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L EE D & W E L L PROJE C T S

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Brand Experience Service Retail Supermarkets Marketplace Corporate Rollout Hospitality Specialty Stores COMMUNITY Civic Justice Schools Higher Education

HEALTHCARE L EE D & W E L L AC C R E DIT E D P RO F E S S I O N AL S

114 OF F I C E L O CAT IONS

CHARLOTTE, NC DURHAM, NC NEWPORT BEACH, CA ORLANDO, FL WASHINGTON, DC *CERTIFIED OR PURSUING CERTIFICATION

Acute Care Specialty Centers Medical Office Buildings & Clinics

WORKPLACE Office Interiors Mixed-Use Critical Facilities

ENGINEERING Mechanical Electrical Structural Low Voltage Plumbing Civil Center For Building Performance

CONSULTING SPECIALTIES Brand Communication & Design Land Development Skyscraper 3d Advanced Building Technologies Smart Buildings Studio


Little’s goal is aimed at elevating the performance of our clients in the retail, healthcare, community and workplace industries by delivering Results Beyond Architecture. We accomplish this by offering a comprehensive array of services rare among design firms today. Our multi-disciplinary approach unites architects, interior designers, engineers, land planners, graphic designers, animators and IT experts. This strategy assures you of the most creative, comprehensive and fully coordinated solutions possible. We’ve searched out the best of the best, so you don’t have to. These experts collaborate with you and with one another, balancing the regional knowledge acquired through Little’s national network of offices with local, market specific needs to create the most effective design solution for you.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR RETAIL EXPERIENCE IN OTHER LIFESTYLE SEGMENTS, WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO BROWSE THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS.

EAT

LIVE

PLAY

SHOP


BEYOND RETAIL Where we Eat, Live, Shop and Play are converging. Regardless of how these lifestyles intersect, it’s the shared moments that bring us all together to make lasting memories and connect us to brands. Little's strength lies in this diversity - whether designing signature experiences for eateries, apparel boutiques, or financial institutions - all contribute to our understanding of the changing needs and desires of your customers. Our retail expertise spans the full spectrum of customer experience enabling us to engage on projects that re-define traditional retail. The following pages offer an insight to the passion that drives each of us relentlessly forward, illustrated through a selection of projects, thought leadership, and ultimately results that we deliver for our clients.


CONTENTS

Crabtree Valley Mall, page 15

Element Hotel, page 22

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: ELEMENT HOTEL

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A TASTE OF JAPAN

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: ARIA TUSCAN GRILL

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: BUNULU

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: LUCKY BRAND JEANS

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: ALLY CHARLOTTE CENTER

HYBRIDITY: WHEN UNLIKELY TYPOLOGIES COLLIDE – Jim Thompson

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: BELK

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THE STORY OF CREDO

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: SHINOLA

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: CRABTREE VALLEY MALL

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PORTABLE PARK

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: LAZY ACRES

– James Farnell & Daniel Montaño

– Bruce Barteldt Jr.

Click Chapter Titles to View

– James Farnell & Henry Kwon


Pacific Theatres, page 44

Wescom, page 51

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POINTS WELL TAKEN

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BRAND COMMUNICATION & DESIGN

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UN-BANKING THE BANK

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GRAPHICS CAN PLAY A LEED ROLE

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: PACIFIC THEATRES

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: TOKYO CENTRAL

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: MORRISON

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: INNERSELF

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PLACEMAKING IN RETAIL FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A DUAL-INCOME FAMILY

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: CONCENTRA

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: WESCOM

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PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: UNC CHAPEL HILL, CRAIGE PARKING DECK

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SCOPE OF SERVICES

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HIGH PERFORMANCE RETAIL BANKING

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SELECT CLIENT LISTING

– Nancy Everhart

– James Farnell & Nancy Everhart

– Megan D'Albora

– Sarah Curtis

– Kelley Deal


HYB RID ITY WHEN UNLIKELY TYPOLOGIES COLLIDE By Jim Thompson

THE POWER IN A HYBRID IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS; IT’S THE UNEXPECTED INNOVATION FROM THE COMBINATION.

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O

ver the past few decades design has mainstreamed. Children today grow up with design in the form of devices so intuitive that they can determine how to work them without an instruction manual. It’s no surprise people are beginning to create spaces that combine elements in ways that suit their wants and needs.

The idea of hybridity is an association of ideas, concepts and themes that reinforce and contradict each other at once, creating an interesting result in the built environment because of the different types of experiences that they can bring to the users of the spaces, and novel ways of overlapping unanticipated uses in the same space. When these unlikely typologies and ideas collide in the making of new spaces, an extraordinary intersection is created. These unorthodox combinations and ideas related to “place” and the unique associations that are generated because of them become fertile ground for innovation. The power in a hybrid is more than the sum of its parts; it’s the resulting unexpected innovation from the combination. Hybrid buildings are intended to disrupt the social norms of public and private life. What we are seeing with hybridity – through ideas, social and cultural settings, advanced through technology and the intersection of diverse ideas – is making what was once something “out there” and “on the edge” very real and attainable, soon to be expected and the new norm. Hybrid buildings take this a step further. In essence they create places that become catalytic incubators for new and experiential architectural types that are inspiring, active and most often, urban. The best examples of hybrid architecture create stronger physical and programmatic links between an urban center’s retailers, educational institutions, businesses, people and vibrant destinations. We are seeing an early progression to hybridity though mixed-use/shared typologies in places that combine uses, such as retail with work, STEM labs that combine science and technologies, and schools that have community spaces. These types of facilities are pushing the idea of typology in a “linear” fashion; as most simply put, they are combining functions and changing the future of work itself.

Jim Thompson, AIA, IIDA, LEED AP BD+C, is a Partner and Design Principal in the Workplace Practice at Little and can be reached at Jim.Thompson@littleonline.com

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BELK HYBRIDITY IN THE WORKPLACE

A flexible space for staff and clients to recharge, meet & relax Workplace dining facilities can drive so many things beyond the daily menu – they can be a retreat, a cultural instigator, a place to promote wellness and even another type of workspace altogether. Belk’s coffee bar and employee dining area borrow from the hospitality industry by incorporating comfortable seating, unique centerpieces like the 12’ tall wooden “bloom” and indoor terraces. These landmarks anchor the eating area and help make this a powerful place to fuel the body, nurture the mind and cultivate relationships.

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THE STORY OF CREDO "NAME YOUR PRICE"

By James Farnell & Daniel Montaño

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Photo Credit: Caio Freitas View Contents


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owntown Credo is a not-for-profit coffee shop with a large mission focused on using creativity as a conduit to affect positive change in the community. The name Credo is defined as ‘an idea, or set of beliefs that guides the actions of a person or group’. Our story of Credo focuses on the power of design to influence the lives of the people we design for … how breakthrough ideas can create a better future. Many of you probably start your morning with a cup of coffee, but when is the last time you bought a cup and instead of the Barista telling you that you owed $2.30 (ok – $4 if you’re in LA or New York), you told the Barista how much you were willing to pay? Better yet, when’s the last time you bought a cup of coffee and walked away feeling like you impacted your community – or even the world? If you’ve never experienced either of these, then you’ve never been to Credo. With a ‘name your price’ menu and a brand promise to be a catalyst toward lives of meaning, impact and community, Credo isn’t your typical coffee shop. In fact, it acts much like a non-profit, making global impact by buying coffee from countries like Guatemala and Nicaragua. In turn, the proceeds Credo makes from its coffee sales goes toward funding local community projects. But outside of helping to achieve the Credo mission, this small, friendly, flexible space – located in the heart of Florida Hospitals’ Health Village (in the Administrative building also designed by Little) – has created quite the communal buzz. Beyond the Latte and the Mocha Cappuccino lies an incubator for new businesses and community programs. It’s a place where friendships are fostered. And, best of all, it’s a place where the sick can, for a brief moment, forget they are sick. Since Credo is located on the Florida Hospital campus, the space has unexpectedly become a destination where nurses, therapists and physicians take patients to boost their spirits. In fact, Marisa Crooks, a speech therapist with Florida Hospital, works primarily with patients who have suffered from strokes. Before Credo, she would take patients for a stroll outside of their room and maybe let them get a breath of fresh outdoor air. Regardless of where she went, however, there were remnants of the hospital atmosphere. Now, Marisa takes her patients to Credo. And as she strolls them through the light filled space and up the elevator to the mezzanine level, immersing her patients in the communal buzz, something changes. Her patients’ spirits and their demeanor suddenly seem more optimistic. They feel elevated to be away from their troubles and part of something positive. The Credo space our team designed has not only served as a catalyst for bringing people together and impacting lives. The overwhelming success of our AIA award winning concept has allowed Credo to expand into additional space on the hospital campus and to open up two additional locations in the Orlando area. It has exceeded the team’s expectations financially and surprised many by bringing healthy customers and entrepreneurial start-ups to the campus that would never have otherwise visited the site. In the belief this Health Village should not only be a place to go when sick but an integral part of the community, Credo conducted a poll of their customers 6-9 months after openAmerican Institute of Architects (AIA) Orlando Chapter Award of Honor

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“This location is bright, industrial and chic. Definitely a great workspace that is less crowded, with more electrical outlets and a different vibe. Plus there’s the view of the trains passing by which is super cool to watch.” Yelp! Customer

ing. They discovered that 50 percent of their customers were non-patients, now coming to meetings and working from the space (many arriving via the nearby light rail transit). Credo has become a destination rather than a stop-over on a campus visit. Credo’s founder, Ben Hoyer echoed these points."Our customers love the quality of the space, the view and natural light from the windows and the communal buzz – all aligned with our mission.” He notes it has helped them grow beyond these four walls and been a catalyst to: a) incubate new businesses and community programs resulting in the shop taking additional space; b) given Credo exposure to a larger audience and opened up opportunities for their business to expand – with two other locations/ collaborations taking hold since this project opened. There are many more angles to this story that can be told from an architectural point-of-view. However, it’s what architecture enables people to do or feel that will drive customer loyalty and the future success of retail clients. For many, Credo offers an opportunity - for customers of all kinds - to re-connect with themselves and the community.

“This is the place to go if you need a reminder about why this city is so freaking great.” Yelp! Customer

Serving not just coffee, but serving as an incubator for local start-ups and a catalyst in the community. Photo Credit: Caio Freitas on Instagram.


It’s what architecture enables people to do or feel that will drive customer loyalty and the future success of retail clients.

The highly visible 20’x20' cube within a 40'×40' space.

James Farnell, CID, FRDI, IIDA, MCSD, NCIDQ, is a Partner and Retail Practice Leader at Little and can be reached at James.Farnell@littleonline.com. Daniel Montaño, LEED AP, CDT, is a Partner & Design Principal at Little and can be reached at Daniel.Montano@littleonline.com. It’s all in the detail. Credo is a simple, flexible and functional response to their needs, allowing customers to write the script. Photo Credit: Seth Dunlap

Bucking the trend for ‘frictionless transactions’, we refer to it as ‘positive friction’…where we encourage customers to strike up a conversation over their ‘no menu, no pricing’ approach. Photo Credit: Seth Dunlap

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SHINOL LOCALIZED BOUTIQUE

Celebrating craftsmanship in the heart of the Los Angeles District Shinola has built a brand that celebrates craftsmanship and carries out a mission to create jobs and employ skilled American labor. Our creative design team prioritized the brand’s ethos when transforming this space in a 1915 warehouse and made sure it could be felt by consumers in the finished experience. Along with the retail store, the space also houses a cafe and a “speakeasy” tattoo salon. The resulting design has allowed for each of the use components to coexist seamlessly, while establishing distinctly different identities and customer experiences.

Shop! Gold Design Award, Hardline Specialty Store

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CRABTREE VALLEY MALL MIXED-USE DES T INAT ION

A new future for a popular North Carolina mall This redevelopment of Crabtree Valley Mall into a large mixeduse destination includes retail, office space and a hotel in a 30-story tower. The project aims to bring people and activity to Crabtree and ensure that the mall stays relevant in the new retail landscape.

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PORTABLE PARK By Bruce A. Barteldt Jr.

Little conceptualizes Air, a portable popup park tying retail to ‘happenings’

Winner of The Global Architecture & Design Awards, Pop-ups and Temporary Concept

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our life, create clear memories of special moments. Maybe it’s an antidote to the impersonal nature of our "online life" that people of all ages long for unique, authentic, local experiences.

FLEXIBILITY FOR PERSONALIZATION

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very town has a dying commercial power center or a regional mall with vacancies caused by departing anchor tenants. Every city has abandoned urban properties—once active sites begging for redevelopment, but rendered irrelevant as development interests shifted. In both instances, a lack of a sense of place and purpose results. Simultaneously, retail is undergoing rapid change, primarily due to shifting customer behavior. A flick of the finger allows consumers to purchase a 75-in. TV from their couch, and when it’s delivered a day or two later, they’ll binge watch entire seasons of their favorite shows. Everything has become "in the moment"—Instagram moments, fast fashion—and our expectations of time and change have become fluid. Trends in general have become a blur, so much so that we expect (even demand) freshness in all our experiences. Is it any wonder that stores can last a few weeks, or hours? Yet with all this change, some things have remained timeless and even grown more relevant: a seasonal health fair, a farmer’s market, or a festival in the park. These places for "happenings," sprinkled across the pages of

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Air is a concept for a portable popup park. Communities and developers can work with Air to set up for durations ranging from a week to six months and beyond. While an array of retailers/brands are built in, what makes Air unique is its invitation to local retailers, makers, farmers, entertainers, and community groups to breathe life into the experience. Air provides the environment, the kit of parts, the program structure, marketing, management, and guidance. The rest is local. Certain aspects are left open-ended to allow the local community or neighborhood to personalize it.

To inspire a compelling internal rethink for its retail practice, Little challenged its team to mine for breakthrough ideas. The firm designs both retail stores and commercial centers. Little asked "How can we solve for both simultaneously?" This concept grew out of that exercise. See more at vimeo.com/270900512

The intention leads to the elusive "grit," patina, and authenticity that customers prefer and that developers seek but can’t seem to create. What sets Air apart from conventional developments is the notion that "happenings"—not the retail alone—are the experience. In fact, it you create the happening, the customer and therefore the retail, will follow.


While the example shown illustrates the occupying of a deserted gas station, Air can go virtually anywhere and is scalable to accommodate a variety of settings. Air’s modularity not only allows for its mobility and ability to conform to different event and merchandising requirements, but also enables it to expand or shrink and change shape. Either for a regional mall parking lot or a city park, Air creates synergies, sparks curiosity, and provides a novel venue for enjoyment.

ELEMENTS OF AIR The concept was branded "Air" to evoke its ever-present, yet transient and fluid nature. The term can fit anywhere, yet is identifiable enough to take on a brand position of its own when popping up from place to place. Branded elements are applied for primary identification, and the logo geometry (which echoes the cloud elements) is used throughout. Fixed, digital, and projection graphics provide wayfinding and information.

As a result of Air’s flexible/modular nature, the circulation pattern can vary at each installation. The intention is to locate mobile popup retailers between event spaces at opposing zones of the subject site. Larger (i.e., containers) and smaller mobile retailers (i.e., kiosks/carts) are grouped in separate zones to activate adjacent event functions and drive movement from zone to zone. All fixtures are component-ized into a flexible kit of parts that can be loaded into a container for ease of relocation and setup. An array of component types allows for an array of retailers. Larger (i.e., containers) and smaller mobile retailers (kiosks/carts) are grouped in separate zones to activate adjacent event functions and drive movement from zone to zone.

The main feature of the space, an inflatable fiberglass fabric membrane, is both iconographic and sheltering. These cloud-like elements diffuse sunlight during the day and are activated by lighting and kinetic coloration at night. Combinations of raw wood and finished phenolic surfaces make up the fixture palette. Beyond community-sourced graffiti, all décor and visual merchandising is left up to each popup retailer.

"Air is of our times — fluid and purposeful. Air pulls into town, unpacks a happening and brings communities together. Air floats along with trends and moves on before it becomes passé. Communities anticipate Air's arrival and wave goodbye when it leaves for the next town. Air is an unfolding story in which each neighborhood writes its own unique chapter."

TREND RESPONSE Air is a response to the convergence of two seemingly unrelated trends. The first is the customer’s desire for constant change, conditioned by their digital devices. The second trend is the fundamental shift in commercial development resulting from customer expectations for authentic, meaningful experiences.

Bruce A. Barteldt Jr., AIA, LEED BD+C, is a Partner and Chief Innovation Officer at Little and can be reached at Bruce.Barteldt@littleonline.com.

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LAZY ACRES NAT UR AL M A RK E T

Engaging the community in a meaningful lifestyle for wellness Lazy Acres understands the importance of being dedicated to its local communities. Offering wholesome, natural and organic foods, this supermarket features a working classroom where adults and kids can receive hands-on instruction to learn and taste as they cook. Also central to this design is a “Bee Department,” featuring a live observation Honeybee hive, that highlights these important insects and how they contribute to the food system.

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ELEMEN HOTE PIONEER IN EC O - F R IE NDLY IDE AT ION

Ensuring the guest experience is environmentally friendly and as holistic as possible. In re-positioning the Element brand for Marriott International, our design team provided solutions that elevate the guest experience and better align Element’s brand promise with guest expectations. Emphasis was placed on the entry and check-in sequence, public lounges complemented with a new bar and mobile self-serving drink station. Additional focus was placed on the creation of an "industry-first" room type. The "studio commons" combines four independent rooms that share a living room, kitchen, work area, and a large dining table – perfect for traveling groups that want to stay in and stay together.

See how Bon Appétit Magazine Food Director Carla Music turns Element Hotels into her very own BA Test Kitchen. www.youtube.com/user/Element

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THE NEW DESIGN HAS GARNERED A

14 POINT INCREASE

IN GUEST SATISFACTION AND INTENT TO RETURN

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A flexible event space offering a community program for cookery classes & calligraphy lessons.

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Custom graphics woven into the interior design to further localize the design.


A TASTE OF JAPAN By James Farnell & Henry Kwon

The story of a Japanese grocery brand offering a far more localized experience, one that provides customers with a sense of ownership and belonging in its new Californian neighborhood.

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he client’s vision for Tokyo Central was to become the area’s go-to destination for high-quality Japanese food and specialty items at affordable prices. Perhaps more importantly, to connect with the community in a meaningful way, by offering an authentic Japanese cultural and inter-generational experience. Design has the opportunity to create a better future for people – retail environments have an opportunity to offer far more than a simple product or service offering. What we know, from our experience working with retailers across the full spectrum of the industry, is that customers have a growing appetite for retail with a more culturally enriching, experiential accent. They want an authentic story – they are searching for meaning and greater depth to brands offering a more curated product selection. Tokyo Central responds to this with a unique experience that can be enjoyed by the whole family, one that educates and inspires the neighborhood with a localized design solution. Tokyo Central Market is a fine example of how multi-disciplinary design can have a powerful impact on the businesses, customers and communities we serve. Beyond the grocery experience, the project fosters connections between east and west, young and old through the sharing of recipes, the craft of calligraphy, unique ingredients and signature moments – from cookery classes to store tours that Tokyo Central offers local language schools. To that end, our team was very deliberate in creating a retail environment that would be inviting to the community and create a sense of ‘ownership’ for the locals of Orange County through the programs, offerings and even the environmental graphics used throughout the store. The resulting prototype design allows Tokyo Central to ‘transcend the transaction’, to accurately reflect the exchange between grocer, neighbor and culture, while helping create a unique community experience. The grocer's commitment to craftsmanship, combined with fresh aesthetics and thoughtful merchandising, provide an environment that entertains, educates and excites. The project required a hyper-collaborative team approach to successfully create a fusion between the cultures of Japan & California. Our team was regularly prompted to take a closer look at each element, to engage the customer's senses with an interplay between organic and inorganic materials, to be cognizant of the positive vs. negative space, or rather, the

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A

B

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Tokyo Central Market’s parent company, Marukai Corporation, embarked on this project with a clear mission – to create a new experience for locals that celebrates the fusion of Californian-Japanese culture in the heart of Orange County’s Yorba Linda.


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yin and yang, and to appreciate the sense of craftsmanship in everyday food preparation. The new space also emulates an overall sense of Zen and Joy. We leveraged this ideal as a common thread that connects each separate entity within the store into a cohesive, collective calm. The core inspiration was derived from the traditional, vibrant outdoor markets of Japan. The prototype design’s wayfinding and interior signage banners pay homage to these markets in particular. Dual layers comprised of a transparent and textured Washifabric are reminiscent of the markets of Tokyo. They incorporated bilingual text, in both English and Japanese, to signify a fusion of cultures, and pragmatically, to help guide the American shopper in an otherwise foreign environment. In recognition of the year the company was founded, the store design features a 1964 Daihatsu ‘Midget’ 250cc delivery truck – sourced on a farm near Osaka like many of the ingredients imported to California. The truck spent 3 months in customs and was allowed through as a ‘museum’ piece before being restored – the first of it’s kind to land on the docks of North America. Yorba Linda customers now clearly identify Tokyo Central Specialty Market as much more than the new grocer in town; they see a local, authentic, community-centered brand focused on bringing people together. VM&SD Magazine Retail Renovation Award

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A. B. C. D. E. F.

Localized graphic murals for Yorba Linda provide a backdrop to the Bakery. Traditional raised ‘Horigotatsu’ seating provides a unique dining experience in the food court. Japanese sake & beer tastings adjacent to the community event space. Dual layers comprised of a transparent and textured Washi fabric are reminiscent of the markets of Tokyo. A unique 1964 Daihatsu ‘Midget’ 250cc delivery truck – sourced on a farm near Osaka. Customer register lanes named after Japanese neighborhoods.

James Farnell, CID, FRDI, IIDA, MCSD, NCIDQ, is a Partner and Retail Practice Leader at Little and can be reached at James.Farnell@littleonline.com. Henry Kwon, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is a Partner & Supermarkets Studio Principal at Little and can be reached at Henry.Kwon@littleonline.com.

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MODERN I TA L I A N SETTING

Honest and authentic “craftsmanship” embraces simple old world Italian comfort food in a modern setting Nestled in Bank of America’s world headquarters, this highend Tuscan Italian restaurant occupies a former exterior driveway and vehicular drop off area. Our retail team worked with the owner to design a timeless and sophisticated interior that continues to wow new customers and regulars alike.

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BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY A TWIST ON THE TRADITIONAL

Flexible retail experience that adapts to student needs With this new campus store, Bloomsburg wanted to create a dynamic and flexible retail experience that would excite students and visitors. Mirroring the University’s core attributes of “inspired, diverse and engaged,” the customer experience is orchestrated before even entering the store with the modern iconic storefront and inspiring window displays. The experience has exceeded expectations with a double-digit sales increase and increased frequency of visits.

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BUNUL PL ACE OF WAT ER

A unique, soulful and comfortable approach to style When Florida retailer Bealls wanted to launch a new brand to coincide with its 100-year anniversary, Bunulu was born. Our team worked with the client to create the brand strategy and identity for Bunulu - a name derived from the aboriginal word for “place of water”. The overall look and feel of the store supports Bunulu’s commitment to coastal lifestyle enthusiasts who expect a unique, soulful and comfortable approach to style.

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ALL-AMERICAN SPIRIT

Recognizing vintage inspired roots The Lucky Brand core brand attributes - Spirit, Freshness, Americana, Nostalgia and Freedom further evolved through the opening of their store in Palm Desert. While the Lucky Brand Jeans store design is dynamic and differs from location to location, it prompts a consistent emotional response from their customer and allows the Lucky experience to remain fresh.

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ENHANCING THE STREETSCAPE

One of Charlotte's most transformative mixed-use projects This urban mixed-use project integrates workplace, retail, restaurant and hotel spaces. The 26-story tower is grounded by thriving public spaces, with pedestrian corridors, niches and gathering spaces that enhance the streetscape and engage the business theater and art districts. Focusing on environmental and human sustainability, this project is pursuing LEED and WELL Certification.

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POINTS WELL TAKEN By Nancy Everhart

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wareness of how the environment and food affects our health is becoming increasingly more important. What is the quality of the air we breathe? How does the built environment impact productivity and quality of life? What should you eat and not eat? The WELL building standard blends design principles with the study of neuroscience to create spaces with programs, design strategies, and performance metrics focused on the health and well-being of building occupants.

Retailers may want to consider adding WELL measurement factors when constructing brickand-mortar locations. These initiatives can help the company be a good steward to the community; retain strong, consistent staff; and provide an immersive experience that allows the customer to embrace the brand and decompress for longer stays in the store. A WELL program could positively impact your staff, the environment, sales, and consumer confidence. WELL focuses on seven categories: Nourishment, Light, Mind, Comfort, Air, Fitness, and Water. The standard outlines “preconditions” and “optimizations” for each category. For retail spaces, some requirements are easy and a few may prove more arduous. Here’s a look at each category.

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NOURISHM ENT Many features under the Nourishment category do not apply to retail environments. In fact, out of the eight preconditions and seven optimizations, only three preconditions and two optimizations are listed in the retail pilot program. The preconditions promote restrictions on the amount of sugar on all foods, including beverages and snacks sold on the premises and in vending machines, and a ban on partially hydrogenated oil. Another precondition requires packaging labels on food sold on the premises to indicate the inclusion of known allergens such as gluten, shellfish, and peanuts. The third precondition requires providing fragrance-free hand soap with disposable paper towels at sinks. It is important to note that WELL requires hand air dryers to be supplemented by disposable paper towels. The two Nourishment optimizations are fairly cost-effective to pursue. The easiest method is to provide a refrigerator that has temperature control capabilities and is large enough to accommodate at least 20L/0.7 cu. ft. per occupant. The other optimization calls for providing typical breakroom amenities and communal eating spaces for at least 25% of the total number of employees. All of this is to promote mindful eating, instead of distracted eating, which leads to consuming more food than necessary.

L IGHT Light strongly affects a person’s mood, productivity, and circadian rhythm. We spend much of our waking hours indoors and, of course, retailers want customers to spend as much time as possible in their stores to increase sales. The quality of light in the store can facilitate an increase in sales, as glare can impact comfort and visual acuity. An uncomfortable customer will subconsciously leave the store quickly, negatively impacting sales. The only light precondition required in the retail pilot program is Solar Glare Control. At first glance, it can be a challenge. Retailers need to provide external systems, interior light shelves, micromirrors, or variable opacity glazing for glazing areas that are above 2.1m/7 ft. to minimize glare. An even harder condition to implement is adding view window shading devices for all glazing less than 2.1m/7 ft. above the floor in regularly occupied spaces, but this can be achieved through interior window shades controlled by the occupants, external shading systems, or variable opacity glazing. While seeing into the store is of utmost importance, it’s also good to consider that if the customers in the store cannot see the products due to glare or poor lighting, the consequence will be reduced sales. Two of the four preconditions in the general standard’s Light category are moved into the optimization for the retail pilot program, giving retailers seven optimizations to select from. One of the most important attributes to pursue for all retailers may be improving the color rendering index (CRI) in-store, as this can enhance visual appeal. An easy optimization to obtain is to provide breakrooms for employees with specific lighting averages.


MIND

AIR

As retailers begin to morph their spaces from mere point-of-sales environments to experiential environments, adopting components from the Mind category can better align the brand with customers and provide a better environment for staff. Retailers will want to submit a guide on the WELL features pursued in the design. As a side benefit, the retailer may choose to promote what was done for customers and why. Another required concept is an integrative design approach, requiring the owner, architect, engineers, and facilities team to work together during and after the design to ensure that project goals and values are met. And here is where creativity can link the brand to the Mind category’s precepts: Develop a narrative around human delight and celebration of culture, spirit, and place. Interweaving the brand with these features can unify brand, space, and mind. Many of the Mind category’s optimizations can strengthen the bond between the brand and its customers. It has been proven that biophilic design reduces stress. If the brand can effectively and honestly connect with nature, the store can present a delightful experience for customers and become a place of refuge. In addition, retailers can consider establishing a volunteer program, as altruism illustrates a company’s values.

The Air category focuses on testing indoor air quality, implementing smoking bans, improving ventilation and air filtration, reducing volatile organic compounds (VOCs), controlling mold, reducing contaminates from entering the building, improving cleaning protocols, limiting types of pesticides, and restricting exposure to harmful building materials. Of these, testing indoor air quality will be rigorous, but retailers will find it easy to ban smoking and install carbon MERV 13 filters. Given the space of some retail environments, the healthy entrances credit may be one of the most challenging to pursue; it requires a 10-ft.-deep sealed-air entryway to slow the movement of air from the outside to the interior space. Another challenge could be the cleaning protocol, which requires a list of the sanitation schedule for all “high-touch” surfaces. In an environment designed to encourage people to touch and feel merchandise, the list can be extensive.

COMFORT If both staff and customers are not comfortable in the store, sales associate productivity and customer dwell time will be affected. This feature naturally aligns accessibility, ergonomics, noise, and thermal comfort to maximize occupant comfort. The retailer needs to assure compliance with current ADA standards throughout the space. Most retailers have employees whose duties require standing for extended periods of time. To improve comfort for them, retailers need to install toe spaces at the point of sales counter, footrests, and anti-fatigue mats. To address noise, the design should identify loud and quiet zones and take into account the placement of noisy equipment. From an optimization standpoint, the Comfort category offers a choice of adding source separation methods, such as self-closing doors between restrooms and the main retail area. Another optimization guides the retailer to allow personal thermal devices, such as fans (not space heaters). A performance test to ensure that the average sound pressure from the outside does not exceed 50dBA could be another simple optimization to pursue.

Nancy Everhart, AIA, NCARB, CDT, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP, is a Partner and Service Retail Studio Principal at Little and can be reached at Nancy.Everhart@littleonline.com.

F ITNESS Reducing sedentary behaviors through design and programs is another feature of WELL. The retail pilot precondition requires the retailer to implement an activity incentive program for full-time employees. These may include offering a subsidy to purchase a personal bicycle or offering incentives for every six-month period an employee visits a gym at least 50 times. The optimizations are also easy to implement. Retailers can offer on-site fitness programs or provide bike storage and maintenance tools. Ground-up retailers can add pedestrian amenities, such as movable chairs and tables and an open plaza. In an urban context, a green space, trail network, or existing gym located within 0.8 km/0.5 mile from the building’s main entrance can apply.

WATER The Water category calls for performance testing of the store’s water supply to measure sediment, microorganisms, dissolved metals, organic pollutants, herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, disinfectants, disinfectant byproducts, and fluoride. Filters such as kinetic degradation fluxion filters, reverse osmosis systems, and activated carbon filters can be used to bring levels into compliance. Three Water optimization strategies are outlined. The easiest for many retailers is the drinking water promotion. It requires drinking water dispensers within 100 ft. of all areas of the regularly occupied floor, daily cleaning of the dispensers, and quarterly cleaning of the aerators and outlet screens. Other optimizations include periodic water testing, using active carbon and sediment filters, and treating water with UVGI or ultraviolet germicidal irradiation water sanitation along with documenting operations schedules. View Contents

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UN-BANKING THE BANK By James Farnell & Nancy Everhart If it has been a long time since you visited your local branch bank, statistics show you’re in good company. Adoption of electronic mobile banking has resulted in a decrease in branch traffic for many financial institutions. Chelsea Groton Bank sought to combat this trend by rethinking what a bank can do for its customers - to create an environment that fosters learning, connecting and problem solving. Our resulting design is based on a sound strategy for transforming the transaction through education and mentorship towards financial well-being.

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C

helsea Groton Bank, the largest mutual bank in Eastern Connecticut, found themselves in a position similar to that of many financial institutions across the country today. With the success of online banking offerings, customers are finding increasingly less value in the traditional, physical branch and were coming into the branch less often. While many branches faced closures, Chelsea Groton instead thought to embrace this shift in the industry’s landscape, and in doing so, completely transformed their Groton, CT branch into a community destination for financial wellness and empowerment. Their aim was to redefine all that a bank can be and do for people, businesses, and communities, and they knew that in order to remain relevant in today’s marketplace, their branches needed to emulate that philosophy. Our team's approach to this repositioning project recognized the need for a comprehensive, multi-faceted strategy. The design would require a highly strategic customer experience to “un-bank the bank” and bring Chelsea Groton’s philosophy to life. Our primary challenge was that the standard branch environment and client service methodology was no longer resonating with today’s customers; it felt somewhat intimidating, and formal. We began with borrowing inspiration from that of hospitality environments and incorporated elements that translated as warm, inviting and approachable. We broke down the traditional barriers typically found in the standard branch layout, both in the literal and figurative sense, and injected adaptable functionality for a variety of uses. The team spent months researching to identify bestin-class practices. The research resulted in the realization that customers must develop habits that reinforce the educational information provided. They learned that customers preferred face-to-face learning environments, surrounded by like-minded friends and neighbors.

A birds-eye rendering of the concept illustrating how every inch of the 1,800sf space is used to enhance customer engagement.

A re-designed teller line that transcends the transaction.

DOUBLED INCOME DERIVED FROM FINANCIAL SERVICES

from

THE LOAN PRODUCTION

Before : Consultation/Teller Line

The finished space is uber-flexible, offering many options for different types of interaction. At the entry we included a station more closely resembling that of a welcoming hotel concierge desk, adjacent to a touch down area and booth seating. The teller line remained but now features seating so it is more consultative and less about the transaction. This has been welcomed by locals and encourages more shoulder-to-shoulder interaction between associates and customers. The Knowledge Library, a comfortable yet modern

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40% to 83%

IMPROVED CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE SATISFACTION

from

57% to 98.7%


reading nook, provides customers with a more private space to learn about financial well-being at their own pace, and to become empowered in taking a proactive role in their financial health. The Knowledge Bar further reinforces Chelsea Groton's educational program with a place where customers can be inspired while enjoying coffee and engage in a conversation. The sense of community and hospitality were emphasized, as we aimed to reduce the feelings of isolation and intimidation that customers can sometimes feel when it comes to the financial subject matter. Strategically placed tablets provide customers with the option of delving into a particular interest independently and can be leveraged by associates to enhance customer interface. The bank also introduced an offering of educational classes which is supported through the design of a hyper-flexible environment, where members of the community can learn about anything from savings plans to CPR. This demonstrates how the bank genuinely cares about their community; connecting customers to their brand with a sense of authenticity, ultimately customer loyalty.

“We found a lot of inspiration from retailers like Apple, Verizon and Williams-Sonoma,” says bank President and CEO Michael Rauh, “where the store [is] a place to learn.” The Groton branch has evolved into much more than a place for transactions, more than simply a place to deposit checks. It’s now an atmosphere that fosters learning both in and outside the parameters of finance. The finished space has yielded incredible performance results: doubled financial services income, tripled loan production and a customer experience score of 98.97 percent. By leveraging the power of design, the space feels welcoming and inviting, and at the same time, functional and adaptable. Collectively, these design elements redefine the value proposition of the traditional bank branch entirely, and make a place where associates, customers and the community feel at home. Chelsea Groton focused solely on solving customer needs and, as a result, transformed the company, the role of its associates, the design of its financial centers, the interactive tools used, its class curriculums, the tone of voice used and its impact on the community. Local and national competitors alike are studying this project as an example of how a customer experience process can help transform businesses and positively impact lives. 1st Place in VM+SD Magazine’s Retail Renovation Competition IRDC Retail Renovation Award

A rendering of the Knowledge Bar concept.

The Chelsea Groton Knowledge Bar and adjacent consultation rooms.

The mid-floor area converts for a variety of configurations. The rear library space provides workstations, comfortable seating & localized photography on the walls. James Farnell, CID, FRDI, IIDA, MCSD, NCIDQ, is a Partner and Retail Practice Leader at Little and can be reached at James.Farnell@littleonline.com. Nancy Everhart, AIA, NCARB, CDT, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP, is a Partner and Service Retail Studio Principal at Little and can be reached at Nancy.Everhart@littleonline.com.

See more at vimeo.com/264425891

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A NIGHT OUT

Paying homage to the glamour of Old Hollywood in the Art Deco era Situated in a high-end retail development, this popular movie theatre wanted to enhance its customer experience by way of refreshing interiors and expanding concession offerings. Deriving inspiration from the vintage glamour of LA’s film scene, our design team introduced signature design elements that were modern yet cohesively fortified the vintage glamour motif. The signature backlit, brass-framed marquee bar has yielded such compelling revenue results that the concept has been replicated in other locations.

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MORRISON CRE AT ING A DES T INAT ION

A mixed-use hub for popular restaurants and boutiques Anchored with a large, neighborhood grocery, Morrison strikes a critical retail/residential balance that appeals to those wanting location and convenience. It also incorporates easy walkability, parking and dining.

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PLACEMAKING IN RETAIL FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A DUAL-INCOME FAMILY By Megan D'Albora

A

s I pull into daycare, I prepare myself for the challenge and start strategizing. I know my two sons will be exhausted from their stretched attention spans and, with only two hours to spare before bath and bedtime, I know our evening will be rushed. We pile into the car and suddenly a wave of dread hits me square in the face - we’re out of milk! This means our usual 15-minute car ride will include a 30-minute stop that will result in my watch telling me to “breathe” multiple times throughout. As we pull into the store parking lot, my youngest starts complaining about being hungry while the oldest is moaning about wanting to play Mario Kart. I quickly assess the situation and, unfortunately, milk is a must-have. I make a beeline for the aisle, all while steering the kids away from anything that could prolong our time in the store. After multiple bribes to leave the store I had bribed them to go to in the first place, we set out on the final stretch home. We are now 45 minutes into the precious two hours we have together on weeknights and our patience is long surpassed. Exhausted? Me too. That’s why Amazon works. For our family it is the ease of free home delivery of everyday items that minimizes an already crazy work week. Free home delivery, discounts for automated monthly bundles, and access to endless products add to the success of online retailers in general. Who doesn’t want paper towels automatically delivered without having to remember to purchase them each month? But with all this convenience and just-in-time delivery, there is still one thing Amazon and, so many other e-commerce retailers, is lacking - a memorable, engaging experience that offers a sense of place and a sense of community.

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Placemaking for retailers serves as an antidote for the online epidemic. My husband and I have two short days with our boys before the next whirlwind of a week starts. That means our weekend plans are a combination of getting ready for the next work week and enjoying our time together. If a retailer can offer a way for our entire family to enjoy quality time together while accomplishing an errand, sign us up! What is placemaking exactly and how does it shape our retail interactions? As outlined by CBRE’s “Global Retail and Placemaking” report, there are five key elements to successful placemaking: Leisure, Technology, Sustainability and Wellbeing, Vertical Retail and Planning. Leisure relates to anything that “offers a place for visitors to sit, visit, or eat.” This is probably what comes to mind first when thinking of placemaking in retail. It could be a small park, a restaurant you have been wanting to try, or even an outdoor concert series. The use of Technology in retail can be a tool to help integrate the shopping center into the customer’s ‘everyday technology’. I can open my saved Pinterest boards while in the store to check my purchases against what I am attempting to replicate. Social media is a means of how a customer can remain connected to the retail center even from the comfort of their own home.


But technology in retail can be more than the Pinterest or Instagram apps we find ourselves opening every day. In the case of John Lewis’ flagship store for Hitachi Capital Consumer Finance in Victoria Leeds UK, the combination of visual merchandising and 3D graphics entices the customer to enter and experience the store for themselves. Taubman Centers’ COO, William Taubman, is testing a customized loyalty rewards app based on customer spending levels at the Mall at Green Hills in Nashville. They are also testing cameras that can read license plates and help shoppers navigate back to their cars. The online shopping trend pits technology against brick and mortar retail, but technology should enhance and complement an in-person shopping experience. As outlined by CBRE, the “internal and external sustainability of a place affect how it is perceived by the public.” Through Sustainability and Wellbeing, the impact a built environment has on the surrounding environment can be reduced. This concept is especially important for millennials who are health-conscious and concerned with environmental sustainability. The DLF Mall of India capitalizes on the concept of sustainability and wellbeing through LEED Gold incorporating practices such as solar heating for energy, treatment and reuse of waste water, more energy efficient HVAC, extensive use of renewable and regional materials, comprehensive storm water management system and bore wells to recharge ground water. The design of the mall centers around sustainability and helps further reinforce the commitment to the environment in real time. In the past, retail has not been focused on verticality. I’m sure we can all remember our parents dragging us through the lengths of the mall. As land becomes increasingly harder to find, this seems to be changing. The “Global Retail and Placemaking” report by CBRE notes that the

use of vertical buildings in retail can create an actual tourist attraction through visual impact as well as a reduced footprint, thus reducing land costs and impacts to the environment. Vertical Retail is particularly embraced by Asian markets. Ginza Place in Tokyo, Japan is an example with approximately 7,000 square feet of land area and over

79,000 square feet of floor area. This 11-story building utilizes vertical retail in a location where prime real estate is prohibitively expensive. With special event space, traditional retailers, food/beverage operators and storerooms, this vertical retail building is allowing retailers to thrive in an otherwise unaffordable location.

Lastly, Planning in placemaking focuses on how to integrate a development into all the different functions of a place - from residential and office to hotels and retail. Runway at Playa Vista in LA offers a mix of tenants that appeals to locals but also to the surrounding office tenants. The residential component is accented with a technology hub, a lifestyle center and greenspace for events like concerts, open air movie screenings and food truck events that help strengthen the community feel of the center itself. What does this mean for the future of retail? Is placemaking the catch-all solution for retailers that will stop e-commerce from taking over the world? Most likely not but placemaking does give retailers an edge over the online channel. In “The Science Behind Placemaking in an Omnichannel World”, CBRE points out that in-store sales are consistently higher and yield a higher profit than that of online sales. This tells us that any efforts to increase foot traffic are well worth it, even for a retailer with a higher online presence. Without question there is the need for e-commerce. Groceries delivered almost immediately to my front door is a necessity in my household. But if one-third of all retail sales will take place online, that still indicates that twothirds of all purchases will occur in physical spaces. More than half of all purchases will still happen in brick and mortar stores. If my family’s experience is any indication, retailers that can offer families time together, time that goes beyond the instore purchase, will come out ahead. Whether it is in the form of leisure, technology or planning, a retail destination that offers a memorable and impactful experience is something that simply cannot be rivaled or re-created in the digital realm. Megan D'Albora, AIA, CDT, LEED BD+C is an architect in the Retail Practice Group at Little and can be reached at Megan.DAlbora@littleonline.com.

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WESCOM BUILDING BETTER LIVES

A new prototype for future branches that focuses on sustainable design Dedicated to help its members build better lives, the new Wescom Credit Union prototype focuses on providing more meaningful interactions with its customers. With digital displays and new teller stations designed without dividers, the focus is on a more forward-thinking member experience. LEED certified, the floor-to-ceiling glass incorporates an extension of the architecture with the landscaped footprint. The community banking truck was a key focus of the new ground-up construction of this flagship location – the truck and the events surrounding the branch will remain a key driver for local foot traffic and for building brand awareness of Wescom in the community.

See more at vimeo.com/327019557

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HIGH PERFORMANCE RETAIL BANKING By Sarah Curtis

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First Citizens, a family-controlled bank with over 500 branches, came to us with an opportunity to work with them on a branch in Boca Raton, FL. When we first began our partnership, the bank was fully committed to investing $100,000 in upfront cost for a Geothermal system that would result in 41% energy use reduction. A 41% energy use reduction isn’t bad, right? Our team knew, however, we could do better. But first, we needed to convince First Citizens to take a step back and be open to a new idea – a more holistic approach to their entire building – an idea that could save them upfront costs AND reduce their energy use even more.

Client Baseline Ground Source Heat Pump

41% $100K MORE ENERGY EF F ICIEN T T H A N C ODE BA SEL INE

UP F RON T C OS T

Strategy Synergy Efficient VRF System + Plasma Ion Filtration + Phase Change Material + Improved Glazing Assembly + Daylight Harvesting Sensors

We started taking note of and assessing the design’s overall pain points. Engaging early on with the general contractor helped us determine that the geothermal system not only had large upfront costs, but also imposed scheduling delays due to the sheer amount of space needed for installation. Geothermal wells were also an issue, both with location placement due to the fixed nature of the site, and with maintenance. Maintenance was a documented issue for the bank. The contractor indicated that maintenance on the geothermal wells was frequently required, as leaks at existing branches were regular occurrences. We took stock of the pain points and aligned on four focus areas: upfront cost, maintenance cost. scheduling implications and building footprint rigidity. In setting out to solve for these, we knew we didn’t have an endless supply of time or budget to find the absolute perfect answer to each and every one. But by leveraging a “whole building approach”, we could comprehensively optimize the design from every angle; making a much stronger final product where these original issues would be rendered as obsolete. We researched terms like Efficient Variant Refrigerant Flow (VRF) system, Plasma Ion Filtration, Phase Change Material and studied methods like Improved Glazing Assembly and Electrochromic Glazing.

52%

$80K

MORE ENERGY EF F ICIEN T T H A N C ODE BA SEL INE

UP F RON T C OS T

To make our case, Little’s Center for Building Performance performed a very deliberate, very detailed comparison between First Citizen’s go-to geothermal system - and a more holistic approach that included a more efficient HVAC System (VRF), improved air filtration, a high-performance envelope and improved glazing. With this, the integrated team was able to provide a breakthrough solution that would save First Citizens $20,000 in upfront cost and raise their energy efficiency from 41% to 52%. Through this evaluation, we gained the trust of First Citizens that allowed us to move forward.

Sarah Curtis, AIA, CDT, LEED AP ID+C, is a Project Architect in the Retail Practice Group at Little and can be reached at Sarah.Curtis@littleonline.com.

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BRAND COMMUNICATION & DESIGN EVERYTHING COMMUNICATES When organizations recognize the importance of aligning their brand communication efforts with the overall architectural narrative of the space, the results provide cohesive experiences with coordinated design functionality. THE EXPERIENCE The best user experiences create deep engagements with brands and stories. Therefore, our focus is on curating your spatial experience by making it more relevant, memorable and effective.

GRAPHICS CAN PLAY A LEED ROLE By Kelley Deal

A

s an environmental graphic designer at a multidisciplinary firm, I’m always evaluating the importance of aligning a client's brand communication efforts with the overall architectural narrative of their space. This alignment results in a cohesive spatial experience that is more relevant, memorable and effective. More often than not, we see clients aligning themselves with environmental sustainability. There are countless ways to support this from an architectural standpoint - HVAC calculations, sunlight + wind considerations, low-flow this and that, and thousands of eco-friendly flooring, furniture and fixtures - but, as graphic designers, how do we ensure this sustainability is reflected in the cohesive experience?

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We’re looking at two ideas: first, considering the environmental impact of graphic design products throughout their entire life cycle (raw materials > manufacturing > use > disposal), and second, how storytelling via graphics can perpetuate the success of an organization's integration of sustainability into their core values, culture and environment. Fabricators and vendors are now embracing and realizing that while it might be less detrimental than a high-VOC flooring spec, materials for brand communication matter, too. As designers we’re working toward a consistent audit of the amount of materials required for production, using materials made with recycled, post-consumer waste, printing with low-VOC inks, minimizing the amount of transport required, and which vendors might use renewable energy. On the flip side, however, integrated brand design can take years of thoughtful attention to green building from a proud moment between the design team + the client to a public-facing recognition of stewardship and forward-thinking values. Walking into a space, the identity, mission and personality of that company should be immediately reinforced. Branding an environment transforms a building from a container or shell into a piece of the brand puzzle. We’ve seen (and completed) projects that do an excellent job at walking a visitor through the space and the story, and integrate those sustainable

attributes into everything from landscaping to embedded signage and graphics all the way to LEED-specific iconography. By getting involved early in projects, our goal is to help clients determine the easiest, greenest, and most cost-effective way to ensure that the opportunity to tell their story of sustainability doesn’t get left behind.

Kelley Deal, LEED AP ID+C, is an Art Director in Brand Communication & Design at Little and can be reached at Kelley.Deal@littleonline.com.

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A

B

T O K YO C E N T R A L F USION OF CULT URES Patterns, illustration, color theory, food and product photography styles along with English and Japanese typefaces were all developed into a communication style relevant to the new store experience. Signage throughout incorporates bilingual text, signifying a fusion of cultures and pragmatically helps guide the American shopper in an otherwise foreign environment. A. Overview of department banner signage designs. B. Product ID’s of various sizes and unique product information poster.

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A

IN N E R SE L F SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Signage and graphics were used to create a common platform for each of the brands within the store, highlighting attributes and offerings consistent across all of the Hanes Brands products.

B

C

D

A. Signage was designed in multiple scales from many points of view. B. Fitting rooms became a teaching opportunity. C. Clever placement of signage to avoid interrupting the shopping experience. D. Fixture-based signs are easily changed.

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A

B

C

about concentra

patient services

employee services

features

our locations

careers

contact us

customer login

clinical expertise

news 02.08.08 FLU VACCINATION

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Concentra’ President & COO discusses what’s ahead for patients, customers, and employees in 2008. learn more

LOCATION FINDER

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8.22.07

Concentra Acquires Assets of Business Health Services, Inc.

6.25.07 TOTALCARE

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Concentra’s Network Services Division Becomes Viant

6.22.07

Concentra Announces Expiration of Exchange Offers

5.24.07

Commencement of Exchange Offers in Connection

C ONC E N T R A FINDING TRUE PURPOSE Concentra transformed its brand to reflect a more warm, welcoming and caring experience. The successful strategy included naming, brand development, corporate identity and retail branding that truly embodies the organization's mission, “To improve the health of America, one patient at a time”. A. Brand identity standards. B. The smallest details can say a lot about your brand. C. Applying the brand identity consistently across all channels is a key ingredient to maintain integrity. D. A full suite of paperworks and brand standards was developed.

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D


A

U NC C H A P E L HIL L , C R A IGE PA R K IN G DEC K LESS IS MORE In a parking deck that’s used by visitors, students, faculty, and fans for athletic events, with stairwells and elevators that all deliver to varying levels, wayfinding is key. Little was tasked with creating a signage system that was easy to read, easy to remember, durable and on-brand. The wayfinding system emphasizes pictograms and as little information as possible, giving users the information they need as they need it.

G D ECK G

B

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ROUGHOUT DECK, AS NEEDED FOR CODE.

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RESTROOM

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ND PICTOGRAMS (COLOR TO MATCH PMS 282 C UNLESS OTHER-

M 1/32” DEPTH FROM SURFACE PER ANSI A117.1-2009 AND 2010

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MED BRAILLE (PER 2010 STANDARDS FOR ACCESSIBLE DESIGN

ON 703.4), PAINTED TO MATCH SURFACE OF SIGN. MAINTAIN 3/8”

01

Elevation: Sign Type B1 Room ID Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

02

Elevation: Sign Type B2 Service ID Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

CE FROM ADJACENT ELEMENTS. MEASUREMENTS TO FOLLOW

OT BASE DIAMETER : .059-.063”; DISTANCE BETWEEN 2 DOTS IN

TANCE BETWEEN CORRESPONDING DOTS IN ADJACENT CELLS :

5-.037”; DISTANCE BETWEEN CORRESPONDING DOTS FROM ONE

5-.400”, PER ANSI A117.1-2009, NCBC 1022.8 AND 2010 STANDARDS

GN PANEL MOUNTED WITH Z-CLIPS, COLOR TO MATCH PMS 278 C. CONSISTENCY THROUGHOUT CAMPUS.

IN CASE OF FIRE USE STAIRS

EXIT STAIR 2

In case of fire use stairs

ein be

03

Elevation: Sign Type B3 Regulatory ID Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

04

Elevation: Sign Type B5 Exit ID Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

AIG E PAR KIN G DE C K & WAYFI N D IN G

C R AIG E PA R KING D E C K & WAYF IN D ING

or Blade Sign

C

WALL

tor Blade Sign

PLAN WALL PLAN

3

D AT ADJACENT TO TO EACH

ADER TO COORDINATE WITH

M. AT ADJACENT TO TO EACH SED

ORS TO MATCH PMS 159 C OR.

ORS TO MATCH PMS 278 C.. HEADER TO COORDINATE WITH

ED L-SHAPED SIGN PANEL RAM.

O MATCH PMS 282 C. 159 C TORS TO MATCH PMS

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E WHITE AND ATORS TOLETTERING MATCH PMS 278PICC..

MOUNTED WITH Z-CLIPS. NTED L-SHAPED SIGN PANEL TO MATCH PMS 282 C.

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MS, MOUNTED WITH Z-CLIPS.

14

Access to Levels 1-5 Access to Levels 1-5

FRONT PAGE

A1 A1

4 6

3 4

5

6

6

B2 B2

5

6 6

6 SIDE

FRONT

Access to Levels 2, 4, 6-9 Access to Levels 2, 4, 6-9

B2 B2

B.

SIDE

12

PAGE

01

FRONT Elevation: Sign Type P1 - A Elevators Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

SIDE

02

FRONT Elevation: Sign Type P1 - B Elevators Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

A.

SIDE

C.

Level ID markers are overscaled and reflective while using UNC colors to stay on-brand. Interior base building signage uses a slightly different color palette to distinguish it from vehicular wayfinding. Elevator identifiers are colorcoded and alphanumerically tied-back to an adjacent infographic.

and written material appearing herein blished work by Little and may not be d without written consent.

014

12

ings and written material appearing herein npublished work by Little and may not be osed without written consent.

01

Elevation: Sign Type P1 - A Elevators Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

02

Elevation: Sign Type P1 - B Elevators Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

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SCOPE OF SERVICES

Shinola

Lazy Acres

Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Belk

Crabtree Valley Mall

Element Hotel

Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Research, Strategy, Master Planning, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Research, Strategy, Interior Design, Architecture

Credo

Air

Tokyo Central

Interior Design, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Research, Strategy, Branding, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture

Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

(pages 6-7)

(pages 8-11)

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(pages 12-13)

(pages 14-15)

(pages 16-19)

(pages 20-21)

(pages 22-23)

(pages 24-27)


Aria

Lucky Brand Jeans

Pacific Theatres

Interior Design, Implementation, Engineering

Interior Design, Visual Merchandising, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering, National Program Management

Interior Design, Implementation, Engineering

Bloomsburg University

Ally Charlotte Center

Morrison

Strategy, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Visual Merchandising, Implementation

Research, Strategy, Master Planning, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Research, Strategy, Master Planning, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Bunulu

Chelsea Groton Bank

Wescom

Research, Strategy, Branding, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Visual Merchandising, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Research, Strategy, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

Strategy, Interior Design, Graphic Communication, Architecture, Implementation, Engineering

(pages 28-29)

(pages 30-31)

(pages 32-33)

(pages 34-35)

(pages 36-37)

(pages 40-43)

(pages 44-45)

(pages 46-47)

(pages 50-51)

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ELEVATING OUR CLIENTS' PERFORMANCE


WHAT THEY ARE SAYING

“One of the best business decisions is hiring Little for my projects. You guys have a strong partnership mentality and expertise that makes the best decision on behalf of me. I can now focus on my job that is growing the company.”

“The folks from Little made a real point, right from the beginning, of understanding who we are as a company. We have an existing culture, we have an existing brand. Little really embraced who we are and helped us advanced that cause.”

Carlos Smith, CEO, El Super

Michael Rauh, President & CEO, Chelsea Groton Bank

“Little has great people to work with. We truly consider them as our extended internal team. We show Little’s work to the other firms to follow as standards. Raising the bottom line of our performances.”

“Little has been able to work with us to develop a design that expresses our vision for our brand, as well as one that enhances our members’ experience when they step into one of our branches.”

Rosalio Arellanes, Director, Boos Development

“Little produces the best quality drawings. I have asked three contractors, ‘who puts out the best drawings?’ and they all say ‘Little’. Little is always there and super responsive whenever and whatever.” Sam Masterson, Executive Vice President, Chief Development Officer, Bristol Farms

“With Little’s help, our branches are now much more relevant and welcoming to our customers, and are places that both our members and associates are proud to call their own.” Joe McCain, Chief Procurement Officer, Founders Federal Credit Union

“One of the challenges with doing mixed-use is that architects don’t always understand retail. Little knows how to do retail so that was an advantage we had right out of the box.” John Kane, CEO, Kane Realty

“I have worked on the food service and QSR market for decades and have worked with many architects, designers and creative teams from around the world. Little is one of the top, in my mind. A rare blend of creative and executional talents, all under one roof. Their culture, collaborative approach and service mindset ensures to us that they have the best interest of our brand at the forefront of their minds.” David Milne, Director of Global Shop Design, Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corporation

“The new design is beating our financial expectations, which were set very high.” Rick Bolton, Prana

“As a result of our repositioning effort, Concentra customers’ Net Promoter Score (NPS) increased from below 20% (on average) to a score of 79%.” John deLorimier, Chief Marketing Officer, Concentra

Bill Partin, President/CEO, Sharonview Federal Credit Union

“Bravo!!! This is incredibly thorough, detailed and comprehensive work and well on target. You guys did your homework. Very impressive to have a new partner put his much time and effort into a concept.” Brandon Haddock, Textron

“A better way to shop has translated in improved sales which continue to increase month to month in spite of this tough economy.” Alex Lara, Chedraui

“Just left our first Bunulu store...wow, it is amazing. I am so pleased with how it is coming together. You and the team should be very proud of the results.” Lorna Nagler, President, Bealls

“After the successful launch of “Salsaritas, Fresh Cantina” as a fast casual concept, I understood the value of a strong brand and visuals. Little worked with me and my team over several iterations of the Capishe concept, each time delivering a brand that felt and looked like a chain of 100 units. The performance and success of our first location was such that we accelerated the time table to open location number 2, that is a true testament to the potential of this brand.” Bruce Willette, Founder/Owner, Capishe! Real Italian Kitchen

“Whereas the College Park location is like grandma's house (hip grandma who knows old is in and has outlets everywhere for your devices) this location is your Silicon Valley uncle's house. Sleek, clean, slightly industrial - I was digging the amount of space and light from the two story high windows. This is the place to go if you need a reminder about why this city is so freaking great.” Yelp! review for Credo, Florida Hospital Campus, Orlando


FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

James Farnell, CID, FRDI, IIDA, MCSD, NCIDQ Partner | Retail Practice Leader James.Farnell@littleonline.com 949.698.1408


www.littleonline.com