Like Love & Share Magazine no.2

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P H OTO M AG A Z I N E - I S S U E 2 2021

W H AT I S F R E E D O M Ka z a kev i c i u s , St rö m , Q u éa u , Sy n c h ro d ogs , Sta rze c, Bo n d a reva , D e d e

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Cover Photo

Carl-Mikael Strรถm @carlmikaelstrom

@likeloveshare_magazine


Issue 2

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What is Freedom S


See

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Tadas Kazakevicius Soon to be gone 26

Carl-Mikael Ström Montöristen 50

Marie Quéau The Handbook Project 70

Synchrodogs Slightly Altered 86

Paweł Starzec Zersetzung 102

Tatiana Bondareva Boys

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Dimitra Dede Mayflies

Colophon 148


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Marcin PĹ‚onka Editorial

Extensive freedom restrictions that have been introduced on a large scale through the lens of the fight against Covid-19 have become an inspiration for this edition of LL&S. For many generations, especially for those born in countries with long democratic traditions, restrictions on physical freedom were something completely new and often accepted without any scientific re-search proven nor with any social discussion taken. Dozens of photographers traveling the world without any limitations, had virtually unlimited access to people and places. Photographic landscape dictated only by our own imagination and conceivability, have suddenly been shortened and never granted back. In addition to purely tangible matters, the question arises whether photographers working in the field will have needed freedoms in the years to come? Will the world hyped by the corona fear look at the photographers with the suspicion of a threat to its own health, not opening up to a mutual social exchange as it used to be in times before the outbreak? Separating ourselves with masks, social distancing, gradual transfer our life’s towards the internet, fuelled by certain reality check served by mass media in opposition to common sense indicates social behaviour shift, perhaps being the beginning of a new era. It is hard to say now whether these events will leave a permanent mark on the human psyche or once we all go back to the new-old reality, all those be forgotten. People, however, through the prism of what have been frozen for so long may open up even more, letting photographers deepen the reality even more than before. 4


@m.plonka

These limitations, however, originated the possibility of an in-depth study of our own environment where potentially dangerous but fascinating exoticism have been replaced by creativity this much needed in our own hoods. Realities that were often overlooked in the broader context of photography may have contrarily become a source of new projects, bringing into being conversations on beauty and importance of everyday banality in a new context. Focusing on the smallest, seemingly insignificant, even forgotten parts of modern being, reached its true essence. Certain shift also took place when it comes to personal archives. Through refined editing, combining photos in unique ways, dozen of previously unreleased outtakes filled up Insta feeds showcasing way more playful approach to the created content. True creative boom is perhaps yet to come, current times of restriction of freedom have become a good opportunity to plan new projects and improve those never finished, thus filling the often unfulfilled gap left by 2020. In this issue we present projects created soon before the changes introduced in 2020. Searching for different aspects of freedom we’re featuring both personals and fundamentals but also looking for freedom of speech in conjunction with new science, hence in the fields most affected by crowds not accepting an inevitable change.

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Soon to be gone

Tadas Kazakevicius 6


@tadas.kazakevicius

‘84

Tadas Kazakevicius is a Lithuanian born documentary, editorial and portrait photographer residing in Vilnius, Lithuania. Focused on individuals and their stories, as the principal subject of his photography, he is a devotee of traditional film photography and prefers using medium and large format film cameras for his photography work. With his extensive series ‘Soon to be Gone,’ he became a finalist in numerous awards like Leica Oskar Barnack, LensCulture Exposure, ZEISS awards, shortlisted for the Royal Photographic Society 160th exhibition and was featured in the British Journal of Photography journal. His new series “Between Two Shores” secured him a place among finalists in the LensCulture Emerging Talent Awards” as well as being the prize winner in the latest World Press Photo awards and a finalist in the latest ZEISS Awards. His work was featured in numerous online magazines and platforms. 7


As far back as in the 1930s, during the times of the Great Depression in the United States, a group of photographers such as Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Jack Delano, led by Roy Stryker, head of the Farm Security Administration (FSA), kept restlessly recording views which were soon destined to fade into obscurity. The continuous migration of people moving around in search of easier conditions of life was relentlessly changing the demographic map of the States: homesteads, villages, small towns were disappearing right before the eyes. All this was photographed and put into extensive archives – the effort of those photographers proved not to have been in vain. A somehow different process is ongoing in present-day Lithuania too. Neither in the scope nor the conditions of life should those two situations be compared, though something still prompts us to look for similarities. Just within the last decade, this continuous migration has caused the population of Lithuania to shrink by almost one-sixth. Towns that have usurped the whole economics and are sucking out young people to the cities, an inappropriate

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lifestyle often adopted by the young rural generation – those who are still here – all this is inexorably changing our country. Just one question inevitably arises: for how long will our forests and valleys be adorned by views of homesteads and villages – places where a totally different understanding of time and closeness still exists? For how long will there still be found places, where an unexpected visitor is met like a close relative and every passer-by, is greeted with a heartfelt ‘hello’? Every time a thought like that crosses my mind, I, as a photographer, am driven by an instinct to hurry and turn those symbols and places into something more than just memories in the stories of future grandparents. Though a recorded image is incapable of reviving what has been lost, it still lets us remember something that perhaps once, while speeding by, momentarily caught our eye at the roadside. Maybe this monument to the Lithuanian countryside will evoke some sentimentality from the viewer and touch those deeply hidden corners in the memory which we, seemingly inadvertently, have closed up, being used to accept what can be gone very quickly.

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Montรถristen

Carl-Mikael Strรถm 26


@carlmikaelstrom

‘86

Born in Sweden, he lives and works in France. He studied photography at Fatamorgana in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 2013-2014. He was an assistant to the Swedish photographer JH Engström between 2014-2018. Ström works within photography, writing and film. He moves between the different mediums, using time as his essential tool to let the frame of the project become visible. Intrigued by what cannot be explained through language within images his work revolves around the question: ”what is there that can be shown but cannot be said?” He believes that an image has endless forms and that time passing inevitably shows, even in an image. Convinced that there is always more behind what you intend to say, he tries to accept the restraints and lies of creations.

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“After my son was born, it occurred to me that the whole thought about the self is a contradiction”. This is the starting point to read ‘Montöristen’. In Ströms perspective, pregnancy was an abstract process, which didn’t become real until he held his son for the first time. Confronted by the immensity of birth, and becoming a father, he questioned his own importance. Carl-Mikael understood his unimportance. A feeling about the vision of his inner self. Being present was more important than being a father. He tried to fit those emotions into thoughts. It led him into writing approximately 1700 journal pages during his son’s first year.

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@carlmikaelstrom

‘Montöristen’ is the diary of those who lose themselves and look for reconciliation. The story follows Ström’s inside journey as he becomes a new father. A new man. New paradigms. As he looks for a balance between love and self-preservation. The title is a Swedish neologism. Comes from the word “monteur”: to put something together, to assemble. That is how Ström sees himself. He creates and then he puts “it” together. “The term itself is something I feel “home” in, it is a place where “I” can belong. There is no great importance for me to have a role title. Creating my own, is a way of having an authority upon my own creations.” Carl-Mikael Ström

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My Dad Was a Firefighter

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The Handbook Project

Marie QuĂŠau 50


@mariequeau

‘85

Born in Choisy-le-Roi (France), Marie Quéau has lived and worked in Paris since her last residency at the Cité internationale des arts in 2017. Graduate of the ENSP Arles (2009), her work has been exhibited at the PhotoLevallois Festival, the Salon de Montrouge, the International Festival of Fashion and Photography in Hyères, Filature Mulhouse, Gallery Michel Chomette, as well as in various museums and institutions. In 2012, she received the Nofound Photo Fair/ de Groot Foundation Prize for her series Gojira. Started in 2013, her Odds and Ends project has already been supported by the CNES Space Observatory, the DRAC Grand Est and the Centre Européen d’Actions Artistiques Contemporaines (international project grants). In 2016, the artist was selected for a postproduction residency at the CPIF (Centre Photographique d’Ilede-France). Marie Quéau was also laureate of the 2017 CNAP creation grants (contemporary documentary photography). In 2018, Odds end Ends won the Carré sur Seine Prize. In september 2018, her series Handbook was published by September Books. She was laureate of the “Résidence sur Mesure” grant, supported by the French Institute, for her project “232,8°C” in 2019.

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The Handbook project is a poetic cartography of sites dedicated to research. In such places, the functioning of our environment, of nature and of our body is measured and analysed for further understanding. In this project, I focus on do-it-yourself gestures and on the modeling of reality performed by researchers. Therefore, I have depicted contemporary research (public, private and civic) and what forebodes our future.

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@mariequeau

Through a non-linear narration allowing me to transition from trivial to complex or even absurd subjects, this body of work tells the story of life. In a world where seasons no longer exist and where many people are no longer interested in what is inside objects, our environment seems very disconnected from the world of knowledge and from how it came into being. This work thus comes from the desire to better understand how our environment is studied and created.

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Slightly Altered

Synchrodogs 70


@synchrodogs_official

‘84 ‘89

Synchrodogs, the duo formed by Roman Noven and Tania Shcheglova, working together since 2008. Between 2010 and 2019 they had solo shows in Chicago, London, Barcelona, Krakow, Venice, Amsterdam, Antwerpen, Riga, solo exhibition in Dallas Contemporary museum in 2015. Synchrodogs took part in numerous group exhibitions in galleries and museums like Benaki Museum (Athens), Boston Museum of Fine Art, Guy Hepner gallery (New York), Palais de Tokyo (Paris), Somos Gallery (Berlin), The Annenberg Space for Photography (Los Angeles), ArtPrize Hub (Grand Rapids, Michigan) Galerie Blanc (Montréal) among others. Their artworks were published in many magazines like Esquire, Vice, Vogue, Odda, Liberation magazine, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Hunter, Metal, Wild, TUSH, Dust, Vision, Another, Oyster, Jalouse, shot Femen activists for Dazed and Confused, published on the covers of British Journal of Photography (UK), Vogue (Ukraine), Stylist (France), Impression (USA), TUSH, Neon, Zeit Campus magazine (Germany), Blink, S magazine, L’adn, Afisha.

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Working on ‘Slightly Altered’ project artistic duo Synchrodogs went into a one-month trip across Carpathian Mountains to discover how far people managed to intrude into the territories that were meant to be wild. People have always been shaping natural forces around them. But is there a limit of resources the Earth would allow us to use? “Slightly Altered” is a reflection on how much we are intertwined with nature - changing the environment, we change ourselves. The project is about interdependency of humans and nature and the new ways the Earth begins to look as a result of our interventions into the environmental processes.

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@synchrodogs_official

Witnessing these and other intrusions into nature, Synchrodogs have started reflecting upon how much we, like all life, both alter our environment and are altered by it. Creating installations meant to live for a single day and photographing them before they decay, Synchrodogs’ images preserve vistas that are—sadly—likely to be irrevocably altered by the next generation.

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Zersetzung

Paweł Starzec 86


@pestarzec

‘92

Photographer, sociologist, educator, journalist. Works on photographic documents. Mainly interested in correlations between space and its context, and in envisioning broader processes through their aftermath and peripherals. Visual sociologist, working in the field of modern iconography, mass visual memory and visual narratives. Art educator responsible for a number of workshop programs as a lecturer and teacher, cofounder of Paper Beats Rock foundation, current member of Azimuth Press collective. Student of Applied Sociology Department of University of Warsaw (Ph. D.), and of Institute of Creative Photography of Silesian University in Opava (MA). Musician and sound artist, currently playing in Mazut, and solo under Centralia moniker. DIY / zine culture enthusiast.

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Zersetzung is a word without proper translation, roughly meaning decomposition in German. It’s also a name given by the officers of Ministerium für Staatssicherheit – Stasi – to the complex tactic utilised against any person that was perceived as a possible threat for the regime of German Democratic Republic. Zersetzung process was in fact a psychological warfare technique, designed to damage the mental health of a person it was applied to by subtly undermining all aspects of one’s life, using a variety of methods of sabotage. On 9th of November, 1989, a man named Günter Schabowski was tasked with presenting new border policies of German Democratic Republic. However, being late for the conference, he made a small mistake that led to a chain of events. Borders between East and West Germany opened, the Berlin Wall started to crumble. Unification of Germany was completed almost a year after, on 3rd of October, 1990, and as it was prepared, on 23rd of August the GDR Volkskammer officially stated the state’s will to access West Germany, and to accept Western laws as their own.

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30 years later, the situation in Germany isn’t that simple that it might seem. The division is still clearly visible in many statistics, covering things from wealth and welfare to opinion on free immigration. The notion that the East – and with it it’s culture, heritage and life of its citizens – had been concealed after the unification is persistent; the economical fall of former Eastern Germany after the unification is also a factor. Ostalgie, nostalgia for the East, had been coined as a term covering not only Trabi adventure companies, but also growing sentiment of Ossis – former citizens of GDR, and residents of ex-GDR part of Germany – towards their former homeland that voluntarily ceased to exist. 30 years after the last Zersetzung – this time aimed towards the state itself – I’m interested in what remained of GDR heritage and identity of Eastern Germans 30 years after reunification of Germany, and what were the side effects of this process. I am heavily relying on my own research; as in previous projects, I started gaining information regarding the reunification

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of Germany more than a year before I started field work. As of today, I did three separate trips, each covering different parts or events – former border, the official events of the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, part of Cold War museum industry. I strongly believe that the work on the main part of this series should be completed – at least in terms of field work – in the next eleven months, as in October 2020 there would be the 30th anniversary of formal unification of both East and West Germany. My main goal is to publish this work as a book, or series of publication, and / or work further on the matter of modern Germany and western Europe in general, as it appears less documented than the East I come from. I want to document East Germany without being biased in any direction, and rather focus on more nuanced perspective of what the reunification had bringed to the former East – ie. what was given, and what was taken away. There are always two sides to any story, and this case isn’t different – while gaining freedom, a lot of people lost

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their economic stability. A recent poll by Infratest Dimap, shows that 60% of former citizens of GDR label the political change as positive – and that figure dropped by 7% in the last decade. What interests me is not only a mark left in a landscape – material one, but on personal microhistories, that gathered together form a more collective narration on individual’s trajectories after the Cold War ended. As Germany is being regarded as one of the key countries in the EU, this division is mostly unrecognised in narration of what a success reunification – or The Turn – was. But at the same time, the tension it creates inside Germany is responsible for social, economical and political turn of events.

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Boys

Tatiana Bondareva 102


@tatiana__egorova

‘83

Tatiana Bondareva, born in SaintPetersburg. Graduated from the British Design School in Moscow and Docdocdoc School of Modern Photography in Saint Petersburg. She is interested in “closed societies where people behave differently than normal”. Social isolation, both forced and voluntary, affect a person’s behaviour and lifestyle. She seeks and identifies the borders limiting the freedom of a person or of a group. Bondareva’s works have been published in Russian Reporter, Colta, F-Stop, Fotoroom, Society (France), and C-41. A participant in the group exhibitions Field of Vision at the Lumiere Brothers Gallery, Sprouts at the RuArts Gallery, and Young Photographers of Russia, as well as the international competition “Point on the Map” in Uglich.

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For the first time I visited this colony as a volunteer 15 years before I started to shoot this story. Convicted boys and I were of almost the same age at that time, and I unintentionally compared their life with my life. The administration of the colony asked me to organise an orienteering team of my friends. It is a common practice in Russia, when prisoners who maintain good behaviour are taken out of a colony to a disciplinary event. For a whole day through, my friends and thieves, murderers, and rapists ran in the woods, cooked food on a fire, and talked friendly. We joked about whether everyone would get back from the woods, but no one escaped. A prisoner who looked very good-natured confessed to me in the evening that he had killed a person, and asked what I thought about it. It so happened that after that I had three novels. And all three young men were serving their sentences in the juvenile colony. They told me a lot about what they felt in prison. It was very

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@tatiana__egorova

difficult for me to realize that your young man was a criminal and I left them. Years later, when I visited the same colony, I had déjà vu; but this time I was a stranger, and two times older than they were. Boy explicitly ignored me, closed their face, and turned away. All of them have a similar uniform and emotionless closed expression of their face. As it is a secure facility, very many prisoners’ activities are performed by an entire detachment. No one can go to the canteen, school, or laundry alone. Prisoners can only parade to anywhere within the colony in a group. Visually, it looks like a troop of cloned robots. I saw this place not only as one limiting the freedom, but also as some sort of a new home, where the prisoners adapt to the rules and do things they wouldn’t do otherwise, a place where they live and leave behind their youth. Many of them come from problem families. Here they go through stages in life that they had

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never experienced. Going to school regularly, attending art sections, visiting church, etc. I was surprised how nervous they were while learning poems before the parents’ day, how they were showing their stuffed toys, bragged about what vegetables they managed to grow, etc. When I just arrived here, I thought I’d be capturing losses and suffering, but now I think that for many people this place is the best, as before their lives were even more difficult. Many of them say that here, at least, they eat regularly. Some of them committed horrible crimes. The main problem in the post-prison support in Russia is the absence of guidance. Many of the boys will go back to their dysfunctional families and criminal neighbourhoods. Many of them are sentenced for a long time, and as soon as they are released, they are transferred to an adult prison, where all the best that was instilled in them will be lost. However, I wouldn’t like to either pity or condemn them in this series. Not only I considered this place as a custody facility, but

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@tatiana__egorova

also as a new home, where prisoners adapt to an existing order and perform actions that were not typical to them earlier, where they live and spend their youth. Here they pass stages of life that they have never had before, such as, for example, regular school attendance, taking an amateur course, church going, and so on. I was surprised to see how excitingly they were leaning verses by heart prior to parents’ day, showed stuffed toys they made, boasted harvest they yielded, etc. It seemed to me that they were compensating for their childhood. Therefore, I dubbed the series “Boys.� Tatiana Bondareva

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Mayflies Dimitra Dede Dimitra Dede is a London based visual artist working mainly with photography. Her practice combines painting and the use of chemicals with photography. The making of the imagery is based on an intuitive process. Her subject matter quests the connection between space and time, memory and displacement, loss and longing, life and the Absurd. Her work has been presented in galleries and festivals internationally (Center for Fine Art Photography - Fort Collins, Black Box Gallery Portland, Brighton Photo Biennial, Les Rencontres d’Arles, Unseen Festival Amsterdam, The Benaki Museum Athens etc.). ‘Mayflies’ is Dimitra’s first book published by Void and it was shortlised at the Unseen Dummy Award 2018 (Unseen Festival, Amsterdam). 122


@dimitra_dede

‘Mayflies’ speaks about motherhood, the ephemerality of life and the complexity of loss. It delineates a turbulent journey in memories, feelings, pain and acceptance after my mother’s death. Through multiple chirographic mutations of the imagery, the experience of loss in intertwined layers is represented throughout the work. The scientific name of Mayflies is Ephemeroptera and it is derived from the Greek “ephemera” meaning shortlived, and “ptera” meaning wings. This is a reference to the short lifespan of adult mayflies. Most adults are delicate insects with a very short lifespan. They emerge, reproduce, and die in a single day. 123


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We are open for sub mis sions

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Submit finished body of work up to 10 mb with a descripton or share link to your website & Instagram account. @likeloveshare_magazine likelovenshare@gmail.com

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Like Love & Share Magazine CREATED BY Krzysiek Orłowski @krzysiek_orlowski Marcin Płonka @m.plonka ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Marcin Płonka @m.plonka PHOTO EDITOR Krzysiek Orłowski CONTRIBUTORS Tadas Kazakevicius, Carl-Mikael Ström, Marie Quéau, Synchrodogs, Paweł Starzec, Tatiana Bondareva, Dimitra Dede CONTACT likelovenshare@gmail.com

2019-21 © Like Love & Share Magazine No part of this publication may be used or reproduced without written permission from the editors. All photographs & copy are property of the owners.

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