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Friday, February 17, 2017

Vol. 77, No. 7

LEARNING ABOUT JUDAISM

For Syosset Schools, plans for increased community outreach BY RIKKI N. MASSAND

50 participants from the Jericho Jewish Center gathered at 9:00 am on Super Bowl Sunday to learn about Tefillan (black boxes we put on our arms and heads which contain teachings from the Bible). This is part of a national effort to teach how to wear this ritual item and its practicality in our everyday lives. It was geared towards students in Grades 5-7 to learn how to wear the Tefillan before their Bar Mitzvahs. The event was followed by a wonderful breakfast, which everyone enjoyed.

LI artist honored by Hall of Fame BY GARY SIMEONE

Mort Kuntsler, a famous artist and resident of Oyster Bay, will have his latest work unveiled and put on display at the Baseball Hall of Fame and the White House. The painting which depicts soldiers during the Civil War playing baseball on the White House South Lawn will also be on display this month in Huntington at the Heckscher Museum of Art and on the February cover of the Saturday Evening Post.

Kuntsler said he committed hours of painstaking research in finding historically correct images to make sure his painting was an accurate description of the event. “It was like detective work,” said Kuntsler. “All my life I’ve been doing this sort of thing and the authenticity is part of the fun of it.” Dr. Michael Schantz, Executive Director of Heckscher Museum of Art, said that he was elated to have the famous artSee page 8

The Syosset Board of Education and school administration have made it very apparent that they learned a lesson in communications and perspectives from the recent uproar over the Woodbury property sale to developer Basser Kaufman, which was officially retracted by a board vote at its January 25 meeting. The district will have to pay the developer $125,000 as part of a negotiated settlement, but strengthening the community’s trust is now at the forefront of all budget and school investment-related priorities, presentations and outreach this spring. “No one in district administration or anyone in favor of this project (the sale and Basser Kaufman’s original plans for the property) was trying to put up a group of stores near Walt Whitman Elementary and in residents’ backyards and sneak it in overnight. That’s just not the way Syosset Schools functions. I support getting the community together and revisiting things and ideas but it has to be the whole community. Should another discussion on the property come to fruition, it will involve the entire community,” Dr. Michael Cohen, the school board’s president, said on January 25 at a packed school board meeting at Harry B. Thompson Middle School. Cohen added a word of caution to over 150 residents in attendance then, saying that for notice of public forums and major district issues it isn’t the responsibility of school board trustees to go door-to-door in Syosset and Woodbury to make every resident aware. “We’ll figure out the communication aspects of it and get it right, but there’s a role on both sides,” he said last month. For Syosset district administration there’s a new initiative underway. On February 13 at the school board’s meeting, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Thomas Rogers said that he’s instructed Peggy Grasso, Syosset Central Schools’ coordinator of educational services, “to acquire the email addresses or other means of contacting every homeowners’ association or senior living community/complex within the district.” He also announced meetings with leaders of homeowners’ groups and senior citizens’ complexes and associations scheduled for the next six weeks. “We are trying to make sure that as we go through all the facilities work and a timeframe for it, the seniors will have opportunities to participate in this process along with everyone else in our community. We will continue our many communications with the PTA’s and the parents and children. (Deputy Superintendent) Adele Bovard has put together a district group of key communicators with us, representatives of the PTA in every school building, and we have been asking them for their suggestions on how we can do more communications of our ideas with our facilities plan,” Rogers said. New collaborations and outreach from school administration include the first ever Chinese-English Town Hall, scheduled for Friday evening March 17 at H. B. Thompson Middle School. Dr. Rogers will be speaking and taking questions from community members, some that will be prepared ahead of the event and some in an open dialogue. The Chinese and English statements will be translated for all See page 8

Syosset robotics teams unite to win PAGE 4 “The Singing Bus Driver” at Berry Hill PAGE 6


Friday, February 17, 2017

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Town of Oyster Bay Arts Robert Seaman Elementary School Council Talent Competition host Author Peter Catalanotto The Town of Oyster Bay and the Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council will hold the 2017 Talent Competition on Saturday, March 4, at the Seymour Weiner Theatre at the Long Island High School for the Arts located at 239 Cold Spring Road, in Syosset, Oyster Bay Town Councilwoman Michele M. Johnson announced. “The Talent Competition is open to all students from Kindergarten through 12th grade who reside in or attend school within the Town of Oyster Bay. The 2017 Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council Talent Competition celebrates the extraordinary talents and inspiring performances by the Town’s young residents through vocal, instrumental music, dance, magic, drama, and comedy,” Councilwoman Johnson said. Residents who are interested in performing in this year’s Talent Competition are encouraged to visit the Town’s website at www.oysterbaytown. com to download this year’s application, or visit the Town of Oyster Bay

Arts Council’s website directly at www. tobac.org for a copy of the application. Councilwoman Johnson additionally noted that the deadline for the application for this year’s competition is Tuesday, February 14. The price for an individual performer is $20. A group performance of more than one member pays $10 for each member. Payments should be made by mailing the application form and a check to the Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council, 977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa NY 11758. Application fees are non-refundable. “As in years past, this annual Talent Competition promotes the celebration of performing, and visual arts within our local communities, symbolizing everything the Arts Council stands for,” Councilwoman Johnson said. For residents interested in registering for the Talent Competition or for additional information, call Sharon Betz, Executive Director of the Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council at 516-797-7926 or email sbetz@oysterbay-ny.gov.

BY DARLENE PERGOLA-APOLANT

On January 18th, Author Peter Catalanotto visited Robert Seaman Elementary School’s 4th grade students. He is the author and/or illustrator of such books as Dylan’s Day Out, Matthew A.B. C., Monkey and Robot, and Mr. Mumble. His presentation began with showing the students his creative process from inspiration to finished book and then demonstrated basic strategies for getting ideas and developing them. Mr. Catalanotto explained to the students that the simplest things from everyday life can become an interesting and imaginative story. The students loved hearing his tips and techniques and we’re very eager to try them. His presentation and visit was so fascinating that he left the children inspired and empowered to try to write and illustrate their very own books!!

Author Peter Catalanotto explains his sketches

Jericho Schools announce Adult ESL Classes

Adult ESL classes will resume this spring for parents of Jericho students. Federal funding offsets all costs for this program. The goal of this program is to improve communication between school and home. This is one of many steps that the district hopes will make all members of the community feel welcome in our schools. There are 2 Day Sessions planned – Level I from 9 :00 AM – 10:30 AM and Level II from 10:30 AM – Noon. The classes, which are held on

Tuesdays and Thursdays, begin February 28, in the Middle School Conference Room B, and will run until April 6. To register, please e-mail mstokel@ jerichoschools.org and indicate which class you are interested in attending and your child’s name. Please also include your name, email address and phone number in the email. Space is limited so enrollment is on a first come, first served basis. Unfortunately, childcare services are not available.

About to hit a milestone?

Share your life accomplishments with your neighbors! Put your engagement, wedding, or baby announcement in the paper, (and it's free of charge for subscribers!) Email editor@gcnews.com

Author Peter Catalanotto explaining to the students how he gathers ideas for his books.

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Registration is currently underway for the Town of Oyster Bay’s Spring Men’s Softball Night League hosted by the Town’s Department of Parks, according to Town Councilman Chris J. Coschignano. “As we head closer towards the end of winter, we also head closer to warmer weather and another fun filled spring softball season just waiting to happen,” Councilman Coschignano said. “The Town of Oyster Bay is proud to continue the Men’s Softball Night League each year to promote teamwork as well as a great game of softball.” According to Councilman Coschignano, the Town of Oyster Bay’s Men’s Softball Night League offers players a competitive atmosphere as well as exceptional conditions for the sport. “This well managed Men’s Softball Night League provides players with the opportunity to play on fields that many consider to be among the finest in the country,” Councilman Coschignano said. “From the friendly competition in each game to the ideal facilities, these night-time softball games have a lot to

offer.” Councilman Coschignano also noted that games will begin in April 2017 and will be held at either Theodore Roosevelt Park, located on West Avenue in Oyster Bay, John J. Burns Park, located at 4990 Merrick Road in Massapequa, Ellsworth Allen Park located at 45 Motor Avenue in Farmingdale or Plainview-Old Bethpage Community Park located at 175 Washington Avenue in Plainview. The Men’s Softball Night League will feature 10 regular season games (2 games per night once a week). The fee for registration is $650 per team plus an umpire fee of $830 per team, making the total registration fee $1480. Two separate checks are required for payment. Registration is currently ongoing but will close on Friday, March 31. Teams interested in more information or looking to receive a registration packet, please contact Donna or Jackie in the Parks Department Recreation Division at (516) 797-4125, ext. 1 or 4 or visit the Town’s website www.oysterbaytown.com.

Wednesday, February 22nd at 2 PM

(Biography/Drama/Thriller) - This is the story of the man who brought high-ranking German Nazi criminal Adolf Eichmann to justice. (Germany) English Subtitles. Rated R. 1 hour, 45 minutes.

Wednesday, February 22nd at 7 PM

An Aesthetic Realism Cabaret About Love & Everyone’s Hopes! The Jericho Library is happy to bring back the Aesthetic Realism Theatre Company in a new, unforgettable presentation that will include some of the most loved and timeless songs with comment on their meaning. The basis is Aesthetic Realism, a philosophy founded by the American poet and critic Eli Siegel. This show will feature Carrie Wilson, Carol McCluer, Marion Fennell, Bennett Shapiro, Alan Shapiro, Barbara Allen and Rob Colavito. Tickets are required. Non ticket holders will be seated as space allows.

Here’s Looking at You Humphrey Bogart – Celebrate the life and career of Humphry Bogart with Marc Courtade. Art Lecture: The Art of the Mexican Revolution - with Professor Thomas Germano. From the start of the Mexican Revolution in 1910 through 1950, artists and intellectuals in Mexico were at the center of a great debate about their country’s destiny. Witness this exhilarating period through a remarkable range of images, from masterpieces by artists such as Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo to masterful works by their contemporaries Dr. Atl, María Izquierdo, Roberto Montenegro, Carlos Mérida and Manuel Álvarez Bravo. Movie: The People vs. Fritz Bauer

Sunday, February 26th at 2 PM

Get Results!

Place an ad in our Classifieds for reasonable rates and prompt results. Call our Garden City office at 294-8900 for more information.

Spring 2017

CAMPUS HAPPENINGS

Town announces registration for Men’s Softball Night League

Friday, February 17th at 2 PM

US

Newly elected Oyster Bay Town Supervisor, Joseph Saladino, held a press conference at the Town Animal Shelter on Monday regarding a recently abandoned dog that was discovered last Tuesday off of a jogging path in Plainview. The dog, a male Yorkie mix was found in a Sherpa bag by two joggers in a wooded area off of Washington Avenue. Gary Rogers of the Nassau County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) and Town Clerk, Jim Altadonna also spoke at the press conference. “We want to bring attention to the sad situation that occurred last week where this male Yorkie mix was discovered inside of a Sherpa bag off of Washington Avenue in Plainview,” said Saladino. “The dog appears to be lost or abandoned but otherwise is healthy and in good shape.” He said if the dog, who the Animal Shelter has affectionately named ‘Steve’ was lost, the Town would like to reach out to the owner to try to get him back. And if the dog was abandoned the person or persons held responsible would be brought to justice. “This is a great opportunity to reach out to the public and get the details out about Steve,” said Saladino. “We’d like to see if there is a loving family out there who’d like to adopt this animal,”

Gary Rogers of the SPCA, said in his thirty plus years in working with the organization, he’s never seen an animal trapped in a carrier case and abandoned in the woods like that. “This is a serious issue where this poor dog was confined in a bag like that and possibly left to die,” said Rogers. “If this is a case of animal abandonment we are offering a $5,000 award for the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for this reprehensible act.” Rogers said he has seen similar cases like this before but never with an animal tossed into the woods inside of tightly confined carrier bag. “Imagine the public outcry if this had been a child. We want people to know that animal cruelty will not be tolerated in Nassau County.” Animal abandonment is considered a misdemeanor crime in New York State and is punishable by up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine. In the interim, Steve will remain at the Town Animal Shelter and if no one comes to claim him within seven days he will be put up for adoption. Town Clerk, Altadonna, said he hopes to see a good story come out of an unfortunate situation. “Maybe our Town Supervisor will adopt him or maybe not but we do want to find this animal a good home,” said Altadonna. “The Town is concerned about the welfare of all of our animals.”

JOI N! SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR HEALTH INNOVATION

BY GARY SIMEONE

This Week at the Jericho Public Library

“SHATTERED SILENCE”

ADELPHI IS SPEAKING OUT AGAINST GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE Monday, March 6, 2017 • 6:00 p.m. Nexus Building, Adelphi Room We’re honored to host renowned speakers Tricia Bent-Goodley, Ph.D., and Natalie Sokoloff, Ph.D., for “Shattered Silence: Critical Conversations About Intimate Partner Violence in the African American Community.” African American women are more likely to be murdered by an intimate partner than women of other racial or ethnic groups. We will discuss ways we can collaborate to build more culturally competent interventions to service this population. The event is free of charge and open to the public. Hosting important lectures like this one is part of our mission to transform lives at Adelphi.

Learn more at adelphi.edu/shattered LONG ISLAND • NEW YORK CITY • HUDSON VALLEY

Friday, February 17, 2017

Town Supervisor holds press conference regarding abandoned animal

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Friday, February 17, 2017

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Photo courtesy of the Syosset School District

Members of Syosset High School’s Elite, Syosset Sparks and Syosset Syborgs robotics teams advanced to the FIRST Tech Challenge championship.

Syosset HS robotics teams unite to win, advance to championship

For the fourth consecutive year, Syosset High School hosted the FIRST Tech Challenge regional qualifying tournament on Jan. 28, an event that showcases student knowledge in engineering and robotics through game-style challenges in which robots compete. Once again, the hometown students gave the audience something to be proud of as two Syosset robotics teams partnered with another school to take the tournament’s

top honor. Syosset robotics teams Elite and Syosset Sparks, along with their alliance partner from Locust Valley High School, won first place for robot performance. The Syosset Syborgs, another team from Syosset high School competing in the challenge, won the Motivate award. Just a few weeks earlier, Syosset Syborgs were the runner-up at a FIRST tournament at Center Moriches where they

also took home the Inspire award, which recognizes “gracious professionalism,” teamwork and the ability to effectively communicate with judges regarding their experience and knowledge of the FIRST program. As a result, Elite, Syosset Sparks and Syosset Syborgs have all advanced to the FIRST Tech Challenge Championship at Smithtown High School West on Feb. 11. Advisers/teachers John Chae,

Craig Mooers and Tom Morritt oversee Syosset’s robotics group. The FIRST Tech Challenge – also referred to as “Sport for the Mind” – is an organized series of robotics competitions in which students participate by designing and building robots. FIRST robots are specifically engineered to complete a set or series of tasks in a specified amount of time. More than 70 Syosset High School students are involved in the program

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Friday, February 17, 2017


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“The Singing School Bus Driver” makes a stop at Berry Hill

Berry Hill kindergarten and first grade students enjoyed singing and dancing to songs by Joe Guida, The Singing School Bus Driver. Guida performed some of his favorite hits including Hit the Bump Joe, Buckle

Up, Dinosaur Walk, Macaroni and Cheese and Circle & Shout. Made possible by the Berry Hill PTA’s Cultural Arts Committee, The Singing School Bus Driver has become a favorite annual event for students and staff.

Ms. Halleran’s first grade class enjoyed dancing with their teacher to Circle & Shout. This Berry Hill kindergarten student performed an animated dinosaur dance during Joe Guida’s performance!

Berry Hill students perform Dinosaur Walk with Joe Guida.

Joe Guida - The Singing School Bus Driver - performs for Berry Hill’s kindergarten and first graders.

Berry Hill students all dressed up to perform Macaroni and Cheese.

Cheese hats were all the rage.


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SCHOOL AND CAMP DIRECTORY 2016

THE POLICE BLOTTER

Incidents that have occurred recently in the local area include: On Northern Boulevard in Manhasset, a victim has reported that all four tires of her vehicle were slashed as it was parked between 7:10 a.m. and 4:05 p.m. on January 20. n

At 3:15 p.m. on January 26, a 69-yearold man from Hempstead was arrested and charged with Shoplifting from Macy’s in East Garden City. n

At the Red Roof Inn on Dibblee Drive in Westbury, an arrest of a 35-year-old man from Madison occurred at 9 p.m. on January 26. He was charged with Criminal Possession of Marijuana. n

At 9:55 p.m. on January 26, a 20-year old man from New Cassel was arrested on Park Avenue and Garden Street in Westbury. He was charged with Criminal Possession of Marijuana. n

At the intersection of Burkhardt Avenue and Haussner Place in Mineola, a 20-year-old man from that town was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated at 10:15 p.m. on January 26. n

At 1:20 a.m. on January 27, a 50-yearold man from East Meadow was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on Main Street at East Broadway in Roslyn. n

At Ruby Tuesday in Westbury, a pocketbook and its contents were stolen from a vehicle between 5 and 10:45 p.m. on January 27. n

On January 27, between 7 and 9:30 p.m., an iPhone charger, prescription drugs, and sunglasses were stolen from a vehicle on North Broadway in Jericho. n

On Northcote Road in Westbury, unknown subjects poured paint on the front windshield, front driver’s side door & the interior of a parked car sometime between 10:30 p.m. on January 27 and 8:30 a.m. the next day. n

A 33-year-old man from Port Washington was arrested on Port Washington Boulevard and Willowdale Avenue in that town at 3:25 on January 28. He was charged with Driving While Intoxicated. n

A passenger window of a vehicle was smashed in and a pocketbook with contents were stolen from the Roosevelt Field Mall in East Garden City. The incident occurred between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. on January 28. n

On January 28 at 6:51 p.m., a 29-year-old man from Roslyn Heights

Friday, February 17, 2017

was arrested and was charged with Shoplifting at the Target located on Corporate Drive in Westbury. n

At the corner of Searingtown Road and Dianas Trail in Roslyn Estates, a 36-year-old man from Port Washington was arrested on January 29 at 2:40, and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated. n

At 3:10 a.m. on January 29, a 33-yearold man from Flushing was arrested at Glen Cove Road and Pond Hollow Road in Glen Head. The subject was charged with Driving While Intoxicated.

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A 35-year-old man from Hempstead was arrested at 3:18 a.m. on January 29 and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on Sunrise Highway in Merrick. n

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At Cozumel’s in Westbury, an unattended backpack and its contents were stolen at 7:15 p.m. on January 29.

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Driving While Intoxicated was the charge brought against a 25-year-old man from Mineola, when he was arrested at 10:50 p.m. on January 29 on Sea Cliff Avenue at Carpenter Avenue in Sea Cliff. n

On Sea Cliff Avenue and Locust Street in Sea Cliff, a 25-year-old woman from Glen Cove was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on January 29 at 11:10 p.m.

Additional SCHOOL HOLIDAY PUBLIC SESSIONS for President’s Week!

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Two individuals were arrested at 6:11 p.m. on January 31 on Stewart Avenue in Westbury. Charged with Criminal Possession of Marijuana was a woman from Lakeview and a man from Hempstead, both 26 years of age. n

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At the parking lot of LA Fitness on Marcus Avenue in New Hyde Park, unknown subjects broke the front right side passenger window, causing damage, sometime between 10:45 a.m. and 8 p.m. on January 31. n

At 6:45 p.m. on February 1, a 28-yearold man from Floral Park was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated at the intersection of Glen Cove Road and the entrance to the Northern State Parkway in Carle Place. Compiled by Kate and Meg Meyer

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An 18-year-old man from Central Islip was arrested at 7:20 p.m. on January 30 and charged with Shoplifting from Home Depot in Westbury.

On January 31 at 9:26 p.m., a 29-yearold man from Uniondale was arrested at the Stop & Shop Supermarket on Old Country Road in Carle Place. He was charged with Shoplifting.

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Friday, February 17, 2017

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For Syosset Schools, plans for increased community outreach

From page 1 to hear and the setup will be similar to a regular board meeting’s accessibility at H.B.T. School, with a large seating area. The district has again partnered with the growing Chinese-American Association of Syosset (CAAS) to create the event, and the date, convenient scheduling for end-of-the week, and larger auditorium was requested by CAAS leaders so that more local families can attend and participate. This new event and other in-person meetings coming up hope to accomplish some ‘new bonds’ with the community while promoting the district’s plan for projects (eventually through a bond referendum vote) to address infrastructure needs. Details of the district’s overall plans, fiscal and physical, are contained in what Dr. Rogers has called “the mother of all Powerpoints” from the September 2016 board meeting. But he noted that in the last two years’ of board meetings, there’s the backdrop of trying to strategize and “chug away” at facility needs. “We schedule from each construction season – summer of 2017, 2018, or 2019 – and we have to add into that a window for state approvals for all the work the district does. Anything we start now ends up taking a long time to get done, and there are some ‘health and safety’ priorities to address. We want to get to that health and safety work because it impacts kids and staff in the school buildings,” he explained. At the January 25 meeting, School Board Vice President April Neuendorf made a motion for the board to accept a “Phase I” plan which Rogers outlined for important short-term improvements, and the board voted in favor of setting forward a bond referendum for May with that as the focus. With that move six agenda items for SEQRA (State Environmental Quality Review Act) related to larger scale referendum projects were tabled, along with a special election date. That date is subject to the board approving a resolution at its upcoming Monday March 20 meeting, and agreeing to the latest timeframe for the process that schools’ administration advises. With the 2017-’18 budget and a “priority project” calendar ahead, the board and district leaders are primed to shift gears. In January Neuendorf commented that the district should spend considerable time reaching out to residents. “There are a lot of community members here that we don’t normally get at board meetings. We will need your input when pushing through a project like that.

We spoke about grassroots, how we reach out to people – you are the people going out into the community now and please encourage them to see what is going on with the district. We do want the input,” Neuendorf told the crowd. Among top district priorities are items noted in the district’s buildings and conditions survey. Fire alarms at H.B.T. Middle School are one prime example of very old handles dating back over five decades. Hallways that are half cinderblock and half glass (top portions) are no longer safe for fire code, Rogers said. “We will need to do a number of interior door replacements to make our doors more secure. And we have been talking about doing security vestibules at each school, interior spaces between outer doors and inside – they would allow us to control visitors before they would have access to the whole school property. If we were to look at that work as a ‘first phase’ it would total about $7.7 million but with the district’s capital reserve we could approach this work without necessarily doing any borrowing, and we could approach other work that is also necessary plus have a conversation about projects on our list – A/C, the fitness room, turf/track. We will not lose a construction season if we consider those projects for a later date and just focus on the ones that are the most urgent in the short term,” he said. Part of the February 13 school board meeting was centered on plans for the 2017-’18 district budget. Appropriations for part of the security vestibule project was included in that presentation, which is available on the district’s website. Prior to his time at the helm in Syosset the community’s voters had approved a capital reserve fund to set aside no more than $5 million per year and $20 million in the aggregate. The superintendent referenced $14.1 million in that account to date, and the referendum in May will include a proposition before voters to utilize funds from capital reserve. The resolution for the proposition to voters (to approve using capital reserves) is now expected to come before the school board trustees for consideration at the March 20 school board meeting. On February 13, at a much quieter school board meeting than December or January’s, Rogers explained the outlook for March. “At the (January) meeting the board asked us to look into a staged facilities plan, and that work is well underway. We’ve planned to present a set of resolutions that will be necessary to start the first phase of work with money that is essentially in the district’s

savings account. Then we will have a timeline for the public approval (referendum) and then our larger projects in the fall. In support of that work one of the things the administration has been doing is to work on improving the ‘facility of communications’ and identifying groups of the community that would may not always be reached by school district communications or the website, either because they’re not people with children in the schools or they aren’t closely connected with Syosset district’s work,” he said. Early on in 2017 Dr. Rogers and the school board began sharing community feedback from several school PTA meetings they’ve attended. The board discussion last month, particularly concerning propositions and potential for a new track and synthetic turf playing field as well as a small freestanding fitness facility adjacent to Syosset High School, started to include community input relayed to board members. With the Town Hall coming, there’s more input sought. “We would anticipate if separate propositions are up for votes by the public with the May election, we – the administration – would spend the next two and a half months meeting with as many people as we could find in as many venues as we can find. We will work to try to identify people and make sure that they understand the work that is before us and why it is necessary. This can create an opportunity for folks to give us some feedback on what they hear at presentations from the administration (Bovard and Rogers),” he said. As indicated with the outreach to seniors, Syosset Central School District is trying collect as many residents’ email addresses as possible. In December and January, several seniors have told the district they aren’t using email, and other issues with the timing of district contact has been highlighted due to the Woodbury property issue. With meetings face-to-face already planned, Syosset starts anew as it works on the bond referendum. “We have to start somewhere, so we began with our 11 PTA’s and had varying turnouts for those meetings. That’s the tip of the iceberg for our communications plan,” Rogers said on January 25. From the relatively low turnout at the February meeting to the outreach plans that are evolving, it appears that as winter enters its final month, there’s less of an iceberg between the district and all the residents of Syosset/Woodbury.

LI artist honored by Hall of Fame From page 1 ist’s work on display at the Museum. “We are absolutely thrilled to have this great talent and well respected member of the community’s paintings featured at the Museum,” said Schantz. “He lives close by to us and with his recent work being honored by the Baseball Hall of Fame and the White House, we thought this would be the appropriate time to do so.” He said that he was grateful for Mort and his wife Deborah, for letting him come to his home to extract the paintings for public view. This will be the first time that Kuntsler’s work will be on display at the Museum. The exhibition at the Museum, which runs from December 10, 2016 - March 5, 2017, is entitled Norman Rockwell and Friends: American Illustrations from the Mort Künstler Collection. Some of the artists featured include Winslow Homer, Maxfield Parrish, Dean Cornwell, Howard Pyle and many others. Kuntsler’s iconic picture of George Washington crossing the Del-

aware River is prominently featured in the exhibit and his new book, which features his artwork, ‘The New Nation: The Story of the Birth of out Country’ will act as a catalog for show. The 85 year old Kuntsler is considered to be one of the premier historical artists in the country and his career spans over 65 years. He said that his parents encouraged him to be an artist because he showed from an early age an aptitude to paint complex, action oriented pictures. After graduating from art school he began working on illustrations in the 1950’s for various magazines including National Geographic and Fish & Game Magazine. His artwork started to gain recognition and many of his pieces were eventually featured in movies such as the Poseidon Adventure and the Hindenburg. “It was a great experience working in the movies and from there I ended up doing one of my first gallery shows,” said Kuntsler. He did his first gallery show at Hammer Galleries

in New York City in 1977 with his artwork being mostly Western subject matter which was popular at the time. At that time he started to become well known as an important painter of historic subjects. Since his first show in 1977 he has ended up doing thirteen shows at Hammer Galleries with 2006 being his latest exhibition. The gallery shows led to his work doing commission type paintings for thigns such as calendars and limited edition print work. He said that he was very happy to have his work honored by the Baseball Hall of Fame and the White House and that the Heckscher Museum did a wonderful job putting together a gallery show of his and other historical artist’s work. “The Museum is such a beautiful building and the show is hung so beautifully with the personal collection of the artist works,” said Kuntsler.


HealtH Update for SeniorS A Free Community eduCAtion SeminAr

How to redUce YoUr “wHattage� roY f. SUllivan, pHd Family communication and gender-related dynamics play an important role in hearing. Learn how individual differences impact hearing difficulties from Roy Sullivan, PhD, Audiologist. Information will be presented on the types of hearing impairment, not hearing vs. not understanding, and alternative solutions. Hearing aids and assistive listening devices for TV and phone will be discussed, as well as how to access hearing aids on a trial-use basis. A question and answer period will be included.

DID YOU KNOW?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, regular physical activity is one of the most important things older adults can do to promote their longterm health. The CDC recommends that men and women age 65 or older who are generally fit and have no limiting health conditions need at least two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, each week. In addition, such people should perform strength-training activities that work all major muscle groups at least two days per week. While many fit older men and women with no preexisting health conditions are capable of these activities, those able to push themselves a little further can opt for 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, such as jogging or running, combined with the same strength-training regimen. A combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity coupled with strength training may also provide adequate physical activity for aging men and women. Before beginning a new exercise regimen, men and women should consult with their physicians to discuss any limitations they may have and how to manage those risks while still being physically active. ADVERTORIAL

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Friday, February 17, 2017

SENIOR LIVING

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Friday, February 17, 2017

10

Host a successful event with the help of a catering hall

Special occasions often call for special venues. Catering halls are capable of hosting big and small parties, making them worthy of consideration for hosts looking to impress. While catering halls are most often associated with weddings, such venues can host everything from birthdays to religious rites of passage to anniversary parties and more. Catering hall staff can guide clients through the booking, preparation and hosting of their events. Many party hosts prefer to leave much of the hosting work to the professionals, feeling it reduces the stress associated with hosting while ensuring hosts they will have the time to mingle with guests and enjoy the festivities. Working with a reputable and reliable caterer is the first step toward ensuring a party will be successful and enjoyable. The following tips can help anyone develop a good relationship with a caterer en route to hosting a fun and memorable party. • Think about the size of the venue. Catering halls can cater to parties of various sizes. When choosing a venue for the party, hosts should keep the comfort of their guests in mind. Guests should be able to move around and not feel as though they are sitting on top of one another at the tables. Halls can be too big as well.

Rooms that are too large for the guest list can feel uncomfortable and make guests feel isolated. • Develop a budget. Budget should factor into hosts’ decisions regarding a catering hall. Speak with the catering manager prior to booking and be sure that there is a package that will fit into your budget. When examining catering packages, hosts can discuss if certain substitutions or amendments can be made to packages

to meet their needs and the needs of their guests. • Consider the banquet hall location. Proximity to public transportation, highways and hotels is an important consideration. Guests should be able to get to and from the venue with ease. Try to find a catering hall that is not too far from home. This way you can communicate with the banquet manager and be able to pop in to drop off centerpieces and favors easily or handle any other last-minute issues that pop up. • Explore the amenities. Amenities, such as outdoor gardens or gazebos for photo opportunities, can add to the experience of throwing a party at a catering hall. Hosts should compare amenities at the catering halls they’re considering, and factor in the benefits of having those amenities versus the disadvantages of choosing a venue with no such offerings. • Don’t forget the food. Food should not be overlooked when choosing a catering hall. Be sure to taste test the menu to determine if the food is up to par. Catering halls can be beautiful, but the food should meet hosts’ expectations as well. Finding the right catering hall requires hosts to consider the venue, their budgets and a host of additional factors.


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12 Friday, February 17, 2017

Black tie affair ... now what?

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Receiving an invitation to a wedding or another party in the mail can be an exciting prospect, presenting a chance to enjoy a night out and share several hours in the company of friends and family. Upon opening the invite, you may find the words “black tie.” If you have never attended a black tie event, you may be unsure what that entails and how to prepare. The appearance of “black tie” on an invitation means the party hosts are planning a formal affair and they’d like their guests to dress appropriately. For men, this dress code is unequivocally a black tuxedo. Gentleman who want to dress in the spirit of the occasion should purchase a tuxedo or rent one if finances do not allow for the purchase. Accompanying the tuxedo is a bow tie. Now is not the time to don a clip-on. Only a hand-tied bow tie will suffice. Additionally, men are expected to be conservative with their choice of tuxedo shirt. A white shirt is customary. It may have ribbing or a subtle detail. If a cummerbund or vest is worn, it should also be black. However, sometimes matching the vest or cummerbund to a date’s dress is acceptable. Women have a little more wiggle room when it comes to dressing for a black tie affair. A cocktail dress is customary, and many women prefer to wear something floor length because it appears more formal than a shorter dress. Dressy separates also are acceptable, provided they look formal enough. A ball gown or something you might see a celebrity wearing on the red carpet is customary.

On some occasions, some men may not want to be curtailed by dress code and may use the opportunity to dress as they would like. This is a breach of etiquette. Although a party host may be accommodating to the lack of tuxedo, he or she doesn’t have to be. If you are invited to a black tie party, try to keep with the dress code so you are respectful of the party hosts. In some instances, an invitation may read “black tie preferred” or “black tie optional.” At such events, the hosts are giving guests the option to attend even if they prefer not to wear extremely formal attire. In this case, it’s still in your best interest to dress as formally as possible. A black suit for a man and a cocktail dress for a woman are appropriate. White tie is similar to black tie. Men are expected to wear full dress with a white shirt, white vest and white tie. Women wear long, fancy gowns. Party hosts who request formal attire are trying to keep a uniform look to their party and avoid any conflicts that could arise with lax dress code requirements. If a host or hostess has specified a dress code, it is in proper form to stick to the requirements or decline the invitation. If you are ever in doubt about what to wear, you can always ask your hosts what is expected of you.

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Friday, February 17, 2017

Four Friends and a Babymoon in Morro Bay on California’s Highway 1 BY DAVE E. LEIBERMAN, LAINI MIRANDA, MAYA KESSEL, ANDREW KESSEL We are four friends, two couples, from different cities, who get together as often as we can, although not as often as we’d like, to go on adventures. With the first baby expected in our group, we thought we’d take one last adventure before the greatest adventure of all. Hence, our first “babymoon.” Our adventure takes place in Morro Bay and along California’s Highway 1, a gorgeous Pacific coastal road that embraces the mood of dreamers and wanderers who tend to find themselves there. Before this trip some of us hadn’t even heard of a babymoon or Morro Bay (except in the recent movie “Finding Dory”). In thinking about winter holiday destinations, Zika prevented us from considering many Southern spots while a ski trip for a 6-month pregnant woman was similarly a bad choice. Instead, we set our sights on the Central Coast of California, easily accessible from Los Angeles airport while still providing a great escape from the wintrier East Coast. We did not know what to expect. What we discovered was an amazing combination of outdoor sports and nature, wine, gastronomic delights featuring some of the best seafood we’ve ever had, and so much more, all nestled in beautiful California coastal towns. Highway 1 is famous

Four friends and a Babymoon in Morro Bay, on California’s Highway 1 Discovery Route (photo by Laini Miranda/ Travel Features Syndicate) for its windy roads beside perilous cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The 101-mile-long Highway 1 Discovery Route is situated between San Francisco and L.A. attracts 3 to 4 million visitors a year. Along

the route you will find such popular attractions as the Hearst Castle, the Elephant Seal Rookery, dozens of wine vineyards (11 just in the 40 minute drive from Rock to Castle), oyster farms, and charming coastal

G O I N G P L A C E S N E A R A N D F A R

towns. This region is remarkably diverse, yet it’s a compact area, ideal to satisfy the wanderlust of our expectant mother who is otherwise more inclined to climb a mountain See page D2


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G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

Four Friends and a Babymoon in Morro Bay on California’s Highway 1 Continued from page D1

than sit back and stare at it. Some highlights of our adventure includes a visit to Hearst Castle (http:// hearstcastle.org/), a personal guided tour along the Morro Bay Estuary with  Central Coast Kayaks  (www. centralcoastkayaks.com) watching the sunset with Elephant Seals at Piedras Blancas  (http://www.elephantseal. org/) just at the start of their birthing season in late December, a winery tour and tasting at  Kelsey See Canyon Vineyards  (http://kelseywine. com/), Pedego Electric biking (http:// www.pedegoelectricbikes.com/dealers/ avila-beach/) in Avila Beach, and relaxing in our private mineral springs hot tub on the balcony of the Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort & Spa  (https://www.sycamoresprings. com/). Our home base for the first 3 days is Morro Bay, a picturesque and friendly fishing town on the bay that is home to a state and national estuary and bird sanctuary.  Once a remote fishing village, Morro Bay is still a busy harbor with an active commercial fishing fleet. Most impressive is how Morro Bay as a community is leading the way in sustainable small fleet fishing practices nationwide, helping support this thriving fishing community. Sustainability and respect for the environment is a theme that carried through our adventure. Food & Wine This is a  bountiful wine region and our first stop on our adventure in Morro Bay is the  Chateau Margene,  one of

View from Hearst Castle (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate) 10 wineries located along the Pacific Coast Wine Trail, for  wine tasting. They have two different wine flights to try and the tasting fee is waived if you buy 2 bottles. We loved learning about the Mooney Family and the production of each of the wines we tried.  This boutique, micro-winery produces only 3,000 cases a year of luxury awardwinning Cabernet Sauvignon and Bordeaux blends, as well as Pinot Noir. Owner Michael Mooney co-founded the Cab Collective out of Paso Robles highlighting the many award-winning Cabernets found in the region that rival Napa. One definite perk is that it’s open late and right in the center of town (the only winery nearby open past 5), making it a great spot to hit up just before dinner. If wine isn’t your thing

they also have superb infused olive oils and local vinegar samples. (Chateau Margene,  845 Embarcadero, 805-2251235, www.chateaumargene.com). Next stop, dinner at  Windows on the Water, a fine dining restaurant that has a  gorgeous  panoramic view of the bay and a friendly atmosphere. They also have a lively bar area, live music many nights, and regular weekly specials including $5 martini Mondays, $.75 oyster Tuesdays (elsewhere around town we hear that Tuesdays are the big crab night), and Sliders & Beer Wednesdays and $1 Taco & Tequila Thursdays. Windows, like a few of the other restaurants we visited, emphasizes the season-driven approach to continually changing menus. They take pride in their sustainably

View of Morro Bay from our suite at 456 Embarcadero Inn and Suites (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate)

raised livestock and seafood and locally sourced produce, so you can feel good about how your dinner was caught and prepared while savoring in the delicious freshness of the food. Their wine flights highlight local vineyards and an extensive wine list showcases the expertise of their in-house sommelier, Chris Battles. There is something on this menu for everyone. Starters and salads range from $10-20 and are small, but packed with flavor. Entrees are between $25-39 and fairly large. Our waitress Elizabeth recommends the local halibut and pork loins. Windows is famous for its local sand dabs (a lighter white fish maybe similar to a flounder, but sweeter), so popular, that it is sadly sold out by the time we arrive. Their bread and own garlic and herbs olive oil and vinegar dip is so good, it is hard not to fill up on it before dinner. We enjoy the very crispy, full-of-sprouts crab cakes with a fresh arugula salad pre-entree. For dessert we taste the three homemade ice cream scoops, which, like the rest of the menu, rotate with the season (in the past they’ve had lucky charms and peanut butter chocolate ice cream). We enjoy a vanilla, toasted coconut, and egg nog ice cream perfect for the season. One of the best vanilla ice creams we’ve ever tried.  (Windows on the Water,  699 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, CA 93442, 805772-0677,  www.windowsmb.com). We head to our accommodations, 456 Embarcadero Inn and Suites,  wonderfully  well located in the central part of town, with spectacular views of the coast and the great Morro Rock,  so we can just  park  our car and leave it for the duration of their of our stay in  Morro Bay. The front desk staff goes


Whale Watching Early the next morning we set off for the whale watching adventure with Sub Sea Tour Whale Watching. The staff is professional, courteous, and very friendly. The small boat carries about 20 of us for the 3-hour trip. We  sail passed  the iconic Morro Rock for a great photo op and stop by the halfmile  beacon mark on our way out as well where seals tend to gather. The famous  Morro Rock, now a

State Historic Landmark, is the most distinctive and recognizable landmark of Morro Bay. The 576-foot tall mass of volcanic rock rises above the Pacific Ocean, separating the inviting sands of Morro Strand State Beach from the blue waters of Morro Bay Harbor. While the seas were a bit choppy the lighting was perfect for spotting whales as our guide shared interesting facts about the area and its wildlife. In fact, mid to late December marks the beginning of the great migration of the Gray Whale. Unlike New England and other places famous for whale watching, December whale watching in Central California is very doable. Seeing wildlife, including whales on a tour is always somewhat of a gamble  (they report sightings on 90% of their  trips). Unfortunately, we are in the 10% and don’t get a whale sighting.  Be sure to dress in layers since it can get chilly (and windy!) out at sea. After whale watching, we have lunch just a few feet away at Blue Sky Bistro. We sample a variety of items on the menu including the lobster bisque, clam chowder, Mahi Mahi sandwich, California burgers, and Sailor Benedict eggs. Blue Sky is picturesque, affordable, filling, and the service is friendly. Hearst Castle

Friday, February 17, 2017

above and beyond. They even offer us blankets for our whale watching tour. The rooms are spacious and comfortable and even feature a gas fireplace. The inn offers  33 boutique guestrooms, each with a panoramic view of the bay and the iconic rock from a private deck. Showers come with dispensers, which are appreciated over the typical wasteful bottles of shampoo and soap provided at most hotels. The hot tub is a welcomed, very modern styled amenity, snuck away in a nook on the second floor. Breakfast comes complimentary and is a nice filling way to start the day.  The inn is familyowned and operated and pet-friendly. (456 Embarcadero Inn & Suites,  456 Embarcadero Blvd., Morro Bay, CA 93442, 805-772-2700,  www.embarcaderoinn. com).

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G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

Blue Sky Bistro, Morro Bay Suites (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate) Next up is the famous castle on the hill about 40 minutes north of Morro Bay:  Hearst Castle. The 40,000 acres of ranchland was originally purchased by George Hearst for family retreats. Newspaper mogul, William Randolph Hearst inherited the land in 1919, by that time having grown to more than 250,000 acres. He dreamed of building a retreat for friends and a place to house

his immense art collection. He hired the first woman architect in California, Julia Morgan, and together they built “La Cuesta Encantada” (The Enchanted Hill) into what is now the 165-room Hearst Castle. To tour the castle and its surrounding property, you must buy tickets in advance, as they often sell out. See page D5

W R I T E R’S C O R N E R

The bold & distinctly talented Georgia O’Keeffe BY CLAIRE LYNCH I like reading about people who were ahead of their time. Men or women, it doesn’t matter. Anyone who had a vision for their lives, who had a dream and chased it is fascinating to me. I looked into a female American artist who was a pioneer in many ways. Georgia O’Keeffe pursued her dream of spending her life painting and making a name for herself at a time when the art world was dominated by men. She forged ahead anyway and with a lot of hard work, O’Keeffe’s dream came true. As a result, she paved the way for the many women artists who came after her. She could paint realistic works and abstract works. She took everyday sights in nature and made them larger than life. She believed that she shouldn’t just paint what she saw but that she should put her feelings and thoughts into her paintings. She was on the cutting edge and she seemed to take pleasure in pushing people to look closely at her paintings. She is best known for her paintings of enlarged flowers, New York skyscrapers and New Mexico landscapes. She is known as the “Mother of American modernism.”

Georgia O’Keeffe was born on November 15, 1887, in a farmhouse located at 2405 Hwy T in the town of Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. Her parents, Francis Calyxtus O’Keeffe and Ida (Totto) O’Keeffe, were successful dairy farmers. Her father was of Irish descent. She was named after her mother’s father, George Victor Totto, who was a Hungarian count who came to the U.S. in 1848. (wikipedia.org) Georgia O’Keeffe was the second of seven children and the first daughter. She attended Town Hall School in Sun Prairie. By age 10 she had decided to become an artist, and she received art instruction at home from a local watercolorist. O’Keeffe attended high school at Sacred Heart Academy in Madison, Wisconsin, as a boarder between 1901 and 1902. In late 1902, the O’Keeffes moved from Wisconsin to the neighborhood of Peacock Hill in Williamsburg, Virginia. O’Keeffe stayed in Wisconsin with her aunt and attended Madison High School, and while she was in high school her art teacher showed her a picture of a wildflower and told her to look at it closely before she picked up a pencil or a paintbrush. Listening to her teacher’s words, O’Keeffe studied the wildflower. She

turned it this way and that. She drew it over and over. She wanted her art to be simple and to make a statement. She has said that to just copy the wildflower would have been dull. She later said that her high school art teacher’s advice was some of the best she ever received. After finishing high school O’Keeffe joined her family in Virginia in 1903. In 1905, O’Keeffe began her serious formal art training at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and then the Art Students League of New York, but she felt constrained by her lessons that focused on recreating or copying what was in nature. In 1908, unable to fund further education, she worked for two years as a commercial illustrator, and then spent seven years between 1911 and 1918 teaching in Virginia, Texas and South Carolina. It was while she was teaching at Columbia College in Columbia, S.C., that O’Keeffe began a series of abstract charcoal drawings. She was one of the first American artists to practice “pure abstraction,” according to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. (biography.com) O’Keeffe mailed a few of her drawings to a friend and former classmate who showed the work to Alfred Stieglitz, a N.Y. art dealer and photogra-

pher. Impressed by O’Keeffe’s work, he and O’Keeffe began a correspondence and without telling O’Keeffe, Stieglitz exhibited 10 of her drawings at the 291 Gallery in New York (on Fifth Ave.) in 1916. She didn’t know about the exhibit, but allowed him to continue to show the work. In 1917, he presented her first solo show. A year later she moved to New York, and Stieglitz found a place for her to live and work. He also provided financial support for her to focus on her art. Their relationship deepened and in 1924 Stieglitz and O’Keeffe married. They lived in New York City and spent their summers in Lake George, N.Y., where Stieglitz’s family had a home. Inspired by the vibrancy of the modern art movement, she began to experiment with perspective, painting larger-scale close-ups of flowers, the first of which was “Petunia No. 2,” which was exhibited in 1925, followed by works such as “Black Iris” (1926) and “Oriental Poppies” (1928). “If I could paint the flower exactly as I see it no one would see what I see because I would paint it small like the flower is small,” O’Keeffe once explained. “So I said to myself - I’ll paint what See page D7


Friday, February 17, 2017

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Y O U R S O C I A L S E C U R I T Y

Don’t Worry. Be Happy! It’s Nickels and Dimes. BY TOM MARGENAU

I am always surprised at the number of people who are so darn intent on squeezing every last nickel they can out of their Social Security benefits. I get that people want to get all the benefits for which they are eligible. But some folks seem absolutely obsessed about the issue. I swear they must lie awake at night, worrying about decisions they think will cost them thousands of dollars in lost benefits, but in reality are usually a matter of nickels and dimes. I’ve saved up a few emails from some of these readers to share them with you today. Q: I will turn 70 on April 22, 2017. I want to make sure I get the full 32 percent bonus for delaying my retirement until that age. I’m afraid that if I file for those benefits a little early, like in March, for example, that they will start my checks in March and I will lose my bonus. Should I wait until April 21 to file? A: It sounds like you think the 32 percent delayed retirement bonus is an all or nothing deal. In other words, you assume you get an extra 32 percent added to your monthly benefits if you wait until exactly age 70 to file. But that is not how it works. Instead, the delayed retirement credits are calculated this way. You get an extra two-thirds of one percent added to your Social Security benefit rate for each month you delay retirement beyond age 66. That comes out to 8 percent per year, or 32 percent if you wait until age 70 to file. So, you can file for benefits tomorrow and just tell the Social Security people you want your benefits to start in April when you are 70. And if the worst-case scenario happens, and they start your benefits right away, you would end up getting about a 31 percent bonus instead of 32. And if that were to happen, you could either keep the extra Social Security check or two that you get, or you could go back to your Social Security office and tell them to change the effective date of your benefits to April. Q: I will be 63 in June. I want my benefits to begin then. I understand I will get about 80 percent of my benefits if I do that. I don’t want to take any more reduction than that. How can I make sure my checks start in June? A: You can do whatever you want to do, of course. After all, they are your Social Security benefits. So when you fill out your retirement application, just make sure you indicate June 2017 as the month you want your Social Security checks to start. But frankly, I am a little confused why you are so worried that your benefits start exactly at age 63. Your monthly benefit rate is reduced about one-half of one percent for each month they are

taken before age 66. (The reduction rate is actually five-ninths of one percent for some of the months, and five-twelfths of one percent for the other months. That’s why I just round it out to about one half of one percent.) You were right that if you take your benefits at 63, you would get 80 percent. But if, for example, they were to start a couple months earlier, you’d get maybe 78 or 79 percent. In other words, you’d lose a few bucks per month, but you’d gain one or two Social Security checks. So again, just make sure you indicate June as your starting date when you fill out your retirement application. But if mistakes are made, and you get a couple extra checks with a one or two percent reduction, don’t lose too much sleep over it. And go to your local Social Security office to correct things if you want. Q: I will be 66 next year. I have worked all my life and have always paid taxes on the maximum amount of earnings that could be taxed for Social Security purposes. But my employer just downsized, and I won’t make the max this year. So now I won’t get the maximum Social Security benefit. I’m just sick over this. I’ve been waiting for a long time to get this maximum benefit, and now it’s gone. Can I pay in the difference myself to get back to the maximum? A: No, you can’t pay the taxes on your own. But there is absolutely nothing special about the so-called “maximum” Social Security benefit. It is not like you get some kind of bonus for reaching that milestone. Like everyone else, you simply get a retirement benefit rate that is based on your highest 35 years of inflation-indexed earnings. So if you come up a little shy of the maximum taxable earnings this year, you might make up for it by having earned the maximum in all those prior years -- especially since those past years are adjusted for inflation. And if you don’t end up with the maximum benefit -- so what? What’s the big deal if instead of getting $2,687 per month, you start getting $2,685 per month? As I said in the introduction to this column, it’s all nickels and dimes. And I need to make one more important point about this whole maximum retirement benefit business. That $2,687 figure I just quoted is the maximum monthly retirement benefit for 2017. But that does not mean it is the absolute maximum amount of monthly Social Security benefits that anyone can get from the government. Indeed, there are millions of retirees who get much more than that. $2,687 is the maximum benefit payable to someone turning 66 in 2017 who has paid taxes on maximum Social Security earnings for 35 years. But there are many seniors who work well beyond age 66. And they

get much more than $2,687 per month because of delayed retirement credits paid up until age 70 and because the extra earnings they add to their Social Security account after age 66 will be used to increase their monthly retirement check.

If you have a Social Security question, Tom Margenau has the answer. Contact him at thomas.margenau@comcast.net. COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

C R O S S W O R D P U Z Z L E

Answers on page D5


Four Friends & a Babymoon in Morro Bay on California’s Highway 1 C ontinued from page D3 A bus with an audio introduction leads visitors up the gorgeous winding road to the top of the “Enchanted Hill”. The views from the top of the hill alone are worth the trip. We take the Grand Room Tour, where the knowledgeable docent leads us around the property and through the

President Roosevelt and the New Deal, and Union strikes and boycotts of his properties, the financial strength of his empire began to suffer. Even amidst the declined circulation of his major publications, Hearst continued his outlandish purchases of expensive art and antiques. Ultimately Hearst went into millions of dollars of debt (when a

Kayaking in the Morro Bay Estuary, perfect activity for a babymoon (photo by Dave E. Leiberman/Travel Features Syndicate) Assembly Room, the Refectory, Billiard Room, and Theater, getting a sense of what it would have been like for guests who visited W.H. Hearst. Sitting at 200year old Italian wood tables amidst sterling silver candles and scepters from Ireland, and medieval hand-painted silk banners from Siena, Italy overhead, diners would use paper napkins, Heinz Ketchup bottles and yellow mustard, as the media mogul believed a casual atmosphere would make his guests (often celebrities and politicians) more likely to open up and share stories. Beginning building his San Simeon retreat in the 1920s, Hearst was able to capitalize on the many European collectors desperate to sell after WWI had left much of the region in shambles. Every surface of the rooms is decorated with pieces from his collection (about 25,000 artifacts). Not one to follow advice of art dealers or others, his collection represents his own eclectic taste, which encompassed everything from 15th Century BC Egyptian statues, 16th Century Spanish and 18th Century Italian ceilings, 6th Century BC Greek terracotta pottery, Renaissance paintings, Flemish tapestries, 15th Century Gothic fireplaces, 15th century religious painting, and much more. For most of the 20th century, the estate even had the world’s largest private zoo, with guests driving up alongside bison, elk, zebras, llamas, kangaroos, camels, sambar deer from India, African and Asian antelope and other exotic animals. With Hearst’s public opposition to

million dollars really meant something), had to sell his exotic animals to the Los Angeles Zoo, stopped construction on his estate, leaving parts of the exterior unfinished, sold off much of his art collection and had to pay rent to live in his San Simeon castle. (Hearst Castle, 750 Hearst Castle Rd, San Simeon, CA 93452, 800-444-4445, reserve tickets online and plan visit at http://hearstcastle.org/. Just up the coast from Hearst Castle is Piedras Blancas (www. elephantseal.org), a famous breeding ground for elephant seals. You can’t call this a hidden gem as it is a well-known See page D6

Crossword Answers

LEO’S Saturday, February 18th • 9:30pm

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Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Sunday Only 30% Off Entire Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included • Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined 9/any other offer

Monday Only 30% Off Entire

Tuesday Only 30% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Wednesday Only 25% Off Entire

Thursday Only 25% Off Entire

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

190 Seventh St., Garden City 742-0574 • www.leosgardencity.com

D5 Friday, February 17, 2017

G O I N G P L A C E S N E A R & F A R


Friday, February 17, 2017

D6

G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

Four Friends and a Babymoon in Morro Bay on California’s Highway 1 C ontinued from page D3 attraction but everyone is able to get great views of the playful seals doing their thing. We have a first-hand look at young males sparring for dominance while others sleep undisturbed, groan loudly, flip sand onto their backs or cuddle. Watching these enormous surprisingly cute creatures play, it’s easy for us to forget to look out at the beautiful pacific sunset behind them. The Galley Seafood Grill & Bar is recommended to us by the captain of our whale watching tour as the place to go to really treat yourself, “especially if you want incredibly fresh seafood”. The Galley has a wall of windows overlooking the Bay, warm, modern decor, intimate tables and cozy booths for larger groups. Highlighting their belief in serving only the finest and freshest, their specialty is their “Naked Fish”, with a trio of light sauces served on the side. We share a series of dishes: a perfect Caesar salad with Spanish anchovies, Ceviche, the Original Galley Clam Chowder (their same secret recipe since 1966), Pan Seared Scallops, Blackened Pacific Rockfish (Naked), and a New Zealand Rack of Lamb with Kalamata olive tapenade. The portions are well sized and even the appetizers are ample enough to share. The Blackened Pacific Rockfish was cooked so perfectly it seems to melt in your mouth, and indeed, is so flavorful there is no need for the delicious sauces offered on the side. We top off our meal with their Grand Marnier Creme Bruleé. With nice size portions, the freshest ingredients, distinctive flavors,

and attentive service, we love every minute of our dining experience at The Galley. (The Galley Seafood Grill & Bar, 899 Embarcadero Morro Bay, CA 93442) Kayaking Estuary

in

the

Morro

Bay

After breakfast at The Embarcadero, we set out for our next great outdoor adventure kayaking in the Morro Bay Estuary Natural Preserve. We meet Craig, our  guide from  Central Coast Outdoors for the tour, who provides an intimate and comprehensive account of wildlife in the area as well as the relationship of the local people to it. The Morro Bay Estuary Natural Preserve and its 800-acre wetland are home to more than 250 species of land, sea, and shore birds, both migratory and resident, and dozens of endangered species. The great blue herons and the great and snowy egrets roost all year at the Heron and Cormorant Rookery located near the entrance of the Museum of Natural History. (The tours are complimentary but it is customary to tip your guide.) The weather is perfect and the estuary waters are calm, unlike the open waters of the bay next to it. This is a perfect activity for our expectant mother, who reclines in comfort while getting some exercise in between guided stops and her husband at the back of the two-person kayak. He takes us along the Estuary with stops to view the countless species of local birds spiraling around us. We spot dozens of bird species and lots of adorable harbor seals. If you’re a fan of

Hearst Castle (photo by Dave E. Leiberman/Travel Features Syndicate)

Elephant seals on Piedras Blancas at sunset (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate) these guys, this is one of the best ways to have a close encounter, as a few seal friends traveled alongside our kayak with their pups for a while (just be careful not to get too close so that you don’t disturb their natural habitat!). We learn that estuaries are an ideal natural breeding ground providing protection from larger predators, and we got to see this firsthand. One of the most memorable sights is seeing the natural fireworks as the birds circle around, rapidly alternating between camouflaging into the background and suddenly reappearing as their white feathers turn towards you. Additionally, despite (or perhaps because of) its historically-dependent marine economy, Morro Bay has taken important steps, even leading-edge techniques that are considered a model, to protect their wildlife. The Limited Entry fleet targets ground fish using non-trawl gear (hook and line, trap, long line). They’ve taken measures to maintain clean waters so that agriculture and nearby homes do not cause any environmental degradation of these important waters. Every tour is unique and Craig considers the weather conditions of the day, tidal patterns, rider abilities, and timing to piece together an ideal tour. Craig also leads bicycle, hiking, and other tours for Central Coast Kayaks. (Central Coast Outdoors, #10 State Park Road, Morro Bay, CA 93442, 805528-1080,  www.centralcoastoutdoors. com.) After kayaking, we enjoy a wonderful lunch at  Bayside Cafe, just opposite Central Coast’s dock. Originally started in 1986 by a Cal Poly grad as a walk-up cafe, it quickly became so popular that

it had to expand to include a casual bayside dining area with a large outdoor terrace. The restaurant is bustling with a line out the door from the time we enter to the time we leave. Not a bad place to wait for a table, as you can easily kill time hanging out on the benches, dock, or grassy areas along the water. Bayside has an extensive menu filled with local ingredients and both foodie and kid favorites alike. Some food highlights are their fresh salad with grilled catch-of-the-day, amazing thick calamari strips that are meatier than any calamari we’ve had, salmon tacos, and their ever popular fish & chips (definitely get the large!). To cap off our lunch we indulge in their huge serving of homemade mudpie. Hard to choose from their list of pie specialties, but if you like chocolate, this one is not to be missed! On top of the very friendly service, big portions, and awesome food, the vibe here is familial and relaxed, the view beautiful from any seat. This is the perfect lunch spot to rest and indulge while exploring Morro Bay. (Bayside Café,  In the Morro Bay Marina across from Morro Bay State Park Campground,  #10 State Park Rd, Morro Bay, CA 93442, 805-772-1465). Morro Bay also has some distinctly interesting shops and attractions: Junque Love  (699 Embarcadero) specializes in an eclectic mix of vintage and repurposed goods, and represents the heart and soul of old coastal California, featuring artists from all over California that repurpose vintage items into new goods; (805-821-1154;  www. facebook.com/Gatheringjunquelove/) Morro Bay Skateboard Museum  preserves the complete history of skateboarding,from the early


D7

1930′s to present day, featuring more than 200 skateboards from all eras with rotating exhibits from extensive private collections (601 Embarcadero Road; 805610-3565; www.mbskate.com). The Estuary Nature Center located upstairs in the Marina Square Building at 601 Embarcadero is free and provides a place to experience the beauty of the estuary and learn about protecting

habitats and wildlife (805-772-3834, www. mbnep.org/Learn/nature_center.html). After our satisfying meal at Bayside Cafe, we hit the road and continue south on our adventure along the  Highway 1 Discovery Route.  First stop is the Kelsey See Canyon Winery. For more information on planning a trip,  contact Morro Bay Tourism, 695

Harbor Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442, 805225-1570,  www.morrobay.org.  For more information on Highway 1 Discovery Route, visit highway1discoveryroute.com. Next:  Four Friends and a Babymoon Travel California’s Highway 1 Discovery Route ____________________ © 2017 Travel Features Syndicate, a

Friday, February 17, 2017

G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

division of Workstyles, Inc. All rights reserved. Visit  goingplacesfarandnear. com  and  travelwritersmagazine.com/ TravelFeaturesSyndicate/. Blogging at  goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress. com  and  moralcompasstravel.info. Send comments or questions to FamTravLtr@ aol.com. Tweet @TravelFeatures. ‘Like’ us at facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

W R I T E R’S C O R N E R

The bold & distinctly talented Georgia O’Keeffe C ontinued from page D3 I see - what the flower is to me but I’ll paint it big and they will be surprised into taking time to look at it - I will make even busy New Yorkers take time to see what I see of flowers.” O’Keeffe turned her artist’s eye to New York City skyscrapers, the symbol of modernity, in paintings including “City Night” (1926), “Shelton Hotel, New York No. 1” (1926) and “Radiator Bldg Night, New York” (1927). Following numerous solo exhibitions, O’Keeffe had her first retrospective, “Paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe,” which opened at the Brooklyn Museum in 1927. By this time, she had become one of the most important and success-

ful American artists, which was a major achievement for a female artist in the male-dominated art world. Her pioneering success would make her a feminist icon for later generations. In the summer of 1929, O’Keeffe visited northern New Mexico and found that she wanted to paint many aspects of that state. The landscape, architecture and local Navajo culture inspired her and for several summers she returned to New Mexico to paint. During this period, she produced iconic paintings including “Black Cross, New Mexico” (1929), “Cow’s Skull: Red, White and Blue” (1931) and “Ram’s Head, White Hollycock, Hills” (1935), among other works. In the 1940s, O’Keeffe’s work was

Famous Quotes by Georgia O’Keeffe:

“One cannot be an American by going about saying that one is an American. It is necessary to feel America, like America, love America and then work.” “When you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it’s your world for the moment. I want to give that world to someone else. Most people in the city rush around so, they have no time to look at a flower. I want them to see it whether they want to or not.” “One can’t paint New York as it is, but rather as it is felt.” “I have things in my head that are not like what anyone has taught me shapes and ideas so near to me - so natural to my way of being and thinking that it hasn’t occurred to me to put them down.” “To create one’s world in any of the arts takes courage.” “When I got to New Mexico, that was my country! I’d never seen anything like it before, but it fitted to me exactly. It’s something that’s in the air. It’s different. The sky is different, the wind is different.” “Singing has always seemed to me the most perfect means of expression … Since I cannot sing, I paint.” “I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way - things I had no words for.” “Imagination makes you see all sorts of things.” “I always have a curious sort of feeling about some of my things - I hate to show them - I am perfectly inconsistent about it - I am afraid people won’t understand - and I hope they won’t - and am afraid they will.” “I get out my work and have a show for myself before I have it publicly. I make up my own mind about it - how good or bad or indifferent it is. After that, the critics can write what they please. I have already settled it for myself so flattery and criticism go down the same drain and I am quite free.”

celebrated in retrospectives at the Art Institute of Chicago (1943) and at the Museum of Modern Art (1946), which was the museum’s first retrospective of a female artist’s work. O’Keeffe divided her time between New York, living with Stieglitz, and painting in New Mexico. She was particularly inspired by Ghost Ranch, north of Abiquiú, and she decided to move into a house there in 1940. Five years later, O’Keeffe bought a second house in Abiquiú. Back in New York, Stieglitz died in 1946 at the age of 82. In 1949, O’Keeffe moved to New Mexico which was the same year that she was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Throughout the 1950s-1970s, O’Keeffe spent much of her time traveling the world, finding new inspirations from the places she visited. She said that she was fascinated by the way things appeared whenever she flew in an airplane since she had a different view of things. That inspired her last two major series - aerial views of rivers (“It Was Blue and Green,” 1960, Whitney Museum), and expansive paintings of the sky viewed from just

above the clouds (“Sky Above Clouds IV,” 1965, The Art Institute of Chicago). In both series, O’Keeffe increased the size of her canvases, sometimes to mural proportions, reflecting perhaps her newly expanded view of the world. (metmuseum.org) These works helped renew her popularity, especially among members of the feminist art movement. In 1977, President Gerald Ford presented Georgia O’Keeffe with the Medal of Freedom. In 1985, she received the National Medal of Arts. O’Keeffe died on March 6, 1986, in Santa Fe, N.M., at age 98. The pioneering artist produced thousands of works over the course of her career, many of which are on exhibit at museums around the world. The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe is dedicated to preserving the life, art and legacy of the artist, and offers tours of her home and studio, which is a national historic landmark. For her courage in pursuing her life’s dream and for succeeding against some difficult odds, I salute Georgia O’Keeffe.

Anecdotes – “Quintessentially O’Keeffe”

--When her mother arranged for her to take art lessons at home as a youngster, Georgia O’Keeffe wasn’t the only student there. Her two grandmothers and two of her sisters liked to paint, also. (biography.com) --Her friends knew that O’Keeffe liked to drive her Model-A Ford out into the country and paint. She had an unusual custom, however. She’d remove the driver’s seat. Then she would unbolt the passenger seat and turn it around to face the back seat. Then she’d lie the canvas on the back seat as an easel and paint from inside her car. Painting inside the car, her “mobile studio,” allowed O’Keeffe to stay out of the rain or the hot desert sun of New Mexico. (mentalfloss.com) --When she bought her two houses in New Mexico, they were simple structures made out of adobe and straw. O’Keeffe enjoyed eating in the vestibule off the kitchen, where she would sit on the banco (adobe ledge) and look out into the New Mexican desert, studded with wildflowers and stunted piñon and juniper trees. (architecturaldigest.com) --Georgia O’Keeffe expressed her feelings about New Mexico in a letter to a friend: “I wish you could see what I see out the window - the earth pink and yellow cliffs to the north - the full pale moon about to go down in an early morning lavender sky . . . pink and purple hills in front and the scrubby fine dull green cedars - and a feeling of much space - It is a very beautiful world.” -- Georgia O’Keeffe didn’t sign her paintings. She didn’t think she had to she thought people would be able to tell they were hers because of what she painted and how she painted it.


Classifieds Friday, February 17, 2017

D8

CLASSIFIEDS

...a sure way to get results. Call 294.8935

ONE CALL TO 516-294-8900 AND YOUR AD WILL APPEAR IN 11 LOCAL NEWSPAPERS. CALL TODAY FOR OUR VERY LOW RATES. FAX: 516-294-8924 www.gcnews.com Garden City News • Great Neck News • Mid Island Times Bethpage Newsgram • Syosset Advance Jericho News Journal • Williston Times - Mineola Edition New Hyde Park Herald Courier • Manhasset Times Roslyn Times • Port Washington Times DEADLINE FOR CLASSIFIED ADS IS TUESDAY AT 1:00PM. 3 EASY WAYS TO PLACE ADS: 1) Directly on website: gcnews.com & click on “Classified Order” 2) Email Nancy@gcnews.com 3) Fax 516-294-8924 Please include your name, daytime phone number, address and ad copy. Visa and MasterCard Accepted

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CLERICAL: General office work for Garden City Insurance Agency. Computer literate. Full or part time. Please call: Robert Sommer 516-294-1000

FARM LABOR: Temporary farm labor 4/10/17 thru 11/15/17. 15 openings. Plant, cultivate and harvest peppers and tomatoes, clean, grade, sort and pack produce. 3 months exp req. Tomato exp req. $12.19​/ hr, 50 hr​/​wk. Free housing, tools provided at no cost to worker, transport and subsistence expenses pd upon completion of 50% of contract; Employment guaranteed for three fourths of work period. Velasquez Farms, 105 Marshalltown Rd, Salem, NJ. Apply at nearest NJ Dept of Labor office and show this ad. Contact Workforce NJ One Stop Career Center, 174 E Broadway, Salem, NJ. Reference Job Order #NJ1203485

DISPLAY ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: Blank Slate Media, a fast growing chain of 6 award winning weekly newspapers and website, is looking for an energetic, service oriented professional with good communication skills to sell display, web and email advertising. Earn up to $60,000 in the first year representing 6 Blank Slate Media publications and website as well as 5 publications and 1 website owned by Blank Slate Media’s partner, Litmor Publications. We are looking for an enthusiastic and service oriented sales professional with good communication skills. Requirements: minimum 2 years outside sales experience. Newspaper sales experience a plus. Must have your own car. Exclusive protected territory. Opportunity to sell both print and online programs. A collegial, supportive sales team. Award-winning editorial coverage. A separate newspaper for each community allowing advertisers to target their markets. And you to provide the most cost-effective way to advertise. Represent media that produce superior response for clients. Compensation: Salary plus commission, health. To apply please email resume and cover letter to sblank@theislandnow.com or call Steven Blank at 516-307-1045 ext 201

GET RESULTS! Place an ad in our Classifieds for reasonable rates and prompt results. Call the G.C. office at 294-8935 for more information.

LACROSSE COACHES Twenty Four Lacrosse, LI’s fastest growing youth lacrosse program has several coaching positions open. Earn as a team coach or by running a camp, clinic, personal training. Experience wanted at College & Professional level. Also seeking Dad coaches interested in building a team around a core group of their players. 24Lax offers registration ​ / ​ m arketing ​ / ​ w eb support to build your program. Access to Nassau’s best grass​ /​ turf field facilities provided. Contact: info@24lax.com or 516-712-2424

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

SITUATION WANTED

SITUATION WANTED

AIDE​/​CARE GIVER: CARING, EFFICIENT, RELIABLE Available Mon-Fri live in to care for your sick or elderly loved one. Cooking, light housework, personal grooming, administer medications . 14 years experience. Just ended 7 years with previous patient. References available. Please Call 516-4480502

CLEANING LADY AVAILABLE Cleans, organizes, your home, office or garage. English speaking, honest, reliable. Excellent references. Own transportation. Animal friendly. Free estimates. Call 516-225-8544

LEGAL SECRETARY P/T: Small litigation​/​elder law office in Garden City seeking qualified, outgoing, organized individual for 20 hours a week, preferably 4 hours/5 days a week; no benefits. Professional phone skills a must; filing, updating​ /​ organizing files; entering attorneys time, payments and expenses; serving Court documents, drafting letters​/​data entry; photocopying, scanning; other varied office duties. Email resume and cover letter to: rplodas@gmail.com OFFICE MANAGER: Full time, small Roslyn construction company. Must be experienced in Word, Excel, Data Entry. Requirements consist of light bookkeeping, appointment scheduling, general office duties. Good telephone skills a must. Email resume to: submitresumes3@gmail.com PARISH ADMINISTRATOR: Looking for a welcoming, detail-oriented, organized, computer savvy team player for weekday part time (18 hours) position. Please email Mother Christina van Liew at revxina@ gmail.com for copy of job description and compensation. TEACHER PRE-SCHOOL: Immediate hire! Well known program in Roslyn area seeks teacher with minimum 2 years pre-school experience. 8:30-1:30 or 8:00-5:00. Send resume growing00@aol.com

SITUATION WANTED AIDE AVAILABLE: HOME HEALTH AIDE Kind, compassionate aide with 25+ yrs experience seeking FT​/​ PT position on weekdays, weekends or overnight. References available. Call Liz 516-590-5338 -DO YOU HAVE A SERVICE to advertise? Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 2948935 for rates and information.

ATTN: MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS! Sanford Brown graduate available to do your medical billing coding. Please call 516-384-0852 CAREGIVER: Seeking a patient, experienced care provider to care for your elderly loved one? If so, please contact me. I would be happy to assist. Call Marva 917-302-5482 CERTIFIED HHA, PCA seeks weekend position, live in or live out. 17 years experience with Parkinsons, Alzheimers, dementia, cancer patients. References available upon request. Call Doreen 516-302-7564 CERTIFIED NURSE’S AIDE 15+ yrs experience, honest & reliable seeking home care position. Available full-time, parttime, weekends & overnight. Licensed driver with own car. Contact Barbara 516-734-1165

AUTOMOTIVE

VALET

RALLYE ACURA (Roslyn)

hAs opEnings foR both p/t & f/t AUtoMotiVE VALEts.

seeking motivated and reliable individuals (clean nY license required) to work with our luxury brand/ atmosphere. Candidates should be personal, motivated, reliable, and customer-oriented individuals.

please call 516-393-8040

or email careers@rallye.com to arrange an interview. EoE.

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS AND NURSES GARDEN CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Substitute teachers - all grades and subjects, must have NYS certification Substitute nurses - must have RN license Interested candidates please call the Personnel Office at (516)478-1020 to request an application

CLEANING SERVICES FOR OFFICES OR HOMES. Available 7 days a week. Excellent references. Own transportation. Gift Certificates available! Call 516-974-8959 COMPANION​/​HOME HEALTH AIDE With 20 years experience in home care & nursing homes seeking position to care for the sick​/​elderly. Experience with Parkinsons, Alzheimers, Dementia, Stroke. Licensed driver able to transport to appointments, etc. References available. English speaking. Please call 347-546-4133 FULL TIME LIVE IN HOUSEKEEPER​/​ELDER CARE Reliable & dedicated mature woman available for live in position 5 days a week for housekeeping, meal prep and also elder care. Non driver. 30+ yrs experience. Excellent references. Please call Phyllis 917-412-3418 NANNY looking for work, full time. 20 years experience, excellent references. HHA certified for 6 years. Please call 516-2361711

CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE CAREERS Start here. Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866296-7093 -DO YOU HAVE A SERVICE to advertise? Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 2948935 for rates and information.

AUTOMOTIVE

SALES RALLYE LEXUS

(Glen Cove)

has career opptys for EXPERIENCED Sales Representatives

(Lexus preferred). Come work for the longest running “Elite of Lexus” dealer on Long Island. Are you ready to improve your quality of life, spend more time with your family & make more money? Become part of the Rallye Lexus Team! Please call 516-393-8040

or email careers@rallye.com to arrange an interview. EOE


EMPLOYMENT

MARKETPLACE

CAREER TRAINING MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING CAREER TRAINING at Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers Call 1-888-5359909 or click learn.sctrain.edu Financial aid available to those who qualify. sctrain.edu​/​disclosures

ANNOUNCEMENTS CONVENTIONAL & BANK RATE FINANCING, Fix’n Flips, Hard-Bridge Loans, No Documents-Stated Income Programs, $100K-$100 Million, Purchase-Refinance, SFH-1-4, Multi-family, Mixed Use, Commercial. 888-565-9477

MARKETPLACE EXERCISE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Elliptical Sole e95 $1,100 Powertec adjustable Workout Bench w/ leg and bicep attachments, Olympic and bicep bar and assortment of weights $900 Speedbag setup $100 Call 516-659-0665 INVITED SALES BY TRACY JORDAN Consignment Shoppe and Auction House Open 7 Days a Week Consignments by Appointment Monthly Live & Online Auctions Tag Sale, Appraisals and Estate Sale Services Complete House Cleanouts Moving Services Home Staging Services 839 Stewart Avenue Garden City, NY 11530 516-279-6378 www.invitedsales.com OFFICE FURNITURE SALE Saturday, February 18th 9am to 12noon 1050 Franklin Ave, Suite 304 Garden City, NY 11530 Selling contents of 3,000 sq. ft. professional office. File Cabinets, secretarial stations, conference table and chairs, art work, etc. All in excellent to good condition. CASH ONLY

AARDVARK

AUTO BUYERS We Visit You. Top $$ Paid or donate/tax ded. CALL 516-VAN-CARS LUKE 516-297-2277

Call 294.8935

D9

MARKETPLACE

PETS

AUTOMOTIVE

WANTED TO BUY

TAG SALE

PET SERVICES

AUTOS WANTED

LOOK! Old clocks and watches wanted by collector regardless of condition. Highest prices paid. 917-748-7225

INVITED SALES BY TRACY JORDAN Friday, February 24 9:30 am 835 Plum Tree West Westbury, NY 11590 Packed Basement, Packed Garage, Packed Attic!!! Tons of Art and Crafts, material, yard, paints, many many decorative items, tons of vintage items, furniture, wicker, bedroom dressers, table and chairs, living room furniture, tons of tools and garage items, a lot of clothing and costume jewelry..Visit www.invitedsales.com for pictures and details !

LOOKING TO BUY! Oriental items, clothing, art, old & modern furniture, estates, jewelry, silver, glassware, dishes, old photos, coins & stamps, flatware. Call George 718-3861104 or 917-775-3048 OLD TOOLS, toys, trains, coins, antiques, sterling, costume jewelry. Pleasant and courteous treatment. In business over 54 years. Immediate payment. Immediate removal. 347-256-7981 TOP CASH PAID: JEWELRY, Furniture, Art, etc. Please call 718-598-3045 or 516-270-2128. www.iBuyAntiquesNYC.com

TAG SALE *BROWSE *SHOP *CONSIGN A.T. STEWART EXCHANGE CONSIGNMENT SHOP China, Silver, Crystal, Jewelry, Artwork, Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles Tues-Fri 10-4 Sat 12-4 Every Tuesday: 10% Senior Citizen Discount. All proceeds benefit The Garden City Historical Society 109 Eleventh Street Garden City 11530 516-746-8900 email: store@atstewartexchange.org www.gardencityhistoricalsociety. org GARDEN CITY MOVING Saturday, 2/18 12noon to 4pm 146 Kensington Road Selling contents of home including antiques, knick-knacks, furniture and power tools. No reasonable offer refused.

GRANDPARENTS - Send in your grandchildren’s photos and enter our “World’s Most Beautiful Grandchildren” contest. Just send a photo and a brief description of the child (or children) along with your name and address to: Litmor Publications, Beautiful Grandchildren Contest, 81 East Barclay St., Hicksville N.Y. 11801. We’ll do the rest!

PETS PET SERVICES A GARDEN CITY ANIMAL LOVER doesn’t want to leave your precious pooch or fantastic feline alone all day. I’m reliable, dependable and will walk and feed your pet while you work or travel. Please call Cheryl at 516-505-9717 DO YOU HATE KENNELS? OR STRANGERS IN YOUR HOUSE? HOME AWAY FROM HOME will care for your dog in my Garden City home while you are away. Dog walking also available. Pet CPR & first Aid Certified. Numerous referrals and references. Limited availability. Book early! Annmarie 516-775-4256

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

MYA’S K9 CAMP Full Service Pet Care Professional Dog Training Grooming Boarding Walking GC Resident 516-382-5553

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO FOR SALE HONDA PILOT EX 2010: 4WD, 89,250 miles, good condition. $11,250. 516-263-0598

ALL CARS We pay over scrap prices on most cars. Any year, Any cond. Serving Nass & Suff C A S H PA I D 7 Day Pick-Up

631-697-8345

ABE BUYS ANTIQUES

Silver, Paintings, Rugs, All furniture, till 1960. Estates & all contents from homes! Looking for antiques & Modern Designer Names also, Lucite & Chrome, Iron Garden furniture.

7 18-332-9709

DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefitting Make-a-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 631-317-2014 Today!

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT APARTMENT FOR RENT

FOR RENT BY OWNER: FLORAL PARK VILLAGE 2nd floor apartment- completely renovated 2 BRM /1 Bath. includes EIK with SS appliances, granite counter and D/W. Large MBRM with W/I closet. Hardwood floors thru-out + Laundry room with W/D and 1 car garage, near shops and LIRR. Asking $2150 +utilities. For more information: Call Rose @ 516 655-7501 GARDEN CITY BORDER APARTMENT: Spacious, bright 1 bedroom with dining area + outdoor balcony, gated parking, laundry, A/C, hardwood floors. NO BROKER FEE, near LIRR. $1,500 + electric. ALSO Studio, $1,275.00 Available approximately March 1. www.gcbapts. com or 516-742-1101

FREE JUNK CAR REMOVAL $ We Pay CASH

$$

718-835-2664

CA$H IN A FLASH $500 TAX DEDUCTIBLE Mention This Ad RECEIVE CASH Plus IRS Tax Deductions

LATE 19th CENTURY GAS CHANDELIER

refurbished and electrified by Conant Custom Brass of Burlington, Vermont. 45 inches high by 25 inches wide, perfect for large entry ways or high ceiling dining rooms. Original price was $17,000 $5,000 asking price or best offer. (516) 314-4480

Friday, February 17, 2017 Classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS


Classifieds Friday, February 17, 2017

D10

CLASSIFIEDS

Call 294.8935

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

APARTMENT FOR RENT

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

GARDEN CITY FOR SALE BY OWNER Quiet block. Northeast Section. 3 BR, everything renovated. SD#18. Call for pricing and appointments. NO BROKERS. 516-456-3135

SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA (EAST COAST) Beach Cove is an Age Restricted Community where friends are easily made. Sebastian is an “Old Florida” fishing village with a quaint atmosphere yet excellent medical facilities, shopping and restaurants. Direct flights from Newark to Vero Beach. New manufactured homes from 89,900. 772581-0080; www.beach-cove.com

GARDEN CITY New EIK & tiled Bath, One Bedroom, LR​/​DR combo, wood floors, elevator, doorman. $2,400

GARDEN CITY 3 Beds, 1.5 Baths, Bright Colonial on quiet block. Close to LIRR and Homestead School. Wood Floors and Stainless Steel appliances. $3,800​/​month. Contact: Jon 718-664-8702

GARDEN CITY STUNNING TUDOR CENTER HALL COLONIAL 107 Chestnut Street 6 Bedrooms/5 Baths. Family Room w/French Doors to Patio, Landscaped Backyard. Sunroom, Stainless​/​Granite Eat in Kitchen, Large DR, LR w/ Fireplace, Master Bedroom w/ Bath. 4 BR on Second Floor. Third Floor: 2 BR​ /​ Full Bath. Finished Basement w/Storage. Hardwood Floors​ / ​ M oulding Throughout. Fully Alarmed, Sprinkler, Detached Garage. Garden City Schools. A Must See!!! $1,375,000. Call 516-526-7193

OFFICE SPACE

LOTS FOR SALE

GARDEN CITY Single Window Corner Office Overlooking Franklin Avenue, approximately 16’5” x 14’. Perfect for Psychologist, Therapist, CPA, Attorney or other professional. ELEVATOR, shared waiting area, kitchen, WiFi, Unlimited use Conference Room. $1500​/​month Tom 516-877-7410 ext 101

LENDER ORDERED SALE! 39 acres $89,900. Assessed for $96,000! Pay CASH and pay just $84,900! Catskill Mtn setting w/ view, woods, spring, stonewalls! Stunning land! Financing available! 888-479-3394 newyorklandandlakes.com

Sunny​—​Quiet 3 rooms; 1 Bedroom, EIK, LR​/​DR combo, parking included. Occupancy open. $2,300 Garden City Properties 516-746-1563 / 516-313-8504

HOMES FOR RENT

VACATION RENTAL SOUTH JAMESPORT SUMMER RENTAL Newly renovated, on Peconic Bay, sandy beach. 3 BR, 2 Bath, all amenities, sleeps 6. Single family, no pets, no smokers. $14,000​ / ​ m onth + security. Call 516-456-8808

GET RESULTS! Place an ad in our Classifieds for reasonable rates and prompt results. Call the G.C. office at 294-8935 for more information.

SMITHTOWN L.I. Excl: 3-Story Office Bldg. 18k SF Gross plus Parking. 85% Occupied. Nr LIRR, Rte. 25 Proj 6%+ cap rate. $2.7M Ron @ BESEN

646-424-5317

OUT OF TOWN REAL ESTATE JUST REPOSSESSED! 21 acres​—​$39,900. Orig sold for $49,900! Fields, woods, exceptional views! Just off the Thruway! 30 mins to Albany! Terms avail. Call 888-905-8847

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

REAL ESTATE WANTED

HOMES WANTED GARDEN CITY: Retired couple sold larger home seeks to purchase Ranch or Cape Cod in Village. Please call: 516-747-1024

SERVICES NEW YORK MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPISTS: Joan Atwood, Ph.D. An experienced therapist makes all the difference. Individual, couple, family therapy and anger management. 516-764-2526. jatwood@optonline.net www.NYMFT.com TAX & ACCOUNTING: Winnie Malone, CPA, MBA. Smart Allied Accounting & Tax Services. Individual & Business Taxes. Tax Problems Resolved, Financial Statements. Year-Round Accounting. Bookkeeping & Payroll. 516-626-0711. www.smartallied.com. winnie@smartallied. com

HOME IMPROVEMENTS AMBIANCE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES *Handyman & Remodeling *Kitchen Installations *Furniture Assembly *Finish Carpentry *Minor Electrical & Plumbing 23year GC Resident Lic & Ins H18E2170000 Call BOB 516-741-2154

SERVICES

SERVICES

LAMPS FIXED $65 In home service. Handy Howard. 646-996-7628

TUTORING

PAINTING & PAPERHANGING INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING Plastering, Taping, Sheetrock Skim Cutting, Old Wood Refinish Staining, Wallpaper Removal & Hanging, Paint Removal Power Washing, Wood Replacement JOHN MIGLIACCIO Licensed & Insured #80422100000 Call John anytime: 516-901-9398 (Cell) 516-483-3669 (Office) JV PAINT HANDYMAN SERVICES Interior-Exterior Specialist Painting, Wallpapering, Plastering, Spackling, Staining, Power Washing. Nassau Lic#H3814310000 fully Insured Call John 516-741-5378

PARTY HELP LADIES & GENTLEMEN RELAX & ENJOY Your Next Party! Catering and Experienced Professional Services for Assisting with Preparation, Serving and Clean Up Before, During and After Your Party Bartenders Available. Call Kate at 516-248-1545

CHEMISTRY TUTOR: Call Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D. AP, SAT II, Regents. I also tutor Biology, Physics, Earth & Environmental Science. itutorchem@gmail.com or 516669-0587 ENGLISH TUTOR: Diane Gottlieb M.Ed., M.S.W. SAT​ /​ ACT, College Essays, AP, Regents, ELA Test Prep, Reading comprehension and writing proficiency. 917-599-8007 or email: dianegot@gmail.com LongIslandEnglishTutor.com Providing one-on-one professional support to build confidence, knowledge and skills in every student. MATH, SAT, ACT TUTOR: Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2 plus Trig, Pre-Calc, AP Calculus. Norm 625-3314 ENGLISH, ACT, SAT TUTOR: 25+ year experience Critical Reading, Writing, Grammar, Essays. Lynne 625-3314 SPANISH TUTOR: Spanish Grammar-Literature, FLACS A -FLACS B, Exam Preparation​ /​ Comps. William Cullen, M.A., Spanish, S.D.A. Chaminade HS, Fairfield University Alumnus. 516-509-8174. wdctutor06@aol. com. References furnished upon request.

GET RESULTS! Place an ad in our Classifieds for reasonable rates and prompt results. Call the G.C. office at 294-8935 for more information.


SERVICES

SERVICES

INSTRUCTION

OLD VILLAGE TREE SERVICE: Owner operated since 1989. 24 hour emergency service. Licensed​/​insured. Free estimates, member LI Arborist Assoc. Please call 516-466-9220

BASEBALL INSTRUCTION Top rated on Long Island New York State Certified Go to: coachup.com​/​coaches​/​johns-22 for reviews and info. PIANO LESSONS By Ira Baslow. Experience the joy of playing the piano. Private lessons in your home, free no-obligation piano lesson, all levels, all styles, all ages. Beginners a specialty. 516-312-1054 www.iwantmypianolessons.com

CLEANING MARIA’S CLEANING SERVICE Our excellent cleaning team will get your home or office spotless! Available Monday thru Friday 7am to 6pm Supplies provided if needed Own transportation Excellent references provided CALL 516-849-2026 STRONG ARM CLEANING: Residential and commercial cleaning specialist, post construction clean ups, shipping and waxing floors, move ins and move outs. Free estimates. Bonded and insured. 516-5381125 www.strongarmcleaningny.com

SERVICES A & J MOVING & STORAGE: Established 1971. Long Island and New York State specialists. Residential, Commercial, Piano & Organ experts. Boxes available. Free estimates. www. ajmoving.com 516-741-2657 114 Jericho Tpk, Mineola NYDOT# 10405 COLLEGE ARTS ADMISSIONS: College Counseling in the Visual and Performing Arts. Dance, Musical Theatre & Drama. Film, Instrumental & Vocal Music. Audio Recording & Production. Theatre Technology & Production. Visual & Graphic Arts. Resume, Essays, Repertoire Lists. Michele Zimmerman. 516-353-6255 CollegeArtsAdmissions@gmail.com www.CollegeArtsAdmissions. com COMPLETE JUNK REMOVAL​/​DEMOLITION SERVICE: Strong Arm Contracting Inc. We haul anything and everything. Entire contents of home or office. We clean it up and take it away. Residential​/​Commercial. Bonded​/​Insured. Free estimates. 516-538-1125

OVERWHELMED by inefficient use of living space? Drowning in an ocean of paperwork? We create order out of Chaos. Free Consultation. Neat Freaks Lisa Marx and Randi Yerman. 917-751-0395 www.neatfreaks1976.com Instagram:organizethisnthat PSYCHOTHERAPY: Efrat Fridman, LCSW. Individual, couple and family therapy. effiefrid@gmail.com 2 Pinetree Lane, Old Westbury, NY 11568. 516-224-7670 or 225 West 35th Street, NY 10001 718-887-4400

Our Service

Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935

for rates and information.

Call 294.8935

D11

Cat Lovers Needed

Our Last Hope adoption venue at PetSmart on Route 110, Huntington Station currently has openings for volunteers who are able to cover morning and evening cleaning/feeding shifts as well as midday meet/greet ones. If you enjoy interacting with and helping cats, this is the perfect volunteer job for you! During the year, we have friendly adult cats and kittens that are in our adoption center, eagerly awaiting their forever homes. If you’re interested in helping our furry felines, please email Lauren at lasthopepetsmartvolunteers@gmail.com Our main adoption center is located at 3300 Beltagh Avenue, Wantagh. Please visit our web site – http://lasthopeanimalrescue.org to read more about our organization and to see photos and information about all of our fabulous felines who are waiting in our various venues for loving families of their own.

Friday, February 17, 2017 Classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS

Last Hope receives grant to provide free “Trap, Neuter, Release” vouchers

Last Hope thanks PET PEEVES (with our collective cat-loving heart) for a generous $12,000 grant so we can offer the public FREE TNR spay/neuter vouchers for feral cats from Feb.13 to May 1. This grant allows us to be proactive in an attempt to lessen the upcoming kitten season by altering cats before females get pregnant. We’re trying to “Beat the Heat”. The PET PEEVES funds will help Last Hope to spay/neuter at least 200 cats. Cat caretakers can apply for the FREE vouchers, beginning Mon, Feb. 13 at the link below on the Last Hope

website: http://lasthopeanimalrescue.org/fix-a-feral/ After May 1, we will be resuming our regular FIX-A-FERAL program with discounted TNR vouchers at our participating vets. Feral cats are our community “shadow” citizens, so often ignored and tormented. PET PEEVES an advocacy organization for local animal rescues truly is “The Voice of Long Island Pets”. http://petpeeves.org/ Last Hope is so GRATEFUL to PET PEEVES for their continued support of our rescue efforts.


Friday, February 17, 2017

D12


SERVICE DIRECTORY 

13 Friday,February 17, 2017

MOVING SERVICE

Call 294.8935

TREE SERVICE

CLEANING RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL

Serving the community for over 40 yrs

BRIAN CLINTON

MOVERS

One Piece to a Household/ Household Rearranging FREE ESTIMATES

333-5894

Owner Supervised

Licensed & Insured Licensed #T-11154 175 Maple Ave. Westbury, NY 11590

CARPENTRY

MOVERS

SWEENEY CUSTOM CARPENTRY and PAINTING

Renovations Custom Closets Sheetrock Repairs Interior/Exterior

New Doors New Windows New Moldings Free Estimates

26

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

HOME HEATING OIL

CONSTRUCTION

ACPM CONSTRUCTION CORP RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

ALL TYPES OF MASONRY Concrete • Bluestone • Pavers • Cultured Stones Blacktop • Patios • Stoops LICENSED & INSURED OFFICE 516-328-9089

LIC#1829730220 FAX 516-775-9036

Save 5¢ per gallon

by visiting mysageoil.com and entering promo code SAGE5 at checkout.

516-485-3900

ANTIQUES

LANDSCAPE SERVISES

ADVERTISE

YOUR SERVICE HERE Call 294.8935 For Rates and Information

234099-1

Free Estimates • References Family Owned and Operated • 35 years in business

Sage Oil Services, Inc. “Serving Long Island since 1922”

To schedule a FREE estimate, contact us today! • Complete Landscape Maintenance • Mulch Installation • Seasonal Floral Displays • Landscape Installation • Lawn, Tree & Shrub Fertilization • Plant Health Care Programs • Tree Pruning, Cabling & Bracing • Tree Removal & Stump Grinding • Storm Damage Clean-up • Tree & Landscape Consultations Licenced & Insured

(516) 481-8800

ContactUs@HarderServicesInc.com Visit our website for more information: www.HarderServicesInc.com

Members of TCIA, PLANET & OSHA Compliant


Friday, February 17, 2017

14

SERVICE DIRECTORY  PAINTING/POWER WASHING

SWEENEY PAINTING and CARPENTRY

Interior B. Moore Paints Dustless Vac System Renovations

Exterior Power Washing Rotted Wood Fixed Staining

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000

DEMO/JUNK REMOVAL

Call 294.8935 PAINTING/POWER WASHING

PAINTING & WALLPAPER est. 1978

Interior and Exterior • Plaster/Spackle Light Carpentry • Decorative Moldings Power Washing www.MpaintingCo.com 516-385-3132 New Hyde Park

516-328-7499 Licensed & Insured

ROOFING

“PAULIE THE ROOFER” - Stopping Leaks My Specialty -

• Slate & Tile Specialists • All Types of Roofing LIC & INSD “MANY LOCAL REFERENCES”

(516) 621-3869

HOME/OFFICE ORGANIZER

Overwhelmed by inefficient use of living space? Drowning in an ocean of paperwork? We Create Order Out Of Chaos.

ADVERTISE

YOUR SERVICE HERE Call 294.8935

For a Free Consultation call Lisa Marx and Randi Yerman

917.751.0395 www.neatfreaks1976.com Instagram: organizethisnthat

HOME IMPROVEMENT

classicrenovator.com

BBB & Angies List (A+) Rating Crown Moldings, Wainscot/Recessed Panels, Coffered Ceilings Nassau Lic#H38110500000

Suffolk Lic# 43882-H

516.921.0494 classicrenovator.com HOME IMPROVEMENTS

TREE SERVICE

For Rates and Information


Call 294.8935

Call 294-8935 and let us begin listing you in our Professional Guide and Professional Services pages. Deadline is Monday, 12 Noon COMPUTER SPECIALIST

ELDER CARE

COLLEGE COUNSELING

Joan D. Atwood, Ph.D.

New York Marriage and Family Therapists An experienced therapist makes all the difference Individual, Couple, and Family Therapy and Anger Management

516 764 2526

jatwood@optonline.net • http://www.NYMFT.Com 542 Lakeview Avenue Rockville Centre, NY

HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT

FAMILY THERAPIST

SUSAN MURPHY, LCSW 111 Seventh Street, Suite #111 Garden City, New York 11530

SUSAN MURPHY, LCSW Individual and Family Therapist Child • Teen • Adult

(908) 868-5757 SMurphy824@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL

Marion Cohen

Real Estate Salesperson, CBR "Your agent, your neighbor"

350 Main St., Port Washington, NY 11050 cell: 917.434.2941 o: 516.883.2900 ext. 312 Email: marioncohen@danielgale.com Web: marioncohen.danielgale.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity

CHEMISTRY TUTOR

Family Care Connections,® LLC Dr. Ann Marie D’Angelo, PMHCNS-BC Doctor of Nursing Practice

19 West 34th St. New York, NY

101 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY

LAW

D’Angelo Law Associates, PC Frank G. D’Angelo, Esq.

Advanced Practice Nurse Care Manager Assistance with Aging at Home / Care Coordination Nursing Home & Assisted Living Placement PRI / Screens / Mini Mental Status Exams 901 Stewart Ave., Suite 230, Garden City, NY 11530

Elder Law Wills & Trusts Medical Planning Estate Planning Probate & Estate Administration / Litigation 901 Stewart Avenue, Suite 230 Garden City, NY 11530

WWW.DRANNMARIEDANGELO.COM

WWW.DANGELOLAWASSOCIATES.COM

PSYCHOTHERAPY

PSYCHOTHERAPY/WOMEN’S GROUPS

(516) 248-9323

Efrat Fridman, Individual, couple and family therapy

LCSW

PSYCHOTHERAPY

effiefrid@gmail.com 516-224-7670 2 Pinetree Lane Old Westbury NY 11568

718-887-4400 225 W. 35th St. New York, NY 10001

SPANISH TUDOR

(516) 222-1122

Sandra Lafazan, LCSW Psychotherapist

Individual, Couple & Family Counseling Women’s Groups SLafazan@Hotmail.com 516-375-3897

Woodbury By Appointment

TUTORING

SPANISH TUTOR SPANISH GRAMMAR/LITERATURE call

Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D.

669-0587 itutorchem@gmail.com (516)

AP • SAT II Regents

I also tutor:

biology, physics, earth & envi. sci.

NorthShoreAcademics.weebly.com

TUTORING

FLACS A - FLACS B/ Intensive Review of prior exams. This includes: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading and Writing

William Cullen,

M.A., SPANISH, S.D.A.

Chaminade HS / Fairfield University Alumnus

516-509-8174 / wdctutor06@aol.com References furnished on request

TAX AND ACCOUNTING

TAX PREPARER

TAX PREPARATION IRS & NYS REGISTERED TAX PREPARER Individual & Small Business Returns

We Make House Calls! • 25+ years experience • Available all year • Appointments 7 days

New client 10% discount

Maria Passariello 516-984-3328 • mptax1040@gmail.com

AN OPPORTUNITY...

ADVERTISE

YOUR SERVICE HERE Call 294.8935 For Rates and Information

Each week Litmor Publication’s Professional Guide and Professional Directory publishes the ads of providers of professional services. A 6 week agreement brings your specialty or service to the attention of the public in a public service format. Let us begin listing you in our Next Issue. For More Information and rates call

516.294.8935

15 Friday,February 17, 2017

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE 


Friday,February 17, 2017

16 NOTICE OF SALE Supreme Court County Of Nassau The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS, Inc., CHL Mortgage Pass-Through Trust 200530, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-30, Plaintiff AGAINST Steven Hershkowitz, Evelyn Hershkowitz, et al, Defendant Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/16/2016 and entered on 10/3/2016, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at public auction at the Courtroom of the Supreme Court Mineola, 100 Supreme Court Drive, The Calendar Control Part (CCP), Mineola, NY on February 21, 2017 at 11:30 AM premises known as 23 Eaton Road Syosset, NY 11791. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Nassau, State of New York, SECTION: 12, BLOCK: 358, LOT: 47. Approximate amount of judgment is $842,895.34 plus interests and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 013812/2012. Justin B. Perri, Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON LLP 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 SYO 4018 4X 01/20, 27, 02/03,10 SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU EMIGRANT BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH EMIGRANT SAVINGS BANK-LONG ISLAND, Plaintiff -against- GAYLE ASCHENBRENNER, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein on January 29, 2016, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at (CCP) Calendar Control Part Court Room of the Nassau Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Dr., Mineola, NY on February 28, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being at Woodbury, Town of Oyster Bay, County of Nassau and State of New York, known and designated as Section 15 Block 175 and Lot 67. Said premises known as 22 ROSEANNE DRIVE A/K/A 22

LEGAL NOTICES ROSANNE DRIVE, WOODBURY, NY Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment and Terms of Sale. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Index Number 015291/2013. KEITH BROWN, ESQ., Referee STAGG, TERENZI, CONFUSIONE & WABNIK, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 401 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300, Garden City, NY 11530 SYO 4019 4x 01/27,02/03,10,17 SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU EMIGRANT SAVINGS BANK-LONG ISLAND Plaintiff -against- ADELAIDE DEWHURST RICKERT a/k/a ADELAIDE RICKERT and MARIANNE MANSOOR,, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein and dated January 8, 2014, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at (CCP) Calendar Control Part Court Room of the Nassau Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Dr., Mineola, NY on March 7, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Incorporated Village of Oyster Bay Cove, Town of Oyster Bay, County of Nassau and State of New York; known and designated as Section: 27 Block: D Lots: 30 & 31. Said premises known as 30 COVE WOODS ROAD, OYSTER BAY, NY Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment and Terms of Sale. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Index Number 22826/2010. RALPH MADALENA, ESQ., Referee STAGG, TERENZI, CONFUSIONE & WABNIK, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 401 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300, Garden City, NY 11530 SYO 4020 4X 02/03,10,17,24 NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURTCOUNTY OF NASSAU US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SASCO MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-WF1, Plaintiff, AGAINST GERLANDO BASILE, ANNA

BASILE, et al. Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly entered September 27, 2016 I the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the CCP (Calendar Control Part Courtroom) in the Nassau Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Drive, Mineola, NY 11501 on March 21, 2017 at 11:30 AM premises known as 139 COLD SPRING ROAD, SYOSSET, NY 11791 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being at Syosset, in the Town of Oyster Bay, County of Nassau and State of New York. Section 25, Block 23 and Lot 25 Approximate amount of judgment $1,030,875.40 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment. Index #7315/08 THOMAS A. DEMARIA, ESQ., Referee, Aldridge Pite, LLP - Attorneys for Plaintiff – 40 Marcus Drive, Suite 200, Melville, NY 11747 SYO 4022 4X 02/17,24,03/03,10

PUBLIC NOTICE OF COUNTY TREASURER’S SALE OF TAX LIENS ON REAL ESTATE Notice is hereby given that I shall on February 21, 2017, and the succeeding days, beginning at 10:00 o’ clock in the morning in the Legislative Chamber, First Floor, Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building, 1550 Franklin Avenue, Mineola, Nassau County, New York, sell at public auction the tax liens on real estate herein-after described, unless the owner, mortgagee, occupant of or any other party-ininterest in such real estate shall pay to the County Treasurer by February 17, 2017 the total amount of such unpaid taxes or assessments with the interest, penalties and other expenses and charges, against the property. Such tax liens will be sold at the lowest rate of interest, not exceeding 10 per cent per six month’s period, for which any person or persons shall offer to take the total amount of such unpaid taxes as defined in section 5-37.0 of the Nassau County Administrative Code. Effective with the February, 2016 lien sale Ordinance No. 1752015 requires a $125.00 per day registration fee for each person who intends to bid at the tax lien sale. Ordinance No. 175-2015 also requires that upon the issuance of the Lien Certificate there is due from the lien buyer a Tax Certificate Issue Fee of $20.00 per lien purchased. The liens are for arrears of School District taxes for the year 2015 2016 and/or County, Town, and

Special District taxes for the year 2016. The following is a partial listing of the real estate located in school district number(s) 13, 11, 12 in the Town of Oyster Bay only, upon which tax liens are to be sold, with a brief description of the same by reference to the County Land and Tax Map, the name of the owner or occupant as the same appears on the 2017/2018 tentative assessment roll, and the total amount of such unpaid taxes.

IMPORTANT

THE NAMES OF OWNERS SHOWN ON THIS LIST MAY NOT NECESSARILY BE THE NAMES OF THE PERSONS OWNING THE PROPERTY AT THE TIME OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT. SUCH NAMES HAVE BEEN TAKEN FROM THE 2017/2018 TENTATIVE ASSESSMENT ROLLS AND MAY DIFFER FROM THE NAMES OF THE OWNERS AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. IT MAY ALSO BE THAT SUCH OWNERS ARE NOMINAL ONLY AND ANOTHER PERSON IS ACTUALLY THE BENEFICIAL OWNER. Town of Oyster Bay School:11 Cold Spring Harbor CSD Name Amount Parcel Group Lot FERNANDES CRISTINA & PAUL JASON 4,131.13 14014 00230 WENOF CALIXTA & MICHAEL 12,314.56 14025 00020 DAVIDSON JONATHAN & AMY 2,997.28 14027 00220 BOYLE WILLIAM J & MARY 13,985.16 25048 00130 STARR MARISA 44,646.30 25063 00210 21-22 KALIMIAN ALBERT 72,354.40 25063 00570 E & B REALTY INC 10,872.52 26 C 20950 2095 GLENN THOMAS A & MARY N 1,481.89 26002 00470 Town of Oyster Bay School:12 Syosset Name Amount Parcel Group Lot KREBS FAMILY L L C 32,305.54 15 A 00810 BRODERICK JOHN J & JANE 8,714.51 15 F 13810 FOKAS DEMETRIOS 15,630.36 15005 00560 UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE 414.99 15006 00720 72-79,81,92 MEROLA FRANK 14,084.26 15012 01180 ALAIA GERALD 7,077.98 15016 01600 LAMENDOLA GIOVANNI & ANNA 5,634.40 15075 00190 GAISER GLORIA A LIFE ESTATE 15,934.20 15083 00060 VIDAL JULIO & LISA 2,210.42

15085 00140 FELDSTEIN EDWARD & AMY 11,009.43 15089 00120 12,23 MERCHANT IQBAL 6,514.31 15089 00240 CHAN RITA 16,468.65 15103 00060 XI HOLDINGS INC 15,738.25 15105 00050 TANG YIDA 4,288.58 15105 00180 ECKSTEIN MATTHEW E & CINDY A 51,757.07 25 C0110580 DURST JOHN E & STEPHANIE 62,321.23 25 C0110590 BRUNET LUELLA RUSSO & PETER 3,240.67 25 C0111080 ROSSILLO JOHN, JOSEPH, LAURA, MICH 21,523.78 25002 01550 155 FOXTEIRA REALTY LLC 15,079.29 25009 00060 6 L & L ASSOC HOLDING CORP 37,363.55 25019 00100 PAPALARDO TR NEIL M & JOYE 22,895.42 25024 00060 PEPER REINHOLD & ANNELOTTE 2,836.16 25026 00260 BIRD HERSCHEL & NANCY 2,415.71 25026 00270 CHEN XIU HUI & TIAN JI YAN 30,467.32 25040 00010 Town of Oyster Bay School:12 Syosset Name Amount Parcel Group Lot PANICO JASON & ALYCE 26,030.63 25041 00150 ALLADIN RE HOLDINGS LLC 34,109.74 25051 00080 LEE ROSA 25,726.70 25053 01170 117 GOODMAN FREDRIC & NANCY 7,473.27 25053 01180 118 CHAN CALTON & JOANNA 47,978.02 25057 00160 SILVER MELISSA 24,757.05 25058 00270 27-28 DRUCH ANDREW & KIMBERLY MATHIS 39,692.68 25058 01050 SLADE SCOTT & JENNIFER 8,538.17 25062 00130 Town of Oyster Bay School:13 Woodbury Name Amount Parcel Group Lot PIKOUNIS DESPINA 9,061.09 12350 00190 RETAINED REALTY INC 9,977.44 12395 00010 KANE AUDREY A LIFE ESTATE 2,018.75 12396 00200 STRAUSS ALLEN& SHAPIRO RANDI 11,868.47


17 12397 00090 MCGANNON A PINHEIRO & L 5,803.92 12400 00210 EDWARDS RICHARD 2,884.22 12432 00240 NEWMAN HOWARD & LISA 3,746.62 12433 00130 GURRIERI GRACE 9,119.68 12455 00130 JURMAN JEROME & SONDRA 8,743.97 12455 00700 SPINNER LAWRENCE & R 16,183.65 12500 00330 BONILLA JOHN & MERCEDES 10,067.40 12501 00210 PORTER ROBERT & JOYCE 23,641.70 12503 00100 VAILLANT TRUST 3,453.96 12525 00100 TRUST F/B/O FEINZIG NOEL 8,160.50 12529 00070 WENDT WARREN & JULIE 13,469.59 12604 00020 GREENE JEFFREY & LISA 2,961.63 13 C 0163UCA00350 163 CA 35 UNIT 72 GOTTESMAN AARON & LORAYNE 2,775.98 13 C 0163UCA00350 163 CA 35 UNIT 124 ZHENG MEI YING & TING JIAN 38,331.18 13073 00330 QURESHI FAHIM U TRUST 4,558.42 13081 00030 BICK JACK & SHIRLEY 72,107.65 13081 00110 PRESTO JOSEPH & MARIE 9,602.43 13096 00130 MARINO DONNA 5,191.81 13113 00050 MARGOLIES ALAN & ELYSE 30,049.72 13114 0001UCA01510 1 CA 151 UNIT 50 COHEN ANDREA 32,594.10 13114 0001UCA01510 1 CA 151 UNIT 80 Town of Oyster Bay School:13 Woodbury Name Amount Parcel Group Lot JAFFER ALI HUSSAIN & NASREEN 53,090.99 13115 00080 CASSANDRO ROBERT & TRACY 60,942.69 13115 00100 DUNN FAMILY PARTNERSHIP L P 1,089.24 14 B 00100 VALENTINO VINCENT 21,036.84 14 D 06240 MARGULEFSKY COREY & LISA 52,074.16 14 D 06560 LAMBERTI MARY 12,071.97 14 D 06710 STILLO JOSEPH & DEBORAH 46,378.95

14 D 07100 ELLIOTT REBECCA 17,029.65 14 E 00440 DESTINY DEVELOPERS LLC 30,484.09 14 E 01500 WOODBURY HILLS INC 35,817.13 14 E 08230 ELLIOT REBECCA 21,977.01 14 E 11530 SCHACHTER BRUCE & LYNN 3,688.14 14023 00060 TOBIN EDMUND & E 11,486.17 14024 00360 OHARE DANIEL T 14,784.12 14031 00090 300 WOODBURY RD LLC 12,765.98 14038 00190 ASCHENBRENNER GAYLE 27,964.00 15175 00670 67 BIVONA FRANCES R 19,902.95 15188 00150 WITT ROWLAND & DOLORES 26,148.33 15192 00040 STEIGER MARION 23,628.30 15198 0028UCA01110 28 CA 111 UNIT 11 HAYNES LAWRENCE & AMY 17,894.40 25044 00100 TERMS OF SALE Such tax liens shall be sold subject to any and all superior tax liens of sovereignties and other municipalities and to all claims of record which the County may have thereon and subject to the provisions of the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts. However, such tax liens shall have priority over the County’s Differential Interest Lien, representing the excess, if any, of the interest and penalty borne at the maximum rate over the interest and penalty borne at the rate at which the lien is purchased. The Purchaser acknowledges that the tax lien(s) sold pursuant to these Terms of Sale may be subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or may become subject to such proceedings which may be commenced during the period in which a tax lien is held by a successful bidder or the assignee of same, which may modify a Purchaser’s rights with respect to the lien(s) and the property securing same. Such bankruptcy proceedings shall not affect the validity of the tax lien. In addition to being subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts, said purchaser’s right of foreclosure may be affected by the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act(FIRREA),12 U.S.C. ss 1811 et.seq., with regard to real property under Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation(FDIC) receivership. The County Treasurer reserves the right, without further notice

and at any time, to withdraw from sale any of the parcels of land or premises herein listed. The Nassau County Treasurer reserves the right to intervene in any bankruptcy case/litigation where the property affected by the tax liens sold by the Treasurer is part of the bankruptcy estate. However,it is the sole responsibility of all tax lien purchasers to protect their legal interests in any bankruptcy case affecting their purchased tax lien, including but not limited to the filing of a proof of claim on their behalf, covering their investment in said tax lien. The Nassau County Treasurer and Nassau County and its agencies, assumes no responsibility for any legal representation of any tax lien purchaser in any legal proceeding including but not limited to a bankruptcy case where the purchased tax lien is at risk. The rate of interest and penalty at which any person purchases the tax lien shall be established by his bid. Each purchaser, immediately after the sale thereof, shall pay to the County Treasurer ten per cent of the amount for which the tax liens have been sold and the remaining ninety per cent within thirty days after such sale. If the purchaser at the tax sale shall fail to pay the remaining ninety per cent within ten days after he has been notified by the County Treasurer that the certificates of sale are ready for delivery, then all amounts deposited with the County Treasurer including but not limited to the ten per cent theretofore paid by him shall, without further notice or demand, be irrevocably forfeited by the purchaser and shall be retained by the County Treasurer as liquidated damages and the agreement to purchase shall be of no further effect. Time is of the essence in this sale. This sale is held pursuant to the Nassau County Administrative Code and interested parties are referred to such Code for additional information as to terms of the sale, rights of purchasers, maximum rates of interest and other legal incidents of the sale. This list includes only tax liens on real estate located in the Town of Oyster Bay. Such other tax liens on real estate are advertised as follows: Town of Hempstead Dist 1001 HEMPSTEAD/UNIONDALE TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW YORK TREND NEWSDAY UNIONDALE BEACON Dist 1002 HEMPSTEAD/UNIONDALE TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY UNIONDALE BEACON Dist 1003

EAST MEADOW BEACON EAST MEADOW HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY Dist 1004 BELLMORE HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY Dist 1005 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY Dist 1006 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SEAFORD HERALD CITIZEN WANTAGH HERALD CITIZEN Dist 1007 BELLMORE HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1008 BALDWIN HERALD BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Hempstead Dist 1009 BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE FREEPORT BALDWIN LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1010 BALDWIN HERALD BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1011 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OCEANSIDE TRIBUNE OCEANSIDE/ISLAND PARK HERALD Dist 1012 MALVERNE / WEST HEMPSTEAD HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Dist 1013 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM HERALD VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Dist 1014 FIVE TOWNS TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NASSAU HERALD (FIVE TOWNS) NEWSDAY Dist 1015 FIVE TOWNS JEWISH TIMES FIVE TOWNS TRIBUNE JEWISH STAR NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1016 FRANKLIN SQ / ELMONT HERALD FRANKLIN SQUARE BULLETIN

Friday, February 17, 2017

LEGAL NOTICES

NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Hempstead Dist 1017 FRANKLIN SQ/ELMONT HERALD FRANKLIN SQUARE BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY Dist 1018 GARDEN CITY LIFE GARDEN CITY NEWS GARDEN CITY TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1019 EAST ROCKAWAY TRIBUNE LYNBROOK/EAST ROCKAWAY HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROCKAWAY JOURNAL Dist 1020 LYNBROOK/EAST ROCKAWAY HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROCKVILLE CENTRE HERALD Dist 1021 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROCKVILLE CENTRE HERALD ROCKVILLE CENTRE TRIBUNE Dist 1022 FLORAL PARK BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY THE GATEWAY Dist 1023 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SEAFORD HERALD CITIZEN WANTAGH HERALD CITIZEN Dist 1024 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM HERALD VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Town of Hempstead Dist 1025 MERRICK HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1026 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1027 MALVERNE / WEST HEMPSTEAD HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WEST HEMPSTEAD BEACON Dist 1028 LONG BEACH HERALD LONG BEACH TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1029 MERRICK HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY


Friday,February 17, 2017

18

Dist 1030 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM HERALD VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Dist 1031 ISLAND PARK TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OCEANSIDE/ISLAND PARK HERALD Dist 1201 EAST MEADOW BEACON EAST MEADOW HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WESTBURY TIMES Dist 1205 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY WEST HEMPSTEAD BEACON Town of North Hempstead Dist 2001 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WESTBURY TIMES Dist 2002 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WILLISTON TIMES, WILLISTON PARK EDITION Dist 2003 MANHASSET PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROSLYN NEWS ROSLYN TIMES Dist 2004 MANHASSET TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PORT WASHINGTON NEWS Dist 2005 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK HERALD COURIER NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY Dist 2006 MANHASSET PRESS MANHASSET TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PORT WASHINGTON NEWS Dist 2007 GREAT NECK NEWS GREAT NECK RECORD JEWISH STAR NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 2009 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WILLISTON TIMES, WILLISTON PARK EDITION Town of North Hempstead Dist 2010 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY Dist 2011 MINEOLA AMERICAN

LEGAL NOTICES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WESTBURY TIMES Dist 2122 FLORAL PARK BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY THE GATEWAY Dist 2301 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 2315 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3001 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3002 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3003 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3004 LOCUST VALLEY LEADER LONG ISLAND PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3006 LOCUST VALLEY LEADER LONG ISLAND PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3008 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT OYSTER BAY GUARDIAN Dist 3009 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT OYSTER BAY GUARDIAN Dist 3011 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT SYOSSET ADVANCE Dist 3012 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET ADVANCE SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3013 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET ADVANCE SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3014 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3015 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE

NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3017 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS HICKSVILLE / LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3018 BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PLAINVIEW/OLD BETHPAGE HERALD Dist 3019 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PLAINVIEW/OLD BETHPAGE HERALD Dist 3020 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3021 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3022 FARMINGDALE OBSERVER MASSAPEQUA POST NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3023 MASSAPEQUA POST MASSAPEQUAN OBSERVER MID-ISLAND TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3024 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT GOLD COAST GAZETTE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3203 LONG ISLAND PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROSLYN NEWS ROSLYN TIMES Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3306 FARMINGDALE OBSERVER MASSAPEQUA POST MASSAPEQUAN OBSERVER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY City of Glen Cove Dist 4005 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT GOLD COAST GAZETTE LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY City of Long Beach Dist 5028 LONG BEACH HERALD LONG BEACH TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Nassau County does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to or access to, or treatment or employment in, its services, programs, or activities. Upon request, accommodations such as those required by the

Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) will be provided to enable individuals with disabilities to participate in all services, programs, activities and public hearings and events conducted by the Treasurer’s Office. Upon request, information can be made available in braille, large print, audio tape or other alternative formats. For additional information, please call 571-2090 Ext. 13715. Dated: February 16, 2017 THE NASSAU COUNTY TREASURER MINEOLA, NEW YORK

SYO 4023

LEGAL NOTICE SW BROTHERS LLC Articles of organization. Filed NY Sec. of State(SSNY) 10/24/2016. Office in Nassau County. SSNY design, agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to THE LLC 315 Oak Street, Uniondale, NY 11553 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. JNJ 7836 6X 02/03,10,17,24,03/03,10 NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust, N.A., Plaintiff AGAINST Rohit Bedi; et al., Defendant(s) Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated November 3, 2016 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction in the Calendar Control Part (CCP) 100 Supreme Court Drive, Mineola, New York, 11501 on March 7, 2017 at 11:30AM, premises known as 1639 Cedar Swamp Road, Brookville, NY 11545. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Incorporated Village of Upper Brookville, County of Nassau and State of NY, Section 18 Block A Lot 957 A & 957 B. Approximate amount of judgment $1,128,794.29 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 14-007763. Lisa Anne Leimbach-Gutman, Esq., Referee Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC Attorney(s) for the Plaintiff 175 Mile Crossing Boulevard Rochester, New York 14624 (877) 759-1835 Dated: January 11, 2017 JNJ 7837

4X 02/03,10,17,24

PUBLIC NOTICE OF COUNTY TREASURER’S SALE OF TAX LIENS ON REAL ESTATE Notice is hereby given that I shall on February 21, 2017, and the succeeding days, beginning at 10:00 o’ clock in the morning in the Legislative Chamber, First Floor, Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building, 1550 Franklin Avenue, Mineola, Nassau County, New York, sell at public auction the tax liens on real estate herein-after described, unless the owner, mortgagee, occupant of or any other party-ininterest in such real estate shall pay to the County Treasurer by February 17, 2017 the total amount of such unpaid taxes or assessments with the interest, penalties and other expenses and charges, against the property. Such tax liens will be sold at the lowest rate of interest, not exceeding 10 per cent per six month’s period, for which any person or persons shall offer to take the total amount of such unpaid taxes as defined in section 5-37.0 of the Nassau County Administrative Code. Effective with the February, 2016 lien sale Ordinance No. 175-2015 requires a $125.00 per day registration fee for each person who intends to bid at the tax lien sale. Ordinance No. 175-2015 also requires that upon the issuance of the Lien Certificate there is due from the lien buyer a Tax Certificate Issue Fee of $20.00 per lien purchased. The liens are for arrears of School District taxes for the year 2015 2016 and/or County, Town, and Special District taxes for the year 2016. The following is a partial listing of the real estate located in school district number(s) 13, 11, 12 in the Town of Oyster Bay only, upon which tax liens are to be sold, with a brief description of the same by reference to the County Land and Tax Map, the name of the owner or occupant as the same appears on the 2017/2018 tentative assessment roll, and the total amount of such unpaid taxes.

IMPORTANT

THE NAMES OF OWNERS SHOWN ON THIS LIST MAY NOT NECESSARILY BE THE NAMES OF THE PERSONS OWNING THE PROPERTY AT THE TIME OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT. SUCH NAMES HAVE BEEN TAKEN FROM THE 2017/2018 TENTATIVE ASSESSMENT ROLLS AND MAY DIFFER FROM THE NAMES OF THE OWNERS AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. IT MAY ALSO BE THAT SUCH OWNERS ARE NOMINAL ONLY AND ANOTHER PERSON IS ACTUALLY THE BENEFICIAL OWNER. Town of North Hempstead School:315 Jericho UFSD Name Amount Parcel Group Lot IANNIELLO MATTHEW J &


19 JACLYN P 22,640.06 19 D 01330 SUN HUI 10,717.63 19 D 01740 174 Town of Oyster Bay School:3 Brookville Name Amount Parcel Group Lot GELBARD DAVID & ANNABELLA 18,235.45 18 A 09800 WANG QIANG 15,908.64 18 A 0991B KHAWAJA AMJAD MASOOD & KATHLEEN 17,136.40 18003 00170 SIMON JACQUES TRUST 28,943.45 18005 00180 CALVARY WORLD MISSION CHURCH 28,284.97 22 G 03310 KOLENS ELLANE ELDER 42,993.66 22 J 02470 247,1003 BLASS MICHAEL S & KATHLEEN CURR 41,989.21 22 J 11500 LAVI PARVIZ 15,101.82 22027 0010B TABOADA PAUL E 705.69 22028 0022B 22B,23 GIOVANNIELLO SUSAN 265.69 22029 0005B BARBERA TR JOSEPH 4,772.60 23 B 04940 494 MOSTAFAVI HAMID & YOUSSEF REYHA 5,344.87 24 C 01210 MAZZEO MICHAEL & BETH L 22,305.52 24 C 01530 573 REMSEN LANE CORP 91,768.73 24 E 00210 KIA HASSAN 12,057.58 24 F 03180 BEHROOZ LLC 44,127.10 24018 00090 SONI OM P TRUST 5,950.82 24027 00050 Town of Oyster Bay School:14 Locust Grove Name Amount Parcel Group Lot BARBERA LE F BARBERA,FARA 27,277.12 12421 00170 DASH DEBORAH GOLDBAND & R 22,325.36 12422 00230 BENEVENTANO LE J TREBIG ETAL,C 9,303.16 12457 00060 ANTIOCH MISSIONARY CHURCH 1,927.20 12482 00010 1&5 GRIVAS LILIANA 13,741.44 12551 00210 GUREWICZ DAVID & ANNA 9,840.22 12577 00180 BLUM GEORGE & LILA 1,615.22 12584 00370 HIRA HARPAL SINGH 27,706.79 12631 00570 AHMED FAROOQ 13,692.30 15 A 23030

HOROWITZ SETH & STEFANI D 16,675.30 15 F 1445UCA00520 UNIT 62 CAMPANELLA LEWIS 4,619.04 15 F 1452UCA00530 UNIT 140 ONE 36 OAK DRIVE ASSOCIATES 17,138.16 15 G 00320 KEHOE WALTER J & KATHERINE E 10,628.36 15021 02840 284-286 SHRAVAH AASHEESH & DEEPA 4,891.53 15023 00700 WALIA GURPREET & GURLEEN 39,171.23 15053 00020 MEYER ANDREW JEROME & MARY V LI 12,329.56 15058 00040 BOTTO GABRIEL 19,564.10 15068 00030 MCARDLE VINCENT 4,547.96 15068 00250 I C HOMES INC 14,562.47 15074 00200 CONSTANCE CARDASSI 23,266.58 15090 00140 CHEGEO INC 12,527.75 15098 00010 CHA DANIEL & JANE 2,823.77 15098 00260 GRGAS JOSEPH & JELENA 4,594.27 15118 00260 CHEN SI YA & YANG XIAO MING 19,283.35 15128 00460 Town of Oyster Bay School:14 Locust Grove Name Amount Parcel Group Lot ELKIND YVETTE 5,288.59 15130 00350 JOSEPH SONY & LOVELY 10,005.85 15145 00150 BELLAMORE SHIRLEY 13,264.03 15146 00090 PLAINVIEW BUILDERS INC 14,214.91 15151 00020 ZHANG RU & LU XIAODAN 24,665.25 15154 00230 10 ARDMORE COURT LLC 11,949.54 15206 00480 KUVYKIN ERIC & SVETLANA SHNEYDE 133,714.15 15206 00800 Town of Oyster Bay School:15 Jericho UFSD Name Amount Parcel Group Lot 500 SHAMES LLC 31,316.68 11 B 09220 BEYER A A 13,326.20 11236 00250 BEYER ALBERT LIFE ESTATE 533.60 11236 00260 HAPPY YU WEN AN LLC 6,372.03 11356 00360 EQUITY SRS LLC 5,443.84 11370 0055F 55F MASON TRUST 4,875.36

11378 00050 CONDON CHRISTOPHER & C 6,951.42 11384 00020 PELSINGER MITCHEL & CLAUDIA 2,505.02 11385 00050 PONCE HIPOLITO & LOUISE 24,854.01 11430 00280 LEE JAE SOOG 8,962.24 11440 00250 KEMP JOSEPH G & SIGALIT 6,109.06 11455 00170 ROSENBAUM SHELDON & ELISE 3,597.45 11462 00080 RUDIS JON ANTHONY & MARGARET A 20,840.88 11477 00110 PIKEN KENNETH 6,662.45 12 A 1126UCA00280 UNIT 43 ALESI ROSARIO & ANITA M 17,422.82 12208 00500 50-54 SEMINARIO CHARLES 5,887.80 12212 00160 16-20 IM MYOUNG SIM 16,689.86 12213 00460 KORNREICH MELVIN LIFE ESTATE 2,662.01 12439 01120 LOEBER VIVIAN 6,098.50 12506 00230 MANDELLA JLE 223.24 12508 00380 GREENBERG PATRICIA 25,496.65 12513 00240 SURIC HAIMA 3,620.82 12514 00090 80 CANDY LANE LLC 19,413.13 12515 00230 LOCKER-THURING JOAN 8,135.40 12541 00390 Town of Oyster Bay School:15 Jericho UFSD Name Amount Parcel Group Lot NAGPAL JATINDER K 6,794.46 12545 00120 GOLDMAN CHARLES & MARCIA 17,497.55 12546 00350 WAGNER WARREN & CAROL 6,633.36 12547 00180 CURCIO TRUST MARIE 4,049.96 12562 00230 FRANK TR ARNOLD & SONDRA 23,291.56 12616 00240 COHEN E R 22,502.43 12619 00300 DOXEY FRANCIS & CAROLYN 52,985.90 16 B 1686A JORCHEN STEVEN HAROLD 65,028.01 16 B 1758B WANG YAN 6,933.55 16 C 00460 DANZIGER ELIOT & MARJORIE 26,647.35 16 C 01830 GEORGE JR THOMAS K

41,890.15 16 C 04480 PIRONI SILVANA 67,414.85 16 C 04560 BLOSSOMS LY MANAGEMENT LLC 5,903.32 7009 00050 5 PERGOLA DARLENE 1,045.45 17009 00170 17 UM PRODUCTS II LLC 55,487.70 17009 00670 67 CHUGH AKTA & BHATIA NITEEN 65,113.25 17011 00650 GOLDBERG BONNIE & GERALD 41,727.35 17011 01310 35 CLOCK TOWER LANE LLC 23,666.13 7012 00130 13,15 COOPERMAN RONALD & BRENDA 23,556.55 17015 0018UCA00540 UNIT 34 LEVY MORRIS & LOTTIE TRUSTS 7,569.43 17015 0018UCA00540 UNIT 56 FINA ELIZABETH & STEVEN 16,007.74 17015 0018UCA00540 UNIT 133 SIEGEL LAUREN 17,944.21 17015 0022UCA00630 UNIT 211 LEE EDMUND W & LAI FAI LING 6,361.74 17015 0022UCA00630 UNIT 238 BUFFERD CHESTER 2,869.73 17015 0029UCA00610 UNIT 21 Town of Oyster Bay School:15 Jericho UFSD Name Amount Parcel Group Lot SMOLEV TERENCE 4,969.53 17015 0029UCA00610 UNIT 40 PALMIERI DANIEL & ROSEMARIE 17,852.71 17015 0029UCA00610 UNIT 46 YU WEISHU 31,833.22 17015 00630 ROK MAN REALTY LLC 77,958.93 17016 00310 31 LUXURY HOMES LI LLC 31,525.61 17016 00710 FRANK MAYA 7,853.51 17017 0004UCA01380 UNIT 22 FRANK GALIA 23,343.03 17017 0004UCA01380 UNIT 83 GOMEZ BRUCE 3,747.45 17017 0004UCA01380 UNIT 157 DURST JENNIFER 8,061.72 17018 00100 Choi Jung Eun 14,340.62 17018 00290 CRESCENZO DELFINO 25,111.22 17018 00450 WANG QIANG 621.92 18 A 0991A ADJMI SAMANTHA 4,384.01 18 B 02440 244 33 OLD WHEATLEY LLC 3,444.42 18 D 04240 DIPADOVA ROBERT 3,361.15 18001 00020 NAEEM MOHAMMAD & 33,507.07 18002 00070 DUPONT 18 LLC 192,339.99 19 A 05880

TERMS OF SALE Such tax liens shall be sold subject to any and all superior tax liens of sovereignties and other municipalities and to all claims of record which the County may have thereon and subject to the provisions of the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts. However, such tax liens shall have priority over the County’s Differential Interest Lien, representing the excess, if any, of the interest and penalty borne at the maximum rate over the interest and penalty borne at the rate at which the lien is purchased. The Purchaser acknowledges that the tax lien(s) sold pursuant to these Terms of Sale may be subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or may become subject to such proceedings which may be commenced during the period in which a tax lien is held by a successful bidder or the assignee of same, which may modify a Purchaser’s rights with respect to the lien(s) and the property securing same. Such bankruptcy proceedings shall not affect the validity of the tax lien. In addition to being subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts, said purchaser’s right of foreclosure may be affected by the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act(FIRREA),12 U.S.C. ss 1811 et.seq., with regard to real property under Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation(FDIC) receivership. The County Treasurer reserves the right, without further notice and at any time, to withdraw from sale any of the parcels of land or premises herein listed. The Nassau County Treasurer reserves the right to intervene in any bankruptcy case/litigation where the property affected by the tax liens sold by the Treasurer is part of the bankruptcy estate. However,it is the sole responsibility of all tax lien purchasers to protect their legal interests in any bankruptcy case affecting their purchased tax lien, including but not limited to the filing of a proof of claim on their behalf, covering their investment in said tax lien. The Nassau County Treasurer and Nassau County and its agencies, assumes no responsibility for any legal representation of any tax lien purchaser in any legal proceeding including but not limited to a bankruptcy case where the purchased tax lien is at risk. The rate of interest and penalty at which any person purchases the tax lien shall be established by his bid. Each purchaser, immediately after the sale thereof, shall pay to the County Treasurer ten per cent of the amount for which the tax liens have been sold and the remaining ninety per cent within

Friday, February 17, 2017

LEGAL NOTICES


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thirty days after such sale. If the purchaser at the tax sale shall fail to pay the remaining ninety per cent within ten days after he has been notified by the County Treasurer that the certificates of sale are ready for delivery, then all amounts deposited with the County Treasurer including but not limited to the ten per cent theretofore paid by him shall, without further notice or demand, be irrevocably forfeited by the purchaser and shall be retained by the County Treasurer as liquidated damages and the agreement to purchase shall be of no further effect. Time is of the essence in this sale. This sale is held pursuant to the Nassau County Administrative Code and interested parties are referred to such Code for additional information as to terms of the sale, rights of purchasers, maximum rates of interest and other legal incidents of the sale. This list includes only tax liens on real estate located in the Town of Oyster Bay. Such other tax liens on real estate are advertised as follows: Town of Hempstead Dist 1001 HEMPSTEAD/UNIONDALE TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW YORK TREND NEWSDAY UNIONDALE BEACON Dist 1002 HEMPSTEAD/UNIONDALE TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY UNIONDALE BEACON Dist 1003 EAST MEADOW BEACON EAST MEADOW HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY Dist 1004 BELLMORE HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY Dist 1005 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEIGHBOR NEWSPAPERS NEWSDAY Dist 1006 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SEAFORD HERALD CITIZEN WANTAGH HERALD CITIZEN Dist 1007 BELLMORE HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1008 BALDWIN HERALD BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE

LEGAL NOTICES NEWSDAY Town of Hempstead Dist 1009 BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE FREEPORT BALDWIN LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1010 BALDWIN HERALD BALDWIN/FREEPORT TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1011 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OCEANSIDE TRIBUNE OCEANSIDE/ISLAND PARK HERALD Dist 1012 MALVERNE / WEST HEMPSTEAD HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Dist 1013 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM HERALD VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Dist 1014 FIVE TOWNS TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NASSAU HERALD (FIVE TOWNS) NEWSDAY Dist 1015 FIVE TOWNS JEWISH TIMES FIVE TOWNS TRIBUNE JEWISH STAR NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1016 FRANKLIN SQ / ELMONT HERALD FRANKLIN SQUARE BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Hempstead Dist 1017 FRANKLIN SQ/ELMONT HERALD FRANKLIN SQUARE BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY Dist 1018 GARDEN CITY LIFE GARDEN CITY NEWS GARDEN CITY TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1019 EAST ROCKAWAY TRIBUNE LYNBROOK/EAST ROCKAWAY HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROCKAWAY JOURNAL Dist 1020 LYNBROOK/EAST ROCKAWAY HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROCKVILLE CENTRE HERALD Dist 1021 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROCKVILLE CENTRE HERALD

ROCKVILLE CENTRE TRIBUNE Dist 1022 FLORAL PARK BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY THE GATEWAY Dist 1023 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SEAFORD HERALD CITIZEN WANTAGH HERALD CITIZEN Dist 1024 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM HERALD VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Town of Hempstead Dist 1025 MERRICK HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1026 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1027 MALVERNE / WEST HEMPSTEAD HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WEST HEMPSTEAD BEACON Dist 1028 LONG BEACH HERALD LONG BEACH TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1029 MERRICK HERALD MERRICK / BELLMORE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 1030 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY VALLEY STREAM HERALD VALLEY STREAM/MALVERN TRIBUNE Dist 1031 ISLAND PARK TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OCEANSIDE/ISLAND PARK HERALD Dist 1201 EAST MEADOW BEACON EAST MEADOW HERALD NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WESTBURY TIMES Dist 1205 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY WEST HEMPSTEAD BEACON Town of North Hempstead Dist 2001 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WESTBURY TIMES Dist 2002 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY

WILLISTON TIMES, WILLISTON PARK EDITION Dist 2003 MANHASSET PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROSLYN NEWS ROSLYN TIMES Dist 2004 MANHASSET TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PORT WASHINGTON NEWS Dist 2005 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK HERALD COURIER NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY Dist 2006 MANHASSET PRESS MANHASSET TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PORT WASHINGTON NEWS Dist 2007 GREAT NECK NEWS GREAT NECK RECORD JEWISH STAR NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 2009 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WILLISTON TIMES, WILLISTON PARK EDITION Town of North Hempstead Dist 2010 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEW HYDE PARK ILLUSTRATED NEWS NEWSDAY Dist 2011 MINEOLA AMERICAN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY WESTBURY TIMES Dist 2122 FLORAL PARK BULLETIN NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY THE GATEWAY Dist 2301 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 2315 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3001 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3002 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3003 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE

Dist 3004 LOCUST VALLEY LEADER LONG ISLAND PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3006 LOCUST VALLEY LEADER LONG ISLAND PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3008 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT OYSTER BAY GUARDIAN Dist 3009 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT OYSTER BAY GUARDIAN Dist 3011 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY OYSTER BAY ENTERPRISE PILOT SYOSSET ADVANCE Dist 3012 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET ADVANCE SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3013 NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET ADVANCE SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3014 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3015 JERICHO NEWS JOURNAL NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY SYOSSET JERICHO TRIBUNE Dist 3017 HICKSVILLE ILLUSTRATED NEWS HICKSVILLE / LEVITTOWN TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3018 BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PLAINVIEW/OLD BETHPAGE HERALD Dist 3019 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY PLAINVIEW/OLD BETHPAGE HERALD Dist 3020 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3021 BETHPAGE NEWSGRAM BETHPAGE TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3022 FARMINGDALE OBSERVER


MASSAPEQUA POST NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3023 MASSAPEQUA POST MASSAPEQUAN OBSERVER MID-ISLAND TIMES NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3024 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT GOLD COAST GAZETTE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Dist 3203 LONG ISLAND PRESS NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY ROSLYN NEWS ROSLYN TIMES Town of Oyster Bay Dist 3306 FARMINGDALE OBSERVER MASSAPEQUA POST MASSAPEQUAN OBSERVER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY City of Glen Cove Dist 4005 GLEN COVE RECORD PILOT GOLD COAST GAZETTE LOCUST VALLEY LEADER NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY City of Long Beach Dist 5028 LONG BEACH HERALD LONG BEACH TRIBUNE NASSAU COUNTY WEBSITE NEWSDAY Nassau County does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to or access to, or treatment or employment in, its services, programs, or activities. Upon request, accommodations such as those required by the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) will be provided to enable individuals with disabilities to participate in all services, programs, activities and public hearings and events conducted by the Treasurer’s Office. Upon request, information can be made available in braille, large print, audio tape or other alternative formats. For additional information, please call 571-2090 Ext. 13715. Dated: February 16, 2017 THE NASSAU COUNTY TREASURER MINEOLA, NEW YORK JNJ 7839

SUMMONS NO. CV 2016-016972 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF ARIZONA IN AND FOR THE

COUNTY OF MARICOPA Robert and LaToynia Hudson, husband and wife, Plaintiff, vs. Premium Capital Funding LLC DBA TopDot Mortgage Defendants. THE STATE OF ARIZONA TO THE DEFENDANTS: Premium Capital Funding LLC DBA TopDot Mortgage A lawsuit has been filed against you. If you do not want a judgment or order taken against you without your input, you must file an “Answer” or a “Response” in writing with the court, and pay the filing fee. If you do not file an “Answer” or “Response” the other party may be given the relief request in his/her Petition or Complaint. To file your “Answer” or “Response” Take , or send, the “Answer” or “Response” to the : Office of the Clerk of the Superior Court, 201 W Jefferson Street, Phoenix, Arizona 850032205. Mail a copy of your ‘Response” or “Answer” to : Robert and Latoynia Hudson 11022 West Washington Street, Avondale, Arizona 85323. If served out of the State of Arizona - certified mail, or by publication – your “Response” must be filed 30 days after the date of first publication. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that in the event of your failure to appear and defend within the time applicable, judgment by default may be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a copy of the Summon and Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Maricopa County Superior Court located at 201 West Jefferson, Phoenix, Arizona. Requests for reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities must be made to the office of the judge or commissioner assigned to the case at least 10 judicial days before your scheduled court date.. JNJ 7840 4x 02/17,24,03/03,10

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Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 2948935 for rates and information.

Winthrop “A Cause to Celebrate” to benefit the Child Life Program

The Children’s Medical Center at WinthropUniversity Hospital is pleased to announce the 20th Annual “A Cause to Celebrate,” benefitting the Child Life Program. Honoring Baldwin resident Hayden S. Wool, Esq., the highly anticipated annual event will take place on Thursday, March 16, at The Garden City Hotel. Mr. Wool is a Partner and Director at Garfunkel Wild, P.C., which is headquartered in Great Neck. His firm has been involved in providing legal representation to Winthrop for nearly 31 years, and Mr. Wool’s connections and commitment to Winthrop run even deeper. He has been passionately involved in fundraising for pediatrics at Winthrop for many years, serving as co-chair of the Pediatric Fund for the Future, which supported the Hospital’s pediatric floor. His wife, Andrea Leffler Wool, was born at Winthrop, and two of his three children are employees of the Hospital. A frequent guest of the annual “Cause to Celebrate,” this is his first time being honored. “Hayden Wool has been a cherished friend to Winthrop for many years,” said Leonard R. Krilov, ‎MD, Chairman of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease at Winthrop. “We are so pleased to honor him this year, and deeply grateful for his service and com-

mitment to Winthrop and its young patients.” The evening will feature “Neil Berg’s 100 Years of Broadway,” a performance by award-winning composer, lyricist and producer Nick Berg with Broadway classics sung by top Broadway stars. The funds raised by “A Cause to Celebrate” support Winthrop’s extraordinary Child Life Program, through which certified Child Life Specialists utilize play and education to improve the understanding of medical procedures, teach relaxation techniques to help the patients cope with illness or surgery and provide emotional support for the entire family. “Thanks to the Child Life Program, countless patients and their families are helped during their time of need,” said Dr. Krilov. “We are so appreciative to everyone in the community who comes together for this important cause and whose generosity has impacted countless pediatric patients at Winthrop.” Individual tickets, including cocktails and dinner, journal ads and sponsorship packages are available, as well as participation in community and silent auctions. For more information or to make a reservation, please call Winthrop’s Office of Development at (516) 663–8275. To make reservations online, visit www.winthrop.org/events.

Annual Arts Council scholarship competition applications available

If you are a high school senior interested in pursuing an education in the performing, visual, or literary arts, then you may be pleased to learn about the upcoming Annual Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council Scholarship Competition. The Arts Council Scholarship Competition encourages high school seniors to submit work in categories such as music, dance, visual arts and literary arts for the chance to be awarded a scholarship. Oyster Bay Town Supervisor Joseph Saladino announced that registration for the Annual Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council Scholarship Competition is currently underway. “The Scholarship Competition is only available for high school seniors who live in or attend school in the Town of Oyster Bay. This event signifies an opportunity for the community to celebrate inspirational works of art in genres such as vocal music, instrumental music, dance, film, and literature,” Supervisor Saladino said. “Each year, dozens of talent-

ed high school seniors enter the Scholarship Competition to exercise their talents and display beautiful works of art. The Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council will present scholarships to the winning 2017 Artists in honor of their remarkable talents.” If you would like to participate in the Scholarship Competition, applications can be picked up at your local library, high school, or in the CAPA Office of Community & Youth at 977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa NY, 11758. Applications can also be obtained by contacting the Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council at 516-797-7926 or by visiting the Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council’s website www.tobac.org. Applicants for the Scholarship Competition must submit two reference letters from a teacher or professional in the student’s preferred category in addition to a typed letter (four copies) detailing the participant’s career goals. There is a $25 processing fee for each category. Payment will be accepted

as a check or money order only; no cash will be accepted. Please make your check out to the Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council, Inc. Please send or deliver all applications, along with checks/money orders to Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council, Inc., 977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa NY, 11758. Applications for the Scholarship Competition will be accepted no later than March 17. “The Town of Oyster Bay Arts Council Scholarship Competition is an excellent opportunity for any of our younger residents who love to sing, dance, film, or write, to strengthen their abilities all while spending time with other talented individuals who share in their passion for the arts,” Supervisor Saladino commented. “The Scholarship Competition provides an outlet for young artists to exhibit their creative minds in the hope of winning a scholarship to help pursue their artistic endeavors. Win or lose, every submission is guaranteed to impress guests and influence future artists.

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LEGAL NOTICES

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22 Friday, February 17, 2017

126 Bounty Lane, Jericho

Sold Price: $947,000 Date: 12/28/2016 4 beds, 2 Full/1 Half baths Style: Split # of Families: 1

Lot Size: 77x127 Schools: Jericho Total Taxes: $15,500 MLS# 2886043

12 Martin Place, Syosset Sold Price: $700,000 Date: 01/06/2017 3 beds, 2 Full baths Style: Split # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 70x100 Schools: Syosset Total Taxes: $12,939 MLS# 2890890

424 S Marginal Road, Jericho

9 Hicks Avenue, Syosset

Sold Price: $740,000 Date: 12/28/2016 3 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Ranch # of Families: 1

Sold Price: $540,000 Date: 12/28/2016 3 beds, 1 Full baths Style: Ranch # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 65x100 Schools: Syosset Total Taxes: $15,538 MLS# 2884551

Lot Size: 80x130 Schools: Jericho Total Taxes: $16,494 MLS# 2888465

READY TO MAKE A MOVE? I have qualified buyers ready to move into your neighborhood. Contact me today for a free comparative market analysis.

MARYANN CLARA, Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker “Let Me Be Your Partner On This Journey” C: 516.314.4322 | O: 516.921.2262 maryann.clara@elliman.com | elliman.com/long-island

110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY 11746. 631.549.7401 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.  EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

Houses featured on this page were sold by various real estate agencies


23

T O

Landing

Cove

A C T N O W F O R O U R W I N T E R S P E C I A L U P G R A D E PA C K A G E S

The perfect place to call home. Landing Cove is a brand new 55 and over community in the heart of desirable Glen Cove. Close to town, beaches, YMCA with pool, fine dining, shopping and transportation. Features spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath units. Lower level units have patios. All units have high ceilings, washer/dryers and walk-in closets. Close to everything Glen Cove has to offer. Web# 2888179. Prices starting at $389,000.

FOR GPS ENTER 40 HILL STREET | MODELS NOW OPEN – CALL FOR HOURS

Phone 516.280.6945 for more information

Visit us at elliman.com/long-island THE COMPLETE OFFERING TERMS ARE IN AN OFFERING PLAN AVAILABLE FROM THE SPONSOR. FILE NO. CD14-0325. LANDING COVE, LLC. 189 FOREST AVENUE, GLEN COVE, NY 11542. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE APPROXIMATE AND SUBJECT TO CONSTRUCTION VARIANCES. PLANS, LAYOUTS, AND DIMENSIONS MAY CONTAIN EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. MINOR VARIATIONS FROM FLOOR TO FLOOR. SPONSOR RESERVES RIGHT TO MAKE CHANGES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERMS OF THE OFFERING PLAN.

Friday, February 17, 2017

W E L C O M E


Friday, February 17, 2017

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Snow is falling and a new season is upon us.

Are you thinking about making a change too? Whether you’re looking to buy or sell your home, Lisa has the knowledge and experience to get it done. Need detailed pricing analysis or data research? Lisa can provide it and will work with you to develop an up to the minute marketing plan that will sell your property as quickly as possible for the highest possible price. Give Lisa a call to see if this is your season for change.

B R I NG I NG B U Y E R S A N D S E L L E R S T OGE T H ER SI N CE 1999

Lisa Bossio “Your Satisfaction is always my Success” ANNALISA BOSSIO

Licensed R. E. Salesperson O: 516.364.2039 C: 516.445.0454 annalisa.bossio@elliman.com 110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY, 11746. 631.549.7401 | © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


The Jericho-Syosset News Journal