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Lindsey Karasik Master of Architecture 2018 University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning lmkara@umich.edu


TABLE OF CONTENTS STUDIO PROJECTS

REPRESENTATION

1

7

COLLECTIVE BACKYARD

90 90 TRYPTICH

Studio : Systems | FALL 2017 Instructors : Jon Rule, Mick Kennedy, Kevin Adkins

Studio : Situations | SPRING 2 Instructor : Thom Moran

2

8

FAME

Studio : Thesis | SPRING 2018 Instructor : Julia McMorrough

3

INTERSECTIONS

Studio : Institutions | FALL 2016 Instructor : John McMorrough

4

PLACE OF PRODUCTION

Studio : Propositions | SPRING 2017 Instructor : Mary-Ann Ray

5

ART GALLERY

Studio : Summer Intro | SUMMER 2015 Instructor : James Tate

6

SYMMETRY HOUSE

Studio : Form | FALL 2015 Instructor : Peter Halquist

PATTERN/STRUC

Course : Representation | FAL Instructor : Hans Tursack


N

2015

CTURE/SURFACE

LL 2016

FABRICATION 9

PHATEE

Course : Future Use | SPRING 2017 Instructor : Julia McMorrough

10 2017 ST ETIENNE DESIGN BIENNALE Position : Research Assistant | FALL 2016/SPRING 2017 Design Firm : Akoaki (Detroit, MI)


COLLECTIVE B AC KYA R D Studio : Systems | FALL 2017 Instructors : Jon Rule, Mick Kennedy, Kevin Adkins Situated in the Mexicantown neighborhood of Detroit, MI, Collective Backyard is a proposal for a new housing development that connects to the surrounding neighborhood, while creating a strong internal community structure. To this end, I, and two other group members, studied community at 3 different scales: NEIGHBORHOOD COLLECTIVE INDIVIDUAL


SITE DENSITY COMPARISON

Site Area: 42,908 sqft Acre: 43,560 sqft

Dearborn Heights - Typ Suburb

Mexicantwon, Detroit

COLLECTIVE BACKYARD

Lafayette Towers

Housing Area: 7,457 sqft 17% lot coverage

Housing Area: 7,961 sqft 18.5% lot coverage

Housing Area: 13,976 sqft 32.6% lot coverage

Housing Area: 13,685 sqft 31.9% lot coverage

7.5 Single Family Homes 6 Detached Garages

7.5 Single Family Homes 3.5 Detached Garages

55 Apartments 7 Garages

~315 Apartments Parking lot

~22-30 Residents

~22-30 Residents

~98 Residents

~945 Residents

Collective Backyard fits in the middle of the density spectrum, ranging from the low density of the Dearborn Heights suburb, to the high density of the Lafayette Towers housing project tower.

SITE APPROACH COMPARISON

INDIVIDUAL

PRIVATE INTERNAL

COLLECTIVE

STREET

LOT

ALLEY

PUBLIC CONNECTION

Single Family House

Courtyard

COLLECTIVE BACKYARD

The central axis through Collective Backyard extends the public realm from the busy street of Bagley all the way through the site.

NEIGHBORHOOD


C O L L E C T I V E

SECTIONAL POPULATION DENSITY OWNED SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSES

OWNED APARTMENTS ADJACENT TO CO-HOUSING SPACE SLEEP

4 Residents 1 Car

SLEEP

SLEEP

RENTED ROOMS CONNECTED TO SHARED LIVING SPACE

SLEEP

APT.

APT.

KITCHEN

APT.

APT.

APT.

EATING

STUDY LOUNGE

APT.

APT.

APT.

APT.

LAUNDRY PARKING

APT.

APT.

20 Residents 1 Car

KITCHEN

SLEEP

SLEEP

EATING

SLEEP

PARKING

LAUNDRY

SLEEP

SLEEP

12 Residents 1 Car

42’

SHARED LIVING

88’

SITE TYPOLOGIES

CO-HOUSING

SHARED LIVING COMMON HOUSE INTERNAL ACCESS

CO-HOUSING COMMON HOUSE

CO-HOUSING BALCONY ACCESS

ACCESSIBLE APT

ROOF GARDEN

MARKET PUBLIC CENTER

PUBLIC BAGLEY RD

GROUND FLOOR

N

BAGLEY RD

SECOND FLOOR

N

BAGLEY RD

N

THIRD FLOOR

Our project contains two models of collective living that contrast the model of the single family home. These models encourage the use of shared amenities and neighbor interaction, as well as create a diverse community by providing housing types for both long and short term residents.


16

8

7

2

13 10 9 1 2 1 - BALCONY WALKWAY 2 - KEY ACCESS 3 - LIGHT WELL 4 - ENTRY-WAY BRIDGE 5 - CO-HOUSING APT 6 - SHARED LIVING APT 7 - LAUNDRY 8 - SHARED VEHICLE 9 - SITE PAVILION COVERING 10 - PORCH 11 - LIVING SPACE 12 - LARGE KITCHEN 13 - TWO LEVEL APT 14 - DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE 15 - LOFTED BEDROOMS 16 - GREEN ROOF

4

5

CO-HOUSING NEIGHBORHOOD POPULATION: 20-24 ( x 3.5 NEIGHBORHOODS) CAR: 1

CO-HOUSING Co-housing apartments are individual apartments that are stacked vertically and sandwich a common house that provides shared services: laundry, electric car, and larger kitchen and dining areas for shared meals between neighbors.These apartments are adjacent to the common house and accessible via the shared balcony.


I N D I V I D UA L

10”

CO-HOUSING

6

8

15’ - 2”

2 1

1 11

13

7

10”

2

17’ - 2”

2

2

4

4

3

3 12

5 460 SQ FT, TYP.

1 - BALCONY WALKWAY 2 - KEY ACCESS 3 - LIGHT WELL 4 - ENTRY-WAY BRIDGE 5 - CO-HOUSING APT 6 - LAUNDRY 7 - SHARED VEHICLE 8 - WATER HEATER 9 - PORCH 10 - LIVING SPACE 11 - DOUBLE KITCHEN 12 - TWO LEVEL APT 13- DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE 14 - LOFTED BEDROOMS 15 - GREEN ROOF

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

1 - BALCONY WALKWAY 2 - KEY ACCESS 3 - LIGHT WELL 4 - ENTRY-WAY BRIDGE 5 - CO-HOUSING APT 6 - LAUNDRY 7 - SHARED VEHICLE 8 - WATER HEATER 9 - PORCH 10 - LIVING SPACE 11 - DOUBLE KITCHEN 12 - TWO LEVEL APT 13- DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE 14 - LOFTED BEDROOMS 15 - GREEN ROOF

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

1/4” = 1’-0”

1/4” = 1’-0”

Ground floor plan showing common house with shared garage/car and single story apartment.

3rd floor plan showing common house with shared large kitchen and double story apartment.


16

11

12

7

2 1

1 - BALCONY WALKWAY 2 - KEY ACCESS 3 - LIGHT WELL 4 - ENTRY-WAY BRIDGE 5 - CO-HOUSING APT 6 - SHARED LIVING APT 7 - LAUNDRY 8 - SHARED VEHICLE 9 - SITE PAVILION COVERING 10 - PORCH 11 - LIVING SPACE 12 - DOUBLE KITCHEN 13 - TWO LEVEL APT 14 - DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE 15 - LOFTED BEDROOMS 16 - GREEN ROOF

9 6

SHARED LIVING NEIGHBORHOOD POPULATION: 12-14 ( x 3 NEIGHBORHOODS) CAR: 1

SHARED-LIVING The shared living apartments consist of 10 bedroom units off of a vertical common house. While the bedroom/bathroom units are private, residents share all other amenities including laundry, double-kitchen, dining, study, and lounge.


I N D I V I D UA L

10’ - 11”

SHARED LIVING

4

4

8

4

147 SQ FT, TYP.

3

10”

208 SQ FT, TYP.

2

2

2

7

17’ - 2”

42’ - 4”

7 1

1

11

11

5

10”

10

2

10’ - 11”

4 1 - BALCONY WALKWAY 2 - KEY ACCESS 3 - LIGHT WELL 4 - PRIVATE BEDROOM 5 - LAUNDRY 6 - SHARED VEHICLE 7 - WATER HEATER / SHAFT 8 - PORCH 9 - LIVING SPACE 10 - DOUBLE KITCHEN 11- DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE 12 - GREEN ROOF

6

1 - BALCONY WALKWAY 2 - KEY ACCESS 3 - LIGHT WELL 4 - PRIVATE BEDROOM 5 - LAUNDRY 6 - SHARED VEHICLE 7 - WATER HEATER / SHAFT 8 - PORCH 9 - LIVING SPACE 10 - DOUBLE KITCHEN 11- DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACE 12 - GREEN ROOF

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1/4” = 1’-0”

1/4” = 1’-0”

Ground floor plan showing private bedroom units, shared laundry, and garage.

4

3

2nd floor plan showing private bedroom units and shared kitchen/dining


T.O. WALL = 47'-0" 1

ROOF = 45'-0"

5

1

Green roof Plants over media layer, geofabric, drainage layer, water reservoir, insulation and reinforced screed

2

Balcony Structure Steel I-Beams with a fixed plate connection to concrete panels and columns

3

Exterior Site Screen Folded perforated metal screen

4

Structural Shear walls 1’-0” Exposed concrete SIP walls, with 2” insulation

5

Infill �all� Light gauge 8” metal studs with 2 layers of gyp board

6

Window system Double glazing operably sliding window, with folding shutters

7

Facade Panels Metal panel rain-screen, white external walls , orange internal walls

8

Ceiling Drop gyp-board ceiling over kitchen

5

04 = 34'-0" 2

4

8

6

10 3

03M = 25'-6"

7

7

11

03 = 23'-0" 9

Floor Build-Up 10” two-way concrete slab, topped with 1-1/2” insulation and screed

10 Floor Build-Up 2 10” two-way concrete slab, topped with 1-1/2” insulation, screed and wood planks 11 Embossed steel deck Lightly open grate steel deck, over light gauge joists

12

12 Light Well 3’-10” x 12’0” space before unit window. Creating a separation between walkway and bringing light down behind screen 9

02M = 14'-6"

02 = 12'-0"

13

13 Site pavilion coverings Structure and screen extend in front of common houses creating exterior gathering rooms 14 Split Level 30” level change within apartment separating SERVICE and LIVING areas 15 Foundation Site poured concrete over 1’-0” insulation and pebbles 14

01M = 3'-6" 14

01 = 1'-0" 15

WALL SECTION 1/2” = 1’0”

CO-HOUSING_SECTION_DETAIL


The detailed section cuts through the co-housing apartments and describes the layered zones of space that range from the collective backyard, to the neighborhood balcony, to individual apartment. Within the apartment there are two zones: the front which is service space with wet programs like kitchen and bath, and the back living space. The two spaces are differentiated by a vertical shift, change in materiality, and use of screens.

1

1

Concrete Structural Walls 10” Cast in place concrete, with 1” XPS isolation break to transition to exterior wall

2

Steel Column Steel I-Beams with a fixed plate connection to end of concrete walls

3

Steel Beam 1 Primary beam connected to columns, bracing balcony and screen

4

Steel Beam 2 Below Secondary beam connected to concrete walls, bracing edge of light well

5

Steel Joist Below Secondary joist tieing back column and steel beam 1 to end of concrete wall

6

Perforated Aluminum Screen Bent metal panels, attached to steel stiffeners and steel column/beam

7

Embossed steel deck Lightly open grate steel deck, over light gauge joists

8

Light Well 3’-10” x 12’0” space before unit window, extends to ground. Framed by steel beam and joist. Wrapped with perforated aluminum screen guardrail

9

Infill Wall 9” Mineral wool insulation cavity, with double layers of gyp, clad with metal panel rain screen

2

11

12

6

3

7

4

8

13

10 9

14

10 Accordion Shutters Sliding system on track with perforated aluminum screen. 4 x 1’-3” 11 Accordion Window Sliding system on track for ventilation 12 Sliding Window Fixed insulated glass

5

PLAN_DETAIL

13 Window Bump-out Counter extends into window sill 14 Concrete Slab Exposed finished screed, over 1-1/2” insulation, over 8” cast in place two way slab


ELEVATION A

ELEVATION B

- 10’-0”

- 9’-0”

- 6’-6”

UNIT PLAN CO-HOUSING

42’ - 4”

- 7’-0”

- 6’-0”

PEDESTRIAN ALLEY

UNIT PLAN SHARED LIVING

ELEVATION B 1/8” = 1’0”

EAST ELEVATION

SECTION

- 2’-6” - 4’-0”

NEWARK ST

88’ - 0” ONE WAY TRAFFIC

COLLECTIVE ALLEY

- 5’-0”

SECTION

PEDESTRIAN ALLEY

136’ - 0” - 3’-0”

- 2’-0”

- 2’-0”

COMMUNITY CENTER

- 1’-0”

KITCHEN

MARKET

BUS STOP WAITING ELEVATION C

ELEVATION C

ELEVATION A

BAGLEY RD

ELEVATION B

0’”

ELEVATION A

GROUND FLOOR SITE PLAN

16TH ST

1/8” = 1’0”

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

N

WEST ELEVATION


FAME Studio : Thesis | Spring 2018 Instructor : Julia McMorrough FAME is a proposal for a performing arts school that explores animate character in terms of architectural form and narrative in terms of how the cast of architectural characters begin to form relationships between each other and the users that inhabit them.


F O R M A L _ S T U D I E S Initial formal studies for this project were based on a taxonomy of human movements that exhibit animate and performative characteristics. These movements were interpreted as formal objects through the manipulation of a generic tower block form, attempting to understand how the animate qualities of the human movements could translate onto the form.

Vogue

Arabesque

Twist

Walk

Pirouette

Leap

Sit

Leaping arabesque

Kick

Waddle


A N I M AT E _ A R C H I T E C T U R E These model studies take a look at the ways in which the initial formal studies can come together and begin to inform an architectural massing. By combining characters together, formal relationships between distinct characters become apparent as moments of gesture and posture in each form intersect or abut to become a new whole.


INTERIOR_STUDIES FAME is a performing arts school and is set up to serve the needs of dance, theater, music, and art academies. After gathering relevant program information including square footage requirements and specific interior program needs, I began studying ways in which the form of the characters could accomodate the program, as well as ways in which the program could begin to push against the form of the characters.


CHARACTER_PERFORMANCE In creating a formal organizational strategy, the characters were given designations of either supporting or featured characters. The supporting characters take positions that reduce or alter their full formal characteristics so they are not immediately recognizeable as distinct and individual characters; their job is to literally support the featured character formally. In contrast, the featured characters take positions that retain full formal characteristics and are recognized as distinct characters; they become the “stars� of the show.

FEATURED

SUPPORTING

FEATURED

SUPPORTING


SUPPORTING

FEATURED

FEATURED

SUPPORTING

SUPPORTING

SUPPORTING


A N I M AT E _ A R C H I T E C T U R E These sections demonstrate the architectural potential of the final supporting/ featured character groupings. In developing the building interiors, there was an ambition to both utilize the unique formal qualities of the characters and retain the solidity and distinct massing of the characters. At times the exterior form reveals what is happening on the interior and other times it does not.

SET_DESIGN/CONSTRUCTIO

T H E AT E R / A C T I N G _ A C A D E M Y

A RT _ A C A D E M Y


ON

DA N C E _ AC A D E M Y

G E N E R A L _ AC A D E M I C S _ S U P P O RT _ P RO G R A M S


F RO N T _ E L E VAT I O N

EXTERIOR_PERSPTECTIVES

B A C K _ E L E VAT I O N


ISOMETRIC


INTERSECTIONS Studio : Institutions | FALL 2016 Instructor : John McMorrough Intersections is a proposal for a middle school in Ann Arbor, MI. As a network of program, circulation, form, and user interaction, Intersections incorporates ideas of an interior urban condition to create situations of encounter between spaces of program, while the figural mass asserts its ormal di erence rom the surrounding architecture.


F O R M AT I O N

Overlap

Arbitrary Figures

Discipline

Formation Diagram Formally, this design was generated from the combination of three arbitrary figures arranged according to a nine square grid. This process created spatial intersections that contributed to the formation of a building as a complex network of spaces. P RO G R A M

Science: 7200 sqft

Admin: 4800 sqft

Classroom: 2350 sqft

Auditorium: 5040 sqft

Art: 1150 sqft

Library: 5040 sqft

Classroom: 4350 sqft

Art: 1150 sqft

Classroom: 4350 sqft

Auditorium: 5040 sqft

Music: 2500 sqft

Classroom: 4350 sqft

Cafeteria: 5440 sqft Aquatics: 7700 sqft

First Floor Program

Gym: 20000 sqft

Aquatics: 7700 sqft

Classroom: 4350 sqft

Gym: 20000 sqft

Second Floor Program

Program Diagram The program is organized so that classroom space is in close proximity to other classroom spaces, while the larger program spaces are restricted to first floor access and pushed towards the outer edge to allow for community access.


C I R C U L AT I O N

Fire Exit Fire Exit

Fire Exit Fire Exit

Fire Exit

First Floor Circulation

Second Floor Circulation

Circulation Diagram The circulation allows for increased flow between program spaces by offering opportunities to travel through and around groupings of program spaces. A LT E R N AT I V E _ U S E Monthly community art classes

Library computing resources available to community after school hours

Auditorium for community gatherings or presentations

Gym access for community sports leagues Community pool use for swimming lessons during summer

Alternative Use Diagram Larger program spaces towards the edge of the building will be available for seasonal and after-hours use by the community. Entry and building access will be restricted to the program


B B

A A

A A

A A

Southeast Elevation

B B F I R S T _ F L O O R _ P L A N@ 1 / 3 2 ” = 1 ’

SECOND

First Floor Plan at 1/32” First Floor Plan at 1/32” = 1’= 1’

Northeast Elevation

Se

Section A - A

SECTION_A-A


B B

A A

Section A - A

B B

D_FLOOR_PLAN @ 1 / 3 2 ” = 1 ’

Second Floor Plan at 1/32” econd Floor Plan at 1/32” = 1’= 1’

Section B - B

SECTION_B-B


ISOMETRIC


PLACE_OF_PRODUCTION Studio : Propositions | SPRING 2017 Instructor : Mary-Ann Ray Located in the Mustafa Bazaar wood market in Mumbai, this factory re-adapts an existing wood storage shed (12’ x 120’ x 30’) into a guitar factory. My interests and investigations in this proposal developed around the idea of a micro-factory, which incorporates elements of large-scale production factories and small-scale ateliers. Working with floor slabs of different sizes at different heights and proximities to one another, the processes of making a guitar feed into one another from the start at one end of the factory to final assembly at the other.


EXPLODED_AXON

T R A N S V E R S E _ S E C T I O N _ F RO N T

LONGITUDINAL_SECTION


T R A N S V E R S E _ S E C T I O N _ B AC K


INTERIOR_PERSPECTIVES


ART_GALLERY Studio : Summer Intro | SUMMER 2015 Instructor : James Tate Located in downtown Ann Arbor, this project is a three story art gallery proposal for an urban infill site. The design attempts to draw on stacking and crenelating self-similar triangular shapes, with a preference to the left side, in order to create interesting opportunities for interactions between interior and exterior.


B

B

A 0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

FIRST F LPlan O atO3/16” R _=P1’ L A N@ 3 / 1 6 ” = 1 ’ 1st_ Floor

A 0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

SECOND_FLOOR_PLAN @3/16”=1’ 2nd Floor Plan at 3/16” = 1’

0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

SSection E CATat 3/16” I O =N1’ _ A @ 3 / 1 6


A

THIRD_FLOOR_PLAN@ 3 / 1 6 ” = 1 ’

6”=1’

0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

3rd Floor Plan at 3/16” = 1’

SSection E C TB atI O N _ B@ 3 / 1 6 ” = 1 ’ 3/16” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

16’


SY M M E T RY _ H O U S E Studio : Form | FALL 2015 Instructor : Peter Halquist Located in Ann Arbor, Symmetry House is a proposal for a two story house with a roof garden. The design was inspired by a study of the structural and formal asymmetries of OMA’s Maison Bordeaux.


S Y M MStudies E T RY _ S T U D I E S Symmety

In these symmetry studies I took the plans, sections, and elevations of Maison Bordeaux, cut them along various axes, and mirrored them.


I then created a plan from the resulting bilaterally symmetrical forms. This plan was used as a base from which all three house plans were created. Ultimately, I attempted to retain a legibility of symmetry between floors despite formal differences on each floor.

BASE_PLAN


C

A

B

A

1st Floor Plan at 1/4” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

2nd Floor Plan at 1/4” = 1’ 16’

F I R S T _ F L O O R _ P L A N@ 1 / 4 ” = 1 ’

0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

SECOND_FLOOR_PLAN @ 1 / 4


C

C

B

A

Roof Plan at 1/4” = 1’

”=1’

0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

RO O F _ P L A N@ 1 / 4 ” = 1 ’

B


Section B at 1/4” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

Section A at 1/4” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

SECTION_A

Section B at 1/4” 16’

0’

2’

4’

8’

SECTION_ West Elevation at 1/4” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

16’

Section A at 1/4” = 0’

2’

4’

8’

East Elevation at 1/4” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

E A S T _ E L E VAT I O N

16’

N


” = 1’ 16’

B

= 1’ 16’

North Elevation at 1/4” = 1’ 0’

2’

4’

8’

N O RT H _ E L E VAT I O N

16’


S I T U AT I O N S Studio : Situations | SPRING 2015 Instructor : Thom Moran This project is a triptych completed in 9090 projection that attempted to incorporate a place: the suburbs, and event: an equestian jumping show, and a prepresentation style: Flower Corpse Glitch Set by teamLAB. As this was a group project, the layout of the drawing and the drawing components were produced collaboratively by myself and two other group members.


PAT T E R N _ S T R U C T U R E _ S U R FAC E Course : Representation | FALL 2016 Instructor : Hans Tursack This representation project prompted us to reconstruct architectural facades through a layering process. We were asked to consider pattern, solid, void, and the tectonic connections that held together the composition of layered bristol paper in an effort to explore and inspire new architectural possibilities.


P H AT E E

Course : Future Use | SPRING 2017 Instructor : Julia McMorrough Phatee is a prototype for children’s furniture. A playful “E” shaped wooden bench holds three rigid foam seats that can be pulled out of the bench and used for extra seating. The wooden bench then becomes a table-top to work on in addition to the back panel of the bench which is a dry-erase board.


D E S I G N _ A S S E M B LY

The rigid foam seats were also milled using the CNC as a series of stacked pieces glued together to become a lightweight seat that fits within the wooden bench frame. Holes were then drilled into the sides of the seats to allow users to pull out seats easily. The seats were then finished using several coats of gesso and paint.


Using a CNC router, my project partner, Salam, and I milled all pieces of the wooden frame. Assembly of the bench is designed with a series of finger joints that allow the pieces to be fitted and glued together easily. The top and bottom pieces of the bench feature a smooth, curved edge, and the back panel is painted with dry-erase paint to become a drawing/writing board.


FINAL_REVIEW


WORK_EXPERIENCE Position : Research Assistant | FALL 2016/SPRING 2017 Design Firm : Akoaki (Detroit, MI)

ST_ETIENNE_DESIGN_BIENNALE


DETROIT_CULTURE_COUNCIL


D E T RO I T _ C U LT U R E _ C O U N C I L

W D C T B


Working as a research assistant for Assitant Professor Anya Sirota, I provided all CNC mill work for a nomadic art installation in Detroit. The installation exists as a 20’ golden arch acting as an architectural threshold for the convening of the Detroit Culture Council. The arch also traveled to Saint Etienne, France to be exhibited in the 2017 Saint Etienne Design Biennale, held from March 9th until April 9th 2017, where Detroit was made guest of honor.


ST_ETIENNE_DESIGN_BIENNALE

I traveled with Akoaki to Saint Etienne, France for two weeks to prepare and install the Mothership in the exhibition. The installation process included adhering dichroic film to acrylic windows, which would eventually be inserted into the metal panels. The next steps were to adhere gold and white vinyl to each metal panel, insert the acrylic windows, and attach the metal panels to the main frame.


Lindsey Karasik Portfolio 2018  
Lindsey Karasik Portfolio 2018  
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