney Conlogue and Southern California native Brett Simpson. Simpson, raised in Huntington Beach, won the US Open of Surfing Competition in 2009 and successfully defended his title the subsequent year in 2010. Set to compete in 2014, the locals are sure to cheer on their man who was named the Orange County Surfer of the Year two years in a row in 2008 and 2009. Other participants include Slater, CJ Hobgood, Julian Wilson and Jordy Smith. Some of the women in this year's lineup are Moore, Sally Fitzgibbons, Malia Manuel and Bianca Buitendag. The Vans US Open of Surfing takes place from July 26 through Aug. 3, and those wishing to attend should make plans in advance, as nearby hotels tend to sell out each year. —Dougal Brownlie For the full lineup and more information, visit vansusopenofsurfing.com.

PHOTO CREDITS FROM LEFT: BRANDON MEANS / MICHAEL LALLANDE PHOTOGRAPHY / SHIGEOPHOTO

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outhern California plays host to the world’s largest surf competition and lifestyle festival, the Vans US Open of Surfing, held in Huntington Beach. For one week every summer, “Surf City” attracts over half a million people for surf, skateboard and BMX events. This year is sure to draw a large crowd, as Huntington Beach is celebrating 100 years of surf. The celebration is hopefully going to put all thoughts of last year’s event being marred by riots out of attendees’ minds. While an unofficial number of 750,000 people showed up at the 2013 Open, there was a lack of wave action and long lines, creating a sour note for many. Thousands of kids had nothing else to do but rebel out of boredom. “We were all huddled inside the building and we had the lights off because all the people were up here mobbing around, and I was inside and I saw

Omar Hassan in 2013 Qualifier

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ATHLETE OF THE MONTH

The Galaxy's Gyasi Zardes Aims To Be Noticed for the Right Reasons

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PHOTO CREDIT: NOAH SALZMAN

where I am now.” Although Zardes’ background information states his rise to the MLS came through organized youth teams and as an NCAA athlete, he honed his soccer skills near his childhood home in Hawthorne. “Coming in as a [high-school] freshman, I was playing against players that used to play in the streets. There was this park by Leuzinger called Jim Thorpe Park, and every day after school everybody used to play there until the late hours of the night,” he recalls. “It was a great experience just going to Leuzinger and then experiencing this park because everybody from that school who played soccer went to that park to play futsal.” What Zardes was fortunate to have in his youth that many other kids who aspire to be athletes don’t is someone like Kamara to give them advice. Because of that, Zardes doesn’t take the fact that he is now a role model lightly. “What I say to the kids is to always have faith and you can achieve anything. A motto I live by is, ‘Every day you don’t train, somebody else in the world is getting better than you.’ So try to train as much as you can every single day.” This MLS season Zardes has started in five games and has scored three goals, a vast improvement from the four goals he had in 23 starts last season. There are clear signs that he is maturing rapidly on the field in nuanced ways. He has added more finesse to his flashy skills and has improved his shot selection and presence as a forward. Although his eye-catching appearance and blunt predictions of his future are the most noticeable quali-

Have faith and you can achieve anything. ties about Zardes, neither of those things are going to help him reach his promising potential. If and when he does make it to the World Cup and prominently establishes himself on that stage, it is going to be the lessons of humility he has learned over the years that push him to the top. Considering where the path he chose from a very young age has taken him, there are no indicators that he will ever veer off that same course. —Francisco Reyes

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yasi Zardes is someone who does not go unnoticed. From his dynamic speed on the field and his signature blond-and-black Mohawk to his interview at the 2013 MLS SuperDraft where he told Los Angeles Galaxy fans, “My skill is going to blow your mind,” the 22-year-old second-year forward from Hawthorne, Calif. is not afraid of the limelight. Some may think those are telltale signs of an arrogant player who has yet to be humbled by the realities of life as a young professional athlete. But when he shares stories from his past, they show a player with an unending amount of gratitude for all the people and circumstances that led him to achieve his lifelong dream. Like countless kids around the world, Zardes dreamed of becoming a professional soccer player from a young age. He recalls his years in middle school – before he became a prep soccer star at Leuzinger High School – as the time when he first felt he had a chance of becoming a pro. “[Becoming a pro soccer player] has always been a dream. I knew if I trained every day, I’d get better every day – I knew I was capable of achieving that goal,” says Zardes. “Kei Kamara, he was a big influence on my life. He graduated from Leuzinger years ahead of me, but he used to come back and mentor me. Seing him make it to [Cal State] Dominguez Hills and into the MLS, I knew if I followed his footsteps I could make it that far.” Zardes and Kamara remain close even now that Kamara is playing for Middlesbrough in England after seven years in the MLS. A glance through Zardes’ Instagram account reveals even more about the young forward. Pictures of him with his wife and newborn son make up a large share of his posts, along with photos of his days at Cal State Bakersfield and moments with his dad. He credits his father’s tireless efforts as one of the main reasons he made it to the MLS. “We have a family of five, but my father really pushed me,” says Zardes. “He sacrificed a lot for me. He used to come home from work and take me to practice [in Pasadena], which was two hours away, and then two hours back. He used to sacrifice four hours taking me to training through downtown L.A. traffic, so my Dad was definitely a motivation. I thank him for everything he’s done for me to get to

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My favorite summertime song would have to be Mungo Jerry’s 1970s hit “In the Summertime.” Not only is this song the epitome of chilling on a beautiful summer's day, but also encompasses a philosophy of appreciating life in general. —Chris G.

“School’s Out” by Alice Cooper because every year when June rolled around I always became excited knowing that I had finished exams, all that hard work was finished and I could relax and enjoy the summer break. It was the perfect song to start off the two months of sun, swimming and hanging out with friends. —Dougal B.

“Boys of Summer” by the Ataris. One of my favorite covers ever! —Francisco R.

What is your favorite summertime song (from any period) - why does it represent summer to you and why do you love it so much? Right now my favorite summer track is “Aminals” by Baths. It’s just refreshing – the whole album feels like dunking your head in cold water. —Mark M.

Keiko Matsui – “Reflections.” Some of my best summer memories have been created at various jazz festivals, from the JVC Jazz Festival in Concord to Jazz Fest at the Hollywood Bowl. The rhythmic groove of jazz is so soothing and has this way of lighting up any warm summer night with its sweet sound.—Nichole J.

"Summer Nights" by John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John from Grease —Lizette R. “Let Me Ride” by Dr. Dre. Those ’90s G-funk synths and funk-sampled drums make for some smooth cruisin’ music best played while driving around with the top down soaking in the sun. —Dash F. I will always love “Summertime.” It has all the elements of a perfect teenage summer outing. —Ariel K.

Sublime’s cover of “Guava Jelly.” Anything Sublime reminds me of summer, actually. A young Dillon, sitting in the truck with his Dad as we drive to his house, listening to every Sublime song possible. I have a lot of great memories listening to Sublime during the days of summer. —Dillon C.

“Hella Good” by No Doubt is one of my favorite summer songs. It’s not quite about summer, but it reminds me of the sun and surf of Los Angeles and the nightlife of the season. —Sabina I.

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“Happy Together” by the Turtles, or anything by the Turtles really. That song reminds me of being a kid and playing outside. —Taylor W.

A no-brainer, "Summertime," by DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince. This song ties in everything about summer, friends, laughter, fun and relaxation. —Elisa H. “California Girls” because, duh! We have the best weather, the best girls and killer summers! — Brenda C.

Don’t even need to think about this one; it's automatic. DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince's “Summertime.” As soon as I hear it, I know it’s summer, barbecues, friends and family. —Ariel P. “Boys of Summer” by the Ataris will always remind me of summer. I always loved the original by Don Henley and although I never really got into the Ataris’ original stuff, I “Back in the Day” (Live) by thought they did a great job capturing the feel Eyrkah Badu is my choice, because of the song. The lyrics are the opposite of the how can you go wrong with Badu, traditional “good-time summer song,” and it Chappelle and block party. That reminds me of getting older and missing the sentence alone is epic! —Oliver N. days when things were simpler. It’s a song about growing up and lost love that I always have related to. —Evan S. Summer represents lots of beach time and barbecues. My favorite summertime song is "Summer Romance (AntiGravity Love Song)" by Incubus! —Erica C.

STAFF PICKS

My favorite summer jam of all time is without a doubt Pharrell Williams’ “Frontin’” because this is the song that introduced me to Skateboard P. Also, this video is still to this day one of my favorites because it got me started on this whole “fashion” thing in the hip-hop world. Not to mention the cool house with the hanging bed and the crazy electronics for the year 2003 blew my mind as a youngster. —Pablo L.

“Get Lucky” by Daft Punk. I remember listening to that song over and over, I’m in my friend’s car and hearing it almost everywhere we went that summer. —Gabriel P. Smif-n-Wessun’s “Wrekonize” because it’s my song of the summer for this summer. —Patrick M.

My favorite summertime song is a tie between two classics, “Summer in the City” by the Lovim’ Spoonful and Alice Cooper’s “School’s Out.” — Jaclyn K.

“Doin’ Time” by Sublime. If summer could drive a car, it would be bumping this song on the way to the beach. Every time I hear this song it just puts me in the mood to go chill at the beach with some friends and enjoy the summer breeze. —Andrew C.

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Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Comes to SoCal with “Legends” CULTURE

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ingling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus pulls into the greater L.A. area with their latest presentation, “Legends,” stopping at Staples Center in Downtown (July 9-15), Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario (July 18-22) and Honda Center in Anaheim (July 25-Aug. 3). The show is currently on tour, something that clown Scarlett Sullivan feels “very good” about. “As a clown, I engage the audience on hand and bring them through the show," she adds. "Some people like clowns, some people like trapeze – it really just depends on who they are.” This particular Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey show not only feature clowns, as usual, but many other entertainers, too. “We do lots of things,” remarks Sullivan. “Legends” consists of over 100 performers from 25 countries around the globe, in addition to the 85 animals who delight the crowd during the nearly two-hour performance. Some of the acts include the China National Acrobatic Troupe from Beijing, who put their many talents on display. These include the act of balancing 20 people on two bicycles, rapid hoop diving and Diabolo juggling skills. “Legends” also sports the Double Trapeze show, a specialty of Ringling Bros. In it, there are four consecutive triple somersaults; it's a mustsee. Big Cats Trainer and Presenter Alexander Lacey, edge-of-your-seat Cossack Riders doing equestrian stunts and Globe of Steel motorcycle daredevils are all be part of the spectacle. “We have new phenomenal acts, as well,” remarks Sullivan. “And during our pre-show, an

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hour before the performance, you can come and meet the performers, and also get to see a few extras you don't get to see during the regular show.” Sullivan also explains how much preparation goes into each show. “Every day, we come in an hour early for the pre-show to do makeup and get into costumes, etc.,” she says. “Some take 20 minutes for makeup, some take a full hour. It also helps with the mental process; it clams you down, gets you into character.”

“ This will be a

completely different show than anyone has ever seen.

PHOTO CREDIT: Feld Media

Clown Scarlett Sullivan performs as part of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey's "Legends."

Sullivan, who has been with the company for over five years, has enjoyed her time as a clown in every Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey show over the span of her career. Sullivan is trained in improvisation and sketch comedy from places like Second City. When an audition came up for Ringling

Bros., she thought, "That would be awesome." So, here she is now and loving it. “It's wonderful. It falls into its own comedy genre,” she describes. “I think the interaction with the audience [the most],” she says. “Everything from working the angles to making sure at least one person in the audience is happy. Every day it's a new thing. We're all very close, it's like a big family. It's just a lot of fun. Every city brings something different.” “Legends” also boasts many interactive elements before the show even begins. Fans can visit the Animal Open House (in Ontario and Anaheim only) to get up-close with the animals and the All Access Pre-Show (all venues), where families can step onto the arena floor and do cool things like meet performers and try on circus costumes. One new element that’s debuting is the exclusive and intimate fan experience within the Ringmaster Zone. So why else should L.A. area residents attend these shows? Sullivan is short and sweet about it. “This will be a completely different show than anyone has ever seen,” she says. After all, a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey show is “the greatest show on earth.”

—Edison Millan and Marvin Vasquez

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s “Legends” stops at Staples Center July 9-15, Citizens Business Bank Arena July 18-22 and Honda Center July 25-Aug. 3. For tickets and ringling.com.

more

information,

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