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SHIDARA and THE JAPANESE FESTIVAL! sparking your students’ imagination STANDARDS-BASED MATERIALS IN JAPANESE ART, CULTURE AND MUSIC

· A toolbox of lesson plans, games and visuals · Download the entire curriculum or individual sections · Designed for active board technology and/or PowerPoint presentations · Springboard toward social studies, language, other learning arenas


Some language and images used in this document were taken from Village of the Gods (Š May 2005), written by Shintaro Ajioka and photographed by Hiromu Yamamoto.


Introduction America is a country of cultural diversity. Music is a part of every culture. A great deal can be learned about the values and beliefs of a culture by experiencing its music, holidays and celebrations. Shidara’s performance showcases Japanese festival songs and stories. We introduce this curriculum with the goal of expanding students’ understanding of Japanese culture, music, and history through the medium of the traditional Japanese festival, which has been at the heart of Japanese life for centuries. We want to give students the vivid experience of a different cultural spirit and energy. Shidara has worked carefully to develop this high-quality, standards-based, relevant arts education assembly and lesson plan. It is a flexible program easily modified to accommodate audience and presenter needs. Activities vary from short lecture-demonstrations of 45-60 minutes in length, to full-day workshops that offer hands-on experience to participants. You will find information and activities to supplement Shidara’s Japanese drum performance, inspired by educators recognizing the role of the arts in education to stimulate learning. Please help us improve our programming by sending back to us both of the evaluation forms (see pages 52-53) and the interactive letters from students to Shidara members. Thank you for your time and assistance!

please note: While our programming is available for all ages, this packet is geared toward ages 6-12. It includes simple pre- and post-assembly exercises, plus extra instruction on Japanese arts, history, culture and music. If you would like to book a workshop or residency geared toward another age group, please contact our booking agent:

Susan Endrizzi California Artists Management PO Box 2479 Mendocino, CA 95460-2479 phone: 707-937-4787 fax: 707-937-4687 Sue.Endrizzi@gmail.com

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LEVELS OF PROGRAMMING AVAILABLE Classroom lecture-demonstrations and workshops: ages 5-12 Workshops for students aged 5-12 include an historical story line of how taiko as a symbol fit into the Japanese culture. Taiko drumming has its origins in the daily life of the common people: priests used taiko to dispel evil spirits and insects from the rice fields; Samurai used taiko to instil fear in the enemy and courage in themselves; peasants used taiko in their prayers for rain, in festivals, and in thanksgiving for a bountiful harvest. Shidara provides a lecture demonstration of the various instruments used in performance with a discussion of how the drums are crafted. Short performance demonstrations are given with limited student participation in the discussion of form and rhythm patterns. 45-60 minutes

Assemblies: Grades K-12 Bus-in school assemblies are a skeleton of the concert program but have the same technical needs. Shidara presents four unique songs chosen for their draw to younger audiences and their interactive, educational content. Members alternately perform and discuss key aspects of Japanese folk, culture, and musical history. At times, Shidara performers jump into the audience, joking with students for an up-close and breathtaking interactive experience. They bring traditional festivals to the stage, with more interactive chances for students to experience Japanese culture first-hand. Lesson plans describe and explain symbols and costuming in these songs, and the Japanese festival and industrial culture from which they were born. Time permitting, there is a short question and answer segment. This program can be modified for middle and high school assemblies of 20-1,000 students. 45-60 minutes

In-depth lecture demonstrations: Junior high, high school, college students These sessions include more in-depth lecture-demonstrations describing the history of taiko, the different instruments crafted and used in Shidara’s Japanese festivals, and hands-on participation in the practice and playing of the drums. Videotapes may be used in these presentations. The effective size for this workshop to work optimally is limited to ten participants, or to the number of drums and instruments available. College and university class lectures and demonstrations are available. These workshops are also available for professional drummers and percussionists.

1-hour up to all-day workshop sessions These workshops are tailor-made to satisfy community and arts groups. Shidara provides sessions based on the following subjects: Odaiko-style, shimedaiko skills and drills, basic Shidara hitting style, yoko-uchi or miyake style, bamboo flute (fue), dance and movement, katsugi okedo style drumming, and Hana Matsuri workshops.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1 ABOUT SHIDARA: GROOVE, AFFINITY AND FORCE Who is Shidara, where are we from, what is important to us? A short history and discussion questions SECTION 2 TAIKO HISTORY About taiko, its historic, religious and practical uses in Japanese art and culture. A short history and discussion questions SECTION 3 SHIDARA’S FIRST SONG: SAIRAI! Japanese Festivals! Background, discussion questions and exercises SECTION 4 SHIDARA’S SECOND SONG: SHISHIMAI Japanese Lion Dance Background, discussion questions and exercises SECTION 5 SHIDARA’S THIRD SONG: YATABAYASHI Giant Festival Floats Background, discussion questions and exercises SECTION 6 SHIDARA’S FOURTH SONG: HANAMATSURI A Traditional National Treasure Background, discussion questions and exercises SECTION 7 SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

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1 SECTION

A STORY, QUESTIONS and VOCABULARY

ABOUT SHIDARA: Groove, Affinity and Force Shidara (SHE-dah-rah) was founded in 1989. Members live in a tiny country village and train in strict, traditional style. Their home is deep within bamboo and cedar forest mountains. They see monkeys, wild pigs, deer, badgers and bears on their morning run. On Shidara’s costumes, isho (EE-sho), there are leaves representing the forest where they live. Shidara performers train very hard, living and working like a family, to “share the same heart.” Living this way gives Shidara a special energy and spirit on stage. At 5:30am, they run 6 miles. After a quick breakfast, they practice. They cover the drums, so they don’t wake the neighbors! After chores, members do 300 sit ups, 100 push ups, hours of muscle training, as well as washing, folding and sewing costumes (isho), facility repairs, and cooking. Everyone plays all the styles of drums (taiko) as well as the flute (fue). Some members also play the Japanese lute (shamisen) and the hand cymbals (chappa). In Japan, there is belief in, regardless of religion, the presence of many gods in the human world. There are shrines and temples everywhere in Japan, in even the streets of Tokyo. People leave offerings on the road and at sites of natural beauty for many gods believed to be protecting people. Next to our training facility in Japan is a small shrine, jinja, dedicated to the Japanese arts. Shidara wants to share a connection to nature, to the gods and to the community on stage. SHIDARA has promised to preserve the ancient dance festivals in our region. With our songs, we hope to bring people together, joining hands in support and encouragement. This is what people have done for hundreds of years in Japan at festivals, celebrating happiness and blessings. We hope you enjoy our performance!

LEARNING OUTCOMES Students will learn real information about a performing arts company based in Japan, and the culture that influences their art. They will have the chance to connect personally with Japanese artists by communicating their appreciation of the performers’ ability through letters written directly to the artists.

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1 SECTION

Pre-Performance Exercise 1: BRAINSTORM and DISCUSSION ABOUT JAPAN SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION1: SLIDES 1-15) I. Brainstorm about all the things students know about Japan, and art and culture in Japan. II. Read Section 1 story About Shidara: Groove, Affinity and Force. Have a discussion using the following questions:

·

In what sort of landscape does Shidara live in Japan?

·

What are some of the things a Shidara performer does each day?

·

What kinds of instruments does a Shidara performer learn?

·

What are the important goals and beliefs of Shidara members?

·

What is one of the symbols on the Shidara costume and what does it represent?

·

To what is the special shrine dedicated on Shidara’s facilities?

·

Discuss what they learned about Japan that they did not know before?

III. Write all the things they learned about Japan that they did not know before.

Pre-Performance Exercise 2: PERFORMANCE/COMMUNICATION/CREATIVE EXPRESSION SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION1: SLIDES 16-20) I. Discuss Shidara’s Character types: Drummers Flute players Farmer Lion Dancers ·

Instruct students to watch for the different characters during the performance. Discuss how does an artist use effective vocal expression, gesture, facial expression, and timing to create character?

Assign students to view Shidara’s performance with these ideas in mind.

·

SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION1: SLIDES 21-31) II. Introduce photos of Shidara performers. Look at the pictures and pronounce the names together. Instruct students to watch for a performer they especially like during the performance.

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1 SECTION

Post-Performance Exercise 3: FOLLOW UP TO PERFORMANCE/COMMUNICATION/CREATIVE EXPRESSION SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION1: SLIDES 17-21, 22-33) I. Talk about the different character types in Shidara’s performance: Drummers (photo Men’s Myoujin), flute players (photo Fue Mana and Chabo), the farmer (photo Tagosaku Farmer Clown), the lion (photo Shishi lion)

·

Which character type did you like best, and why?

·

What did they do with their body or face that was exciting?

·

What about their drumming, the music, their face, or their energy caught your attention?

II. Show photos of Shidara members again.to help them have memories of the experience.

·

Which Shidara performer did you like best?

III. Write a paragraph about why they caught your attention and draw a picture of them. Send them as letters to Shidara members in Japan! Do not worry about addressing members personally by name.

Mail letters to: SHIDARA 30 Nakabayashi, Higashisonome, Kitashitaragun Toei-cho, Aichi-ken JAPAN 449-0203

Post-Performance Exercise 4: LEARN VOCABULARY AND IDENTIFY CULTURAL ASPECTS I. Complete the crossword puzzle and word search worksheets. Refer to the photos from the reading and to the glossary for full vocabulary list and definitions.

Vocabulary for this section (refer to glossary for full list and definitions):

isho (EE-shyo): n. costumes

shamisen (SHA-mee-sen): n. a traditional Japanese stringed instrument

chappa (CHAH-pah): n. small brass cymbals

fue (FOO-eh): n. flute

taiko (TY-ko): n. drum

jinja (GEE-nja): n. shrine

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About Shidara

1

I 2 C S H H 3 T A I K O 4 P F P U 5 S H A MI S E N 6

3 5

6

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J I N J A Across Down 1 Japanese The Japanese costume 2 Small brass drum A traditional cymbals Japanese 4 The bamboo flute string instrument The Japanese shrine


1 SECTION

crossword puzzle

About Shidara

ABOUT SHIDARA: Groove, Affinity and Force 1 2

3 4

5

6

3 5

6

Across The Japanese drum A traditional Japanese string instrument The Japanese shrine

1 2 4

Down Japanese costume Small brass cymbals The bamboo flute

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About Shidara Groove, Affinity, Force Find the Japanese vocabulary words about life at Shidara, and circle them!

N A H A I O F S

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I I S O H K J C

S H O S A I H J

A S I J N A P H

J A US MA J P P E T H F U HH

S H A M I S E N

isho shamisen chappa fue taiko jinja


1 SECTION

word search

AboutAffinity Shidara and Force ABOUT SHIDARA: Groove,

Groove, Affinity, Force Find the Japanese vocabulary words about life at Shidara and circle them! Find the Japanese vocabulary words about life at Shidara, and circle them!

N A H A I O F S

I I S O H K J C

S H O S A I H J

A S I J N A P H

J A US MA J P P E T H F U HH

S H A M I S E N

isho shamisen chappa fue taiko jinja

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2 SECTION

A STORY, QUESTIONS and VOCABULARY

TAIKO HISTORY

The Japanese word, “taiko� (TY-ko) means drum. The directness and immediacy of the drums has made it an important musical instrument in many cultures. The Japanese have used the drum for many reasons. An early practical use of the taiko was to determine the boundaries of the village. A village was as large as the booming sound of the drum would carry. In feudal times the drum was used in battle as military music, to give courage to the samurai (SAH-mu-rai) warriors, and to intimidate the enemy. Taiko is found in other areas of Japanese culture. It is used in various types of theater, and is one of the main instruments in Imperial Court ceremonies. Drums play an important part in Japanese religions. In the Shinto religion, everything, the mountains, fire, water, and animals contain a spirit. The taiko is used as a voice to call these gods, give thanks or pray to them. The Japanese people believed this music and prayer would bring good luck. For this reason the taiko was often at the center of folk festivals. Farmers played the taiko, thinking its thundering sound would bring rain for their crops. Fishermen played taiko to bring lots of fish. In the Buddhist religion, taiko is the voice of the Buddha. It is a voice of wisdom, kindness, truth, and beauty. Taiko are also used to accompany Buddhist chants. In modern times, Japanese people are either Shinto, Buddhist, or Christian. However, the festivals from very long ago are especially Shinto and Buddhist-based, as those were the primary religions of long ago Japan. The drum is believed to have a kami (KAH-mee), a spirit of its own. It is associated with the changing of the seasons, the cycles of nature, and a celebration of life. Taiko is deeply embedded in the traditions of the Japanese people and can perhaps be considered the essence, the heartbeat of the Japanese spirit (TAH-mah-shee).

LEARNING OUTCOMES Students will broaden their understanding of the role music and art plays in a culture, and how integral art and music are in daily life. They will gain a sense of how another culture uses music and beliefs in dealing with both the hardships and the joys of life.

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2 SECTION

Pre-Performance Exercise 1: DISCUSSION ABOUT JAPANESE ART, CULTURE AND BELIEFS I. Read Section 2 story Taiko History. Have a discussion using the following questions:

·

What are some ways the Japanese drum has been used in Japan in daily life?

·

What are two Japanese religions?

·

What is the word for spirit in Japanese?

·

What are some ways the taiko is associated with nature?

·

What other types of drumming from other cultures have you seen?

Post-Performance Exercise 2: LEARN VOCABULARY AND IDENTIFY CULTURAL ASPECTS I. Complete the crossword puzzle and word search worksheets. Refer to the photos from the reading and to the glossary for full vocabulary list and definitions.

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Vocabulary for this section (refer to glossary for full list and definitions):

Shintoism: n. one of the native religions of Japan, primarily a belief that all things have a spirit, and that there is a sacred connection to nature and ancestors.

Buddhism: n. one of the native religions of Japan, based on the teachings of Buddha

Kami (KAH-mee): n. a god

Tamashii (TAH-mah-shee): n. spirit

Samurai (SAH-mu-rai): n. a warrior of long ago Japan


2 SECTION

Taiko is deeply embedded in the traditions of the Japanese people and can perhaps be considered the essence, the heartbeat of the Japanese spirit.

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Taiko History 1

S 3 B U D D H I S M I A N M T U 4 K O R A I A 5 T A MA S H I I I M Across Down A native 1 A native religion of religion of Japan, based Japan, beliefs on teachings that all things of Buddha are sacred and Spirit have a spirit 3 A warrior of long ago Japan 4 The Japanese gods 2

2

5

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2 SECTION

crossword puzzle

Taiko History

TAIKO HISTORY

1 2

3

4

5

2

5

Across A native religion of Japan, based on teachings of Buddha Spirit

1

3 4

Down A native religion of Japan, beliefs that all things are sacred and have a spirit A warrior of long ago Japan The Japanese gods

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Taiko History Find the vocabulary related to Japanese culture and drumming and circle them!

MMK H T U O S S I S I UA I S I I MR S O O H H U MI T MS MD I I NR A NI DS I S MMT T U HDA I I S T S K T NUI A

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I I S I K S B B A

shintoism buddhism kami tamashii samurai


2 SECTION

word search

TAIKO HISTORY

Taiko History

Find the Japanese vocabulary words related to Japanese culture Find the vocabulary related to Japanese culture and drumming and circle and drumming and circle them! them!

MMK H T U O S S I S I UA I S I I MR S O O H H U MI T MS MD I I NR A NI DS I S MMT T U HDA I I S T S K T NUI A

I I S I K S B B A

shintoism buddhism kami tamashii samurai

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3 SECTION

background, discussion QUESTIONS and exercises

song 1: sairai! Japanese Festivals

Shidara’s first song, called SAIRAI (SEYE-reye) means, “the coming of the festival!” It captures all the special excitement of Japanese festival times. This song has a special style of drumming called KATSUGI (Kaht-soo-gi) okedo (Oh-ke-do) style. The drum is slung across the shoulder and the drummer can dance and move while playing!

Pre-performance STORY In Japan, festivals have taken place for thousands of years. Long before TV and radio, people gathered to eat special holiday food, sit, talk, cook, and celebrate the blessings of good harvests, health and happiness. Festivals are a very important time when people set aside daily concerns and give thanks and prayers to the earth and to the gods for all they receive. In the US, families gather at birthdays and holidays. Japanese people have been doing the same for centuries. In the past, people were usually so busy working on their farms and taking care of their communities that there was no time for rest or fun. However, festivals have always been and today are still a great time for fun and celebration! They are a way for the community to come together, and are thought of as a special time for boys and girls to meet. The celebration of New Year’s Day (Oshogatsu) is a very special holiday in Japan, it signifies a chance to change. Japanese people love the chance to change for the better, to improve themselves and become a better person. When the holidays are coming, or school vacation, there is always a happy feeling of excitement and anticipation! It is the same in Japan. Japanese people decorate with pretty colored paper (washi), dress in special clothing, cook very special foods, and gather with music and dances. Young people often have very important roles in Japanese festivals such as dancing sacred dances, riding on the biggest carts, wearing special costumes, and riding big horses in special ceremonies. LEARNING OUTCOMES Students learn about the holidays and celebrations of another culture, and make a connection between how their own holidays are similar or different than those in Japan. Watching the Shidara performance of the song SAIRAI, they will witness the celebratory expression of another culture and make connections to their own. They will also see how different styles of drumming enable performers to move and express emotion differently.

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3 SECTION

Post-Performance Questions: DISCUSSION ABOUT KATSUGI OKEDO AND SAIRAI! SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION3: SLIDES 2-6) I. Note how performers can move and dance using this type of drum.

·

Could you feel the happiness and festival feeling of the first song, SAIRAI?

·

What did you see on stage and in the performers movements that showed this happiness?

·

What are two reasons Japanese people have gathered for festivals for thousands of years?

Post-Performance Exercise 1: CULTURE: Qualities of Japanese Festivals and Celebrations SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION3: SLIDES 7-17) I. The colors and items of festivals and celebrations in different cultures. Sometimes festivals in Japan are very lively, sometimes solemn, sometimes both, often going from morning through night and into the next day. II. Look at and discuss the various festival photos.

·

·

How are the decorations similar or different to your family’s holiday decorations? Note the older man in a priest costume, sitting by the drum. He is performing special ceremonies for the celebration. See the elders performing festival blessings. Are there special elder members of your family or community that head the festivities? See the festive traditional clothing. Do you wear special clothing during celebrations too?

Post-Perfomance Exercise 2: YOUNG PEOPLE IN JAPANESE FESTIVALS SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION3: SLIDES 18-23) I. Look at and discuss the various festival photos. ·

Notice the special costumes, dances and roles of young people in Japanese Festivals in the photos. What sorts of roles do you see these young people playing in Japanese festivals?

Post-Performance Exercise 3: VENN DIAGRAM I. Review the photos of Japanese celebrations and discussions about special qualities, items, and roles of young people. II. Identify similarities and differences in different cultural celebrations. Students will also see how their own family celebrations may have both connections to other cultures, and their own unique qualities. III. Introduce the venn diagram as a way to compare and contrast two different things. It is helpful for the students to have a working knowledge of a word processing program such as Microsoft Works.

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3 SECTION

Venn Diagram Activities: Compare and contrast Cultural Holidays Day One

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Give each student a venn diagram handout. Have students pick a specific holiday celebration of another culture (such as Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hannukah, Fourth of July, New Year’s Day). Next, have the students label the Venn Diagram with “Japanese Celebrations” and their chosen other cultural celebration. Students add six or more facts to the outside circles of the the Venn Diagram contrasting Japanese celebrations to another cultural celebration. Students add 3 or more facts to the overlapping part of the circles telling how Japanese celebrations and the other cultural celebrations are similar or different.

Day Two 1. 2. 3.

Students will use the information from the Venn Diagram to write a paragraph describing how the Japanese and the other cultural celebration are alike. Students will use the information from the Venn Diagram to write a second paragraph describing how the two cultural celebrations are different. Students will write a paragraph about their own family celebration and how it compares to the other two cultural celebrations. Students are encouraged to share what is special to them about their personal family celebration in regards to special foods, customs, opportunities for special time together, and to draw a picture of what they love most about their own celebration

Day Three

1. Students will edit their three paragraphs.

Day Four

1. Students will type their paragraphs on a computer using a word processing program such as MicroSoft Works. 2. With the teacher’s approval, students will print their paragraphs.

Day 5

1. Individually or in groups, students will present their information to the class. VENN DIAGRAM EXAMPLE

Japanese New Year (Oshogatsu)

DIFFERENCES End of the year housecleaning Lion Dancing Special visits to temples and shrines Pine Decorations Gifts of money to children

American Thanksgiving

SIMILARITIES Special holiday food Families gather together Time off from work and school

DIFFERENCES Eating turkey and mashed potatoes Watching football Decorating the table Pumpkin pie

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4 SECTION

background, discussion QUESTIONS and exercises

song 2: sHISHIMAI! Japanese Lion Dance Shidara’s second song, called ShiShiMai (SHEE-shee-my), is a song about an older farmer out working his fields. He happens across an unusual thing: a lion appears in his fields! Hang on to your seats and see what happens during this surprise meeting!

Pre-performance STORY The total land mass of the four main islands of Japan is about the size of California. There is not a lot of space in Japan! Houses and cars are very small. Most children do not have their own room. People work very hard to efficiently use the earth resources and provide for everyone. From long ago, Japanese people have farmed their land to grow food that is very hard to import by ocean. Because Japan is surrounded by the ocean, fishing has also been a very important way of life for the Japanese.

MAP OF JAPAN

Homes in Japan are also multi-generational, and young people do not move out of their parent’s home until they get married. Even after marriage, it is common for a young couple to continue to live with the extended family in the same house. In the small mountain village where we live at Shidara, there are many farmers growing rice, spinach, cabbage, potatoes, radishes, persimmons, etc. People farm all their lives, working very hard in the fields. During Oshogatsu, Japanese New Year, many special festivals take place. One of the festivals during this happy time is the ShiShi or the Lion dancing. In North America, Chinese Lion Dancing is very popular, and you may have seen this kind of festival. There is a special version in Japan, too! The lion goes through the streets, stopping at every home, saying hello, celebrating and bringing happiness for the coming year. If the shishi lion bites you, you are sure to receive good luck and health in the coming year!

LEARNING OUTCOMES Students learn about artistic self-expression, identifying emotional and bodily/facial expressions, creating movements to express a variety of personal experiences. Students compare and contrast the role of the clown in different cultures, drawing their own cartoons to re-enact Shidara’s Lion Dance performance.

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4 SECTION

Pre-Performance Exercise: Self Expression through the Arts Apply choreographic principles, processes and skills to create and communicate meaning I. Create movements reflecting a variety of personal experiences. II. Recall with students, feeling happy, sad, angry, excited. III. What does your face look like, how does your body feel and look? Are your shoulders slouched? Is there a bounce to your step? Assign students a simple emotion to express in their own way. Form a circle, with each getting a turn to express the emotion with their face, voice, and body.

Pre-Performance Discussion: historical contributions and cultural dimensions of dance/art I. Name and recall folk-traditional fables and characters from the United States and other countries. II. Can you think of any clowns or fools from other fables or cultures? III. Is the lion in the ShishiMai dancing a mean lion? What does it mean if he bites you?

Post-Performance Exercise: IDENTIFYING EMOTIONS I. Can you remember the emotions the farmer showed during this song? Circle the ones you remember:

happy

scared

excited

sad

angry

relieved

tired

achy

II. How did the performer use his body and face to express the emotions? III. How did this actor use drama to convey his meaning?

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4 SECTION

Post-Performance Discussion: historical, industrial, cultural context of japan SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION4: SLIDE 1) Using the map of Japan, and the above information, discuss the following: I. How big is the country of Japan? II. How do Japanese people live together on such a small island? How do they share their resources? III. What are some of the foods farmers have grown in Japan?

Post-Performance Exercise: creative writing and drawing SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION4: SLIDE 2) I. Retell or dramatize stories, myths, fables, and fairy tales from various cultures and times. II. After the performance, using the Japanese Shishimai Story worksheet included at the back of this section, instruct students to reconstruct the story of the lion and the farmer, and draw what they remember.

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JAPANESE SHISHIMAI STORY

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The Lion dances around the fields

…and settles for a nap!

The old Farmer arrives but doesn’t want to work!

The Farmer trips over the Lion and wakes him!

The sleepy Lion chases the farmer and grabs him!

The Farmer and Lion chase each other everywhere!

The Lion rears on his hind legs, the Farmer prays!

The Farmer escapes!


5 SECTION

background, discussion QUESTIONS and exercises

song 3: YATAIBAYASHI Giant Festival Floats Pre-performance STORY Chichibu yomatsuri (yo-MAHT-soo-ree) is one of the biggest festivals in all of Japan. Participants pull a heavy 10-ton (20,000 pounds!) float called yatai (YAHT-tie) through the streets of the town. The yatai is like a giant moving outdoor stage. Musical accompaniment is a basic element of the festivities. Crowds of men bravely pull the floats by hand, with heavy ropes. The drums and drummers in this festival sit inside the giant floats. There are two kinds of drums: The larger drums are called chudaiko (chu-DI-ko). Festival drummers cling to these drums with their legs and beat as hard as they can. The second type of drum is much smaller, called a shimedaiko, and requires very fast and precise rhythms.The shimedaiko (shee-may-DI-ko) is tied with rope and the pitch can be changed. Both styles of drumming are very difficult! There are other instruments such as the flute and the atarigane (ah-tah-ree-GAH-nay), a metal instrument struck with a mallet. Turning a 10-ton float of this size by sheer man power is a huge feat! Using their voices to yell with great energy and inspiration, the drummers play a very special rhythm called TAMAIRE (tah-mah-EE-ray) when the carts are turned. Translated, this means, to put ones heart and soul into something. There is a tremendous human effort requiring muscle and lots of shouting and energy and good cheer. Shidara members live together deep in the mountains, training and practicing 11 hours every day! We work very hard with lots of courage to play the best taiko performances we can.When we perform the song, Yataibayashi (yah-TIGH-bi-ah-shee), we bring all of our muscle to the stage, to bring the same energy and group effort of this festival to our audience. Watching Shidara’s performance of Yataibayashi is a lot like being surrounded by Japan’s giant festival floats!

LEARNING OUTCOMES Students learn how music plays a part in cultural celebrations and events based on their study of a major Japanese festival. They learn about specific types of drums and rhythms in Japanese drumming.

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5 SECTION

Pre-Performance Questions: THE ROLE MUSIC PLAYS TO HELP ACCOMPLISH GREAT PHYSICAL FEATS SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION5: SLIDES 1-6) I. Review the pre-performance story with the students and show photos.

What do they think this is?

Where do they think this is taking place?

What are these people doing?

II. Music is the main source of inspiration and encouragement at the Yataibayashi festivals. III. At what American sports events do you see music (and cheers, and cheerleading, mascots, etc) being used as a similar source of inspiration? IV. Make parallels between Japan and the US, and the ways human beings use their strength and spirit to accomplish great feats together.

Pre-Performance Exercise: IDENTIFYING JAPANESE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION5: SLIDES 7-13) I. Show the photos of the musical instruments and identify them by their Japanese names. atarigane chudaiko shimedaiko katsugi okedo odaiko okedo odaiko chappa

Post-Performance Questions: I. What Japanese drums and instruments are used only in the Yataibayashi festival? II. What was your favorite instrument in Yataibayashi? III. What does TAMAIRE mean? IV. Which drum plays the TAMAIRE rhythm? When is this rhythm played during the festival? V. Can you match the instrument to its proper name? VI. What other famous sports events or gatherings does this festival remind you of?

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5 SECTION

Post-Performance Exercise: LEARN VOCABULARY AND IDENTIFY CULTURAL ASPECTS I. Complete the crossword puzzle and word search worksheets. Refer to the photos from the reading and to the glossary for full vocabulary list and definitions.

Vocabulary for this section (refer to glossary for full list and definitions):

shimedaiko (shee-may DI-ko): n. small, rope tightened drum

chudaiko (chu-DI-ko): n. a large drum

atarigane (ah-tah-ree-GAH-nay) n. a brass instrument played with a wooden mallet

tamaire (tah-mah-EE-ray) v: to put ones soul into

PAGE 29


Yataibayashi 1

4

PAGE 30

S H 2 3 C I T H M A U E M D D A 4 A T A R I G A N E I I R K K E O O Across Down 1 Drummers play A brass instrument the special rhythm TAMAIRE played with a wooden mallet on this small rope-tied drum 2 A larger drum used on Yataibayashi floats 3 An expression in Japan: "to put one's soul into"...


5 SECTION

crossword puzzle

Yataibayashi

song 3: YATAIBAYASHI Giant Festival Floats 1

2

3

4

4

Across A brass instrument played with a wooden mallet

1

2

3

Down Drummers play the special rhythm TAMAIRE on this small rope-tied drum A larger drum used on Yataibayashi floats An expression in Japan: "to put one's soul into"...

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Yataibayashi Find and circle the vocabulary words related to the Japanese festival, and Shidara's song, Yataibayashi!

OK K E I D A T DU E T MA I A HO S D

PAGE 32

I D O A C I T A H I

A D I N E D R I I I A E MG A H T A MR

UH I I A A GA OT R E OS HH MA E K

C I D N N A I A H T

I A K E O A D D A E

shimedaiko chudaiko atarigane tamaire


5 SECTION

word search

song 3: YATAIBAYASHIYataibayashi Giant Festival Floats Find and circle the vocabulary words related to the Japanese festival, Find and circle the vocabulary words related to the Japanese festival, and and Shidara’s song, Yataibayashi! Shidara's song, Yataibayashi!

OK K E I D A T DU E T MA I A HO S D

I D O A C I T A H I

A D I N E D R I I I A E MG A H T A MR

UH I I A A GA OT R E OS HH MA E K

C I D N N A I A H T

I A K E O A D D A E

shimedaiko chudaiko atarigane tamaire

PAGE 33


PAGE 34


6 SECTION

background, discussion QUESTIONS and exercises

song 4: HANA MATSURI A Traditional National Treasure The air is saturated with haunting melodies of the bamboo flute and boom of the drums. Please enjoy our performance of Hana Matsuri (hahnah MA-tsoo-ree) Festival!

Pre-performance STORY Hana Matsuri takes place in the villages of Shidara’s mountains from November through March each year. Long ago, people danced and performed oni (god and demon) dances to flute and drums for a full week, without sleep! In modern days, we go for two days without sleep, continuing the same festivities, which are officially one of the National Folk Treasuries of Japan. Hana Matsuri is both a Shinto and Buddhist festival. There are many different dances, with foot movements to push demons down into the ground and give strength to the earth. Special demon (oni) dancers carry giant black axes (masakari), symbolically cutting through heaven, and earth, clearing away bad spirits. Fires burn all night, and there is hot food to keep you warm. This delicious food is called Miso, special Japanese sauce, which brings happiness for a full year. Drums and flutes play throughout the night. Festival cut-outs made with white paper, shirogami, represent nature and the gods. Other colorful paper cut-outs are hung everywhere, representing the four directions, announcing that it is a festival place. The cranes, tsuri, on our jackets, happi, are symbols of celebration and long life. The sword, katana, held by Shidara’s dancer is also a symbol of the gods, and like the ax, cuts through negative energy and clears away bad spirits. Dancers carry many kinds of bells, tsuzu, to make noise and scare away bad spirits. Elders perform religious opening and closing ceremonies. They also teach the children how to dance. Everyone in the town participates from before they can speak, throughout their entire lives. The whole village comes together for hard work, celebrations, gratitude and music.

LEARNING OUTCOMES Students try their hand at making traditional Japanese festival decorations and identify the special symbols and meanings of a 730-year-old harvest festival from the mountains of central Japan.

PAGE 35


6 SECTION

Post-Performance Exercise: SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION6: SLIDES 1-12) I. Print out the two shirogami designs, one copy for each student to use as stencils/examples. Cut out your own shirogami prints using the stencils provided. Required equipment: white paper, stencil, scissors

Post-Performance Questions: IDENTIFYING THE COSTUMES, SYMBOLS AND INSTRUMENTS OF HANA MATSURI SHOW PHOTOS RELATED TO THIS SECTION (SHIDARA_SECTION6: SLIDES 13-20) I. What special Hana Matsuri items did you see the Shidara dancers holding? II. What color were the happi? III. What symbols and musical instruments did you see on stage? IV. Can you name some other folk and traditional dances from the United States and other countries, and some of the instruments played during them?

Post-Performance Exercise: LEARN VOCABULARY AND IDENTIFY CULTURAL ASPECTS I. Complete the crossword puzzle and word search worksheets. Refer to the photos from the reading and to the glossary for full vocabulary list and definitions.

PAGE 36

Vocabulary for this section (refer to glossary for full list and definitions):

oni (OH-nee): n. demon

masakari (mah-SAH-kah-ree): n. axe

shirogami (SHEE-roh-gah-mee): n. white paper

tsuri (SU-ree): n. crane

happi (HA-pee): n. jacket

katana (kah-TAH-nah): sword

tsuzu (su-ZOO): n. bells


6 SECTION

Daikon

Temple

PAGE 37


Hana Matsuri Fill in the crossword puzzle about special Hana Matsuri symbols and items! 1

T S 4 T S U Z U R 5 S H I R O G 6

K A T A N 7

H A P P

2 4 5

6

7

PAGE 38

Across Japanese sauce, bringing happiness for a full year Many kinds of bells to clear bad spirits Festive paper cutouts made with white paper representing nature and the gods A symbolic sword used in dances to scare away bad spirits A Japanese jacket with special designs, especially on the back

1

2

3

2

3

MI S O A N S I A MI K A R I Down The crane, symbolizing long life and celebration, on the back of Shidara's happi The large axe the demon oni dances with to scare away bad spirits A special demon of the Hana Matsuri, who carries an axe and scares away bad spirits


6 SECTION

crossword puzzle

Hana Matsuri

song 4: HANA MATSURI A Traditional National Treasure Fill in the crossword puzzle about special Hana Matsuri symbols and items! 1 2

3

4

5

6

7

2 4 5

6

7

Across Japanese sauce, bringing happiness for a full year Many kinds of bells to clear bad spirits Festive paper cutouts made with white paper representing nature and the gods A symbolic sword used in dances to scare away bad spirits A Japanese jacket with special designs, especially on the back

1

2

3

Down The crane, symbolizing long life and celebration, on the back of Shidara's happi The large axe the demon oni dances with to scare away bad spirits A special demon of the Hana Matsuri, who carries an axe and scares away bad spirits

PAGE 39


Shidara's Hana Matsuri Find the vocabulary words about Shidara's Hana Matsuri festival and circle them!

i a t s mmmh a s i a g n i p o ma r r a n t i r a k h r i r s a z i

PAGE 40

u z u r i r p s k ms o p a h a mz g g u r mz a s a m u k t a i h o u

oni masakari shirogami tsuri happi katana tsuzu


6 SECTION

word search

Shidara's Hana Matsuri song 4: HANA MATSURI A Traditional National Treasure Find and circle the vocabulary words about Shidara’s Hana Matsuri festival Find the vocabulary words about Shidara's Hana Matsuri festival and circle and circle them! them!

i a t s mmmh a s i a g n i p o ma r r a n t i r a k h r i r s a z i

u z u r i r p s k ms o p a h a mz g g u r mz a s a m u k t a i h o u

oni masakari shirogami tsuri happi katana tsuzu

PAGE 41


PAGE 42


7 SECTION

supplements We hope you have had fun and learned many things about Japan and Taiko. We hope you will consider linking this curriculum with your other curricula and use it as a springboard toward social studies, language or other areas of study. We have planned it so that it may spark your students’ imaginations in all kinds of ways. We have provided you with the text and photos in separate documents, so that you can create our own lesson plans. The curriculum is designed so that it is available for active board technology or other PowerPoint presentations you may want to use.

This section contains the following materials: 1. Map of Japan 2. Japanese Festivals Crossword and Word Search Puzzles 3. Full Vocabulary Crossword and Word Search Puzzles 4. Evaluation form for teachers 5. Evaluation form for students 6. Full Glossary

If you would like to learn more about us, please visit our website at www. shidara.co.jp, and watch for a Shidara concert in your city soon! Our goal is to improve, and we would be very grateful if you would fill out the evaluations (teacher and student) and send them to us via email or post. email:

mcsnihon@gmail.com OR

post:

Megan Chao Smith SHIDARA 30 Nakabayashi, Higashisonome, Kitashitaragun, Toei, Aichiken Japan 449-0203

From all of us at Shidara, thank you for your hard work!

PAGE 43


Shidara Festival Songs 1

H S A I R A I N A

2

2

3

4

PAGE 44

M A T 3 Y A T A I B A Y A S H I U R 4 S H I S H I MA I Across Down Shidara's song 1 The special about the festival from coming Shidara's Japanese festival! Shidara's mountain village performance of the Drum Cart Festivals Shidara's Lion Dance


7 SECTION

supplements Shidara Festival Songs crossword puzzle: japanese festivals

1 2

3

4

2

3

4

Across Shidara's song about the coming festival! Shidara's performance of the Drum Cart Festivals Shidara's Lion Dance

1

Down The special festival from Shidara's Japanese mountain village

PAGE 45


Shidara's Festival Songs Find the names of Shidara's four festival songs, and circle them!

H I I S A I A A B T Y A

PAGE 46

A U R A I H S U A S A H

T I U A R S A T S A A A

B Y I A S T S A HI I B MA HY A A S S S H I I

R MI T A A HI A MA N S S R A Y Y R T UI I A MS H I S HA A T NR S A I I H HI S Y N H MI

A S A A B Y H S R A S A

S S H I S H I M A I I A

Sairai Shishimai Yataibayashi Hana Matsuri


7 SECTION

supplements

Shidara's Festival Songs word search: japanese festivals Find the Shidara’s four festival songs and circle them! Find the names of Shidara's four festival songs and circle them!

I H S A Y A B I A T A Y

H R A I A R A Y T H I S

I S A A UA HS UY MA A T T A I T S H B H MT

S R I A Y R Y S T H UA I S I I Y R I S I A MS

A A S B S MA I A S NA Y S A S MA A U Y I B H MI Y I I A S A I R NS H I MA R A S I HS A U

H A Y A A T S A S I H A

Sairai Shishimai Yataibayashi Hana Matsuri

PAGE 47


Complete Vocabulary Crossword Fill in the crossword puzzle about Japan, Taiko, and Shidara's festival symbols and items! 1

T T A 7 S A M U A R S 9 I S H 12 S I 14 13 S H I S H I I H N I T R O O I G S A M M 22 M I S O 5

1 6 7 8 9 10 13 16 17 20 22 24 25

S U Z U

2

S C H A P P U R A I I 8 R J A 10 11 O S H A M I S E H T M A I A M R 16 F U E I D G 18 17 Y A T A I B A Y I N U K E D O D H I 24 M A S A K M

Across Many kinds of bells to clear bad spirits Small brass cymbals A warrior of long ago Japan The Japanese shrine Japanese costume A traditional Japanese string instrument Shidara's Lion Dance The bamboo flute Shidara's performance of the Drum Cart Festivals A symbolic sword used in dances to scare away bad spirits Japanese sauce, bringing happiness for a full year The large axe the demon oni dances with to scare away bad spirits A special demon of the Hana Matsuri, who carries an axe and scares away bad spirits

6

K A M I N J

N 15

4

H A N A

M A T S U R S H I

C H U D A 19 I T 21 20 K A T A N A O A I M K 23 H A O A R I P R P E 25 O N I

1 2 3 4 5 10 11 12 14 15 18 19 21 23

PAGE 48

3

Down Spirit Shidara's song about the coming festival! The Japanese gods The special festival from Shidara's Japanese mountain village The crane, symbolizing long life and celebration, on the back of Shidara's happi Yataibayashi Drummers play the special rhythm TAMAIRE on this small rope-tied drum A brass instrument played with a wooden mallet A native religion of Japan, beliefs that all things are sacred and have a spirit Festive paper cutouts made with white paper representing nature and the gods A larger drum used on Yataibayashi floats A native religion of Japan, based on teachings of Buddha The Japanese drum An expression in Japan: "to put one's soul into"... A Japanese jacket with special designs, especially on the back


7 SECTION

supplements Complete Vocabulary Crossword crossword puzzle: complete vocabulary

Fill in the crossword puzzle about Japan, Taiko, and Shidara's festival symbols and items! 1

3

2

5

4

6

7 8

9

10

11

12 14

13

15

16

18

17

19 20

21

22 23 24

25

1 6 7 8 9 10 13 16 17 20 22 24 25

Across Many kinds of bells to clear bad spirits Small brass cymbals A warrior of long ago Japan The Japanese shrine Japanese costume A traditional Japanese string instrument Shidara's Lion Dance The bamboo flute Shidara's performance of the Drum Cart Festivals A symbolic sword used in dances to scare away bad spirits Japanese sauce, bringing happiness for a full year The large axe the demon oni dances with to scare away bad spirits A special demon of the Hana Matsuri, who carries an axe and scares away bad spirits

1 2 3 4 5 10 11 12 14 15 18 19 21 23

Down Spirit Shidara's song about the coming festival! The Japanese gods The special festival from Shidara's Japanese mountain village The crane, symbolizing long life and celebration, on the back of Shidara's happi Yataibayashi Drummers play the special rhythm TAMAIRE on this small rope-tied drum A brass instrument played with a wooden mallet A native religion of Japan, beliefs that all things are sacred and have a spirit Festive paper cutouts made with white paper representing nature and the gods A larger drum used on Yataibayashi floats A native religion of Japan, based on teachings of Buddha The Japanese drum An expression in Japan: "to put one's soul into"... A Japanese jacket with special designs, especially on the back

PAGE 49


Complete Vocabulary Wordsearch Shidara, Taiko and Japan Find and circle all of the vocabulary words related to Shidara's school assembly performance!

i t s r h u o h mk n a t r e i h a me i o s k o o i s i b

PAGE 50

c h u d a i k o r n i o i j u

t i h s a y a b i a t a y g d

a c s i a a d h t e t j h a p p i a mp s n s s t p j s h t k a mi r u a n ms i o t e s a a r d s h i n o g i r a t a k mp r h g d a mu a i i h s mmi h s i a r i d h i s mk

mk a k f wf s a a u a k z e h u i a i s t a e t n i h a d i h g r i a o s h s h e s n s n a y o t ma a s a a e i t a

t h a s d s s s h a y t e s d

Shidara isho shamisen taiko chappa fue jinja samurai shintoism buddhism kami tamashii Oshogatsu washi Sairai Shishimai Yataibayashi chudaiko shimedaiko atarigane tamaire Hana Matsuri masakari miso shirogami tsuzu tsuri katana oni happi


7 SECTION

supplements

Complete Vocabulary Wordsearch word search: complete vocabulary Shidara, Taiko and Japan Find and circle all of the vocabulary words related to Find and circle all of the vocabulary words related to Shidara's school Shidara’s assembly performance! assemblyschool performance!

i t s r h u o h mk n a t r e i h a me i o s k o o i s i b

c h u d a i k o r n i o i j u

t i h s a y a b i a t a y g d

a c s i a a d h t e t j h a p p i a mp s n s s t p j s h t k a mi r u a n ms i o t e s a a r d s h i n o g i r a t a k mp r h g d a mu a i i h s mmi h s i a r i d h i s mk

mk a k f wf s a a u a k z e h u i a i s t a e t n i h a d i h g r i a o s h s h e s n s n a y o t ma a s a a e i t a

t h a s d s s s h a y t e s d

Shidara isho shamisen taiko chappa fue jinja samurai shintoism buddhism kami tamashii Oshogatsu washi Sairai Shishimai Yataibayashi chudaiko shimedaiko atarigane tamaire Hana Matsuri masakari miso shirogami tsuzu tsuri katana oni happi

PAGE 51


7 SECTION

EVALUATION: TEACHER We at Shidara applaud you as teachers. We know you have one of the hardest jobs in the world. We believe in your work as teachers and want to provide fun, profound, easy materials for you to use in your teaching. Please give us feedback so that we can improve! 1. How many students participated in these activities? 2. From what region are you from in the United States? 3. How were the lessons and materials in this curriculum easy to use? 4. How were they difficult to use? 5. How did the materials enhance the experience /learning of the assembly? 6. How were you able to integrate our assembly and materials into your own existing curriculum and goals for your students? 7. What did students learn about Japan from seeing our performance and using this curriculum? 8. What did you notice they learned about connections, comparisons, communities, and communication among cultures? 9. Did you and your class have fun? 10. Would you attend our assembly again? 11. Do you have any other feedback for us?

PAGE 52


7 SECTION

EVALUATION: STUDENT We are so happy to hear your ideas. We want to do a good job teaching about Japan and taiko. Please help us by telling us what you thought of Shidara. 1. Did you learn something new about Japan? 2. What did you like best about Shidara’s performance? 3. Did you have fun? 4. How do you feel about Japanese drumming? 5. What did you like best about the activities you did in class about Shidara and Japan? 6. What was your least favorite thing?

PAGE 53


7 SECTION

FULL GLOSSARY glossary atarigane: n. A brass instrument played with a wooden mallet Buddhism: n. A native religion of Japan, based on teachings of Buddha chappa: n. Small brass cymbals chudaiko: n. a large Japanese drum made of solid wood fue: n. The bamboo flute Hana Matsuri : n. The special festival from Shidara's Japanese mountain village happi: A Japanese jacket or coat with special designs on it isho: n. A Japanese costume jinja : n. The Japanese shrine kami: n. The Japanese gods katana: n. Sword masakari: n. Axe miso: n. Japanese sauce oni: n. Demon Oshogatsu: n. Japanese New Year Sairai: n. Shidara's song about the coming festival! samurai: n. A warrior of long ago Japan Shidara: n. A taiko group from the mountains of Japan shimedaiko: n. a small, rope-tied Japanese drum Shishimai: n. Japanese Lion Dance shamisen: n. A traditional Japanese string instrument Shintoism: n. A native religion of Japan, beliefs that all things are sacred because they have a unique spirit shirogami: n. Festive paper cutouts made with white paper representing nature and the gods taiko: n. The Japanese drum tamaire: n. An expression in Japan: “to put one's soul into...� tamashii: n. Spirit tsuri : n. Crane tsuzu: n. Bells washi: n. Paper cut-outs Yataibayashi: n. Shidara's song based on the Drum Cart Festivals PAGE 54

SHIDARA Study Guide  

Shidara’s powerful, joyous performances succeed in preserving the folk traditions of Japan through song, music and dance. Special lecture/de...

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