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Š StreetSmart Australia 2012. For permission to reproduce information contained within this guide contact StreetSmart Australia.


The LiveSmart Diary is designed to give young people who are taking the leap to independent living the skills to make it work. Not only is the diary a valuable resource to keep track of appointments, phone numbers, important events and more, it also holds heaps of info about getting a house, keeping healthy, budgeting, handy recipes and getting a job. To help young people get the right support along the way, useful contact numbers and websites are included in the back. Getting a house and keeping it is a big struggle for a lot of people. The diary contains some valuable information to make it a bit easier. It can also be used as a back-up when you’re just not sure what to do. The information contained in this publication is correct as at 1 October 2012.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The LiveSmart Diary is produced by StreetSmart Australia. StreetSmart works to support and strengthen grassroots community organisations that work with people experiencing homelessness. Visit www. streetsmartaustralia.org, facebook and Twitter. StreetSmart would like to acknowledge the team at Iramoo Youth Refuge, who developed the diary in 2006 with funding from StreetSmart. The Queensland edition is produced in partnership with the Queensland Youth Housing Coalition. Thank you to Maria Leebeek for her editing, contributions and distribution of the diary in Queensland. The QYHC website has a range of on-line resources for young people, please visit www.qyhc.org.au

4

The New South Wales edition is produced in partnership with Yfoundations. Thank you to Silvia Ruggeri, Ben Corio, and Jessie Halligan for their editing, contributions and distribution of the diary in New South Wales. The Yfoundations website has a range of on-line resources for young people, please visit www.yfoundations.org.au Design by Blue SKYS Media, cover design by Peter Karamitsios. Blue SKYS Media is a social enterprise run by St Kilda Youth Service (SKYS). Visit www.blueskysmedia.org.au Thanks to the services that distribute the LiveSmart Diary to young people. Thanks also to the past residents of Iramoo Youth Refuge for providing the original inspiration for this resource. We hope it makes a difference in the lives of many more young people.


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Year Planner How to... Housing Employment & Education Assistance Legal Internet, Social Networking & Social Media Health & Hygiene Smart Shopping Budgeting & Money Budget Pages Important Dates and School Terms Diary Get Cooking Recipes Useful Phone Numbers and Websites My Phone Numbers and Addresses Notes

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2013 JANUARY

MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN

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FEBRUARY

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JANUARY

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07 14 21 28

6

We 02 09 16 23 30

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Fr 04 11 18 25

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Su 06 13 20 27

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28

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MARCH

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FEBRUARY

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APRIL

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MARCH

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MAY

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Su 03 10 17 24 31

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

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APRIL

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JUNE

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 MAY

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Sa 04 11 18 25

Su 05 12 19 26

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2013 JULY

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 JULY

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OCTOBER

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AUGUST

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Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

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We 02 09 16 23 30

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NOVEMBER

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27

DECEMBER

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

04 11 18 25

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

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7


Get a Medicare Card… You can call the Medicare Hotline on 132 011 or visit your local Medicare office. If you are aged 15 or older and listed on your parents’ Medicare card you can be transferred to your own card and number simply by filling out a form, or you can apply for a new card. You can also access the forms you need on the website www.humanservices.gov.au Get a Passport… You can get a passport application package from your local Australia Post Office. You will need to make an appointment to have your application processed. Remember to get passport photos to take to your interview (you can get these done at a pharmacy or a Post Office). Get a Health Care Card… A Health Care Card entitles you to concessions on health-care costs. If you are receiving certain Centrelink payments you may be eligible for a Health Care Card – to find out contact your local Centrelink office or go to www.humanservices.gov.au

Get a Bank Account… You can get a bank account at any bank; all you need to do is go in there and apply. Banks require identification to the value of 100 points; you could use school reports, a birth certificate, passport, visa documents, driver licence or Medicare card. Ask them what forms of ID they accept. Do your research when choosing a bank, as bank fees vary. If you’re under 16 years of age you’ll need a parent or guardian to go with you.

8


Get Identification… If you’re under 18 years of age and you need photo ID you can get an Under 18 Keypass from Victoria Police stations. They cost $55 and you’ll need to show proof of your birth date, proof of your identity and proof of your address so take a birth certificate, passport or visa documents. You can also get an Over 18 Keypass www.keypass.com.au. Also available are Proof of Age Cards from the Department of Justice for those over 18. You can apply for these at some pharmacies, VicRoads and Australia Post. They cost $10.

Get a copy of your Birth Certificate… You can get a copy of your birth certificate from the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, located at 595 Collins St Melbourne, online at www.bdm.vic.gov.au, or by phoning 1300 369 367. You will have to show three forms of ID, one with your photo and signature, one with your residential address and one showing you operate in the community e.g. Bank Card, Medicare Card, Student Card.

Get a Tax File Number… You can get an application for a Tax File Number (TFN) from your local Australia Post office, by calling the Australian Taxation Office on 13 28 65 or by visiting their website at www.ato.gov.au Register to Vote… It is law in Australia that you have to be enrolled to vote if you are an Australian Citizen and over 18 years old. You can enrol online at www.vec.vic.gov.au, by getting an enrolment form from Australia Post or have one sent to you by calling 13 18 32.

Get a Learner Driver Permit... If you are 16 years or over, you can sit the test to get your learner’s permit. You’ll need to get a copy of the Road to Solo Driving handbook (also available to read online) to study before the test. Practice tests are available on the Vic Roads website www.vicroads.vic.gov.au You can also book your test online or you can call 13 11 71.

Get a Driver’s Licence... If you’ve had your learner’s permit for 12 months or more and you are 18 years old you are able to apply for a Probationary Driver’s licence. To be eligible you will need to submit a log book showing your 120 hours of driving practice with an experienced driver. To book your test, you can visit the Vic Roads website or call 13 11 71. It can be difficult for some people to get to the required 120 hours of driving practice. In some local government areas of Victoria, the L2P Project has volunteers and a car to help you get enough practice. Check the Vic Roads website to find out about L2P programs in your local area and to see if you’re eligible for support.

9


Finding a house can be a difficult task, especially if you’re in crisis. Whether you need supported accommodation or want to do it alone, here are some things to think about: •

How much can you afford to spend on rent? Create a budget to see how much you currently spend each week/fortnight. Don’t forget to plan for living expenses like bills and food (use the budget planners provided in the diary).

Where do you want to live? This will often depend on how much rent you can afford. You should also think about location in terms of your daily activities like school or work, friends and family, transport and recreational activities.

Who do you want to live with? Do you want a place by yourself, with people you don’t know, with friends, with guys or girls, with people who work or study, with smokers or non-smokers? Make a list of what you will and won’t put up with. We all have standards!

What type of housing do you want or need?

Crisis & Youth Housing... Crisis and Youth Housing Services across Melbourne and Victoria can provide short to medium-term accommodation. These services can be accessed through regional entry points by calling 1800 825 955.

10


Private Rental... Private houses are rented through a real estate agent or private landlord. If you’re interested in private rental it’s important to make a good first impression with a real estate agent to show you are responsible and respectful. You will also need to have at least two referees and show that you are financially capable of paying the rent. If you are offered a property, you will need at least four weeks’ rent in advance and money for the bond. Bond money is usually the equivalent of four weeks’ rent. You can get assistance with the bond from the Office of Housing on 1300 650 172 and rent in advance assistance from Transitional Housing Managers, visit www.melbourne. homeless.org.au/transitional.html. You need to keep in mind that you may have to furnish the house yourself, which can cost a bit of money, so plan ahead. You have rights and responsibilities as a tenant under the Victorian Residential Tenancies Act. Make sure that you sign a lease and that the bond goes to the Bond Authority. Get hold of a copy of the Tenant’s Handbook from the real estate agent or the landlord. These are available in English as well as other languages. It’s also important to do a condition report when you first move in so that you are not held responsible for damage that already existed before you moved in. If you have any questions about your rights as a tenant or problems with your real estate agent or landlord, you can call Consumer Affairs Victoria for advice on 1300 558 181. If you are on a low income and in private rental you can apply to Centrelink for Rent Assistance to help you meet your rent payments.

Share Accommodation... Share accommodation is usually in private houses where there is a vacant room. Share housing notice boards are located in various bookshops, on the internet and at universities or TAFEs. It’s also useful to look in the local and weekend newspapers for vacant rooms.

Rooming Houses... Rooming houses have shared living areas but private rooms. If you are a resident of a Rooming House you have rights under the Victorian Residential Tenancies Act. Make sure you get a copy of Rooming Houses – A Guide For Tenants, when you move in. You can get information about Rooming Houses from Homeless Assistance Services or regional entry points. Call 1800 825 955. Student Housing... Student housing is where a large number of students share facilities and there are organised recreational and social activities. You can find out about student housing on university and TAFE websites.

Rental Housing Cooperatives... Co-ops are available in some areas of Victoria. They offer subsidised rent in properties owned and managed by the co-op. Tenants are expected to participate in the management of the co-op and have input into how the co-op runs. To apply, you will need to contact the Co-op directly. Go to www.housingregistrar.vic.gov.au.

11


There are rules for young people about going to school. It is a legal requirement for all young people to attend school or an approved equivalent until they turn 17. These requirements affect the Youth Allowance. There are heaps of places that can help you decide what to do with your future and help you understand what financial support is available. Here’s just a few:

12

Centrelink Social Workers and Community Support Workers can guide you through the options that Centrelink provides for both students and young people looking for work. If you need to contact Centrelink to register for Youth Allowance, other benefits and for information phone 13 24 90. Or to find your local Centrelink office go to www.humanservices.gov.au

Job Services Australia provides support for young people 15 to 25 years who are looking for a job or training opportunity. Call (03) 9611 2440.


Youth Connections is a service for young people who are at risk of leaving school, or who have left school without completing Year 12. Case management support is provided to assist young people to address barriers to participating in education, training or employment. To find your local Youth Connections provider you can contact Centrelink or visit www. deewr.gov.au

JobSearch is your one-stop shop for jobs and career information. Contact 13 62 68 or visit www.jobsearch.gov.au

The Student Income Bank allows students receiving Youth Allowance who have a job to earn some money and still receive a fortnightly allowance without any deductions. Check out www.humanservices.gov.au for more information.

Indigenous job seekers •

Find out about the Indigenous Employment Program at www.deewr.gov/ Indigenous/Employment/Programs/IEP?Pages/ChangestoIEP.aspx

Indigenous Jobs Australia connects Indigenous job seekers with employers that are searching for Indigenous employees. Visit www. indigenousjobsaustralia.com.au

Other resources with information about employment and education options for young people: •

www.youth.gov.au

www.myfuture.edu.au

Other places to look for employment: •

www.seek.com.au

www.mycareer.com.au

Saturday’s employment section in The Age newspaper or online.

Local newspapers often advertise jobs and sometimes shared accommodation.

Harvest Trail links job seekers with harvest jobs around Australia. If you’re interested in farm work on the Harvest Trail, contact the National Harvest Telephone Information Service on 1800 062 332 or visit www.jobsearch. gov.au/HarvestTrail

If you think you are not receiving the right pay for the work you are doing, you can contact the Fairwork Info Line 13 13 94 for help.

13


Keeping on the right side of the law is the best way to avoid having to deal with the police. If you are questioned or stopped by police remember that you have rights as a young person. •

Police can ask you for your name and address if they think you have committed an offence or you are about to commit an offence or if you are driving.

Police can ask you for your name and address if they think you have witnessed a crime.

It is illegal to refuse to give police your name and address or to give a false name and address.

If you believe police had no right to ask you for your name and address, it’s important to stay calm, give your details and make a complaint later.

If a police officer asks for your name, you can ask the police officer to show you their ID, and to tell you their name, rank and which station they are from.

You do not have to answer any other questions from police other than giving your name and address.

Police can search you without a warrant if: – they have reasonable grounds to suspect that they will find illegal drugs, weapons or explosives – you are on or near public transport property or trespassing and they have reasonable grounds to suspect they will find a spray can or other graffiti implement

14


– they are searching for weapons and the police tell you that you are in a “designated area” for weapons searches – you are under 18 and police suspect you are chroming (inhaling a volatile substance) •

If you are under 16 and police search you in a planned “designated area” for weapons searches, there must be a parent, guardian or independent person present.

You can be searched under graffiti laws if you are age 14 and over but if you are under 18, police can only perform a pat-down search.

It is an offence to refuse to be searched.

It is illegal to carry a knife, weapon, imitation firearm or anything you intend to use as a weapon, such as an axe, bat or hammer without a lawful excuse (e.g. your job or sport).

Self defence is NOT a lawful excuse for carrying a knife, weapon, imitation firearm or dangerous article.

You only have to go with the police to the station if you are under arrest.

Police must arrange a parent/guardian or independent adult to be with you during an interview if you are under 18 years.

The other independent adult can be a youth worker, for example, or police can contact a trained volunteer from the Youth Referral and Independent Person Program.

You have the right to call a lawyer before you are interviewed and the right to call a relative or friend to tell them where you are.

If you are 15 years or older you have to give your fingerprints, otherwise a parent/guardian must be present and give their consent.

You have the right to refuse to have your photo taken or to be in an identification line up.

You have the right to refuse to give a forensic sample (e.g. a saliva swab).

Police must provide an interpreter if you need one.

You have the right to see a doctor or nurse as soon as possible if you are hurt or need medication.

If you want to complain about treatment by a police officer you should talk to a lawyer or contact the Office of Police Integrity on 1800 818 387.

This information (current at August 2012) was reviewed by Youthlaw @ Frontyard, which is a specialist state wide community legal centre providing free and confidential legal advice to young people under 25 years. Please go to www.youthlaw.asn.au for further information.

15


The internet enables us to communicate and stay connected in new ways like never before. We can communicate with people that we already know, staying in touch with friends and family and we can also develop relationships with strangers through social networking sites and social media like Facebook, Myspace, YouTube, Foursquare, Twitter, Skype, chat rooms and online games such as World of Warcraft and Runescape. But what we do online can have an effect on our world offline, so it is important to keep safe and act responsibly. Here are some tips to keep cyber-safe and in control.

16

Protect your personal information and don’t post your phone number, home or school addresses or information about your workplace on social networking website profiles.

Protect your passwords and don’t share them with friends.

Don’t put photos of yourself online that you don’t want everyone (including strangers) to see. Think of posting things online as publishing – if you don’t want everyone to see something or know about it then don’t post it!


Protect yourself from scams and cyber stalking by using privacy settings on social networking sites and screening requests to be “friends” from people you don’t know.

Keep your online friends, online. If you want to meet someone that you haven’t met before in person, always ask someone to go with you; a parent, another trusted adult or friends. Always meet in a busy public place, preferably during the day.

Behave online the same way as you would behave offline; observe the same rules as you would with face to face contact with friends. Treat people online the way you would want to be treated.

Don’t respond to negative messages online or if someone asks you to do something that makes you feel uncomfortable.

If you are uncomfortable with communication online or are feeling unsafe – tell someone! Speak to a friend, a parent, a trusted adult or school counsellor.

If you feel you are spending too much time on the internet or social networking sites, take a break! Have a conversation with someone face to face. Remember, it’s your life and you’re in control.

For more information about internet use and safety go to: – www.cybersmart.gov.au – Australian Communications and Media Authority www.acma.gov.au – www.thinkuknow.org.au/kids/cool.asp

17


Being healthy and hygienic not only makes you feel good on the inside, but it shows on the outside too. You’ll have more energy and motivation. It’s not hard to be healthy and hygienic; all it takes is a bit of planning and routine.

18

Have a balanced diet of fruit, vegetables, dairy, meat and grains. Eat sugar and fats in small amounts. Do some exercise every day. Make it part of your daily activities — for example, you can get off the bus a few stops earlier than usual and walk the rest of the way. Drink plenty of water — eight glasses per day is recommended (not all at once!).

Have regular check-ups with your doctor. Always practice safe sex. Visit your doctor as early as possible for emergency contraception if you have had unprotected sex. Local doctors not only help with medical concerns but also mental health. If you’re feeling depressed, anxious or just not yourself, visit your doctor for advice.

Brush and floss your teeth every day. Shower every day using a mild soap. Wear deodorant or anti-perspirant. It doesn’t have to be an expensive brand to work well. Wash your hair regularly.

Wash your clothes regularly and air-dry them outside to keep them in the best condition. Change and wash your bed sheets regularly.

Wash your hands before you cook, after you’ve cleaned up, and after going to the toilet.

Have a routine for cleaning your house.


It is so easy to blow your money in one go, especially at the supermarket. You need to plan for shopping. The following tips will help you shop on a budget. Groceries •

Make a list. Decide what you want to cook and what you need.

Do your shopping weekly or fortnightly, as this saves money, time and energy.

Shop around. Different supermarkets have different prices for things. Make it your mission to find the cheapest supermarket in the area and stick with it.

Check out your local markets and turn up close to closing time for some great bargains.

Buy cheaper cuts of meat and ask a butcher how to cook them for the best result.

Buy fresh fruit and vegies in small quantities to reduce waste. Buy what’s in season; it will be cheaper and tastier.

If you have the money buy in bulk e.g. meat from a wholesale butcher (which you can then freeze), or any household items e.g. toilet rolls. It’ll save you money, time and will last longer.

Be a bargain hunter. Buying Home Brand or generic products is heaps cheaper and there’s often not much difference in quality, it’s only the packaging that is different.

Keep your eyes open for specials and sales.

Do your shopping by yourself or with your housemate only. Going with friends may mean you’ll end up buying more.

Set yourself a weekly budget and only take that amount with you to avoid blowing your budget. Take a calculator, so you can add up how much you have spent as you go along. 19


Utilities One area that can cost you a lot of money is your utilities: power, water, gas and telephone. By doing your research and keeping on top of things, you can minimise the cost. Here are a few tips: •

Ask questions when you contact the service companies. Ask about connection fees and monthly service charges. This way you can shop around to get the best price.

Make sure you tell the company your Health Care Card number for winter energy concessions and discounts on connection fees.

Remember to take your name off accounts at previous properties, otherwise you can still be charged for these accounts.

Ask about flexible payment options. This allows you to make regular small contributions to your utility accounts, rather than paying a big bill every two or three months. You can also have direct debits set up through the Post Office for your bills, or from your Centrelink payment through Centrepay.

Telephone and Mobile Phones If you’re considering getting a mobile phone on a contract make sure you shop around. Don’t rely on the sale’s pitch; read your mobile phone contract and only sign when you fully understand what you are getting. Getting a pre-paid mobile phone allows you to control how much you spend. If you are considering a smartphone (a mobile phone that functions like a computer) remember that by using some of these features you may be exposed to privacy and security risks and unexpected high bills. Here are a few tips to help you manage phone costs: •

If you are on a low income you may be eligible for Telstra’s InContact telephone service. This allows you to receive calls. You’ll have to pay a connection fee, but after that there are no bills. Check if you’re eligible by calling 13 22 00.

To make calls get a pre-paid mobile from Telstra shops or the Post Office, or buy a PhoneAway calling card, which can be used with an InContact service or a pay phone.

Check with your service provider what assistance or concessions are available for low income earners and those experiencing financial hardship and for other ways to control your costs. Telstra’s Access for Everyone programs enable people experiencing hardship to stay connected. Call 13 22 00 or visit www.telstra.com.au/accessforeveryone.

Call 13 14 50 for an interpreter to help you connect your services.

If you have any problems with mobile phone contracts or services, you can get advice from the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman on 1800 062 058. 20


We all need money to survive, but how do we hold on to it when we get it? By sticking to a budget! A budget is a plan of your income (the money you get in; wages, Centrelink payments etc), expenses (the money that you spend; rent, bills etc) and savings (the money you have left over). Here are some tips for making your budget work: •

Make your budget as detailed as possible.

Make a list of needs and wants. Remember that wants are things you can do without if you have run out of money, for example a new CD or bag.

Re-do your budget every fortnight or month to get used to planning, and to get an idea of the patterns that have formed in your spending. Your needs and wants may change over time.

Have savings goals - things to set your sights on. If you have a savings plan as well as your budget you’ll see the real rewards when you get to buy that special thing you’ve been saving for. A savings plan shows you how you will use the money that is left over from each month’s budget.

Try and prepare for times when you may need to spend more than usual like holidays, in emergencies or when several bills arrive at the same time.

Remember, if you don’t budget it is easy to fall into debt or behind on payments of rent and bills and this can cause you heaps of stress. So take control of your money and get budgeting!

App alert: TrackMySpend: a free and easy to use smartphone app, TrackMySpend shows you what you are spending your money on, as you go! The diary includes budget pages to help you manage your money. 21


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

22


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

23


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

24


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

25


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

26


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

27


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

28


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

29


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

30


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

31


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

32


Your budget for the period (fortnight/month) of: INCOME (money coming in) Wages

$

Centrelink payments (Youth Allowance, Rent Assistance, etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL INCOME (A)

$

EXPENDITURE (spending) Rent / Board

$

Utility Bills (power, water, gas)

$

Telephone (mobile, home)

$

Food

$

Education expenses

$

Medical expenses

$

Loan repayments (car, hire purchase)

$

Travel / Public transport

$

Entertainment (movies, meals out etc)

$

Other

$ $

TOTAL EXPENSES (B)

$

SAVINGS (Total left over) (A) – (B) =

$

SAVINGS PLAN Item

Total Cost

Amount per fortnight

I can get it in:

eg: iPod

$250

$25

20 weeks (10 fortnights)

33


34

Date

Day

Public Holiday

January 1

Tuesday

New Years Day

January 26

Saturday

Australia Day

January 28

Monday

Australia Day Public Holiday (replacement for Saturday 26 January)

March 11

Monday

Labour Day – VIC, TAS only

March 11

Monday

Canberra Day – ACT only

March 29

Friday

Good Friday

March 30

Saturday

Easter Saturday – all states except TAS and WA

April 1

Monday

Easter Monday

April 25

Thursday

ANZAC Day

June 10

Monday

Queen’s Birthday – all states except WA

August 5

Monday

Bank Holiday – NSW (not state-wide public holiday)

August 14

Wednesday

Royal Queensland Show Day – Brisbane only

October 7

Monday

Labour Day – NSW, ACT, SA, QLD

November 5

Tuesday

Melbourne Cup Day – VIC (Melbourne only)

December 25

Wednesday

Christmas Day

December 26

Thursday

Boxing Day


School Terms – 2013 New South Wales: Term 1: Tuesday 29 January - Friday 12 April Term 2: Monday 29 April - Friday 28 June Term 3: Monday 15 July - Friday 20 September Term 4: Tuesday 8 October - Friday 20 December (School resumes January 28, 2014)

Queensland: Term 1: Tuesday 29 January - Thursday 28 March Term 2: Monday 15 April - Friday 21 June Term 3: Monday 8 July - Friday 20 September Term 4: Tuesday 8 October - Friday 13 December (School resumes January 28, 2014)

Victoria: Term 1: Tuesday 29 January* - Thursday 28 March (*Student-free day) Term 2: Monday 15 April - Friday 28 June Term 3: Monday 15 July - Friday 20 September Term 4: Monday 7 October - Friday 20 December (School resumes January 29, 2014)

Other important dates and days to remember: Birthdays to remember

Rubbish Collection day (‘Bin day’) Recycling day Pay Day 35


Dec/

January 2013

31

Monday

01

Tuesday

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27

New Year’s Day Public Holiday

02 Wednesday

Make sure you never sign a blank form, and make sure everything is filled in correctly before you sign.


03 Thursday

04 Friday

05 Saturday

06 Sunday

Remember, you can record on your CV any work experience done at school, any voluntary work, or any work done with family businesses.


January 2013

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

07 Monday

08 Tuesday

09 Wednesday

Writing down appointments, homework or things you have to do may help you to keep track of what’s on. This way you may avoid things catching you by surprise.

Su 06 13 20 27


10

Thursday

11

Friday

12

Saturday

13

Sunday

Having a good study area can make a huge difference to how well you learn. Study in a well lit, quiet area, away from noises and people in the house.


January 2013 14

Monday

15

Tuesday

16

Wednesday

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Dried herbs are more strongly flavoured than fresh. As a general rule, one teaspoon of dried herbs equals four teaspoons of fresh.

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27


17

Thursday

18

Friday

19

Saturday

20 Sunday

Use cheaper cuts of meat for curries and casseroles for long slow cooking, then add extra vegetables and beans to make the meal go further.


January 2013 21

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27

Monday

22 Tuesday

23 Wednesday

One-pot dishes where you throw everything in together save energy, time, money and washing-up.


24 Thursday

25 Friday

26 Saturday

Australia Day

27 Sunday

Watch out for supermarket specials of staples (rice, pasta, pasta sauces, bread and tinned vegetables) and stock up on them when cheap. Items such as pasta and rice have a long shelf life.


Jan/

February 2013

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

28 Monday

Australia Day Public Holiday

29 Tuesday

School Term 1 starts - NSW, QLD, VIC

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27

(replacement for Sat 26 January)

(Student-free day in VIC)

30 Wednesday

Limit takeaway foods; they are expensive, high in fat, high in salt and low in nutrition, and leave you hungry again a few hours after you eat them.


31

Thursday

01

Friday

02 Saturday

03 Sunday

Try not to make your CV longer than it needs to be - if it is too long, an employer may not read it.


February 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28

Sa 02 09 16 23

Su 03 10 17 24

04 Monday

05 Tuesday

06 Wednesday

Walk to work or uni, ride a bike or jog to the shops. Or get off the tram or bus a few stops early and walk the rest of the way.


07 Thursday

08 Friday

09 Saturday

10

Sunday

Go and play. Play football, basketball, netball, tennis, hockey, soccer or any other group sport.


February 2013 11

Monday

12

Tuesday

13

Wednesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28

Sa 02 09 16 23

Su 03 10 17 24

You don’t have to spend hours pumping the weights at the gym or jogging up and down the local park to get fit. Getting active is as easy as dancing around your bedroom to your favourite CD.


14

Thursday

15

Friday

16

Saturday

17

Sunday

Cut down screen time. Count how many hours you spend in front of the telly and try to cut down. The same goes for the computer. Surfing the net and sending emails can be totally absorbing, but limit the time you spend staring at the screen.


February 2013 18

Monday

19

Tuesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28

Sa 02 09 16 23

Su 03 10 17 24

20 Wednesday

Exercise your social skills. Swap screen time and long phone chats for a power walk with friends and catch up on the gossip face to face.


21

Thursday

22 Friday

23 Saturday

24 Sunday

Get involved locally. Look for social involvement such as joining sporting clubs or taking part in community events.


February/

March 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28

25 Monday

26 Tuesday

27 Wednesday

Find different ways of getting places, like rollerblading, skateboarding or bike riding.

Sa 02 09 16 23

Su 03 10 17 24


28 Thursday

01

Friday

02 Saturday

03 Sunday

Stairs provide a great natural workout, so go for leg power whenever you can.


March 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24 31

04 Monday

05 Tuesday

06 Wednesday

Keep it interesting. Go on bush walks and visit parks with friends or family. Take part or help organise community events in your area.


07 Thursday

08 Friday

09 Saturday

10

Sunday

Slip, slop, slap. Even on cooler days, make sure you’re protected against UV rays.


March 2013 11

Monday

12

Tuesday

13

Wednesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

Labour Day Public Holiday - VIC, TAS only Canberra Day Public Holiday - ACT only

You’re better off choosing a piece of fruit over a fruit drink as many drinks contain sugar and other additives.

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24 31


14

Thursday

15

Friday

16

Saturday

17

Sunday

Double up on vegetables. Have extra serves of veggies, especially if they’re raw, steamed or baked.


March 2013 18

Monday

19

Tuesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24 31

20 Wednesday

When you eat fruit and vegetables, look for a variety of colours at every serving including yellow, orange, green, purple and red, such as capsicum, berries, eggplant, sweet potato, tomatoes, plums, berries, mangoes and melons.


21

Thursday

22 Friday

23 Saturday

24 Sunday

Snacks between meals are okay but keep them healthy. Grab a piece of fruit or a tub of low fat yoghurt, tin of tuna, nuts and dried fruit, sandwiches and low fat cheese.


March 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24 31

25 Monday

26 Tuesday

27 Wednesday

Drink water as your first option before reaching for juices, soft drinks, alcohol and energy drinks.


28 Thursday

29 Friday

Good Friday Public Holiday

30 Saturday

31

School Term 1 ends - QLD, VIC

Easter Saturday Public Holiday - all states except TAS, WA

Sunday

Eat your juice. Eat a piece of fruit instead of fruit juice or fruit drinks, which contain energy, but little fibre.


April 2013 01

Monday

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28

Easter Monday Public Holiday

02 Tuesday

03 Wednesday

The experts say you need at least 40 different nutrients for good health. Try and eat a variety of foods most days. Include fruit, vegetables, nuts, legumes (such as dried peas, beans and lentils), wholegrain cereals, lean meat, skinless chicken, fish and low fat dairy products.


04 Thursday

05 Friday

06 Saturday

07 Sunday

Remember to enjoy what you are eating. It’s important to be aware of what goes into each meal. Slow down and savour every bite.


April 2013

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24

Th 04 11 18 25

08 Monday

09 Tuesday

10

Wednesday

Bigger is not better. When meal size upgrades are offered at your local fast food outlet, stick with the regular size.

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28


11

Thursday

12

Friday

13

Saturday

14

Sunday

School Term 1 ends - NSW

Have a healthy breakfast. Build a breakfast around fruit, low sugar cereals, porridge, rice, wholegrain breads, English muffins, bagels, smoothies, yoghurt and baked beans.


April 2013 15

Monday

16

Tuesday

17

Wednesday

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28

School Term 2 starts - QLD, VIC

Listen to your stomach. Eat until you’ve had enough, not till you’re full. Your stomach will let you know the difference.


18

Thursday

19

Friday

20 Saturday

21

Sunday

Cut out TV dinners. Try to reduce the number of meals you eat in front of the television or computer screen.


April 2013

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28

22 Monday

23 Tuesday

24 Wednesday

Make friends with the environment. Devote some time to your local environment - get involved in tree-planting activities or help clean up your local parks and waterways.


25 Thursday

ANZAC Day - Public Holiday

26 Friday

27 Saturday

28 Sunday

Come to someone’s aid. Do a first aid course with St. John’s Ambulance or volunteer at your local CFA or SES.


April /

May 2013

29 Monday

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28

School Term 2 starts - NSW

30 Tuesday

01

Wednesday

Go volunteering. We depend on all types of volunteer organisations, which in turn depend on volunteers. There are literally thousands of organisations that are always glad to have a helping hand. For more info see www.govolunteer.com.au.


02 Thursday

03 Friday

04 Saturday

05 Sunday

Remember, you can record on your CV any work experience done at school, any voluntary work, or any work done with family businesses.


May 2013

Mo Tu We 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

Th 02 09 16 23 30

Fr 03 10 17 24 31

Sa 04 11 18 25

Su 05 12 19 26

06 Monday

07 Tuesday

08 Wednesday

If you find you are being distracted by the phone, it may help to put the answering machine on for a while. You can always ring people back later.


09 Thursday

10

Friday

11

Saturday

12

Sunday

When you leave a room that no one else is in, turn off the light switch. And whenever you can, rely on natural light –it helps save electricity, money and the planet!


May 2013 13

Monday

14

Tuesday

15

Wednesday

Mo Tu We 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

Th 02 09 16 23 30

Fr 03 10 17 24 31

Sa 04 11 18 25

Su 05 12 19 26

Writing down appointments, homework or things you have to do may help you to keep track of what’s on. This way you may avoid things catching you by surprise.


16

Thursday

17

Friday

18

Saturday

19

Sunday

If your utility companies will let you put the bills in everyone’s name, this is can be good idea, so that each house member is authorised to discuss the account with the utility.


May 2013

Mo Tu We 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

Th 02 09 16 23 30

Fr 03 10 17 24 31

Sa 04 11 18 25

Su 05 12 19 26

20 Monday

21

Tuesday

22 Wednesday

It’s important that you ask as many questions as you need to when starting a new job, even if it means asking the same question 2 or 3 times.


23 Thursday

24 Friday

25 Saturday

26 Sunday

Use your own carry or tote bags when possible on shopping excursions.


May /

June 2013

Mo Tu We 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

Th 02 09 16 23 30

Fr 03 10 17 24 31

Sa 04 11 18 25

Su 05 12 19 26

27 Monday

28 Tuesday

29 Wednesday

Check to see if any student or other concessions are relevant. Some computer stores, for example, offer generous discounts to full-time students or unemployed people. Ask!


30 Thursday

31

Friday

01

Saturday

02 Sunday

Make sure you have allowed for ‘unexpected expenses’ in your budget.


June 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

03 Monday

04 Tuesday

05 Wednesday

Make a list on payday of things that need to be paid or bought and stick to the list.

Su 02 09 16 23 30


06 Thursday

07 Friday

08 Saturday

09 Sunday

Learn to say ‘NO’ - if you can’t afford it don’t buy it.


June 2013 10

Monday

11

Tuesday

12

Wednesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Queen’s Birthday Public Holiday - all states except WA

Pay your rent and utilities before spending money on anything else.

Su 02 09 16 23 30


13

Thursday

14

Friday

15

Saturday

16

Sunday

If you have a debt, it doesn’t mean you have to pay it all at once. Ring and make a plan with the loan company to pay it off at a reasonable rate every week or fortnight.


June 2013 17

Monday

18

Tuesday

19

Wednesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Su 02 09 16 23 30

Don’t aim too high with your savings goals - start with small, achievable ones that keep you motivated.


20 Thursday

21

Friday

School Term 2 ends - QLD

22 Saturday

23 Sunday

Give your budget a bit of flexibility so that you’ll be able to stick to it.


June 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

24 Monday

25 Tuesday

26 Wednesday

Try to buy things like toilet paper and household products in bulk (if you’ve got the money). They’ll last you longer and cost less.

Su 02 09 16 23 30


27 Thursday

28 Friday

School Term 2 ends - NSW, VIC

29 Saturday

30 Sunday

You have rights and responsibilities as a tenant. Make sure you sign a lease and get a copy of the Tenant’s Handbook from the landlord. These are available in English as well as other languages.


July 2013 01

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Monday

02 Tuesday

03 Wednesday

Drink plenty of water – 8 glasses per day is recommended (not all at once!).

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24 31

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28


04 Thursday

05 Friday

06 Saturday

07 Sunday

If you are on a low income and in private rental you can apply to Centrelink for Rent Assistance to help you meet your rent payments.


July 2013 08 Monday

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24 31

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28

School Term 3 starts - QLD

09 Tuesday

10

Wednesday

Avoid using small amounts of hot water if cold water will do. Each time you run the hot tap, one litre or more of cold water goes down the sink before hot water is delivered.


11

Thursday

12

Friday

13

Saturday

14

Sunday

If you have any problems with mobile phone contracts or services you can get advice from the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman -1800 062 058.


July 2013 15

Monday

16

Tuesday

17

Wednesday

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24 31

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

Su 07 14 21 28

School Term 3 starts - NSW, VIC

To make sure that your employer is not ripping you off, you can contact the Fair Work Ombudsman to check the Awards and Pay conditions on 13 13 94.


18

Thursday

19

Friday

20 Saturday

21

Sunday

Keep a jug of water in the fridge to save running the tap to get cold water to drink.


July 2013

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24 31

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

Sa 06 13 20 27

22 Monday

23 Tuesday

24 Wednesday

The best advice anyone can give you about mobile phone contracts is don’t get a mobile phone contract ‌ get pre-paid!

Su 07 14 21 28


25 Thursday

26 Friday

27 Saturday

28 Sunday

Remember to take your name off bills at previous properties; otherwise you can still be charged for these accounts.


July /

August 2013

Mo Tu We Th 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

Fr 02 09 16 23 30

Sa 03 10 17 24 31

Su 04 11 18 25

29 Monday

30 Tuesday

31

Wednesday

Do your shopping weekly or fortnightly. Shopping day by day will end up costing you more because you’ll buy extra little things each time. Doing it all at once also saves time and energy.


01

Thursday

02 Friday

03 Saturday

04 Sunday

Make sure you tell utility companies your Health Care Card number for winter energy concessions.


August 2013 05 Monday

Mo Tu We Th 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

Fr 02 09 16 23 30

Sa 03 10 17 24 31

Su 04 11 18 25

Bank Holiday - NSW (not state-wide public holiday)

06 Tuesday

07 Wednesday

Limit your showers to under 5 minutes. Pick a favourite song (that goes for less than 5 minutes) and get out of the shower when it finishes!


08 Thursday

09 Friday

10

Saturday

11

Sunday

If we all turn off the tap while we brush our teeth, we will save enough water every time to fill 10 Olympic swimming pools.


August 2013 12

Monday

13

Tuesday

14

Wednesday

Mo Tu We Th 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

Fr 02 09 16 23 30

Sa 03 10 17 24 31

Su 04 11 18 25

Royal Queensland Show Day - Brisbane only

Turning off appliances that are on stand by, un-used power points and lights when you leave a room can save you up to $150 on your power bill every year!


15

Thursday

16

Friday

17

Saturday

18

Sunday

Fix dripping taps. A tap dripping 45 times per minute wastes around 1,000 litres of water a month – the equivalent of 10 bathtubs.


August 2013 19

Mo Tu We Th 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

Fr 02 09 16 23 30

Sa 03 10 17 24 31

Su 04 11 18 25

Monday

20 Tuesday

21

Wednesday

Did you know that leaving the tap running when brushing your teeth uses around 5 litres of water?


22 Thursday

23 Friday

24 Saturday

25 Sunday

Don’t buy water in plastic bottles from the shops – buy a reusable bottle and fill it up with water from the tap.


August / Sept 2013

Mo Tu We Th 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

Fr 02 09 16 23 30

Sa 03 10 17 24 31

Su 04 11 18 25

26 Monday

27 Tuesday

28 Wednesday

Buy vintage – recycled clothing is cheaper and often more unique and interesting than buying new from a chain store.


29 Thursday

30 Friday

31

Saturday

01

Sunday

If you are going to be moving in with other people in a shared house, establish some ground rules and a roster of chores so that everyone understands what their responsibilities are.


September 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

02 Monday

03 Tuesday

04 Wednesday

Get more fish in your diet – it is better to have it grilled, not battered. Canned tuna is cheap and convenient.


05 Thursday

06 Friday

07 Saturday

08 Sunday

A budget is where you make a plan for how you will spend your money on what you NEED and what you WANT.


September 2013 09 Monday

10

Tuesday

11

Wednesday

Make a shopping list and stick to it.

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12

Thursday

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Friday

14

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15

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To make sure that your employer is not ripping you off, you can contact the Fair Work Ombudsman to check the Awards and Pay conditions on 13 13 94.


September 2013 16

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18

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Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Avoid sweet soft drinks and juices – they can have up to 10 teaspoons of sugar per serve.


19

Thursday

20 Friday

21

School Term 3 ends - NSW, QLD, VIC

Saturday

22 Sunday

If you are on a low income and in private rental you can apply to Centrelink for Rent Assistance to help you meet your rent payments.


September 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

23 Monday

24 Tuesday

25 Wednesday

It important to do a condition report when you first move in to any property, so that you are not held responsible for damage that already existed.


26 Thursday

27 Friday

28 Saturday

29 Sunday

You have rights and responsibilities as a tenant. Make sure you sign a lease and get a copy of the Tenant’s Handbook from the landlord. These are available in English as well as other languages.


Sept /

October 2013

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

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Su 06 13 20 27

30 Monday

01

Tuesday

02 Wednesday

Try to do at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. This doesn’t have to be done all at once, you could do it in 3 lots of 10 minutes.


03 Thursday

04 Friday

05 Saturday

06 Sunday

Don’t go food shopping when you are hungry, you will end up buying unnecessary stuff.


October 2013

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

07 Monday

Labour Day Public Holiday - NSW, ACT, SA, QLD

08 Tuesday

School Term 4 starts - NSW, QLD

School Term 4 starts - VIC

09 Wednesday

Buy generic or ‘no name’ brands.

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27


10

Thursday

11

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12

Saturday

13

Sunday

Make sure you never sign a blank form, and make sure everything is filled in correctly before you sign.


October 2013 14

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Remember to take your name off bills at previous properties; otherwise you can still be charged for these accounts.

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27


17

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18

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20 Sunday

The best advice anyone can give you about mobile phone contracts is don’t get a mobile phone contract ‌ get pre-paid!


October 2013 21

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

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Monday

22 Tuesday

23 Wednesday

If you have any problems with mobile phone contracts or services you can get advice from the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman -1800 062 058.

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27


24 Thursday

25 Friday

26 Saturday

27 Sunday

Keep a jug of water in the fridge to save running the tap to get cold water to drink.


October / Nov 2013

Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

28 Monday

29 Tuesday

30 Wednesday

Buy fruit and vegies when they are in season. These are cheaper and tastier.

We 02 09 16 23 30

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27


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Running a tap can use up to 20 litres of water per minute.


November 2013

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Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24

04 Monday

05 Tuesday

Melbourne Cup Day Public Holiday - VIC (Melbourne only)

06 Wednesday

A leaking toilet can waste up to 16,000 litres of water per year, contact your landlord to fix leaks immediately.


07 Thursday

08 Friday

09 Saturday

10

Sunday

Limit your showers to under 5 minutes. Pick a favourite song (that goes for less than 5 minutes) and get out of the shower when it finishes!


November 2013 11

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Buy fruit instead of packaged or high fat, sugary snacks.

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Su 03 10 17 24


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Know when stores have their scheduled sales - it might pay to wait a few weeks to get the best deal or to hang out for a stock take sale or end of season sale.


November 2013 18

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20 Wednesday

Lots of stores offer a discount on bigger items if you pay upfront with cash.

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24


21

Thursday

22 Friday

23 Saturday

24 Sunday

To save money try shopping at alternative places like trash and treasure markets, garage sales, and warehouses.


December 2013

Nov/

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25 Monday

26 Tuesday

27 Wednesday

When shopping, check if there is a product warranty (if applicable) and how long it is for.

Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24


28 Thursday

29 Friday

30 Saturday

01

Sunday

Check to see if any student or other concessions are relevant. Some computer stores, for example, offer generous discounts to full-time students or unemployed people. Ask!


December 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

02 Monday

03 Tuesday

04 Wednesday

Don’t aim too high with your savings goals - start with small, achievable ones that keep you motivated.


05 Thursday

06 Friday

07 Saturday

08 Sunday

Make sure you have allowed for ‘unexpected expenses’ in your budget.


December 2013

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09 Monday

10

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11

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Try to include some money in your budget for rewards to keep you motivated.


12

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15

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School Term 4 ends - QLD

Sometimes spending a small amount of money can stop you from blowing a lot.


December 2013 16

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17

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18

Wednesday

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Make a list on payday of things that need to be paid or bought and stick to the list.


19

Thursday

20 Friday

21

School Term 4 ends - NSW, VIC

Saturday

22 Sunday

Learn to say ‘NO’ - if you can’t afford it don’t buy it.


December 2013

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

23 Monday

24 Tuesday

25 Wednesday

Christmas Day Public Holiday

Dress appropriately for a job interview – it tells the interviewer you are serious about the job but also that you’re serious about yourself.


26 Thursday

Boxing Day Public Holiday

27 Friday

28 Saturday

29 Sunday

Look after yourself – make sure you get enough sleep every night.


December 2013 30 Monday

31

Tuesday

Pay your rent and utilities before spending money on anything else.

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


Calendar 2014 January Mo Tu We 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

Th 02 09 16 23 30

February Fr 03 10 17 24 31

Sa 04 11 18 25

Su 05 12 19 26

April Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

We 02 09 16 23 30

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28

Su 02 09 16 23

May Th 03 10 17 24

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27

July Mo Tu 01 07 08 14 15 21 22 28 29

March

Mo Tu We Th 01 05 06 07 08 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

Th 03 10 17 24 31

Fr 04 11 18 25

Sa 05 12 19 26

Su 06 13 20 27

October Mo Tu We 01 06 07 08 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

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Fr 02 09 16 23 30

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Su 04 11 18 25

Mo Tu We Th Fr 01 04 05 06 07 08 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

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Su 05 12 19 26

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

September Sa 02 09 16 23 30

Su 03 10 17 24 31

November Fr 03 10 17 24 31

Su 02 09 16 23 30

June

August We 02 09 16 23 30

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 01 03 04 05 06 07 08 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

Tu 02 09 16 23 30

We 03 10 17 24

Th 04 11 18 25

Fr 05 12 19 26

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Su 07 14 21 28

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December Su 02 09 16 23 30

Mo 01 08 15 22 29

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Fr 05 12 19 26


Cooking and eating healthy food can be easy, cheap and fun! Here are some basic cooking tips and info that will help you get started in the kitchen. If you are really keen to improve your cooking skills and experiment, there are plenty of places you can find out more. Check out: •

The internet: if you have access to the internet you can find infinite number of recipes and cooking tips available. Some useful recipe websites are: – www.taste.com.au – www.allrecipes.com.au – www.lifestylefood.com.au

You can also learn how to cook different recipes on YouTube, just search for what you want to cook or type in “recipes” and explore what is there.

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Your local library will have heaps of cookbooks featuring different foods available.

Supermarkets often supply free recipe magazines (usually kept at the check-out counter). Look out for recipes in newspapers too.

Food packaging often features serving suggestions and recipes.


Basic Cooking Tips Hygiene: •

Always wash your hands with soap and hot water before cooking.

Make sure you have at least 2 chopping boards, one for cutting the raw meat, and one for the vegetables. If you only have 1 chopping board wash it well with soap and hot water between uses.

Meat should be cooked all the way through, unless it’s steak, use a knife to cut into the meat — if it’s pink, keep cooking.

Only re-heat left over food once, more than this will encourage bacteria to form and you could get sick.

General rules for buying and storing fruit: •

Fruit is at its best and cheapest when it is in season.

Choose firm fruit. Try not to buy bruised or spotty fruit.

To keep fruit crisp in summer, store it in your fridge. In winter, most fruit keeps well in a bowl on your kitchen cupboard. Always keep bananas out of the fridge.

Buy only what you can eat in a few days.

Cover cut fruit like watermelon with plastic wrap and keep it in the fridge.

General rules for buying and storing vegetables: •

Buy only as much as you can eat in a week.

Use vegetables as soon as possible after you buy them.

Store potatoes and onions in a newspaper lined cardboard box on the kitchen floor, or in a cupboard or pantry.

Keep other vegetables in the crisper section of the fridge.

Keep small or cut vegetables in plastic bags.

General rules for buying, cooking and storing meat: •

Buy only as much as you need for your meals in a week. Keep meat for the first two days in the fridge.

Freeze the rest in sealed plastic bags. Take the meat from the freezer the day before you want to use it. Put it in the fridge to thaw.

Store meat in the lower part of the fridge so raw meat juices don’t drip onto other foods.

Make sure there’s no pink left in cooked meats such as mince, sausages, chicken or pork.

Heat to boiling all marinades containing raw meat juices before serving. 143


Food Safety: •

Keep it cold – before it’s cooked.

Keep it clean – your hands, your utensils, everything you use to prepare and eat food.

Keep it hot – once it’s cooked.

Check the label – Don’t eat food after it’s “Use by” date.

How long can I keep food? •

Look at the “Use by” date on packages. That is the best guide for how long food will last.

Fresh and cooked meat, fish and poultry will keep up to three days in the fridge, Make sure it’s covered with plastic wrap. Smoked meats will last 2-4 weeks but always check the “Use by” date on the package!

Leftovers: •

Cover and put leftovers in the fridge as soon as they stop steaming. Keep them unfrozen in the fridge for no more than 3 days.

Most leftovers will freeze well. Put leftovers in small plastic containers with tight-fitting lids. Put the container in the freezer as soon as the food stops steaming. Thaw the food in the fridge.

When reheating make sure the food is steaming hot.

Information reproduced from ‘Cooking made easy’ with permission from the Community Restorative Centre NSW.

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Kitchen Basics Basic equipment for your kitchen and dining table: •

Frying pan

Saucepan

Baking dish

Bowls, plates, cups and cutlery

Can opener, tongs, vegetable peeler, wooden spoons, sharp knives

Measuring jug and measuring spoons

Chopping board

Colander

Pantry basics Here are 10 pantry essentials that when used with a few fresh ingredients can create many different and delicious meals: •

Rice

Dried pasta or dried noodles

Cooking oil (olive oil is the healthiest)

Tinned tomatoes

Tinned tuna

Onions and garlic

Eggs

Flour

Stock cubes (chicken, beef or vegetable)

Soy sauce

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Cooking Rice Remember that when you cook rice it expands, so 1 cup of uncooked rice will be 3 cups when cooked. ON THE STOVE 1. Boil 2 cups of water in a saucepan. 2. Add 1 cup of rice and a pinch of salt to the boiling water, stir straight away so the rice doesn’t stick together. 3. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 15 minutes. 4. When the rice is cooked, strain through a colander and rinse with hot water. IN THE MICROWAVE 1. Place 1 cup of rice and 2 cups of water into microwave container. 2. Cook in microwave for 14 minutes on high, make sure you stir it half-way through. 3. Remove from microwave and leave it for 5 minutes, then use a fork to fluff it up.

Cooking Pasta As with rice, pasta expands when cooked, so one cup of uncooked pasta will be 2 cups when cooked. 1. Boil 4 cups of water in a saucepan. 2. Add 1 cup of pasta and a pinch of salt, stir straight away so the pasta doesn’t stick. 3. Cook for about 10 minutes or until the pasta is tender. You can test it by scooping a piece out, be careful it will be really hot. 4. Strain the pasta through a colander.

Hard boiled eggs

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Place as many eggs as you want to boil in a saucepan.

Add enough water to just cover the eggs.

Bring the water to the boil and let it boil for 3–5 minutes.

Remove the pot from the heat and strain the hot water from the eggs, allow them to cool before peeling off the shell.


Here are some healthy and tasty recipes to help you eat well on a budget. Try the easier ones first and then when you’ve mastered them, give the harder ones a go. Don’t be afraid to experiment and most of all have fun!

Basic Pancake Batter INGREDIENTS 2 cups self raising flour 2 cup milk 4 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoon baking powder 2 eggs Butter for frypan 1. Add self raising flour, baking powder and sugar to a large bowl then mix with a spoon. 2. Add eggs and milk then whisk with a fork until combined. 3. Heat a non-stick frypan over medium heat. 4. Lightly grease the pan with butter. 5. Add 1 ladle of mixture to pan, wait until bubbles form on surface and sides become dry then flip over to cook other side until lightly golden. Makes 12 x 6.5cm pancakes. Unused batter can be frozen. Serve with topping of choice: 1. Lemon juice and sugar 2. Ice cream/whipped cream and strawberries 3. Add blueberries or chocolate chips to batter Extra filling options: 1. Ham and cheese 2. Mushroom, spinach and cheese 3. Bolognese sauce

This recipe was kindly provided by HEAT Catering: a social enterprise of SKYS which supports disadvantaged youth. www.heat.org.au 147


Basic Vegetable Curry INGREDIENTS 1-2 brown onions, chopped 2-3 cloves garlic, crushed Green chillies, if available 5 cm knob of fresh ginger (grated) 2-3 ripe tomatoes, chopped (or one tin of peeled, diced tomatoes) 2 -3 cups of mixed vegetables – a combination of 1 diced carrot, 1/2 cup chopped pumpkin and any other vegetables available (like cauliflower, beans, spinach etc) 2 tablespoons curry powder (or combination of cumin powder, coriander powder and turmeric) 2 tablespoons cumin powder Salt 1 can of coconut milk Coriander to garnish (optional)

1. Lightly boil carrots separately first to help with cooking time as otherwise other vegetables will become mushy. 2. Fry onions and garlic until lightly browned together in a very large saucepan with some green chillies if available. Add tomatoes, ginger, spices and salt and cook together for about 5 minutes. 3. Add vegetables and a little water if required to stop vegetables from sticking to pan (to below vegetable level) and cook covered until vegetables are almost cooked. 4. Taste for seasoning and then add coconut milk and cook uncovered until vegetables are cooked. 5. Garnish with coriander leaves if desired. 6. Serve with rice or specialty bread (afghan bread, naan, roti etc.)

This recipe was kindly provided by the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre Australia’s leading asylum seeker organisation. www.asrc.org.au

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Mini Pizzas INGREDIENTS Pita bread (or flat bread) 2 tablespoons of pasta sauce/tomato paste 1/2 cup grated mozzarella cheese 1/2 cup grated tasty cheese Capsicum (red or green) Mushrooms Pineapple Meat (salami, ham, cooked chicken etc.)

1. Pre-heat the oven to 150 degrees Centigrade or 300 degrees Fahrenheit. 2. Place the pita bread on a greased oven tray. 3. Spread the pasta sauce with a spoon over the pita bread. 4. Spread half the cheese on top of the sauce. 5. Spread the meat and diced vegetables on the bread and cover with the remainder of the cheese. 6. Place in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese has melted.

Stir Fry Vegetables with Noodles INGREDIENTS 1 brown onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 carrot, diced 1 red capsicum, diced Handful of snow peas Broccoli, cut into small pieces Hokkien noodles (or other egg or rice noodles) Sauce of your choice — satay, soy and sweet chilli, honey and soy

1. Heat a small amount of oil in a frying pan or wok. 2. Fry onion and garlic until brown and soft. 3. Place the noodles in a bowl and cover with boiling water, separate gently with a fork. Drain off the water. 4. Add the diced vegies and snow peas to the wok and stir fry for 2–5 minutes. 5. Add the sauce and noodles and heat through. 149


Chilli Beans INGREDIENTS 1 can kidney beans I can tomatoes or 4 cooking tomatoes 2 cloves garlic 1 onion 1 finely chopped deseeded chilli or chilli powder Spices, try cardamom, celery seed, cumin, coriander (half a teaspoon) Salt and pepper to taste Half a cup of water 1. Lightly fry onion, garlic, chilli and spices in oil. 2. Add kidney beans, tomatoes and water, simmer for 30–40 minutes. 3. Serve with rice, enchiladas or corn chips and avocado, cheese and sour cream.

Chicken Schnitzel INGREDIENTS 2–3 eggs 1–2 cups plain flour 1–2 cups breadcrumbs Chicken breast Vegetable oil 1. Slice the chicken breast into thin fillets. 2. Crack the eggs into a dish and lightly beat, place flour on one plate and breadcrumbs on another. 3. Coat the chicken fillets in flour, dip into egg and then coat with breadcrumbs. 4. Heat the oil in the frying pan, make sure there is about one centimetre of oil in the bottom of the pan. 5. Place the crumbed chicken fillets in the oil. Cook for a few minutes on one side until golden brown, use tongs to turn over. Do the same on the other side. 6. Place the chicken on absorbent kitchen paper and lightly pat until most of the oil has been absorbed. 7. Place the chicken on an oven tray and cook in the oven for 20 minutes on 160º Centigrade or 320º Fahrenheit. 8. Eat with salad or vegetables …YUM! 150


Super Cheap Dahl INGREDIENTS 1 cup dry red lentils 1 onion 2 cloves garlic Small knob ginger Indian spices i.e. turmeric, cardamom, cumin, and coriander (half a teaspoon) Salt and pepper to taste 2 cups water or stock Oil 1. Heat oil in pan, add onion, garlic and spices. Cook for 2 minutes. 2. Add lentils and fry for 2 minutes before adding water or stock. 3. Reduce heat to simmer and cook until lentils are mushy (about 45 minutes). 4. Serve with rice or by itself. For variety add pumpkin or tomatoes while cooking.

Omelette INGREDIENTS 2 eggs per person 2 tablespoons milk per egg (4 tablespoons for 2 eggs) Salt and pepper or other seasoning (like parsley or basil) Tomatoes, mushrooms and cheese Vegetable oil 1. Lightly beat the eggs and milk in a bowl, add the salt and pepper or seasoning. 2. Dice the tomatoes and mushrooms and heat them in a small saucepan with a little oil for a few minutes. 3. Coat a medium-sized frying pan with olive oil, spreading the oil around whole pan. Heat the pan. 4. Pour the egg mixture into the frying pan, move the egg around with an egg flip, fill the gaps created with the uncooked egg so there is a thin layer of cooked egg on the bottom. 5. Just before the mixture is fully cooked add the tomato and mushroom mix and some cheese to half the omelette and fold the other half over the top. 6. Cook for 1 minute to melt the cheese then lift the pan off the heat and gently slide the omelette onto a plate.

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Fried Rice INGREDIENTS 2 cups cooked rice 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon vegetable stock 1 cup of boiling water

3 eggs, lightly beaten 2 cups mixed vegetables (diced carrot, broccoli cut small, diced red capsicum, peas)

1. Mix together soy sauce with vegetable stock and boiling water. 2. Heat a small amount of oil in a frying pan. Cook the egg and remove from pan. 3. Fry the vegetables for 2–5 minutes, gradually adding half the sauce and stock mix. 4. Return the egg to the frying pan and stir fry for a further 2 minutes. 5. Add the rice and remainder of the sauce. Add extra soy if required. Stir through until warm.

Spaghetti Bolognese INGREDIENTS 500 grams of mince meat 1 jar tomato pasta sauce 1 small tub tomato paste 1 onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 packet of spaghetti or preferred pasta

Sugar and salt 2 stock cubes (optional) Water (3/4 pasta sauce jar) 1 red capsicum diced 5 mushrooms cut into slices Parmesan cheese, grated

1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add onion and garlic and cook on medium heat until soft. 2. Add mince meat and break up with a wooden spoon. Cook until mince is brown. 3. Stir through vegetables, pasta sauce, tomato paste and water. Cook on medium heat for 2–4 minutes. 4. Add a pinch of salt, 2 teaspoons of sugar and stock cubes. Turn the heat right down and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring regularly. Prepare white sauce or cook the spaghetti while waiting. 5. Prepare pasta as per packet instructions and serve with sauce and grated parmesan cheese. You can use this Bolognese sauce with other recipes such as Shepherd’s Pie, Greek Moussaka or even just as savoury mince on toast!

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Grilled Eggplant Salad with Zataar and Marinated Feta INGREDIENTS 1 large eggplant, cut into large cubes 2 garlic cloves, crushed 50 mls extra virgin olive oil 1/2 bunch mint, picked and washed 1/2 bunch flat leaf parsley, picked and washed 2 tablespoons zataar (a middle eastern spice mixture made of thyme, sesame seeds and sumac) Juice and zest of one lemon 150 grams marinated feta 1 teaspoon sumac 1. Toss the cubed eggplant with the olive oil, lemon zest and garlic. 2. Season liberally with salt and pepper, cook on medium high heat on a barbeque or chargrill until soft. 3. Remove the eggplant from the grill, place in a bowl, add the lemon juice and zataar, and then allow to cool. 4. When the eggplant is cool, toss through the mint and parsley, season and arrange on a plate. 5. Crumble the feta over the top of the salad, drizzle with a tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle with the sumac. 6. Serve as a light meal with rice, as a side with grilled meats or as a sandwich filling on toasted Turkish bread.

This recipe was kindly provided by STREAT: a social enterprise providing homeless youth with a supported pathway to long-term careers in the hospitality industry. www.streat.com.au

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Housing Homelessness Assistance Services (and Transitional Housing)

1800 825 955

A 24-hour statewide toll free number which directs your call to a service closest to you, or if the call is outside business hours, it will be directed to Salvation Army Crisis Services. St. Kilda Crisis Contact Centre (24 hours, 7 days)

(03) 9536 7777

Melbourne Youth Support Service (MYSS)

1800 800 531 / (03) 9614 3688

MYSS can provide you with contact numbers for Youth Housing Services and Transitional Housing Managers in your area and support with accessing Crisis Accommodation. www.frontyard.org/myss.htm Crisis Help Network: Melbourne Homeless Services Information about housing, crisis accommodation and support. www.melbourne.homeless.org.au Homelessness Advocacy Service

1800 066 256

HAS act as advocates for clients of supported accommodation services who want to know about their rights and making a complaint. Tenants Union Victoria

(03) 9416 2577

www.tuv.org.au Office of Housing

1300 650 172

www.housing.vic.gov.au Aboriginal Housing Victoria

(03) 9403 2100 / 1300 724 882 (cost of a local call)

Share accommodation and private rental listings www.realestate.com.au www.gumtree.com.au Student Housing www.vu.edu.au/facilities-and-services/housing-services/student-village www.australian-universities.com/accommodation/student/victoria Rental Housing Cooperatives For a list of Rental Housing Cooperatives in Victoria visit www.housingregistrar.vic.gov.au

Education, Employment and Training Job Services Australia (Frontyard)

(03) 9611 2440

Provides support for young people 15 to 25 years old, who are looking for a job or training opportunity Fair Work Info Line

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13 13 94


Legal Services YouthLaw @ Frontyard YouthLaw can direct you to a local service if required (freecall except mobiles) Victims of Crime Helpline

(03) 9611 2412 1800 800 531 1800 819 817

www.justice.vic.gov.au Federation of Community Legal Centres Victoria

(03) 9652 1500

Provides information and referrals to people seeking legal assistance www.communitylaw.org.au Office of Police Integrity

1800 818 387

www.opi.vic.gov.au Consumer Affairs Victoria

1300 558 181

www.consumer.vic.gov.au Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman

1800 062 058

www.tio.com.au

Financial Services Centrelink (Youth) Centrelink @ Frontyard

13 24 90 (03) 9614 2411

Community Health Young Persons Health Service (Frontyard)

(03) 9611 2411

Frontyard can refer you to Youth Friendly Doctors, Dentists, Mental Health Services and Community Health services in your area. Action Centre

1800 013 952

Confidential Sexual Health Service for Young People www.fpv.org.au/young-people/ Victorian Aboriginal Health Services

(03) 9419 3000

Reconnect (Frontyard)

(03) 9611 2411

Family Mediation and Reconciliation Royal Women’s Hospital Women’s Health Information Centre For rural callers Email: whic@thewomens.org.au www.thewomens.org.au Living Room Health Services (Youth Projects)

(03) 8345 3045 1800 442 007 1800 440 188

Primary health service for injecting drug users Directline

1800 888 236

24 hour Drug and Alcohol hotline for counselling & referral YSAS (Youth Substance Abuse Service) Line

1800 014 446

Headspace Youth mental health service www.headspace.org.au Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service of Victoria

(03) 9322 3555

Country toll free: 1800 015 188 24 hour information and support if you’re experiencing family violence www.wdvcs.org.au Gay and Lesbian Switchboard

(03) 9663 2939 / 1800 184 527

Telephone counselling for lesbians and gay men, referral to face to face counselling and other services www.switchboard.org.au

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My phone numbers and addresses Names

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Address / email

Phone


Notes

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Notes

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LiveSmart 2013 Dairy - VIC edition