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W ELCOM E HOM E

A R E S I D E NT ’ S G U I D E TO LI V I N G I N TH E M O U NTA I N B R I D G E CO M M U N IT Y


TA B L E O F CO N T EN T S CCMC’s management team is led by a community manager focussing on administration, operations, covenants, and maintenance; and a lifestyle director focussing on community events, classes/clubs/fitness, communication, and administration.

O U R S TA FF COMMUNIT Y MANAGER

Mike Moore, MMoore@CCMCnet.com LIFEST YLE DIRECTOR

Lisa Brennan, LBrennan@CCMCnet.com

2 STAFF

11 PLAYGROUNDS

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PHOTO CREDITS

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THE VILLAS

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MOUNTAIN BRIDGE

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BELLA VIA

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WIDE OPEN SPACES

13 ENTRADA

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OWNERS’ CLUB PARK

15 LEADERSHIP

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DESERT FOOTHILLS PARK

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LIFESTYLE

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UPPER CANYON PARK

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SIGNATURE EVENTS

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OWNERS’ CLUB

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LIVE MUSIC

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FITNESS STUDIO

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FOOD TRUCKS

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FITNESS CARD

18 EVENTS

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LOCKERS

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BLOCK PARTIES

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MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM

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CLUBS AND GROUPS

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21-25 NEIGHBORS

Rick Navarro and Brian Pace

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PUTTING GREEN

26 GATES

M A N AG E M E NT CO M PA N Y

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TENNIS COURTS

28 POSTAL

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PICKLEBALL COURTS

31 PAINTING

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BASKETBALL COURTS

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SOCCER FIELD

34-42 EMERGENCIES

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SWIMMING POOL/SPA

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NEIGHBORHOOD LIST

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POOL RULES

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COMMUNITY MAP

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DISC GOLF

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CONTACT INFO

E V E N T A S S I S TA N T S

CCMC L A N DSC A PE CO M PA N Y

DLC Resources POOL MAINTENANCE

Exceptional Water G AT E M A I N T E N A N C E

Park Pro Services

KEEPING SAFE

AMENITY SECURITY

Whalen Security

PHOTO CREDITS

Mark Boisclair Photography.................. Pgs. cover, 3, 5, 10, 11 (bottom), 12, 38 Lisa Brennan.............................................. Pgs. 8, 14, 19 (middle), 26, 27, 28, 36 Kristen Carter Photography ................. Pgs. 11 (top left and right), 18, 23, 29 Elizabeth Chapman.................................. Pg. 32 Eve Craig Photography........................... Pgs. 4, 15-17 Steve DiGirolamo..................................... Pg. 8 (lower left) DLC Resources......................................... Pgs. 44-45 Suzy Irwin.................................................. Pg. 19 (bottom) Tom Martin................................................ Pg. 21 Charles Radloff......................................... Pg. 11 (center) Dennis Robinson...................................... Pgs.37 Angela Vaughn Photography ................ Pgs. 19 (top), 25, 33-35 © 2 0 1 8 M O U N TA I N B R I D G E


M O U N TA I N B R I D G E

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ountain Bridge is a Blandford Homes, signature community for all ages. The signature feature of this resort-style, master-planned community is the magnificently stunning, yet simply charming, rustic bridge connecting the northern and southern areas of the community by foot or vehicle. The rustic, old-world Mediterranean and Andalusian architecture can also be seen in the covered grand entryways, clock tower, and intimate gated neighborhoods. Established in 2010, Mountain Bridge is set amidst the prestige and beauty of magnificently stunning and scenic mountains. The development boasts an incomparable 45% open space ratio. At its completion the community will have 1,475 homes. CCMC is proud to provide management services to the Mountain Bridge Community Association. With its headquarters in Scottsdale, Arizona, CCMC manages more than 200 associations across the country. CCMC reminds you that community management isn’t just reports, compliance letters, and legal notices it is the unique ability of our on-site community management team helping make human connections. We’re the company bringing people and neighborhoods together. We serve people first. We challenge leaders to be their best. We infuse life with fun. This publication acts as an introduction to the management, governance, and Lifestyle of the Mountain Bridge Community. Welcome home.


WIDE OPEN SPACES This community is designed with 45% open space so there is room to appreciate the breathtaking views, colorful sunsets, and the quiet beauty of the Sonoran desert.

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OWNERS’ CLUB

DESERT FOOTHILLS

UPPER C ANYON

Open sunrise to dusk, daily. The Owners’ Club park is located along the north side of Mountain Bridge Drive. This park includes a large playground and three ramadas. One on the east side of the park, and two adjacent to the play equipment on the west side of the park. Each ramada includes three heavy picnic tables, a concrete garbage can, and a charcoal barbecue. The closest bathrooms are at the west side of the Owners’ Club near the pool Indoor facilities are also available with the use of an amenity access card. The park also features a large grassy area, concrete amphitheatre seating, and plenty of shade trees.

Open sunrise to dusk, daily. The Desert Foothills park is located along the north side of Mountain Bridge Drive, west of the Owners’ Club Park. This park includes a playground and two ramada that is perfect for hosting informal gatherings with friends and family. Let the kids play while the adults relax. There is a soccer field and basketball court at this location. The covered ramada includes ** heavy picnic tables, a concrete garbage can, and a charcoal barbecue. There are no bathrooms at this facility. Use of the ramada is on a first come, first served basis.

Open sunrise to dusk, daily. The amenities at Upper Canyon park include a Pickleball court, basketball court, play structure, and a ramada. There are no additional lights in this park because of its close proximity to homes. This is considered a walk-up park because there are no official, safe, parking spaces nearby. Residents planning to use this area can get there by walking running, biking, hiking, rolling, or scooting. Remember, Upper Canyon is a City of Mesa street and parked cars can be ticketed in this area.

PARK

PARK

PARK

PH OTO PR E V I O US PAG E Annual Classic Car Show hosted by Blandford Homes, the first Saturday in November.

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MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

M O U N TA I N B R I D G E OWNERS’ CLUB 873 0 E . M O U NTA I N B R I D G E D R .

The Owners’ Club is the heart of the community. It is where everyone gathers to be together, chat about the day, enjoy the views, get fit, listen to music, splash like a kid, play games, make memories, and laugh from way down deep inside.

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community guidelines. This will help ensure the community is successful for all to enjoy.

he common areas and the amenities managed by the Mountain Bridge Community Association are available to residents and their guests. These amenities remain beautiful and maintained because of the collaboration between residents, management, and vendors who all have a vested interest in our community.

Please keep in mind, every type of smoking and tobacco use is prohibited in the Owners’ Club areas. S T U D I O . Cardio, check. Strength, check. Flexibility, check. Mountain Bridge residents can enjoy cardio machines, weights and strength training equipment, classes and wellness programs. Hours are 4 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week. FITNESS

If you see any common area or facility issues (gates or irrigation) needing immediate attention please contact the association during office hours, or call the emergency answering service after hours. If the emergency is related to health or safety, please call 9-1-1, and then notify the association.

As with all amenities, the fitness studio is designed to be utilized by owners and their guests only. Children under the age of 13 are not permitted to use the facility. No one under the age of 16 is permitted to work out without an adult, 21 or older present.

All residents are subject to all of the restrictions in the Mountain Bridge governing documents as well as the other rules and regulations adopted by the Association. Please do your part to talk with neighbors violating rules, and help share information about the proper way to follow Mountain Bridge

Personal trainers are allowed to use the facility with their Mountain Bridge client only at the time of the appointment. Residents are required to check into

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the office with the personal trainer to file appropriate certification and insurance paperwork before training begins. Proper athletic attire is required. No bare chests, bathing suits or flip flops allowed. Please put away all equipment to its proper stored positioned when finished. Please limit equipment use to 30-minutes if others are waiting, and remember to wipe down equipment after use with the sanitary wipes provided. If there are any problems with machines or equipment, please notify the association office. Fitness classes are available for residents and their guests. Updated information is provided in the weekly, Wednesday, email blast. Classes are $5 for drop ins, or purchase a fitness card for $35 (10 classes) from the association office or class instructor. Cash or check, please. To use the fitness card, present it to the instructor at class time. Card holders are welcome to share card punches with guest passes have no expiration date.

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L O C K E R S . Lockers are available for residents

using the fitness studio. Keys to the lockers are in the fitness room above the drinking fountain. Blue are for men’s lockers and red are for ladies’ lockers. Remember to return the keys back to the storage board when finished. Lockers are intended for day use only. Management reserves the right to open any locker, at any time, for any reason. OFFICE. CCMC is the management company for this community and is located on-site, in an office, in the breeze-way of the Owners’ Club, off Mountain Bridge Drive, on the south side of the community. We are here for you. Residents are welcome to stop in for general A S S O C I AT I O N


neighborhood information, assistance with the logistics of settling into a new home, learning about Lifestyle events and activities, paying assessments or updating information with CCMC, submitting architectural review paperwork, or getting a treat for the family pet out on an adventure through the neighborhood (on a leash, of course!).

If others are waiting to play, then limit the court time to one hour. Verbalize with other players that you are waiting to play and ask to be next in line. No food or beverage items, other than water, are allowed on the courts. Do not use glass in this area. Appropriate attire must be worn at all times when using the courts. This includes a shirt, shorts or athletic attire, and nonmarking soled shoes. No pets are permitted in the court.

C L U B M U LT I - P U R P O S E R O O M . The multi-purpose room is a ** sq. ft. open floor plan that can be divided into three separate spaces by pulling divider walls. The room includes a gas fireplace, kitchen with refrigerator, microwave, warming oven, and access to an outdoor patio. Seating capacity is 136. OWNERS’

Bicycles, roller blades, skateboard, remote control vehicles, or any other potentially damaging equipment is strictly prohibited on the courts or surrounding common areas. Please report any issues, with the gates, lights, water fountain, courts, nets, or surrounding area directly to the association.

The Owners’ Club room is available for use by Mountain Bridge Community Association approved classes, clubs, events, and other activities falling within Lifestyle. Owners and tenants of Mountain Bridge are eligible to rent amenities, but tenants must be living in the community at the time of the rental. Rentals are only available to owners in good standing with the association. Look for the link to the “Rental” information sheet in the weekly, Wednesday, email blast or in the association office.

B A S K E T B A L L C O U R T . If you want to shoot some hoops or

are looking for a late night, pick-up game, visit the basketball court, just west of the tennis courts at the Owners’ Club. This full-size court is available first come, first served, from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. daily. Timed lights can be set during court hours. The Desert Foothills Park also has a full-size basketball court that is open from sunrise to dusk, daily. This court does not have lights.

P AT I O . This patio is the heart of the community for so

many different reasons. It is the perfect place to settle into one of the comfy patio chairs with a bottle of wine and watch a sunset. It is a great place to join friends on a Friday or Saturday night in the spring to listen to an amazing band. It is a fun place to bring your best friends to play a game of giant Jenga, ping pong, or corn hole and watch golf on the televisions. Or, it is a great place to sit next to the gas fireplace and read a book. Daily seating capacity 65.

If others are waiting to play, then limit the court time to one hour. Verbalize with other players that you are waiting to play and ask to be next in line. No food or beverage items, other than water, are allowed on the courts. Do not use glass in this area. Keep in mind, the courts are professionally power-washed the first Thursday morning of each month. S O C C E R F I E L D . Grab a soccer ball and head over to Desert

9 - H O L E P U T T I N G G R E E N . Grab your putter and a golf

Foothills park for a game of soccer. This game can be a great workout and a lot of fun for the entire family. The health benefits include an increase in aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health, and it lowers body fat and improves muscle tone. This soccer field is not striped, but has goals at each end. The area is open daily from dawn to dusk. There are no additional lights in this park because of its close proximity to homes.

ball to brush up on your short game. This nine-hole putting green is located east of the Pickleball court at the Owners’ Club. The flags are numbered so you can putt through the holes 1-9, or make up your own practice exercise. The Owners’ Club lighted courts include one permanent Pickleball court, two permanent tennis courts, and extra striping and portable nets to add two additional Pickleball courts to the east tennis court, when needed. Residents are reminded to return pickleball nets to stored position after play. The Upper Canyon park has one Pickleball court that is not lit. TENNIS AND PICKLEBALL COURTS.

PH OTOS PR E V I O US PAG E A variety of year-round outdoor activies are always taking place in Mountain Bridge. That is what happens when you live where there are 301 days of sunshine each year.

All courts are available first come, first served, from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. daily by using the white amenity access card issued to each resident. Timed lights can only be set at the Owners’ Club courts during court hours. The courts are professionally power-washed the first Thursday morning of each month.

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MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

S W I M M I N G P O O L & S P A . This private, 25-meter

pool is heated to 81 degrees, unless it is summer and then the goal is to keep the pool cool. The water has an oxygeninfused purification system patented by Exceptional Water Systems. The pool cleaning system uses a minimal amount of chlorine. The pool gates may only be accessed using an amenity card between 5 a.m. and 11 p.m. each day. A shower is located outside the southeast pool gate near the outdoor restrooms. Please use the shower before entering the pool or spa. The spa is recommend for adult use. P O O L R U L E S . WARNING. NO LIFEGUARD ON DUTY.

Swimmers assume personal risk for themselves and their guests. Children 13 and younger must be supervised by a responsible adult 18 years of age or older. GOOD BEHAVIOR. No food allowed inside pool gates. No smoking, vaping, or use of tobacco products. Musical devices must not disturb others. Floatation devices and

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thrown toys can only be used when pool is not crowded. No wheels on deck (bikes, scooters, wheelies, etc.). GOOD HYGIENE. Proper swim wear required. No street clothes including cut off jeans. No pets allowed inside pool gates. Shower before entering the pool. Swim diapers required for all children not potty-trained. Swimmers encouraged to use pool restrooms. Allow sunscreen to dry before entering pool, and avoid oil. KEEPING SAFE. Water is shallow, no diving. No running on deck. No jumping from the fountain. Do not prop open gates. No rough housing. No glass allowed inside pool gates. No wet swimwear allowed indoors. The pool deck is professionally power-washed the first Thursday morning of each month. Parties and large gatherings are not permitted poolside, unless it is a community event arranged through the Lifestyle Director. Each household may bring a maximum of six guests to the pool. Facility rentals do not include the use of the swimming pool and/or spa. For more


specific information, contact the association office.

PR E V I O US PAG E Owners’ Club Swimming Pool at sunset.

D I S C G O L F C O U R S E . Disc golf is played much

like traditional golf. Instead of a ball and clubs, players use a flying disc or Frisbee®. The sport uses the same scoring as golf. The object is to complete each hole in the fewest throws. The disc golf basket has a pole extending up from the ground with chains and a basket where the disc lands. The game begins by starting from a tee area and finishing at the disc golf basket. Generally, a course is 9 or 18 targets long. Players start at “hole” one and complete the course in order, playing through to the last hole. The player with lowest total cumulative score wins. There are five disc golf goals located around the perimeter of the Owners’ Club Park. Play it three times and you have a complete 18-hole course.

LEFT MB kids and their families know how to Party Like A Pineapple! TOP RIGHT There was no shortage of leaping dolphins at the Dolphin Tales Dive In Movie in the Owners’ Club pool.

RIGHT Aerial view of the Owners’ Club pool with the inflatable movie screen up and in place for Dive In Movie night. BELOW Dessert Foothill Park has it all - with a play structure for the kids, a basketball court, soccer field, and Ramadas.

P L AY G R O U N D S . The Mountain Bridge kids will

agree, there is no shortage of great playgrounds and play structures in this neighborhood! There are three to chose from- one in each park - and each has a style all its own. The kids love the spring toys in the sand, too. So, grab your tennis shoes and head over to the park of your choice to meet some of the other families in the neighborhood!

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THE VILLAS There are two sub associations within Mountain Bridge. One community is located to the north of McKellips Road (Bella Via) and one is to the south (Entrada).

BELLA VIA Members’ Club: 8809 E. Kenwood Rd.

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ENTR ADA Members’ Club: 8938 E. Ivy Glen St.

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F R O N T YA R D C A R E

LIFESTYLE

DLC Resources pays especially close attention to the plantings, tree trimming, care, and watering of all Villas homes. Any changes to the front yard landscape must be arranged with the Association.

A celebrated part of living in the Villas is how friendly and neighborly these residents are known to be. Watch for information about regular get-togehters, mixers, happy hours, and other exciting events happening at the Members’ Club or on a cul-de-sac near you.

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INSURANCE

MEMBERS’ CLUB

The additional assesment for the Villas includes insurance coverage of the home’s roof, home exterior (paint and stucco), and fence. Be sure you are not paying for extra coverage you do not need by asking your agent about H06 insurance. However, the Association is not responsible for windows and doors, including the garage and gate - and light fixtures. If your bulb is out, it is up to you to change it!

This beautiful clubhouse is loaded with amenities for Villas residents, and is open from 4 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily. Inside is a cable television, Wi-Fi, card tables, a library, pool table, heated swimming pool and spa. There is also a small fitness room filled with a basic cardio and weight equipment. This space is not reservable and the only parties hosted in this space must be coordinated through Lifestyle and open to all residents in that specific community.


MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

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LEADERSHIP

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urrently, Blandford Homes is the developer and builder of Mountain Bridge Community Association, also known as the “DECLARANT.” The Declarant is the first owner of the entire property, who then develops and builds the community. Eventually, the Declarant gives control of the home owners association over to the property owners who then elect members to a board of directors. This process is called “transition.” The following are the three causes for transition to ocur: 1. It shall occur 90 days after the Class A memberships (homeowner) equal the Class B Memberships (Declarant). Note the Declarant (Developer) has 10 votes for every lot they own instead of the 1 vote each homeowner has for their property. 2. The first day of January 2030. 3. At anytime the Declarant decides to provide written notice of turnover. It is estimated the closing rate of homes will cause the first criteria to be met in 2019. Once it is met, the association has 90 days to complete the transition to an elected homeowner Board of Directors.


LIFESTYLE

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ifestyle. With a capital L. Some people may not understand the concept of Lifestyle, but most Mountain Bridge residents will be quick to tell you this community is infused with it - and it doesn’t happen by accident. It is a way of Life (with another capital L).

At its core, a community association is a collection of structures: homeowners, governance, management, stewardship, rules, and guidelines. But what sets the Mountain Bridge Community Association apart is the most vibrant arm of all the structures, LIFESTYLE. This is the focus of making a plot of houses, into a collection of homes, and encourages the people inside to become friends, neighbors, and most importantly - a rock-solid community. Lifestyle comes in the form of using the first-class amenities you’ve just read about, to bring people with similar interest together to live, work, and play. This is done though special events, clubs and groups organized and run by neighbors, classes taught by qualified instructors, relevant fitness programming, and more. Lifestyle is all about making connections and finding the ways to make it happen.


MAKING LIFE MEMORABLE

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Those who devote their lives to serving our country, children, and neighborhoods are giving back. They have answered the call to serve. - Jennifer Granholm ach year residents can count on Mountain Bridge Community Association to host a number of community events designed to bring the neighbors together and build a sense of community.

E V E N T S . From its inception, Blandford Homes has found ways to bring the community together to celebrate its uniqueness. Many of these activities are still happening today and many have evolved over time to become some of the most anticipated events of the year. S I G N AT U R E

Each year you can count on experiencing these impressive events with your family and friends: THE ANNUAL CAR SHOW T H E G R E AT P U M P K I N P A R T Y GINGERBREAD LANE BIKE BASH THE BUNNY HOP WOOFSTOCK

L I V E M U S I C . In Mountain Bridge, if someone is

playing music, people will gather with beverages, appetizers, and sometimes a crock pot or two. Through the years the music selections have grown into a nice menu of events on the patio. From October to April., Plan on grabbing your snacks and head to the Owners’ Club patio for a night of friendship, food, music, and dancing.

F O O D T R U C K F R E N Z Y. The last Thursday of the

month, Mountain Bridge residents refuse to cook. There are no frozen foods to thaw, no dinner to plan, no extra efforts to make. Instead, the families head down to the Owners’ Club park with a few camping chairs and set up a picnic. Generally there are two entrée and one dessert truck on the grounds - with a huge variety of selections. The night also includes some type of entertainment for the kids, like a bounce house or water slide, and live music for anyone who stays to relax. Check each month’s calendar to find out which trucks and entertainers are scheduled. E V E R Y D AY E V E N T S . Building a strong Lifestyle

program is about listening to residents. There are so many opportunities to bring people together based on interesting information you hear in day-to-day conversations. A resident’s trip to save the sea turtles can turn into an interesting presentation. Discovering


there are 15 authors living in the neighborhood can lead to a diverse book signing. When learning there are 20 artists in the community it is the perfect way to plan a gallery showing as part of the annual meeting. Events are stumbled upon, requested, and inspired by just listening to the voices of the people and letting the magic happen organically. P A R T I E S . Many of the neighborhoods within the community host a block party (or two!) Every year. It usually involves a BBQ or pot luck in their own neighborhood cul-de-sac and everyone is invited. The association is happy to help by creating a flyer, distributing it by email to everyone in the neighbor, providing paper goods, and loaning trash cans and banquet tables. If you are interested in hosting your next neighborhood shindig, just say the word. We are here to help. BLOCK

ABOVE Santa Claus visits Mountain Bridge during our annual, snow and cookie-filled Gingerbread Lane holiday event

RIGHT Social Singles enjoy getting out on the town - like their trip to an Escape Room which they beat with 3:43 to spare!

C L U B S A N D G R O U P S . Regardless

of your interests, there is likely a club or group for you! And if not, we are always looking for leaders to take the reins. From cards to Pickleball, panting to small business owners - it is easy to make a connection. Some of the common ongoing group meet ups include Mexican Train dominoes, Mah Johg, Hand Foot cards, Poker, Mountain Bridge Business Owners’ Network, Wine and Canvas, Quilt Club, and two Book Clubs. It is easy to join other resident led groups by joining Facebook groups like: Babysitters & Pet Care resources, Mountain Bridge Basketball Association, Mountain aBRIDGEd Book Club, Novel Characters Book Club, Hiker’s Group, MOMs Group, Online Yard Sale, Photography Club, Quilters Group, Runners and Walkers Club, Social Singles, Tennis & Pickleball Group and more!

ABOVE Mah Jong players meet each Tuesday at 1 p.m. All skill levels invited. RIGHT Always dreamed of being a mermaid? These seven ladies learned how to safely swim with a mermaid tale in the Owners’ Club pool.

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NEIGHBORS

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id you realize there are actual health benefits for kind neighbors living in a vibrant, socially active community like Mountain Bridge? This boost in Vitamin N(eighbor) is supported by scientists and psychologists. The trick is easy, all you have to do is find a connection to the people living next door and across the street from you and know that you can trust them. According to a study at Duke University, people ages 55 to 80 who were high in interpersonal trust lived 14 years longer (on average) than those who were not. So what is the neighbor to health connection? When you believe your neighbors are generally trustworthy, kind, and inclusive people, you are more likely to interact. Whether it’s a chat by the mailbox, a helping hand with packages, or simply a wave and a smile, this type of interaction can lift a mood, reduce stress, and instill a sense of belonging. Those benefits, in turn, have been linked to better health, including a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, digestive complaints, and sleep problems. Good neighbors also provide emotional support in hard times, such as being out of work, going through a divorce, or coping with an illness. Good neighbors may offer practical help, such as keeping an eye on your place when you’re away or sharing valuable information, such as the name of an excellent doctor. Spending time in public areas like the pool, gym, park, tennis courts, putting greens, or live music nights is also a great way to meet people. The better you get to know your neighbors, the more likely you are to trust them - and the more you stand to gain in health and well-being. So make friends with your neighbors, for the health of it!


MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

HOW TO BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR

A S K Y O U R S E L F, “ W H AT W O U L D M R . R O G E R S D O ? ”

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ME E T YOUR NE I G HBOR

KEEPING IN THE LOOP

Head out your front door, walk down the sidewalk, and head straight to your neighbor’s door. Knock. Introduce yourself. Leave your phone number. Find out where he’s from. Tell him where you are from. Find a connection. Ask him to keep an eye out for you. Offer to keep an eye out for him. Shake hands. Go home knowing there is someone you can borrow sugar from, right next door.

Give your neighbors a general heads up if something out of the ordinary is happening at your house. If you are starting a renovation, doing landscaping, having a large group of people over, leaving on vacation, or having friends in from out of town. This lets your neighbors determine if they’ll need to park elsewhere, move their cars for the night, keep an eye on your house, or be tolerant of a little extra noise.

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REACHING OUT

TA L K I N G FA C E T O FA C E

Attend community events or consider hosting a neighborhood block party. Invite a few of your neighbors over for a nice dinner or barbecue or to head down to the Owners’ Club Park on the last Thursday of the month for Food Truck Frenzy. Pack a few chairs and your favorite beverage so you can listen to the live music too. These are great ways to get to know your neighbors whether you’ve been in the area for days or years.

If any common, neighborly issues should arise, be sure to deal with it face-to-face. It is also important to act fast, and go to that person directly to discuss what is going on. A neighbor may not be aware of an issue that is causing another resident to be upset. Giving your neighbor a chance to come up with a solution is better than immediately reaching out to authorities. Ask for help in finding a solution that works for both of you. Avoid gossiping about any issues with your neighbor or using social media negatively.

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YA R D C A R E

OUT BY 6; IN BY 6

When caring for your yard, please pay attention to the foliage reaching over your walls and into your neighbor’s. If you don’t maintain the foliage, your neighbor is welcome to do it. Trim back any trees or bushes in the sight line of drivers, or growing over the sidewalk, too. If you share a space or common area with a neighbor, do your part to keep these spaces as nice as possible by picking up trash, storing items out of sight, or notifying the Association if you see anything in need of repair.

On trash collection days, keep in mind that the City of Mesa code only allows trash cans to be at the curb from 6 p.m. the day before pick up until 6 a.m. the day after pick up. The black barrel (garbage) is picked up on Monday. The green (landscape debris) and blue (recycle) barrels are picked up on Thursday. For more information about specific items that can go in your barrels, visit: www.cityofmesa.org

8 7 W E LL B E H AV E D P E T OW N E R S KNOW WHERE TO PARK

All animals should be vaccinated, licensed, and on a leash when in the front yard or out in the neighborhood. A maximum of three house pets are allowed, if not used for commercial purposes, do not create a nuisance, or bark incessantly. Barking issues should be addressed first with the neighbor (hey, they might not know!) before contacting City of Mesa Police or Animal Control. If you are walking pets in your neighborhood, practice common courtesy by picking up your pet’s poop. Remember wildlife poops too, so if it is in the way, volunteer to get it out of the way.

Park your car in your garage. Only guests can park on the street (for a maximum of 72-hours in a seven day period), but make sure they park in front of your house, not your neighbors’. All parking should be on paved surfaces, not the gravel in your front yard. Obey the fire lanes and don’t block gates. If necessary, vehicles can be towed at the owners’ expense. Pickup trucks that don’t fit in in the garage can receive permission from the Association to park in the driveway.

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MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

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YA R D A R T G O E S O U T B A C K

BACK WA SHING POOL

HOA rules require driftwood, wagons/wheels, skulls, sculptures and other similar yard art is prohibited within front yards. There are so many beautiful metal, wooden, and clay sculptures available for sale around the valley, so if you purchase any, remember it needs to be placed in the backyard for your own enjoyment.

Of course YOU know all the ins and outs of back washing your pool, but does your pool guy? According to a City of Mesa ordinance, it is unlawful to pump the water from your pool and allow it to drain into the street. Discharge water must not be drained into washes, either. Use the front yard sewer clean out drain for pool back washing, but be sure to use the pipe curving away from the house.

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S T E A LT H S AT E L L I T E S

MAKING CHANGES

When installing asatellite dish, keep your neighbor in mind. Generally, the installer will try to put the dish in the easiest spot, but you must make sure it is positioned in the least visible area. It should not be seen from the street, hanging over the party wall onto your neighbor’s property, or anywhere it can be seen by your neighbor. It can be mounted on the party wall, but it must be set farther back from the street so it is out of view as much as possible.

Before you begin any outdoor projects or make any changes to the exterior of your home or lot, remember to fill out and submit an Architectural Review Committee form BEFORE beginning the project. If the owner fails to get the proper approval before installation, the work is subject to removal at the owner’s expense. The form can be found at the bottom of the weekly, Wednesday email blast and is quite simple to complete. Turn around time is generally about 14 days.

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M A I N TA I N I N G C O M M O N A R E A S

WHICH LIGHT IS RIGHT

Many of the common areas within Mountain Bridge are considered 404 washes. This means the Army Corp of Engineers has deemed that this area is to remain “natural” and can not be disturbed. For example, if a cacti is to fall in this area, we are required to leave it be. Nothing is to be removed, added, or manipulated by human hands, unless it is for the removal of trash.

The sidewalk lights along the city sidewalks are the responsibility of City of Mesa. If you notice one of these lights is not working, let the association know and we will contact the City. Lights within the common areas, and at gated entries are the responsibility of the association. The gate houses have photosensors and turn on and off automatically.

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BUILDING IN THE BACK

POLITICAL SIGNS

Planning to build in the backyard? Get it approved first. Items like play equipment, trampolines, solar collectors, gazebos and storage sheds REQUIRE that an ARC form be submitted for approval BEFORE any work begins. Don’t be caught off guard, there are very specific heights and set backs that are required for these types of installations.

A political sign is the only type of sign permitted in the community, but only one can be displayed per yard. According to state law, signs that are approved may be displayed 71 days prior to an election and only seven days after it has ended by state law.

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OPEN HOUSE INFO

KNOW IT ALL

Only one For Sale or For Rent sign may be placed on your property, and nothing may hang over a wall. Please ask your Realtor to contact the Association for the Open House brochure. It contains information about reserving A-frame gate signs, where to place signs outside the community, and other commonly asked questions.

There is so much more information available for residents wanting to be a good neighbor in Mountain Bridge. Be sure to read the complete CC&Rs (last updated October 2017). The information is available as a link on the weekly, Wednesday, email blast or just ask for an emailed copy.

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NEIGHBORHOOD G AT E S Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. - J.R.R. Tolkien

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ach neighborhood in the Mountain Bridge community has an entry gate requiring residents and their visitors to use a gate access remote, provide an access code, or prompt the gate directory to make a telephone call to request the gate be opened.

association office and fill out the gate access form so it can be customized for the new owner. Replacement gate access remotes are available for $50.

G AT E A C C E S S R E M O T E . Each household is

To begin: Press and hold the HomeLink button until LED on vehicle flashes slowly. Continue holding the HomeLink button. Press gate remote for 2 seconds and then release. Repeat the previous steps until the LED light flashes quickly. Once flashing quickly, programming is complete. The first time you test the HomeLink button at the gate be sure to have the gate remote handy.

given two remotes at the time of purchase from the builder, and should receive two remotes from the seller on a resale. Some of the remotes are taupe/ gray, while others are black. The taupe/gray remotes need to be aimed at the key pad at the gate when the button is pressed. The black remotes need to be aimed at the gate when the button is pressed. Only the black remotes can be programmed to vehicles with the HomeLink system. In order to initialize the remotes for the first time, please visit the association office and fill out the gate access form. This form will ask you to select your PIN number, disclose the color, and document the serial number on each remote. Once this information is entered into the software and it is updated at the keypad, the remotes will work. Resale homeowners are also encouraged to visit the

H O M E L I N K I N S TA L L AT I O N If your car has the

HomeLink system installed, the black, ACT-31B remotes can be programmed into its system.

If these instructions do not work, refer to your vehicle’s owners manual, or visit www.HomeLink.com for vehicle model specific instructions. F O U R D I G I T P I N . Each household may select a

unique, four-digit PIN number to use at the gate for direct entry into the neighborhood. This is the number you give to people you trust to have access to your residence at any time. Still using the temporary builder code (8110) issued when you first moved in? It is time to get your own


number. The builder code is cancelled by management as neighborhoods fill. If you don’t have your PIN number, call the association office and we will update your information so you aren’t left stranded.

G AT E D I R E C T O R Y. Unexpected visitor? Pizza delivery

person? These are the types of people who will be using the gate directory to call and ask permission for entry. As they drive up to the gate and look at the keypad, they can arrow to find your name and select the button to call you. If you have made arrangement with the office to use this service, the call will ring on the phone number provided. You answer the phone, ask who it is, decide if you are willing to let the visitor in the gate, and if the answer is YES, you press and hold 9 on your phone, or press repeatedly on a cell. The gates will open and the vehicle may enter.

Remember, you can always change your PIN code if there is ever a time you feel it has been compromised. Call or stop in the association to make the change. U S I N G T H E P I N . Kids coming home? House cleaner

stopping by? Here is how to use the PIN number at the gate:

O P E N . O P E N . O P E N Here are a few random facts you

Step 1: Look to see if there is a red light blinking in the upper corner of the key pad box. If it is blinking when you arrive, the person before you locked up the system and you will need to wait for it to reset. In the meantime, tell your visitor to look around and count bunnies or geckos (or find the peacock that is roaming the neighborhood!) while they wait and the time will pass quickly. No blinking light? Move to the next step.

might want to know about the gates. The first is that these gates should not be considered a security measure, but instead, an inconvenient barrier. People who need to get in the gates on a regular basis have their own PIN; this includes the landscapers, FedEx, UPS, the USPS, police and fire departments. If the power goes out, the gates will automatically open and stay open. If an emergency vehicle goes into a neighborhood using a knox key, the gates will hold open until a knox key is used to close the gates. Occasionally, they forget and the association has to call and ask the captain to come back out and close the gates.

Step 2: Enter the four-digit number into the gate display pad and wait for the display to read “access granted.” The gates will open and your car can pass through. The gates will close behind your car. Step 3: To exit from the neighborhood, pull up to the gate in your vehicle. In a few seconds the gates will open and close behind your car. There is a sensor under the pavers that will open the gate.

Keep in mind, the streets behind each set of gates are private. The streets throughout the community leading up to the gates are City of Mesa. If you ever experience any issues with the gates, please let the association know. It is appreciated!

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P O S TA L DELIVERIES To write is human, to get mail: Devine!

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- Susan Lendroth

ven in this day and age, in a world filled with texts and emails, you can’t possibly feel at home until you start receiving mail in your very own mailbox.

key chain and the key will automatically remain in the lock once the door is open. If the parcel box lock should become stiff, gritty, or hard to open, be sure to let the association know so it can be repaired.

If you purchased your new home from Blandford Homes you were given two key and the directions to find your neighborhood mailbox.

M A I L B O X K E Y S are the owner’s responsibility.

If you purchased a Mountain Bridge home as a resale, you should have received a least one key and the directions to find your neighborhood mailbox. If not, stop by the HOA and we can help you locate the proper bank and box where your mail will be delivered. Mountain Bridge Community Association is responsible for the care and maintenance of all the hardware related to the banks, mailboxes, and parcel boxes throughout the community, not the United States Post Office. So, if you have any issues, call the association.

If keys are lost, the resident will be charged for the service call. If you need additional keys for your mailbox, you can have more keys cut from your master at any key-making business. P O S T O F F I C E . If you need to contact the United

States Postal Service, be aware that the closest office is not our station. Mountain Bridge neighborhoods are handled through: USPS Desert Station - on Broadway, west of Power Road, 480-641-1166. If there is odd or suspicious package or mail delivery from USPS, call the post office and the police. This includes unfamiliar people loitering near mailboxes, missing packages, shifty delivery behavior, etc. E L I M I N AT E T H E D A N G L E . If your neighbor’s keys

P A R C E L B O X K E Y S . A parcel box key is left in

your mailbox by the postal delivery person if you have a large package that will not fit in your space. Use the parcel key to unlock the box noted on the

are dangling from a mailbox but no one is in sight, note the box number/bank and contact the association office to get the keys back where they belong.


B U L L E T I N B O A R D . The display cases located near each of the mailboxes

are managed by the association, and filled with event flyers and other important information for residents. Please do not tape or attach anything to the exterior of these units. Boards are not to be used for selling items or advertising commercial businesses. If you wish to make arrangement to post information inside the bulletin board, contact the association office.

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PHOTOS The Mountain Bridge Woofstock Celebration is the perfect place to have your pet blessed by our very own Padre Dave, get the best kind of smooch in the kissing booth, and find out about all things pet related! Owners who brought man’s best friend to the festivities had a free lunch at Mugsy Dogs. There isn’t anything wrong with hot dogs at a dog event, right?


PAINTING FAQS All you need to paint are a few tools, a little instruction, and a vision in your mind. -Bob Ross

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Q: Where do I get an ARC application form? A: The form can be obtained from the association office or from the link in the weekly, Wednesday, e-mail newsletter. Print out the form, fill it out, and return it to the association office by e-mail, fax, or in person. Q: How long does it take to get approval? A: Generally, the Board meets every two weeks. The community manager then calls with the results, and follows up with a letter.

hinking of painting your home? Here are some of the most frequently asked questions:

Q: What colors may I paint my house? A: All exterior paint color must be selected from the color palette approved for that neighborhood. This is available from the association office via the Architectural Review Committee. Q: If I am repainting using the existing color, do I need to submit an approval form? A: No, there is no approval needed when repainting your home the original color.

Q: What color is the exterior block wall in my yard? A: Sherwin Williams, Blandford Mountain Bridge Gold, 100%, Acrylic Flat Q: Who paints the exterior wall? A: The association is responsible for the exterior surface of the block wall in all neighborhoods, except Estrella Vista.

Q: How do I know which colors were originally used to paint the exterior or the interior of my house? A: Contact Blandford Homes Customer Service to see if they still have records on file for your home, 480-892-4492.

Q: How often is the exterior wall painted? A: Approximately, every 5 to 6 years.

Q: If I want to change the exterior colors of my house, do I need approval? A: Yes, the colors must be selected from the existing paint palettes available in the association office.

Q: What color is the wrought iron in my yard? A: Sherwin Williams, Blandford Mountain Bridge Fence, Brown, Oil Base, Semi Gloss. Q: What if I want to paint the interior of my wall a different color? A: A sample of the paint color needs to be submitted to the Architectural Review Committee for approval before painting begins.

Q: I live in a Villas neighborhood. What am I responsible for painting and what does the association paint? A: The association is responsible for the exterior surfaces of the home, including stucco and paint. The owner is responsible for gates, and doors, including the garage door.

Q: Who paints the view fence in the exterior wall? A: The association is responsible for painting the metal fence.

Q: When filling out the ARC application form what other information is required? A: You will need to list the colors currently on the house, the new colors being painted on the house, and note that the colors of each house next door to you are not painted these colors.

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KEEPING SAFE

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he Mountain Bridge Community Association is diligent about the welfare of its residents and maintaining the community amenities. In an effort to convey this dedication, the Association presents this information guide as a resource and a starting place when planning your family’s emergency preparedness plan. Inside this section, residents will find information regarding household emergency preparedness as well as view the established operational guidelines set in place for community during emergency conditions.


MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. - Benjamin Franklin

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• • • • •

s a matter of practice and service, CCMC has developed an emergency plan for Mountain Bridge staff to oversee during a crisis. Steps include educating residents, communicating to the owners, implementing steps devised in the plan, and evaluating and updating the plan on a regular basis.

Nuclear power and nuclear blast/ Radiological emergencies Chemical threat and biological weapons Cyber attacks Explosion Civil unrest

In most cases the City of Mesa responds to emergencies and assumes coordination of the emergency. However, the Mountain Bridge Community Manager may declare a site emergency and communicate with owners/residents about the plans being implemented.

DEFINITION OF A DISASTER A community wide emergency/disaster is an event involving the entire community or a significant portion of it. An event that involves one or even several homes is not to be considered a disaster.

FOUR PHASES OF DISASTER EXPLAINED Mitigation Mitigation involves steps to reduce vulnerability to disastrous impacts such as injuries and loss of life and property. This might involve questioning, monitoring, and maintaining the efforts being made regarding buildings, public infrastructures; and other efforts needed to make the community more resilient to a catastrophic event.

Below is a list of the various types of disasters – both natural and man-made or technological in nature – that can impact a community: Natural Disasters • Agricultural diseases & pests • Damaging winds • Drought and water shortage • Earthquakes • Emergency diseases (pandemic influenza) • Extreme heat • Floods and flash floods • Hail • Hurricanes and tropical storms • Landslides & debris flow • Thunderstorms and lighting • Tornadoes • Wildfire • Sink holes • Technology disasters • Hazardous materials • Power service disruption & blackout

All Association employees and board members who are readily available and accessible will be utilized first. However, in certain circumstances, neighborhood representatives may be necessary to account for and verify the safety of the residents. Preparedness Preparedness focuses on understanding how a disaster might impact the community and how education, outreach and training can build capacity to respond to and recover from a disaster. This may include engaging the community, pre-disaster strategic planning, and other logistical readiness activities.

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Management will make the emergency plan available on a regular basis so residents can be familiar with it and have time to plan and prepare. Communication before, during, and after an incident is an important service the Association will coordinate with the City of Mesa, Maricopa County, State of Arizona, and the association’s management company, CCMC.

Triage efforts assess and deal with the most pressing emergency issues. This period is often marked by some level of chaos, which can be lengthy, depending on the nature of the disaster and the extent of damage. City, State and Federal resources, such as action from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (in the case of a major disaster declaration) and non-profit resources such as the Red Cross are deployed immediately.

When disaster threatens be sure to listen to local radio and television reports. If possible, residents will be kept up-todate via the MBCA emails, the Facebook page, on the association office door, and at the bulletin boards near mailboxes at each community. In the event of a power outage the emergency response team will be equipped by the association with two-way radios, and battery operated bullhorns.

Recovery Recovery is the fourth phase of disaster and is the restoration of all aspects of the disaster’s impact on a community. The recovery phase of disaster can be broken into two periods. The short-term phase typically lasts from six months to at least one year and involves delivering immediate services. The long-term phase requires thoughtful strategic planning and action to address more serious or permanent impacts of a disaster.

Response Response addresses immediate threats presented by the disaster, including saving lives, communicating with those involved, meeting humanitarian needs (food, shelter, clothing, public health and safety), clean up, damage assessment, and the start of resource distribution.

After the initial crisis is over, the MBCA Team will do its best to communicate the restoration process. Emergency response will vary depending on the extent of the situation. Most situations can be handled with the existing staff and neighborhood or resident involvement.

In most cases of an emergency, the local and state authorities will conduct the response plan; but as a community we must also prepare ourselves in the event those resources are maximized.

PHOTOS All of these photos are from the Dino Dig in the Owners’ Club Park. It was definately an emergency! Our smallest paleontogists saved our park from hatching dinosaur eggs. Because of the bravery of these short residents, the play equipment was not destroyed by out-of-control reptiles.

As the response period progresses, focus shifts from dealing with immediate emergency issues to conducting repairs, restoring utilities, establishing operations for public services, and finishing the clean up process.

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MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

C R E AT I N G YOUR SAFET Y BLUEPRINT WHERE TO BEGIN

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ach household needs an emergency action plan. This should include a checklist of the steps required to secure the home and prepare for possible evacuation. A good checklist should prioritize the necessities that are needed first and foremost. Then remember, once the checklist is in place it should be periodically rehearsed and supplies should be inspected. MAKE A PLAN A “Family Emergency Plan” is as individual as the families designing it. The level of emergency preparedness is the decision of each household. There is no right or wrong plan, just remember that “failing to plan - is a plan to fail”. LEARN FIRST AID First aid can help a person survive and function with injuries and illnesses that would otherwise kill or cripple. Take time now to learn basic first aid and CPR and gather the supplies you will need to stock a first aid kit. Include basic over the counter items like ibuprofen, acetaminophen, antacid, and benadryl. UPDATE RECORDS Make a visual or written record of all your household possessions. Record model and serial numbers of major appliances. Know your vehicle identification number. Store a second set of this information off-site. PREPARE AN EVACUATION PLAN An evacuation plan should include a much wider scope than just your home. It is important to have paper maps of the community, the city, and the state in case there is a disruption in Wi-Fi or cellular service. Be familiar with the area and ways to move out quickly. Map routes in advance so you know where you will go.

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HOUSE EVACUATION Plan two ways out of every room of the house, and make sure windows will open easily. Consider providing rope ladders if your house is more than two stories high. Create easy access for disabled or elderly people in your home. Pick a place outside the house to meet. MAIN SHUT OFF LOCATIONS Teach family where and how to turn off water, gas, and electrical at main shut-off locations. COMMUNICATIONS Have written records of emergency phone numbers in case cell phones don’t work. Know your neighbors and their phone numbers; you may need each other in an emergency. Appoint an out-of state contact person to communicate with in case family is separated. Keep communication lines open during an emergency. SHELTER Protecting your family from the elements is critical. Make a plan to create/store a form of shelter protection from rain, extreme heat or cold exposure. This could be anything from plastic sheeting to a tent. WATER & HYDRATION A human body can survive approximately three days without access to water. Make sure you have at least three different ways to access water. Use large barrels for storage, portable water containers in case you need to evacuate, and plan for a way to purify water if you have access but it is unsafe to drink (boiling, filtration or chemical treatment). FOOD & NUTRITION Depending on the environment, temperature, activity level, and physical condition a human can survive approximate-

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ly three weeks. Items high in protein are important. Think about the food you have on hand that could be used in an emergency and fill in where needed. Another option is purchasing a 72-hour emergency food storage kit for each person in your home. SANITATION & HYGIENE During periods of emergency or disaster, sanitation levels can deteriorate rapidly and disease can spread and even cause death in a matter of days. Maintaining good hygiene will prevent disease and illness from spreading. You will need to plan for a way to use the bathroom, a way to keep your living environment clean, and a way to keep your hands, mouth, and body clean. FIRST AID It’s important to have a first aid kit to treat any type of trauma; like lacerations which may become infected, bites or stings from venomous animals, bites leading to disease, infection through food, animal contact, drinking contaminated water, bone fractures, sprains, burns, poisoning from plants or fungi. TOOLS A complete set of tools is among the most basic essentials in an emergency. By planning ahead you can greatly increase your ability to provide for your family. Essentials include a pocket knife, shovel, pliers, and compass - especially if you are in a situation requiring you to flee quickly. Consider light to be a tool as well. Pack flashlights, lanterns, headlamp, glow sticks or other sustainable sources.


MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

DO YOU KNOW HOW TO... Take a few minutes to read through the lists below. These ideas may seem obvious, but they may also spark a new thought or make you consider something new!

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1

FILL A SAND BAG?

D E C I D E W H AT T O D O F I R S T ?

To fill a sandbag properly, use a shovel to fill each bag onehalf to two-thirds full. The bag should lay fairly flat when filled. Overfilled/tight bags won’t nestle into one another creating a leaky sandbag wall. Tying bags is not necessary.

Before a medical emergency arises, make sure you can: • Locate the first aid kit and AED machines in the gym or either of the Villas Members’ Clubs. • Know where to call 911 if you don’t have a phone. • How you can notify the Community Manager. • Know how to take charge of the area until relieved by CCMC personnel, community manager, developer/ board of directors or law enforcement. • Be able to follow directions of the Community Manager or his/her designee. • Keep detailed notes of the incident. • Maintain rumor control - official information will be released, if needed, through the chain of command.

Free sand and bags are available for Mesa residents, but come prepared with your own shovel. Sand bags are constantly being replenished throughout the day.

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Mesa Fire Station 216 7966 E McDowell Rd · (480) 644-2101

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Mesa Fire Station 213 7816 E University Dr · (480) 644-2101

East Mesa Service Center, 6935 E. Decatur

For more information about sandbag availability in Mesa call 480-644-2160

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3 PACK A B U G - O U T BAG? An evacuation bag or “bug-out bag” is a portable kit containing items you would need in order to survive for seventy-two hours away from your home when evacuating from a disaster. This bag should contain: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

Food and water (as much as you can carry) Portable radio and extra batteries First aid kit and handbook 5-day supply of regular medications Copy of prescriptions Rescue whistle Toilet paper and personal hygiene supplies Emergency lighting and batteries Large garbage bags and paper towels Change of clothing, sturdy shoes, and a hat Dust mask Pen, paper, scissors, and tape Cash in small denominations (no larger than $5s) Maps (do not rely on GPS) Notarized copies of important documents: health insurance card, passports, drivers license/ ID, birth certificate, social security card, deeds, titles, insurance policies/policy numbers and carrier contact information Photos of family members for reunification purposes Printed list of contact phone numbers

5 RECOGNIZE A MONSOON? Mountain Bridge Community is located in south central Arizona which has a distinct desert climate subject to seasonal monsoon storms. These storms can bring strong winds and damaging micro-bursts causing localized severe damage. The official monsoon season is June 15 - September 15, however, storms with strong winds can occur anytime of the year. Since the velocity of rainfall prevents adequate absorption of the rain into the soil, rapid runoff washes over the desert floor results in flash flooding. The results of flash flooding via washes include rapid rise in water height and volume even if the storm is not in the immediate area. The volume and velocity of the water picks up debris in the stream bed causing further damage to the landscape and structures downstream.

S H E LT E R I N P L A C E ? At some time, you may be instructed by local officials to ‘Shelter-in-Place’ to reduce your exposure to some type of hazardous materials in the air. The purpose is to create an enclosure that is as airtight as possible to prevent the hazardous material from reaching the enclosure’s occupants. The following are steps to be taken only when instructed to ‘Shelter-in-Place’, not to be completed ahead of time: • If instructed, go indoors immediately • Close and lock all doors and windows, so everything is shut tight • Turn off air handling systems such as window fans, kitchen and bath exhaust fans, air conditioners, and other sources pulling outside air into the house • Shut off clothes dryers and seal exhaust vent. • Do not use the fireplace, and close the fireplace flue • Seal off cracks allowing air leakage to the outside • Keep pets indoors • Go to an above-ground room with the fewest windows and doors • Take your prepared 72-hour kit with you • If traveling in a motor vehicle, close the windows and air vents. Turn off the heater and air conditioner • Keep the radio tuned to an Emergency Alert Station • If outside, go into a nearby building; if none is available, leave the area immediately • If sheltering-in-place is recommended during school hours, children will be sheltered right in the school building and cared for by school personnel • Don’t use the phone unless for special assistance • Stay inside until officials say otherwise. If you go outside, cover your nose and mouth with a folded damp cloth. Persons with respiratory disorders should not go out at all

6 PACK A N EMERG EN C Y PE T BAG? Pet food, treats, and drinkable water in plastic bottles Non-electrical can opener for canned food Pet medications and medical records in a water-proof bag A list with the name/address/phone of veterinarian Current photos of your pet in case they get lost. Pet beds, toys - but only if there is room Sturdy leashes, harnesses and/or carriers


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R E S P O N D TO A VA R I E T Y O F E M E R G E N T S I T U AT I O N S ?

H AV E S H E LT E R I N P L A C E SUPPLIES? Gathering emergency supplies will give you time think about what you really need in advance, ultimately leaving more time to make immediate plans during the crisis. Below is a list of suggested items to consider if you are sheltering in place:

These emergency situations need quick action. Here are tips for making the right decisions for your family: CHEMICALS AND RADIATION • Following an accident, local authorities will monitor any release of radiation and determine the level of protective actions and when the threat has passed • Bring household members and pets inside • Limit the time spent near sources of radiation and stay as far from the emergency site as possible • The most heavy, dense materials between you and the source of radiation, the better • Cover your mouth and nose with a damp cloth and keep your body fully covered • Use all the techniques listed in the ‘Stay-in-Place’ list to secure yourself and your home • Close all exterior/interior doors and window • Turn off heating, air conditioning and fans • Avoid eating or drinking anything uncovered • Prepare for possible evacuation

Water—minimum of 3 days water • One gallon of water per person per day for drinking and cooking (note: water can be stored in a dark area for up to a year but don’t use milk jug-type containers) • Water for pets • Toilet flushing requires additional water Food—minimum of 3 days food. Select items that do not require much cooking or preparation: • Ready to eat canned meats, soups, juices, fruits and veggies • High energy food (peanut butter, jelly, crackers, energy bars, trail mix) • Supplies for infants, elderly and those with special diets • Beans and rice (neither requires heat, just soaking) • Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) • Dehydrated foods • Emergency food rations

DOWNED POWER LINE • Call 911 • Stay 100+ feet away from downed power line • If the power line has fallen on your car while you’re in it, don’t touch anything metal in the car and stay inside until professional help arrives • Never try to help someone trapped by a power line, call for help immediately

Equipment - know if your community uses gas • Flashlight (do not store with batteries inside) • Extra batteries • Lantern/candles • Emergency radio • Alternate cooking appliance • Paper plates and disposable utensils • Non electric can opener • First aid kit / supplies / prescription meds • Toilet paper/paper towels • Extra glasses or contacts • Hand sanitizer • Hygiene products • Deck of cards or board game • Cash • Change of clothing • Sturdy closed toed shoes

FLOODING • If told to evacuate, do so quickly • Stay away from storm drains/irrigation ditches • Avoid downed power lines • Don’t drink tap water • Leave low-lying areas immediately • If your car stalls in rapidly rising water, get out of the car and seek higher ground immediately. • Do not drive through/around police or construction barricades; these are in place for your safety • Walking and driving through flood water is very dangerous. Just a few inches of flood water has enough force to move a car • Have sandbags available

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MONSOONS/STORMS/TORNADOS • Monsoons commonly include lightning, strong winds, heavy rain, and flooding • Stay away from windows during strong winds. Tree limbs and other wind-borne objects can be a hazard • Go to a bathroom, closet or interior hallway in the center of a building on the lowest floor • Bring in or secure outdoor furniture, and make sure awnings and window screens are secure • Park your cars in the garage. • Disconnect computers, TVs and other delicate electronic equipment • Use surge protectors to plug in electronic devices. Unplug outdoor electrical appliances, too • Electrical wiring attracts lightning, so avoid using a landlines telephone, except for emergencies

PET EMERGENCIES • If you need to evacuate, it’s important to take your pet with you if it is practical. However, never compromise the safety of your family • All pets should have identification tags and a collar • Contact hotels outside your immediate area and ask about pet policies • If you may need to evacuate, keep pets inside and nearby so you don’t need to hunt for them • In case of lost pets contact Arizona Human Society or Maricopa County Animal Care and Control Services. SPECIAL NEEDS The elderly, babies, and other special needs residents must have an advocate who is willing to make sure everyone around them is safe. • Make a preventative plan to meet with your personal care attendant to discuss the procedures to take in special circumstances • Know how to connect or start a back-up power supply for essential medical equipment • If you use a wheelchair, make sure more than one exit is accessible • Teach others how to operate medical equipment • Identify two people to assist those with a disability • Assign a friend to check in on the person with a disability if an emergency should arise • Consider getting a medical alert system allowing you to call for help if immobilized • Have a supply of emergency back-up equipment stored on and off site • Keep an updated list of medication, phone numbers of medical providers, and emergency contacts

LIGHTNING • Know that you are in a strike zone if you hear thunder less than five seconds after seeing lightning • Lightning is attracted to tall objects, metal, wide open spaces, and water • Get at least seven feet away from tall objects • Stay off hilltops and other high points of land • Get to the lowest point of ground you can, and kneel or squat to minimize your contact points with the ground. Do not lie flat. This will make you a bigger target. • Don’t huddle with others. Spread out 15+ feet apart • Avoid metal objects such as golf carts, golf clubs, lawn mowers, umbrellas, and pipes. Remove golf shoes or steel-toed boots • Let swimmers know to leave the water when lighting occurs. Get out and get to land.

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MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

• WILDFIRE A wild land fire burns rapidly and winds can make it unpredictable, so be very cautious when attempting to control a brush fire with a garden hose. Prevent a fire by: • Creating a 30-foot “defensible space” - an area free of dried grass or other highly flammable dry vegetation around your home. • Living plants don’t need to be removed from around the home; only things that are dead or dry. • Removing dead branches or leaves from living trees and cut the brush and grass around trees short. Also, clear all flammable items and foliage from underneath wooden decks and overhangs. • Reporting brush fires immediately by dialing 911 - never assume someone else will make the call. • Back your car into the garage or park it in an open space facing the direction of escape. Shut doors and roll up windows. Leave keys in ignition. • Close garage doors/windows. Disconnect automatic garage openers. • Confine pets. Make plans to care for pets and have all supplies ready in case you must evacuate. • Follow instructions of emergency personnel. If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. • Wear protective clothing, sturdy shoes, cotton or wool clothing, long pants, long sleeved shirt, gloves and handkerchiefs to protect your face. • Lock your home, and tell someone where you are going • Choose a route away from fire hazard and watch for changes in the fire’s speed and direction. • Never throw a cigarette butt on the ground or out a car window. Deposit all cigarette butts properly. • Mountain Bridge amenities are a smoke-free zone.

SUSPICIOUS PACKAGES Receiving packages and mail order deliveries on our front porch or in our mailbox is common for most people. Watch for: • Excessive postage, excessive weight, lopsided or uneven envelope, no return address • Handwritten or poorly typed address • Misspellings of common words • Oily stains, discolorations or odor • Protruding wires or aluminium foil • Excessive masking tape, string, etc. • Ticking sound • Marked with restrictive endorsements, such as “personal” or “confidential” • Shows a city or state postmark that doesn’t match the return address UTILITY OUTAGE A power outage can be a common occurrence in the heat of the summer (due to high use), transformer fires, during monsoon season, a common storm, or during cold weather. Other utility problems might involve gas leaks, sewer and water line damage. Generally utility outages are short-lived. • If you are not sure if the power is out at just your house or all over the neighborhood, check to see if your neighbors have their lights on. If they do, reset your circuit breaker. • Call SRP (use a cell phone or a neighbor’s phone) to find out how long the power will be down. • Use flashlights instead of candles. • Turn off all lights and major appliances (computers, air conditioners/heaters, and TVs). When the power returns, wait a few minutes before turning anything on - then do it one appliance at a time. • Know what to do in case of a gas leak. If you smell gas, open a window or door and leave the building. • Gas settles to the floor; stay upright/high/standing. • Turn off the gas at the outside main valve and call the gas company. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional. • Electrical system damage can be identified by looking for sparks, frayed or broken wires, or the smell of hot insulation. Turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker if the area is dry. Otherwise, call an electrician. • If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid running water, showering, or using the toilets - and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water department and avoid using water from the tap. If you have a pool, remember you have a huge supply of water.

WILD ANIMALS People who live in Mountain Bridge can expect to see many species of wildlife. On any given day you might see, coyotes, javelina, vultures, snakes, and some crazy-looking bugs. Learning to co-exist with wildlife is the best way to enjoy the wildlife. • Never approach a wild animal. • If an animal approaches, pick up your pet. • Humans are dominant and must act that way by maintaining eye contact if an animal approaches . • Scare off animals by making loud noises. • Throw small rocks in their direction if they approach. • Don’t stimulate an animal’s chase instinct by running. • Do not feed or water wildlife. • Do not feed pets outside and keep bird feeders up high. • Trim back bushes to eliminate hiding places. • Install outdoor lighting.

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M O U N TA I N B R I D G E N E I G H B O R H O O D S Sorted by Location Parcel

Neighborhood

1

Sanctuary

2

Sorted Alphabetically

Location

Parcel

Neighborhood

Location

North

10

Bella Via

North

Summit

North

12

Canyon Gate

South

4A

Estancia

North

17

Canyon Preserve

South

4B

Eagle Ridge

North

8

Carmel

North

5

Riviera

North

19

Corte Bella

South

6

The Reserve

North

4B

Eagle Ridge

North

7

Stonegate

North

EV

Ellsworth Villas

South

8

Carmel

North

14

Entrada

South

9

Monterey

North

27

Escalante

South

10

Bella Via

North

4A

Estancia

North

ESV

Estrella Vista

North

23B/232

Estates at Valencia

South

12

Canyon Gate

South

ESV

Estrella Vista

North

13

Seville

South

20

Lantana E & W

South

14

Entrada

South

24

Legacy N & S

South

19

Corte Bella

South

26

Montebella

South

20

Lantana E & W

South

25

Montecito

South

23A/231

Valencia

South

9

Monterey

North

23B/232

Estates at Valencia South

5

Riviera

North

24

Legacy N & S

South

1

Sanctuary

North

25

Montecito

South

13

Seville

South

26

Montebella

South

7

Stonegate

North

27

Escalante

South

2

Summit

North

EV

Ellsworth Villas

South

6

The Reserve

North

17

Canyon Preserve

South

23A/231

Valencia

South


MOUNTAIN BRIDG E | WELCOME HOME MAG A ZINE

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I M P O R TA N T C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N LOCAL Emergency..................................................................................... 911 Mesa Police Non-Emergency................................480-644-2211 Mesa Fire Non-Emergency....................................480-644-2211 Maricopa County Sheriff Non-Emergency.........602-876-1011 ASSOCIATION Mountain Bridge Community Association.........480-284-4510. 8730 E. Mountain Bridge Drive After Hours Answering Service....................... 1-800-274-3165 Blandford Customer Service..................................480-892-4492 CCMC Management Company.............................480-921-7500 DLC Resources Learning Center (Landscaping) dlcresources.com/learning-center ANIMALS Arizona Humane Society...................................... (602) 997-7585 www.azhumane.org Maricopa Animal Care and Control Services... (602) 506-7387 www.maricopa.gov/pets/ Arizona Game and Fish......................................... (602) 942-3000 https://www.azgfd.com/ CITY OF MESA Facebook Updates - www.facebook.com/CityofMesa Twitter Updates - Follow @MesaAzGov ELECTRICITY AND WATER Salt River Project (SRP)......................................... (602) 236-8888 Outage or Downed Power Lines - Mesa.......... (480) 644-2266 Emergency..................................................................................... 911 Downed Power Lines - SRP...................................602-236-8811 Emergency..................................................................................... 911 EMERGENCY ORGANIZATIONS Dept. of Emergency and Military Affairs www.dem.azdema.gov Emergency and Preparedness & Prevention.... (800) 424-9346 www.epa.gov/swercepp Federal Emergency Management Agency........ (800) 480-2520 www.fema.gov Maricopa County Emergency Management.... (602) 273-1411 www.maricopa.gov/emerg-mgt/ National Safety Council........................................ (630) 285-1121 www.nsc.org OSHA www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness Ready.Gov www.ready.gov Red Cross www.redcross.org

FIRE Emergency................................................................................. 911 Mesa Fire Station 216...................................... (480) 644-2101 7966 E McDowell Rd Mesa Fire Non-Emergency................................480-644-2211 Mesa Water Operations Division...................(480) 312-5650 National Fire Protection Assoc.......................(800) 344-3555 www.nfpa.org AZ Interagency Wild Fire Info www.wildlandfire.az.gov GAS Natural Gas Leak - Mesa.................... 911 or (480) 644-4277 HEALTH Arizona Department of Health Services.......(602) 542-1001 hs.state.az.us/ Banner Baywood Hospital................................ 480-321-2000 222-248 S Power Rd, Mesa, AZ 85206 Dignity Health.....................................................(480) 728-8000 3555 S Val Vista Dr, Gilbert, AZ 85297 The Centers for Disease Control....................(800) 311-3435 www.cdc.gov MAIL/DELIVERY SERVICE Mesa Desert Station Post Office..................... 480-641-1166 6644 E Broadway Rd, Mesa, AZ 85206 U.S Postal Service.............................................(800) ASK-USPS www.usps.gov/ FedEx....................................................................(800) 463-3339 www.fedex.com UPS .......................................................................(800) 742-5877 www.ups.com RADIATION & CHEMICALS Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency...........(602) 255-4845 Chemtrec Emergency Hotline.........................(800) 424-9300 TRANSPORTATION Arizona Department of Transportation.......... 602-712-7355 Arizona Road Conditions............................... (888) 411-ROAD www.azfms.com Federal Highway Administration..................... 202-366-4000 www.fhwa.dot.gov WEATHER Phoenix Area Weather Service.......................(602) 275-0073 www.phx.noaa.gov The Weather Channel...................Ch. 69 on Mesa Cox Cable www.weather.com

Profile for Lisa Aitken Brennan

Mountain Bridge: Welcome Home  

A resident's guide to living in the Mountain Bridge Community.

Mountain Bridge: Welcome Home  

A resident's guide to living in the Mountain Bridge Community.

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