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Contents About Lindsay Harkema

3

Peripheral Shift

6

Projects Assembled Ground

14

Extraterritorial-Bound

20

The Banded Edge

30

The Living (Dr)Edge

38

Three Schools

44

The Delirious and the Determined

50

Greenhouse Abu Dhabi

56

Pier 1 Park Residences

68

The DUMBO Block

74

Mercedes Club

80

Chelsea Penthouse

84

Cecil Balmond: Solid Void

88

Strelka Academic Exhibition 2013

92

Writing

Professional

Exhibitions

1


About Lindsay Harkema is an architectural designer, researcher and collaborator. Through her work, Lindsay explores the interaction between the built environment and the human ecology that occupies and adapts it. In 2013, she finished a 9-month post-graduate research program at Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture, and Design in Moscow, Russia. While at Strelka, she worked with 35 other individuals from around the world and various disciplines on a collective research on the city of Moscow. She was also part of the design team for a project that was selected as a finalist in the Tallinn Architectural Biennale Design Competition, awaiting final results in September 2013. From March 2010 to September 2012, Lindsay was Project Designer at Leeser Architecture in Brooklyn, New York. While at Leeser, she worked on various projects at all stages of design, from concept to construction. Selected projects include the winning competition design for a greenhouse in Abu Dhabi, the Pier 1 Park Residence in Brooklyn, the BRIC Arts | Media House in Brooklyn, the South Lobby and recreation facilities for the Mercedes House in Manhattan, and several other residential and institutional design projects. Lindsay has a Master of Architecture degree from Rice University (2010). As the recipient of the Morris Pitman Travel Award in 2009, she traveled around the world to conduct research for her thesis project, Extraterritorial-Bound, which was sited in Istanbul, Turkey. While at Rice, Lindsay was a research assistant for professors Sanford Kwinter and Mary Ellen Carroll, and worked on a student journal of architectural theory, Manifold Magazine. She also worked as a designer and coordinator for the Cecil Balmond: Solid Void exhibition at the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts in Chicago in the summer of 2008. In 2007, Lindsay graduated magna cum laude from the Washington University in St. Louis Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts. She lives in Brooklyn.

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5


Peripheral Shift

Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, St. Louis, Missouri Steedman Design Competition Individual Entry Spring 2012

As categorical distinctions between design disciplines are blurred, the space of their overlap at the fringe becomes the zone of highest productivity - a site for collaboration and creative emergence. PERIPHERAL SHIFT proposes a new building for art, architecture, and design education shaped by this concept: productive collaboration occurs in the peripheral, unfocused realm of the academic institution, where disciplines intermingle, ideas are exchanged, and inspiration occurs. Juhani Pallasmaa wrote, “Focused vision makes us mere outside observers; peripheral perception transforms retinal images into a spatial and bodily involvement and encourages participation.”1 Peripheral Shift presents a spatial arrangement constructed around peripheral views and adjacencies - creating multiple lines of perspective from a single vantage point through a continuously bifurcating volume of space. This site strategy pulls from the natural sloping topography of the site, lifting the ground plane to insert interlocking interior volumes. The form is then deformed by pushing down the southeast corner to create an outdoor amphitheater space in the heart of the Sam Fox campus. A continuous ramping pathway wraps the building, acknowledging multiple directions of approach. Peripheral Vision refers to the large portion of sight which the human body perceives as unfocused, yet to which it responds and adapts subconsciously. The interplay between the focus and unfocused creates our sense of being and self within context.

6

1 Pallasmaa, Juhani,“Hapticity and Time”, Encounters: Architectural Essays, 2005.


He paused for a moment, eyes unfocused on his computer screen - the filtered sunlight from above and the conversations around him flooded his thoughts, and inspiration came.

PERIPHERAL VISION

PERIPHERAL VISION

90 120

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60

70 60 50

150

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40 30 20 10

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 360

180

FOCUS PERIPHERAL VISION

210

300

240

330

The lecturer’s comment sparked a mental tangent, her gaze drifted through the framed view to the ouside as she reframed her studio project in her mind.

270

While attuned to the panel speakers’ exchange, he also engaged in a visual dialogue with the outside through the gossamer facade.

7 From the top of the grand stair, the dual perspective exposed a bifurcating spatial arrangement. She looked in and out in a single gaze.


GROUND LEVEL

UPPER LEVEL

WORKSHOPS

ROOF

DECK

ADMIN

STUDIOS

THEATRE

IT LAB

STUDIOS

AUDITORIUM

GREEN ROOF

PUBLIC CAFE

STUDIOS

AMPHITHEATRE WETLAND

Architectural and artistic endeavors are inherently informed by a perception of context. Today more than ever, the creative process of design disciplines is shaped by interaction with and exposure to other fields of study and methods of approach, accelerated by technological advancement and an intellectual shift toward the understanding of the world as a network of interconnected processes rather than discrete entities. This building proposal fosters the peripheral space as the most dynamic space for creation and interdisciplinary collaboration. Peripheral Shift breaks down the interior/exterior dichotomy by blurring their boundary, and fostering immediacy between inside and out. Research, learning, and design experimentation occurs both in the studio and in the fringe, and the laboratory expands to envelop the building itself. As a building nested within the landscape, the outdoor environment becomes an extension of the ‘peripheral� space within. The facade is a gossamer envelope, constantly shifting the interaction between inside and out. The existential experience of Peripheral Shift is shaped by the peripheral gaze and the gossamer envelope. By this the building transcends institution and becomes incubator.

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9


The program is distinguished between focused – the dedicated spaces for classrooms, studios, labs and offices – and unfocused – flexible area for exhibition, collaboration and ‘haptic’ interaction, as well as a close adjacency and intermingling with the outdoor environment. By interlocking the focused and unfocused zones, the peripheral becomes ubiquitous throughout the building, and activating the interior and exterior as a continuous site for future collaborative blurring.

“Even creative activity calls for an unfocused and undifferentiated subconscious mode of vision, which is fused with integrating tactile experience. The object of a creative act is not only enfolded by the eye and the touch, it has to be introjected, identified with one’s own body and existential experience. In deep thought, focused vision is blocked; thoughts travel with an absent-minded gaze. In creative work, the scientist and the artist are directly engaged with their body and existential experience.” – Pallasmaa, 2005

10


Building plinth deflects cold winter wind and provides thermal insulation

Roof wetland filters and recycles runoff, cools hot summer wind

Amphitheatre spaces for formal and informal lectures and discussions, with visual connection to the outside

UNFOCUSED ZONES

Sunken lounge for presentations, video screenings, and relaxation

Large open space for exhibition, socialization, and interaction between student work and public interest

Outdoor amphitheatre

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13


Assembled Ground Väike-Õismäe neighborhood, Tallinn, Estonia

First Prize, TAB Design Competition: Recycling Socialism Team: Izabela Cichonska, Nathan DeGroot, Ondrej Janku Spring 2013 9

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11

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3 10

10

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5 7

3

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6

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2 1

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1 Väike-Õismäe 2 Tallinn Zoo 3 Grassland 4 Lake 5 Residential Area 6 Industrial Area 7 Woodland 8 Shopping, Sports & Entertainment 9 Open air Museum 10 Tallinn City Border 11 Sandy Beach

How to wake up the sleeping district of Väike-Õismäe? From above, the city of Tallinn looks like a patchwork of different zones. At its historic core is a walled old town in which the Toompea hill remains a separate enclave. Surrounded by autonomous districts of wooden houses, Soviet massive housing projects, and post-modern commercial areas, the urban morphology reflects the city’s history as a diary. Which parts should be preserved, and which parts changed? Within Tallinn’s urban archipelago, Väike-Õismäe is the ultimate island. The sub-district was designed on the edge of the city as a happy marriage between modernist architecture and socialism. The beauty and stoicism of the circular blockhousing district is both striking and disorienting, as its repetition overwhelms the place. At the core of the concentric plan is a void - the inversion of an island. It is surrounded by vast space intended as a common ground. How can this ground be reactivated? We propose to ‘wake up’ the sleeping neighborhood by recharging the ground level. Significant aspects of the surrounding area are strategically pulled into VäikeÕismäe, transforming the district from a dedicated residential and institutional zone to a versatile mix of natural habitat, commercial activity, and communal identity. Its new identity is assembled on the original, through the preservation of its architectural integrity and original concept of communal life, but opened up to new uses and interactions.

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9

8 3

2

4

1

6

7

Step 1: Connect Lake Harku with Väike-Õismäe’s pond Step 2: Pull diverse natural conditions from surroundings Step 3: Place commercial pockets Step 4: Place office spaces and small industry Step 5: Preserve Väike-Õismäe as open-air museum

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3 2

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EXISTING TREES ON SITE EXISTING TREES ON SITE

CONCENTRATION IN WOODLAND ZONE CONCENTRATION IN WOODLAND ZONE

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT: The nearby woodland is extended by concentrating Väike-Õismäe existing trees into the southwest quarter. A new canal connects Väike-Õismäe’s central pond with the nearby lake. From the Northwest, wild grasslands are pulled into the site allowing the eastern zone to be dedicated to more park-like greenery. The Southeast zone represents the former fame of Väike-Õismäe as an open-air museum and the architecture of buildings and landscape design is manicured according to its original conception. BUILT ENVIRONMENT: The panels removed from the buildings are recycled as the infrastructure for a local market, urban farm and community garden. The flexibility of their placement in the landscape allows for constant adaptation for different uses. While maintaining its architectural heritage, the base of the buildings become an open framework for improvisation, and the recycled panels are reassembled for new uses.

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GROUND FLOOR LIBERATED FROM FACADE WALLS

Ground floor liberated from the facade walls


By recycling authentic materials and the existing buildings to facilitate mixed functions and social interaction, the district becomes an assemblage of Tallinn’s most vibrant ‘patches’ within one community.

Liberate ground level from continues walls

VISUAL AND SOCIAL CONNECTION THROUGHOUT NEIGHBORHOOD

Ground floor liberated from the facade walls provides visual and social connection

17


REPURPOSED GROUND LEVEL: The ground plane of Väike-Õismäe’s residential buildings will be activated by removing the existing facade of the first two levels to introduce open, mixed used spaces, as well as continuous views through the building.

Step three: Open up ground level of housing blocks for new commerical and other use

HOUSING BLOCKS

VÄIKE-ÕISMÄE

FORMER INSTITUTIONS

Step one: Identify main elements of Väike-Õismäe

EXISTING BUILDINGS: 18

HOUSING BLOCKS + FORMER INSTITUTIONS

HOUSING BLOCKS

REMOVE GROUND LEVEL FACADES OF HOUSING BLOCKS

Step two: Remove facade panels to open up for


COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE: By exposing the concrete structure of the former school a flexible framework is created to accommodate temporary uses and facilities that allow for constant change and adaptation based on the interests and desires of the active Vテ、ike-テ品smテ、e community.

Step three: Recycle building structure of former school as platform for new activities

FORMER INSTITUTIONS

Step three: Recycle facade panels as new community infrastructure

REMOVE FACADES OF UNUSED INSTITUTIONS

RECYCLE FACADE PANELS AS NEW COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE 19

panels to open up formerly closed buildings


Extraterritorial-Bound Istanbul, Turkey MArch Thesis Project, Rice School of Architecture Advisors: Neyran Turan, Eva Franch Fall 2009

OLD CITY CENTER

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT SPECTACLE ASYLUM

MEDICINE CUT

FOR

AY

SUBW

MEDICAL CAMPUS

PORT

Extraterritoriality, the state of exception from local jurisdiction, is not yet formally manifest as an urban architectural problem. Bound by vertical walls and political geometries within island typologies such as airports, embassies, and free trade zones, current modes of architectural extraterritoriality are founded upon a disconnection from the city. The ExtraTerritorial Typology is an urban architecture that reconfigures the boundary conditions between territorial grounds and user groups: displaced populations and local citizens. Mediating between global and local scales, the ETT relates to its urban context despite its bigness. The ETT demarcates its nonvertical boundary in relationship to the existing ground by strategically connecting to and detaching from the site topography. Above/below/askew take precedent over the conventional interior/exterior dichotomy. The ETT accommodates a spectrum of multiscalar international programs within venues of emplacement and displacement dispersed in topographical bands across the site. As an urban scale site intervention, the project is a megaplane which interacts with the existing ground. Sometimes a surface condition, sometimes as megaobject, it is perceived from the street as a shifting architectural form. it extends from the urban context to accommodate programmatic spaces of individuation and collectivity, from transit to asylum, from privatized medical treatment to public athletic stadia. The test site for insertion of the ETT is in Istanbul, at the emergence of the intercontinental subway connection between the Asian and European sides of the global city. A temporary destination for tourists and travellers, the city also is the inadvertent detention zone for thousands of transit refugees and asylum seekers. The extraterritorial typology intermingles these formerly disparate groups with the local public in an international collective of the megaplane.

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THE AIRPORT

THE CAMP

Existing architectural typologies of exception are the airport and the camp, defined by controlled access and circulation, vertical walls, and a manipulation of view to the outside. Both provide venues for the collective and the individual, within a spectrum of multi-scalar spatial conditions. This typology could be urbanized by opening up the zone into a ground of exception in the city.

stasis

event

juncture

Social extraterritoriality applies to displaced people, both in transit and suspended, who do not belong to the place where they are – tourists, business travelers, migrants, transit refugees, and asylum seekers. Their differences are of reasons for travel, legal right to a local identity, and length of stay. The extraterritorial provides a space in the city unappropriated by political boundaries for multiscalar human programs, from public square to private residence, transit hub to medical retreat, venues for exhibition and observation. time

entrance 5 minutes

transit exchange

clinical visit exposition tour

venue public baths

hotel

asylum medical procedure + recovery

5 weeks

21


The test site for insertion of the ETT is in Istanbul, at the emergence of the intercontinental subway connection between the Asian and European sides of the global city. A temporary destination for tourists and travellers, the city also is the inadvertent detention zone for thousands of transit refugees and asylum seekers. The extraterritorial typology intermingles these formerly disparate groups with the local public in an international collective of the megaplane.

OLD CITY CENTER

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT SPECTACLE ASYLUM

MEDICINE CUT

FOR

AY

SUBW

MEDICAL CAMPUS

PORT

22

SITE TOPOGRAPHY: Rises toward NW corner.

BANDING: Based on the natural topography of the site.

URBAN GRID: Prominent street lines extended through the site divide it into roughly twenty large city blocks.

PROGRAM: Proximity to medical, residential, cultural, and transit infrastructures informs the figural placement of program onto the site.

DISTRIBUTION: Strategic points of connection suggest a zigzagging framework across which the program and circulation is mapped.


PLA NE APL ANE

MEG

Avg. building height: 21m

Maximum Thickness: 20m

MEGA

PLAN

E MEGA

PLANE

MEGA

PLAN

MEGA

E

Metro depth: -17m

MEG APL ANE20m Site topographical chage: MEG

PLANE

EXPAN

DED

EXPAN

DED

Spatial Boundary

APL

EXTRA

ANE

TERRIT

EXTRA

ORIAL

TERRIT

MEGA

PLANE

MEGA

PLANE

ORIAL

SPACE SPACE

EXPAN

DED

EXPAN

DED

EXTRA

TER

ITORIA 17m site metroRdepth: L SPA

CE

EXTRA

Bosphorus

TERRIT

YEDIKULE

max depth: 56m

ORIAL

SPACE

YENIPAKI

SERKECI

THE URBAN MEGAPLANE ASYLUM

PUBLIC GROUND

TRANSIT HABITABLE SURFACE

PUBLIC GROUND

[RETREAT]

USKUDAR

The Megaplane is not a plane but a differentiated ground, defined by a logic of strategic cuts and lifts – pushing down new public grounds and pulling up spaces of retreat. Along the connective ground, intrusions and extrusions along the surface open up new interruptions and spatial exceptions. The bands are shifted and thickened within the spatial boundary. The tilted strips construct a continuous path from the submerged metro to suspended terrace.

DROP

LIFT [COLLECTIVITY]

The megabands emerge as programmatic strips constructing grounds for the figures and textures of the ETT. They are distinguished from subterranean to raised. Lodged within the strips are significant programmatic figures and surface textures.

EXCEPTIONS

Banded Site

Vertical Thickening

Tilted Path

BANDED SITE BANDED SITE SECTIONALSECTIONAL EXPANSION EXPANSION FIELD EXPANSION FIELD TILTEDFIELD PATH TILTED PATH BANDED SITE SECTIONAL TILTED PATH

Interband Connections

Program Volumes

Surface Cuts

INTERBAND INTERBAND CIRCULATION CIRCUL INTERBAN

Deep Textures

PATH TILTED PATHTILTED PATH INTERBAND INTERBAND CIRCULATION INTERBAND CIRCULATION CIRCULATION PROGRAM PROGRAM VOLUMES PROGRAM VOLUMES VOLUMES SURFACE SURFACE CUTS SURFACE CUTS CUTS DEEPCUTS TEXTURES DEEP TEXTURES DEEP TEXTURES FIELD INTERBAND CIRCULATION PROGRAM VOLUMES SURFACE DEEP TEXTURES

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SITE PLAN

10

50

100

The megaplane is only understood as such from an extraterrestrial view. Sometimes read as a surface condition, sometimes as mega-object, it is not perceived at the street scale as a single entity, but a shifting architectural form. It extends from the urban context to provide spatial exceptions which accommodate programmatic spaces from the individual residence to collective bowls of participation and demonstration, from the privatized body culture of medical treatment to the public arena of athletic stadia.

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500m


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NOMAD BAND

The nomad band stretches from the subterranean subway platform to the spectacle stadium, providing a crenelated surface texture which serves as a public infrastructure for temporary occupation and use: the urban camp. A stacking of transit infrastructures provides multiple scales of access to and circulation within the site.

A

PLAN A

stadium urban camp

cross street

subway platform / parking deck

0

10

50

100m

SECTION AA stadium urban camp

subway platform / parking deck

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cross street


BODY CULTURE BAND

The body culture band accommodates the medical complex of public bath and private surgery hotel in a layering of planes into which embedded pools created a deep, yet transparent surface. B

B

B

PLAN

100

50

10

0

10

50

100m

SECTION BB stadium urban camp

cross street

subway platform / parking deck

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WORLD BAND

The world band dips strategically to provide access to the medical building, and then to construct a public amphitheatre which steps down below the lifted volume of the world consulate and political convention center, creating a shared continuous atrium space between the pubic and political zones of exhibition. C

C

PLAN 10

section cc 0

10

50

50

100

100m

depression to medical entry

amphitheatre atrium

world consulate

cross street

helipad

0

10

50

100m

SECTION CC

depression to medical entry

amphitheatre

world consulate stadium urban camp

subway platform / parking deck

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cross street


REFUGE BAND

The refuge band lifts and fans to provide a terraced decking for temporary asylum residences from which observation rooms are punched upward and downward, providing venues for directed, displaced surveillance. D section ee 0

10

temporary asylum residences 50

world consulate

100m

medical complex urban camp

subway

PLAN D

0

10

50

100m

SECTION DD stadium urban camp

cross street

subway platform / parking deck

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The Banded Edge Istanbul, Turkey Graduate Design Studio Advisor: Neyran Turan Spring 2009

This project recognizes the edge as a symptom of an expanding city. Istanbul is its case study. In the last 60 years, the population has grown from 1 to 12 million inhabitants, which has driven the expansion of the city into the surrounding landscape. The expansion of the city creates voids as the urban fabric is fragmented. These voids are intentionally cut into the fabric for the insertion of parcels of land for private development and gated communities, directly related to the highway network. Other voids build up at the edge from process of leap-frogging as the city expands. The territorial dichotomy of city and hinterland creates an intermediate band of highway, parcel and void at the urban edge. Integration of public, private and natural space in the voids preserves the city-hinterland edge in a new typology of urban growth. The edge is not a line but a band that mediates between the city and the wildlife beyond. The band is largely correlated with the highway network that feeds the encapsulated gated communities at the edge.

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1960 Urban Population: 1,000,000

1970 Expansion of city Introduction of highway

1980 Expansion of city Extension of highway

1990 Voids emerge and are carved out as parcels for sale

2000 Urban Population 12,000,000 Residential and highway development drives expansion

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FIELD OF VOIDS + PARCELS

The edge is proliferated with voids that are opportunity sites for intermingling private and public urban space with natural ecologies from the hinterland in a new quarry typology. The PARCEL development of a metrorail and underground subway system is currently underway and will feed the quarries, as an accessible system that parallels the highway/capsule network. PARCEL

HIGHWAY HIGHWAY

QUARRY QUARRY

SUBWAY SUBWAY

HIGHRISES HIGHRISES HIGHWAY HIGHWAY

SUBWAY

GATED COMMUNITIES COMMUNITIES GATED

SUBWAY QUARRIES

QUARRIES

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UNDIFFERENTIATED EDGE RESIDENTIAL

FOREST WALMART 10

HIGHWAY

0

GATED COMMUNITY

VOID-IN-TRANSITION [INDUSTRIAL SITE] IKEA

RESIDENTIAL

The field RESIDENTIAL

of voids inserted as capsules within the edge band creates a pixilized edge. The urban growth mechanism of land parcelization [dense voids] at the edge proliferates the undifferentiated edge between urban and natural territories. This causes a deterioration of the natural as the unbounded urban edge constantly migrates into the hinterland. 5

17

200

225

175

5

12

150

100

125

125

150

0

15

BANDED EDGE 0

15

1 KM

12

5

125

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Urban Surface

Low-density private housing Native plants + animals Collective Space New Public Ground

Arboretum arboretum

Geology geology Park park

The band is a field of quarries that are concentrated within sites along the edge. This edge is not only a band of mediation, but also of differentiation between the urban and natural territories. The quarry provides a differentiation of density, topography, and surface, which allows for the mediation of city and hinterland.

The quarry is a spiraling alternative to the linear edge condition of the city/ nature dichotomy: a new interterritorial urban void.

VIEWS FROM THE QUARRY Ë„

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Natural History natural Museum history museum


Forest forest

Grouped within patches of productive landscape, dense forest and collective space, and interconnected by bands of circulation, the individual quarries incorporate residential units, public institutions, and wetland cultivation into the surface newly unearthed. A new typology of urban and natural collectivity. Farmland harvest landscape Public public pathPath

private Private housing, Housing, public Public amenities

Subway subway

Amenities

Wetland wetland

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The Living [Dr]Edge Galveston Island, Texas Graduate Design Studio Project with Seanna Walsh, Advisor: Christopher Hight Spring 2008

2008

2018

2028

2058

STAGING AND EXPLOITING NATURAL CONDITIONS OVER TIME The hard edge is an artificial conditions: a bulkhead. The natural edge is a gradient: a wetland. On the bay side of the Galveston barrier island, the natural edge is a habitat, buffer, and indispensable resource. The least stable building foundation is the most desirable building location: at the water’s edge. Proximity to water is a desirable condition. Our case study of this is the Bay Harbor neighborhood, located near the western tip of the island. As sea level rises, the hardened edge is forced to surrender to natural processes of wetland encroachment upon private property.

BAY HARBOR NEIGHBORHOOD

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POTENTIAL WETLAND ENCROACHMENT


.38 mi unfolded edge: 1.52 mi

BAY

Desirable Water Edge

Density of houses

Community ties formed around water access

Proximity to water is a desirable condition. The confluence of residents attracted to the edge creates social, visual, and spatial relationships that characterize the Bay Harbor neighborhood. The bay’s attraction creates higher density, higher property values, and stronger communities in the most unstable areas. In the future, as the hard edge surrenders to wetland growth, the role of infrastructure in unstable zones is called into question. On the natural edge, infrastructure becomes a mediator rather than a fortified barrier.

GALVESTON ISLAND 2028

FORTIFIED INFRASTRUCTURAL SKELETON

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GALVESTON ISLAND, INFRASTRUCTURAL 2028. T


Wetland banks sell offset credits to developers in the region who wish to build on protected natural resources. Purchasing these credits, simliarly to carbon offsets, allows developers to fulfill their legal obligation of NO NET WETLAND LOSS.

GING THE EDGE The Bay Harbor neighborhood regularly dredges material from its bay side canal. The Baymaterial Harbor neighborhood regularly from its bay side canal. This material could be used to create a community wetland bank. This could be used to dredges creatematerial a community wetland bank. wetland bank

$

$

FEMA buyout SBA loan

$

FEMA aid

$

0

!

1

$

$

$

$

2

3

4

5 6 time (months)

7

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$ 11

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Wetland banks Wetland sell offset tocredits developers in the region wishto to build on bankscredits sell offset to developers in the regionwho who wish build on protected natural resources. Purchasing theseresources. credits, simliarly to carbon offsets, developers to fulfill legaloffsets, obligation of NO NET WETLAND LOSS. protected natural Purchasing theseallows credits, similarly to their carbon allows developers to fulfill their legal obligation of no net wetland loss. The residents of bay harbor have two options for maintaining their land: perpetuate the artificial edge or exploit the natural condition. The creation of a wetland bank will allow homeowners to leave the disenfranchised hard edge without compromising their property investments.

wetland bank

$ $

FEMA buyout

$

SBA loan

$

$

$

$

2

3

4

5 6 time (months)

$

FEMA aid 0

1

7

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The Bay Harbor neighborhood regularly dredges material from its bay side canal. This material could be used to create a community wetland bank.

EXISTING BUILT AND WETLAND ZONES:

x

40

x

w

x+w

w

PROPOSED RESHUFFLING:

x+w


bjects.

Future Wetland Growth 2058

Redistribution of Houses in Clusters

Future Wetland Bank and Community Clusters

Residents living on property encroached upon by wetlands will need to relocate. A localized shift from grids to clusters preserves the network relationships integral to Bay Harbor while also making room for the growth of the wetland bank. This project proposes a model for distributing dredged material as the community wetland bank develops. Implicit connectors are built into an infrastructure which mediates between the individual house and the community bank.

DISTRIBUTION: ExistingEXISTING Grid: Isolated Objects. ISOLATED OBJECTS

PROPOSED Proposed Distribution: Localized DISTRIBUTION: Clusters. Proposed Distribution: Localized Clusters. LOCALIZED CLUSTERS

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HOUSING UNITS Housing Particulates

PRIVATE DECK LATTICE

Private Deck Lattice

PUBLIC DECK LATTICE Public Deck Lattice

DREDGED MATERIAL DEPOSITS

Dredged Material Deposits

Wetland Bank Residential Infrastructure

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SITE PLAN 2058 dredged material dredged canals

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Three Schools Sugarland, Texas Graduate Design Studio Advisors: Gordan Whitaker, Dawn Finley Fall 2007

“L” VOLUME STUDIES

RAMP

BRIDGE

WINDOW

OVERHANG

A courtyard, like a school, is a place for human interaction and mixed use. The experience of that space gives a sense of identity; the awareness of one’s presence in a place within a larger place. A courtyard within a building brings the site inside, incorporating the landscape into the interior program. In a scheme for three schools in one building, the presence of courtyards creates a layering of spaces to distinguish and blend the individual schools. The arrangement of the schools and their shared components - cafeteria, gymnasium, administration, and library - allows inter-school commingling, and also provides a medium of separation. A variety of “courtyard” spaces are created within the building, where corridors open up to double-height common areas and circulation spaces become multi-use zones. At moments when the slatted scrim which traces the building’s exterior separates from the skin, the residual interstitial spaces become intimate courtyards or semienclosed pathways. The library and adjacent roof courtyard overlook the more active zones, as a point of destination within the building. During the course of a school day, a child has several types of experiences through academic lessons, social interaction, and self-expression. Therefore, a school building which provides a variety of spaces is appropriate. The layering of classrooms, corridors, and courtyards achieves this variety, creating a rich learning environment for students.

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BALCONY


SINGULAR INSTANCE: SOLID (PROGRAM) + VOID (COURTYARD) + CIRCULATION

SHOULDER AND EDGE CONFIGURATIONS

GREEN ROOF CONSTRUCTION 4” growing medium vapor barrier rigid insulation 2” corregated steel decking roof membrane 4” concrete slab

air diffusers

suspended lighting

PRESSURIZED PLENUM 4” concrete 8” PEX piping corregated steel decking foam insulation 2” concrete

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LIBRARY

DISCRETE SCHOOLS SHARED FACILITIES

ROOF

COURTYARDS

24 R. @ 6" 23 T. @ 1'

24 R. @ 6" 23 T. @ 1'

24 R. @ 6" 23 T. @ 1'

UPPER LEVEL

HEALTH SERVICES

GYM

ADMINISTRATION

CAFETERIA

SECTION (pg 46)

GROUND LEVEL

46


STRUCTURE: steel columns + concrete slab

SKIN: steel columns + wood scrim

SHELTER: steel columns + roofs

TRANSPARENCY: steel columns + glazing

MECHANICAL: pressurized plenum floor slabs

EGRESS: circulations cores + exit routes

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ON D

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

MULTI-USE 1/16” SECTION = 1’0” D SECTION

1/16” = 1’0”

INTERIOR LIBRARY

EXTERIOR HALLWAY

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CLASSROOM CAFETERIA COURTYARD

EXTERIOR LIBRARY

INTERIOR HALLWAY

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ON D

The Delirious and the Determined 1/16” = 1’0”

Median Magazine Post-Industrial Issue April 2013 www.medianmagazine.com

“I wonder if failed space isn’t more conducive to creativity. This may be a romantic notion, but it’s also a classical idea. Think of Goethe pondering Roman ruins. Postindustrial cities that are seeking to remake themselves as cultural centers might also benefit from pondering the success of failure: the glamour of their own collapse.” - Herbert Muschamp1 When does a industrial city become post-industrial? How does thriving innovation give way to urban degeneration? Once booming with industry and culture, American cities like Detroit, St. Louis, and Cleveland have become shells of their former identities facing uncertain futures. In economic terms, the point at which a cities’ soft economy surpasses its industrial production can be pinpointed. But in the life of the city, this is just one moment in an era of urban decline - a slow process of regression. As a label, post-industrial implies a transition beyond a former industrial state, but refers more to the past than to the future. More finite than ‘after’, the prefix ‘post’ underscores this notion of the past, implying a nostalgic sense of loss. In 1967, Henri Lefebvre declared that society had already been completely urbanized. By this, he meant that beyond cities themselves, society - its way of being, perceiving, and interacting, was a product of the urban condition. He described a time-space continuum from 0% (agrarian) to 100% urbanization, with four critical phases: the political city, mercantile city, industrial city and the critical zone. The industrial city phase is located beyond the halfway point in the overall transition from agrarian to urban society. However, the implosion-explosion point in which urbanization becomes ubiquitous marks the transition from industrial city to critical zone. This sequence is significant in the processes of urbanization and industrialization. According to Lefebvre, the process of urbanization precedes industrialization, but the industrial city is the catalyst for the total subordination of the agrarian to the urban.2

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1 Herbert Muschamp, “Public Space or Private, a Compulsion to Fill It,” The New York Times, 27 Aug 2000.

2. Henri Lefebvre, trans. Robert Bononno. The Urban Revolution. (1970). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2003.


3. William H. Frey, “Demographic Reversal: Cities Thrive, Suburbs Sputter”, Brookings Institute, 29 June 2012. 4. Lauren Knapp, “Detroit’s Population Decline: 1 Person Departed Every 22 Minutes”, PBS Newshour. 23 Mar 2011.

5. Krzysztof Nawratek, Holes in the Whole. Winchester: Zero Books. 2012. Pg. 8-13.

So, the City as a construct has already won. It is widely known that more than half of the global population now lives in urban areas. This shift can be accounted to the explosion of the urban population of the developing mega-cities in Asia and across the southern hemisphere, as well as a symptom of the economic crises of the past decade in the developed, western world. US census data in 2010 revealed that, for the first time in nine decades, the population growth of major American cities surpassed the growth of their suburbs.3 On the whole, these patterns could suggest a generally optimistic future for the City. Still, in 2010, as the ‘general’ American population moved to the city, residents of Detroit had been leaving the city at a rate of 1 person every 22 minutes for 10 years.4 Detroit is of course an extreme case - perhaps the most studied, most discussed ‘Post-Industrial’ American city. Still, Detroit’s urban exodus, is indicative not only of the city’s unique situation, but also a precursor of a subtler crisis of the City in general. As Krzysztof Nawratek points outing his 2012 book Holes in the Whole, “The only reason for the flourishing of modern cities is that they are nodes in global flows.” And although these flows of capital, people and ideas are currently sustaining cities, they are also undermining each city’s individual integrity. “The weakness of the modern city is primarily the result of cities being more of a condensation of global flows than autonomous entities.”5 The era is approaching in which the industries which fuel many developed cities will have no physical relationship to them. Rather, they will be fully embedded hubs within an increasingly globalized network which is inherently negligent of any singular entity within its total system. Today, in the fleeting moment after the existence of the city has proved victorious, yet its conceptual failure is palpable, and before the transformation from industrial to information society is complete, it is an opportunity to reflect on this shift, and perhaps to predict a possible future of the urban condition. According to Lefebvre, urbanization, superseding industrialization, is the force of capital growth in the city. The city, its development and its history, is an urban phenomenon, rather than a byproduct of its industry. And the industrial city, as a predecessor to the ‘critical zone’ of complete urbanization, is understood to be transient. As the city follows this linear progression, however, its complexity grows exponentially. The spacetime continuum breaks, as the physical space of the city no longer correlates to the networks of activity which occupy it. The critical zone, then, is where the linear

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progression of the city breaks down. “The unconscious appears sometimes as a deceptive and blinding emerges of a rural and industrial past, sometimes as a sense of loss for an urban reality that is slipping away...” (Lefebvre, 166). This is the crisis of the Post-Industrial city. The silver lining of this crisis could be the escape form what Lefebvre ultimately suggests to be a highly politicizing process of enterprise as strategy for the urban society - the state of the functioning industrial city. In its failed, delirious condition, the Post-Industrial city becomes the space of exception from total urbanization. Now that everything is urban, an emerging dialectic within the urban condition could be the Delirious and the Determined. The Determined City - the established and emerging industrial cities - will follow the linear progression and will continue to be epicenters of production. Perhaps in either or both cases they will be capable of withstanding the transition to fully embedded node in the global network of flows. However, in the future, the relationship between city and industry will become increasingly estranged. With the introduction of technologies like mass accessibility to 3d printing and the immaterial commodity of data stored in the cloud, proximity to a physical means of production will become less critical. Urban density will no longer directly correlate to a higher yield of capital, a higher production output. The future of the Determined City is still uncertain. The Post-Industrial, or Delirious, City is a state of exception that is completely free to transform. The process of transformation implies a change in appearance which could refer to the regeneration of the existing built environment. The Delirious city inhabits a shell of its former identity - an over-built environment constructed for a past urban density. Still, as dilapidated or underused as it may be, the physical body of the city also signifies its history and its failure. Failure is not the same as death but instead, as Muschamp inplied, a rich source of inspiration. As urbanization will drive not industry but the production and exchange of ideas and information, recycled physical infrastructure could become productive sites for new cultural and creative ‘factories’: creative laboratories, labyrinthian data centers, platforms of experimentation. Formerly an industrial belt situated on a medieval fortification, the Meelfabriek complex in the Netherlands is an interesting precedent for this type of urban

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6. ”De Meelfabriek: A project of redevelopment and urban renewal”, Architect: Peter Zumthor http://www. demeelfabriek.nl/index.php

transformation. Already empty for a decade, in 1998 a design competition was held a decade later to gather strategies for its preservation and regeneration. The Swiss architect Peter Zumthor won the competition with a proposal to strip the industrial buildings down to their ‘structural anatomy’ and apply mostly transparent facades to complement the old structure and materiality. The buildings were each given a new function and architectural character according to its original structural concept. Among the convention residential and retail facilities are some more intriguing cultural attractors like the House of Fashion and the House of Design, occupying cavernous former silos and warehouse forests of concrete columns. The industrial complex is remade as a cathedral of contemporary lifestyles.6 Cultural makers will embrace the Delirious city. As unfailed, Determined cities continue to reconstruct themselves, becoming more expensive and less distinctive, a innovatory creative class will relocate to the more desirable, opportunistic environment of the Delirious city. Whereas the Determined city is an organism in itself, the Dispersed city is a palimpsest of inspiration, a project of which its citizen can still take ownership. The critical shift yet to be made is foremost a psychological one. Delirious cities can no longer suffer the association with a past that can never be reincarnated. Like other ‘post’ movements - post-colonialism, postmodernism, the label of PostIndustrial imposes constant nostalgia onto a city. The ‘post’ condition can not exist independently of its historical reference. It is also important to note that a singular city can be an assemblage of the Determined and Delirious cities. I have a hunch that in the future most cities will be composed of both the Determined and the Delirious. This is an optimistic vision because the presence of both conditions will ensure constant adaptation of the city and the urban society, breaking down the linear progression to total urbanization. For now, the transformation of PostIndustrial cities begins by reveling in the glamour of its failure. By Lindsay Harkema

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Iconic Greenhouse

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Project for LEESER Architecture Project Manager: Simon Arnold Competition: Summer 2010, Project Completion: est. 2013

GARDEN BIOME TROPICAL BIOME MEDITERRANEAN BIOME

During the summer of 2010, I worked on Leeser’s design team for an invited competition to propose a greenhouse for a private client in Abu Dhabi. Given the requirement for differentiated climate typologies (Tropical, Mediterranean, and Vernalized) to be housed within the building, we developed the concept of three disc-like biomes beneath a continuous undulating roof. Leeser was awarded the project in August, at which point we embarked on an ambitious project schedule, completing the schematic, design development and construction drawing phases in just 13 months. The 10,000 sq m project is currently under construction, and expected to be completed in late 2013. The three biomes are essentially basins filled with planting soil and mechanical infrastructure required to create the three ecospheres. A central atrium connects the three greenhouses at the ground level where the building entrance, front-ofhouse programmatic spaces and circulation are located. A continuous ramp wraps the perimeter of the atrium providing access to the perimeter walkways around each biome, as well as a continuous path up to an outdoor rooftop terrace. The rolling topography of the roof, inspired by the natural terrain of the implanted climates inside, creates a organic form which allows for the necessary internal airflow and thermal dynamics of the greenhouse.

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SOIL (TROPICAL ABOVE)

SOIL (MEDITERRANEAN ABOVE)

GROUND LEVEL

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

ROOF LEVEL

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˅ COMPETITION DRAWINGS

POTABLE WATER

AMENITY COOLING CONDENSATE BLACKWATER

TROPICAL

GREENHOUSE PLANTS

LIVING MACHINE TREATMENT

GREENHOUSE PLANTS

HYDROPONICS

MEDITERRANEAN

INTERIOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

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WATER CONCEPT DIAGRAM


COMPETITION DRAWINGS Ë…

structure beam openable window panel louver panel control arm connected to motor

pivot pin

ROOF CONCEPT DIAGRAM

ROOF PLAN

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< COMPETITION RENDERINGS BY HYPERTECTURE ˅ COMPETITION AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM

GLASSROOF - HIGH PERFOMANCE GLAZING

ROOF SYSTEM

STRUCTURAL WINDOWFRAME - REFLECTIVE METAL GRATED CATWALK - GALVANIZED STEEL -FOR MAINTENANCE OF ROOF

OPERABLE ROLLER SHADES - WHITE FABRIC BEAMS - PAINTED STEEL

STUCTURE

COLUMNS - PAINTED STEEL BEAMS - PAINTED STEEL BORDER INTERIOR FLOORS LAB

ELEVATED SLABS - CONCRETE

ELEVATED INTERIOR PLAN

ING

LIV

E HIN

C MA

RAILINGS - CONCRETE

ICS

PIN

RO HYD

INTERIOR GLASS CURTAINWALLS - GLAZING PIC

TRO

NIT

E AM

MAIN INTERIOR PLAN + RAMPS

EXTERIOR GLASS CURTAIN WALLS - HIGH PERFORMANCE GLAZING

AL

AMPHITHEATRE - CONRETE FLOOR

Y PIC

TRO

ACCESS RAMPS - CONCRETE -FOR PUBLIC AND MACHINERY ACCESS

AL

AMENITY GLASS CURTAIN WALLS - GLAZING

M

ING

D LOA

EXTERIOR PLAN + RAMPS

N

NEA

RRA

TE EDI

ME

DIT

NIT

ERR

E AM AN

EAN

Y

ACCESS RAMP RAILINGS - CONCRETE ACCESS PATHS -MACHINERY AND LABOR ACCESS

CK

DO

BUILDINGS FOOTPRINT - CONCRETE RETAINING WALL CONTAINING SOIL PUBLIC PATH - GRANITE ACCESS RAMPS - CONCRETE -FOR PUBLIC AND MACHINERY ACCESS MAIN ENTRANCE

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˅ DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

FACADE DETAILS

4.6 M

VERNALIZED BIOME

6.3 M 3.1 M

6.4 M

5.1 M 10.8 M

ATRIUM

3.6 M

GRP RAINSCREEN STEEL RING COLUMNS

MEP BASEMENT

3.9 M

3 PLY ETFE FACADE PILLOW ALUMINUM ETFE CLIP EXTRUSION HORIZONTAL STEEL FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE CONCRETE BASE PROFILE MOLDED GRP EXTERIOR PANEL

1 3 2

SECTION CUT ˅

3.0.1 BASE WALL AND FACADE SYSTEM

H ATRIUM AND VERNALIZED BIOME ICONIC GREENHOUSE, ABU DHABI CONCEPT DESIGN ATELIER TEN

NCEPT DESIGN AITHFUL GOULD

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GRANT ASSOCIATES FAITHFUL GOULD

OCSC

OCSC

MZ ARCHITECTS ARUP

MZ ARCHITECTS ARUP


BIOME AIRLOCK SYSTEM

FINISHED CEILING ABOVE RAMP BIOME 3 RING COLUMNS ALUMINUM DIAGRID ETFE STRUCTURE HORIZONTAL STEEL FACADE STRUCTURE ATRIUM RAMP BIOME RETAINING WALL MAJLIS ENTRY AUTOMATIC DOORS TO BIOME

3

1 2

3.0.2 AIRLOCK SYSTEM

ICONIC GREENHOUSE, ABU DHABI CONCEPT DESIGN ATELIER TEN GRANT ASSOCIATES FAITHFUL GOULD

OCSC

MZ ARCHITECTS ARUP

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3

1 2

3.3 M

ATRIUM

7.0 M

MEDITERRANEAN BIOME

5.1 M

2.6 M 2.7 M

1 3 2

H ATRIUM AND MEDITERRANEAN BIOME

NCEPT DESIGN AITHFUL GOULD

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OCSC

MZ ARCHITECTS ARUP

SECTION CUT ˅

8.6 M


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT ˅

ATRIUM RAMP ISOMETRIC AT BIOME 1

ETFE AIRLOCK FACADE SYSTEM ATRIUM ROOF STRUCTURE CURB ATRIUM ROOF FACADE SYSTEM DOOR TO ELEVATOR CORE

GLASS ENTRANCE DOORS

GLASS STOREFRONT AT OFFICE

ELEVATOR ACCESS

ATRIUM RAMP PROJECTED ELEVATION AT BIOME 1

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˅ CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS

SECTION DETAIL AT EAST ENTRANCE

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CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS ˅

1000

5 A431

WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE INTEGRATED INTO FLEXIBLE ISOLATION JOINT SEAL AT ROOF SLIP JOINT CONNECTION, SEE STRUCTURAL DRAWINGS

3000

SLIP JOINT CONNECTION, SEE STRUCTURAL DRAWINGS

710

485

350

225 50

+ 6.50 LEVEL 2

EEL AND CABLE GUARDRAIL EE PLAN FOR EXTENT

THICKENED CANTILEVER SLAB AT LINK BETWEEN BIOMES G.W.B. CEILING AT ATRIUM

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

+ 5.20 BIOME 1 SLAB

CEMENT BOARD (CMB) TWO-COAT CEMENT RENDER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE

4015

DRY WALL WITH CEMENT RENDER

150 200 125

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

FAMILY ENTRANCE STOREFRONT BEYOND

125 200 150

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

+ 2.00 ATRIUM

1

SECTION DETAIL AT CONNECTION BETWEEN BIOMES 1 & 3 1:20 A401 R5

RAIL WITH RENDERED H AT TOP, INSIDE, OUTSIDE, SIDE FACE OF RAMP

CL

R6

440

2200

CL

500

R4

R3

500

UBSTRATE

2200

440

STEEL BALUSTER ANGLE AT SLAB

STEEL ANGLE ANCHORED INTO FACE OF STRUCTURAL CONC. SLAB AS SUPPORT FOR GUARDRAIL POSTS, TYP. ALONG CONC. PORTION OF RAMP

STEEL HANDRAIL WITH INTEGRATED LIGHTING ANCHORED TO STEEL BALUSTER

DRAIL WITH INTEGRATED NCHORED TO STEEL

CHAMFERED EDGE AT SLAB ALONG RAMP, TYP. BOTH SIDES

+ 6.50 LEVEL 2

1000

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

593

THICKENED CANTILEVER SLAB AT LINK BETWEEN BIOMES ISOLATION JOINT BEAD AT CONC. RENDERED CEILING, COORDINATE WITH JOINT LOCATION IN GRP PANELS

324

350 42

R4

42

R4

185

175 710

710

350

185 165

50

225 50 150

NDING

900

STAINLESS TUBE STEEL HANDRAIL ANCHORED TO STRUCTURAL CONC. SLAB, SEE PLANS FOR EXTENT

FAMILY MAJLIS STAIR STOREFRONT ENTRY

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

+ 5.20 BIOME 1 SLAB

CEMENT BOARD (CMB) TWO-COAT CEMENT RENDER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE DRY WALL WITH CEMENT RENDER

7 A451

SUSPENDED RENDERED CONC. CEILING

3370

STAIR TO FAMILY MAJLIS

125 200 150

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

P

D

FLEXIBLE CAULKING AT ISOLATION JOINT IN CONC. SLAB, COLOR TO MATCH FINISH FLOOR. SEE PLANS FOR LAYOUT

D

+ 2.00 ATRIUM

D

D

2

SECTION DETAIL AT WEST ENTRANCE

SECTION DETAIL AT FAMILY ENTRANCE 1:20 A401/2

S

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Pier 1 Park Residences Brooklyn Bridge Park Competition Entry for LEESER Architecture Project Manager: Simon Arnold Summer/Fall 2011

ONE BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK - BROOKLYN 390’ x 340’

LEESER PIER 1 PROPOSAL - MAIN BUILDING 440’ x 120’

AUSTIN NICHOLS WAREHOUSE - WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN 435’ x 165’

EMPIRE STORES - DUMBO, BROOKLYN 460’ x 190’

˄ 100,000 sq. ft. site location in Brooklyn Bridge Park

BROOKLYN ARMY TERMINAL - BAY RIDGE, BROOKLYN 990’ x 205’

Scale Comparison of Notable Waterfront Buildings In Brooklyn <

BROOKLYN-QUEENS EXPRESSWAY - DUMBO, BROOKLYN 2225’ x 50’

The Pier 1 Park Residences and Hotel is a future development for the northeast end of Brooklyn Bridge Park. The given site was composed of two long rectangular parcels, the larger of which was situated at the entrance to the park, at the intersection of Old Fulton and Furman Street in DUMBO, Brooklyn. During the initial design process, the Leeser team studied the heritage of horizontal massing and interior atriums of Brooklyn’s notable waterfront buildings (Brooklyn Army Terminal, the Austin Nichols Warehouse in Williamsburg, Empire Stores in DUMBO, and the nearby One Brooklyn Bridge Park). We developed the concept of extending the public park into the building by lifting the landscape up into the central atrium of the building. Cuts in the building facade open up public spaces such as restaurants, terraces, and entrances, and express the floating hotel on the top two floors of the building. At the base of the building towards Furman St, the form lifts to invite residents, guests, and park patrons inside.

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CUT Brooklyn Bridge Park

LIFT Extend park vertically

CUT Building envelope

TWIST Open public spaces

SPA

ROOFTOP POOL RUNNING TRACK HOTEL

CONFERENCE/ BANQUET HOTEL LOBBY POOLTOP BAR

RECREATIONAL PLATFORM RESTAURANT AND PUBLIC TERRACE RETAIL/CAFE RESTAURANT

RESIDENCES CONFERENCE CENTER/ BANQUET/ PARK SERVICES RESTAURANT PARKING

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE: CENTRAL ATRIUM ˄ ATRIUM VIEW ˅

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A sculptural and iconic escalator lifts hotel visitors from the main ground level entrance up to the hotel lobby on the 8th floor.

STREET VIEW Ë&#x2026;

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Rooftop pool and running track with view of lower Manhattan <

Atrium with floating amenities: lap pool and gym <

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Atrium entrance at foot of escalator <


30’

4 BR

30’

120’ 60’

4 BR

30’

LOWER DUPLEX

LOWER DUPLEX UNITS

2 BR

1 BR

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

SKYLIGHT ABOVE

4 BR

2 BR

2 BR

1 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

2 BR

3 BR

3 BR

RAMPED PARK

3 BR

3 BR

1 BR

3 BR

2 BR

4 BR

2 BR

3 BR

3 BR

2 BR

1 BR

2 BR

550’

RESIDENTIAL 40,840 SQ FT

ROOF LEVEL 523’

90’

UPPER DUPLEX

UPPER DUPLEX UNITS

10’

PRIVATE 10’ BALCONIES 2 BR

20’

120’

4 BR

GYM ABOVE

LOWER DUPLEX UNITS

LEVEL 2

3 BR

3 BR

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

SKYLIGHT

ROOF GARDEN

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

1 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

RAMPED PARK

GYM

30’

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

1 BR

3 BR

2 BR

4 BR

2 BR

3 BR

1 BR

2 BR

PRIVATE 10’ BALCONIES

UPPER DUPLEX UNITS

LEVEL 3

550’

LEVEL 3

RESIDENTIAL 30,790 SQ FT

523’ 30’

120’ 60’

30’

4 BR

1 BR

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

SKYLIGHT ABOVE

4 BR

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

1 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

Hotel Amenity

Service

3 BR

3 BR

4 BR

3 BR

2 BR

3 BR

3 BR

RAMPED PARK

3 BR

3 BR

1 BR

Park

3 BR

2 BR

4 BR

2 BR

3 BR

3 BR

2 BR

1 BR

2 BR

550’

LEVEL 2

RESIDENTIAL 40,840 SQ FT

523’ 90’

UPPER DUPLEX

UPPER DUPLEX UNITS

10’

PRIVATE 10’ BALCONIES 2 BR

20’

120’

4 Bedroom Apartment

GYM ABOVE

LOWER DUPLEX UNITS

LEVEL 2

3 Bedroom Apartment

2 Bedroom Apartment LOWER DUPLEX

LOWER DUPLEX UNITS

4 BR

30’

1 Bedroom Apartment

ROOF GARDEN

30’

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

SKYLIGHT

2 BR

2 BR

2 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

1 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

RAMPED PARK

GYM

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

3 BR

1 BR

3 BR

2 BR

4 BR

2 BR

3 BR

1 BR

2 BR

PRIVATE 10’ BALCONIES

UPPER DUPLEX UNITS

LEVEL 3

550’

RESIDENTIAL 30,790 SQ FT

GROUND LEVEL

1 Bedroom Apartment

3 Bedroom Apartment

3 Bedroom Apartment4 Bedroom Apartment Hotel Amenity 1 Bedroom Apartment2 Bedroom Apartment 2 Bedroom Apartment

4 Bedroom Apartment

Commercial

Hotel Amenity Park Service

Park Service

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DUMBO Block

DUMBO, Brooklyn Competition and Commissioned project for LEESER Architecture Project Manager: Kate Burke Fall 2011 - 2012

The DUMBO Block project began as a competition proposal for the facade of a new residential tower in DUMBO Brooklyn. Leeserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team developed three schemes based on methods of breaking down the large block-like mass of the building - by introducing voids, grids, and interruptions in the otherwise continuous surface. In addition to the larger design concepts, we developed the strategy for construction and details for operable window units within the facade After we were commissioned for the project, we embarked on a series of rigorous feasibility studies to understand how to realize several facade schemes. We worked very closely with the client to understand the needs and interests of the project, the neighborhood, and the future residents. Many factors were considered, including visibility in and out of private apartments, reflections of the city skyline on the facade, the geometry and transparency of the building base, and environmental aspects such as light and shade, insulation and drainage.

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‘CUTS’ Composed of a continuous envelope of mirrored glass with ‘cut’ voids of recessed transparent glass.

‘FACTORY’ Visually read as an assemblage of crate-like boxes with industrial details and finishes, composed by constantly shifting scales of the grid.

‘STACKS’ Resembles a ‘stack’ of irregular blocks, the gaps articulated as recessed solid elements which introduce a slight unbalance in an otherwise regular facade

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˅ FACADE ASSEMBLY STUDIES FACADE UPDATE CONCEPTS: ASSEMBLY DETAILS DIAGRAM

[SCHEMES 1&2]

1 FIN DETAIL

ROLL DOWN SHADE 1A

2A SLAB EDGE SHADOWBOX

2A

METAL FIN DETAIL

SLAB EDGE SHADOWBOX DETAIL

1B

2B

GLASS FIN DETAIL

SLAB EDGE RECESS DETAIL

STRUCTURAL COLUMN

2B SLAB EDGE RECESS

HEAT PUMP

3 VERTIAL SHADOWBOX

STAINLESS STEEL OR PTD METAL BACK PAN SHADOWBOX

3

VERTICAL SHADOWBOX DETAIL

FACADE UPDATE CONCEPTS: SCHEME 2

Aluminum Hybrid Wall

2A

Slab Edge Shadowbox Detail

Clear Glass with Low-E Coating Four-Side Structural Silicone Glazed

Line of Glass Fin Beyond

2B

Slab Edge Recess Roll Down Shade

Detail

3

Metal Back Pan Shadowbox Detail

LIVING ROOM

BEDROOM

LIVING ROOM

BEDROOM

Clear Glass with Low-E Coating

3’ 7”

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3’ 7”

Glass Fin


FACADE ASSEMBLY STUDIES ˅ FACADE UPDATE CONCEPTS: ASSEMBLY DETAILS DIAGRAM

[SCHEMES 3&4]

1 MULLION DETAIL MULLION WITH METAL CAP DETAIL

1A

ROLL DOWN SHADE

MULLION DETAIL

1B

MULLION WITH METAL CAP DETAIL

2B

SLAB EDGE MAJOR RECESS DETAIL

2A SLAB EDGE MINOR RECESS

2A

2B SLAB EDGE MAJOR RECESS

SLAB EDGE MINOR RECESS DETAIL

STRUCTURAL COLUMN

HEAT PUMP

3 VERTIAL SHADOWBOX

STAINLESS STEEL OR PTD METAL BACK PAN SHADOWBOX

3

VERTICAL SHADOWBOX DETAIL

FACADE UPDATE CONCEPTS: SCHEME 4

Aluminum Hybrid Wall

2A

Slab Edge Minor Roll Down Shade

Recess Detail

Clear Glass with Low-E Coating Four-Side Structural Silicone Glazed

2B

Slab Edge Major Recess Detail

3

Metal Back Pan Shadowbox Detail

LIVING ROOM

BEDROOM

LIVING ROOM

BEDROOM

Recessed Vertical

3’ 7”

3’ 7”

Clear Glass with Low-E Coating

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4 in

4 in

1 in 2 in 2 in 2 in

1 in

4 in

4 in

1 in 2 in 1/2 in

2 in 2 in

4 in

1 in

2 in

1 in 1 in 4 in

3 in

˄ LOUVER STUDIES ˅ FACADE SECTIONS

1 in

SUMMER SUN

Louvres WINTER SUN

Light Shelf

Canopy

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NORTH ENTRANCE ELEVATION

WEST ENTRANCE ELEVATION

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Mercedes Club New York, New York Project for LEESER Architecture Project Manager: Kate Burke Summer 2010 - 2011

The Mercedes House is a residential development designed by Enrique Norten, located in Manhattan’s Midtown West neighborhood. Leeser was commissioned by the developer to design the third floor fitness center, a 30,000 sq. ft. complex including indoor and outdoor facilities. The Leeser team used color and shape to highlight the various programmatic volumes and compose the outdoor landscape. We designed a continuous circular lounging bench surrounding the outdoor pool, one of the Mercedes’ Club’s greatest attractions. BACCI COURTS

AMPHITHEATRE

SCREENING ROOM

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JUICE BAR & LOUNGE

LOCKER ROOMS SAUNA & STEAM ROOM OPEN GYM LAP POOL

BASKETBALL COURT

STUDIO

OUTDOOR POOL & DECK

OFFICES

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˄ PLAN OF OUTDOOR POOL

˅ OUTDOOR POOL DETAILS

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SECTION: OUTDOOR POOL, OPEN GYM AND BASKETBALL COURT


Pictures from Mercedes Club website ˄

SECTION: OPEN GYM AND POOL

SECTION: LAP POOL AND JACUZZI

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Chelsea Penthouse

Chelsea, Manhattan Schematic Design for Private Client, LEESER Architecture Project Manager: Joseph Haberl 2010 - 2011

Private Public

The Chelsea Penthouse project was a schematic design proposal for the top floor of a seven-story building in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City. The couple who owned the apartment wanted to create an open layout in the 7th-floor space and create and extension up onto the 8th floor (roof). Of most importance for the design were: • • • • •

a subtle, flexible transition from public to private space within the apartment a breakfast and greeting area at the south end overlooking the street a quieter bedroom and work space at the north end with views of the city an expansive roof terrace with kitchen and fireplace for hosting guests thoughtful placement throughout the apartment of several large art pieces by the designer Sottsass, from the owner’s collection

To achieve these requests, we proposed to remove the 7th floor kitchen and expand the bathroom into a series of spaces along the east wall of the apartment. Considered more of a piece of furniture than an appliance, the bathtub would be housed in a space between the bathroom and the bedroom, offering views through the apartment and out to the city. A long, molded storage unit would run along the west side of the apartment, breaking at each window to allow light in, and incorporating the stair to the roof terrace in its form.

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Greeting Room

Bedroom

Sliding closet units

Office

Sliding partition

7th Floor Plan

Art piece in glass floor Kitchen

Roof Terrace

8th Floor Plan

Section

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Design iterations in physical and digital model studies <

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Solid Void

The Graham Foundation for the Advancement of Fine Arts, Chicago Exhibition of Cecil Balmond’s work and research with ARUP/AGU Director: Sarah Herda Summer/Fall 2008

Rainbow >

plan of H_edge < An installation composed of over 6,000 aluminum leaf-like plates suspended in tension by over 5,000 feet of rigid stainless steel chain. Rather than hanging from above, these chain grow upwards from the ground. view through H_edge >

Danzer >

In 2008, I was the coordinator at the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts in Chicago for an exhibit of acclaimed engineer Cecil Balmond’s written, built, and ongoing work with ARUP and the Abstract Geometry Unit, entitled Cecil Balmond: Solid Void. My role as coordinator was to conceptualize the installation of several large-scale models as well as the appropriation of information material for presentation at the Graham’s Madlener House, a hundredyear-old mansion in Chicago’s Old Town district. The task required the ability to work with local and international collaborators to design, curate, and fabricate the various exhibition elements working with time, budget, and spatial constraints.

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˄ view of Rainbow

plan of Danzer < A giant geode-like element composed of mirrored tetrahedrons and a facated wooden panel exterior.

plan of Rainbow > A series of custom lightboxes displaying concepts of geometry as applied in Balmond’s architectural and structural designs.

view of Danzer ˅

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Ë&#x201E; detail of Rainbow lighbox

Ë&#x201E; reflections on Rainbow lighbox

reflected ceiling plan of skylight < A rigid fractal pattern applied to the skylight glass creating a soft, lacey effect when viewed from below.

Skylight installation and completion >

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Strelka Exhibition

Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture, and Design, Moscow, Russia Research Exhibition of 2012-2013 Academic Program Designed and installed by the Strelka Class of 2013 June - July 2013

> Strelka Exhibition at dusk Plan of pavilions in Strelka courtyard >

25m

From June 26 until July 6, 2013, the courtyard of the Strelka Institute in Moscow 4m by 3mfour temporary pavilions representing the products of a 9-month was occupied academic research program by 35 students. For the first time, instead of a pin-up 3m presented their work in three-dimensional, inhabitable form.. exhibition, the studios Each studio developed a concept for their pavilion which offered some insight into their research approach and findings. The four studios included the Another Place studio about new patterns of cohabitation, the Recharge Information studio about dealing with Big Data and the city, the Education as a Project studio about new methods of education, and the Foresight in Hindsight studio about the history of predictions for the future. The original pavilion concept was 4 pavilions under a single roof, much like the structure of the educational program at Strelka. Extending from the amphitheatre stair at the NW end of the courtyard, the roof was intended to be a communal space providing a new perspective on the courtyard and the public lectures and events taking place there during the course of the exhibition. Due to budgetary and time constraints, the connection to the amphitheatre was not constructed, but the 4 box-like pavilions under a continuous roof was achieved.

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pavilions in Strelka courtyard > Conceived as four individual “rooms”, the four studio pavilions were treated uniformly on the exterior while the interior spaces reflected each studio’s unique concept.


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THE FORESIGHT IN HINDSIGHT PAVILION: ‘OLD FUTURE’ The Foresight in Hindsight studio project was a collective history of the future. We collected ideas, methods, and visions from the past which are in some way predictions. In hindsight, its easy to understand the intermediate steps of progress - if and how a prediction came true or not. In foresight, a prediction detaches from the present, creating a fantasy of which it is not necessarily understood at the time it is made how it will come true. Whether the prediction comes true or not, its idea about the future is frozen in time.. During the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1961, Nikita Khrushchev predicted that communism will be built “in the main” by 1980. The current generation of Soviet people would live under communism, as would generations to come. At this moment, it would have been difficult to imagine that though the Soviet Union would still exist in 1980, it would have ceased to exist a decade later. The concept of our pavilion is “Old Future”. It is a room suspended in another time - perhaps the time of Khrushchev’s speech, filled with objects from the past that are used as a medium to communicate a prediction of the future. These items represent the imagination of the future that is not yet attainable in the time of the room, such as a website navigated through an old diafilm slideshow or an old TV showing futuristic video content. There are objects which refer to the past and future simultaneously, demonstrating the fine line between history and future.

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Foresight in Hindsight studio pavilion interior > A recreated room from a mid-20th century Soviet apartment, with elements hinting at both past and future.


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ʻOLD FUTUREʼ PAVILION ПАВИЛЬОН «СТАРЫЙ БУДУЩЕЕ»

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FUTURE MUSIC / МУЗЫКА БУДУЩЕГО:

Modern sounds which could not be detected in the past are played through an old record player. Cовременные звуки, которые не могли быть записаны в прошлом, проигрывающиеся через старый патефон.

OLD GOOGLE MAP / СТАРАЯ КАРТА «GOOGLE»

A former and now obsolete geography portrayed in the technological context of the future. Бывших и теперь устаревшим географии изображаются в технологическом контексте будущего.

REVOLUTIONARY BANNER, PAST AND PRESENT / РЕВОЛЮЦИОННОЕ ЗНАМЯ ПРОШЛОГО И НАСТОЯЩЕГО The date of a now significant, contemporary protest event sewed onto the symbol of a past revolution.

ORACLE BOOK / КНИГА-ОРАКУЛ

A divination book of literary citations for multiple interpretations of Russia's past, present and future. Литературный цитатник для гадания и различных толкований прошлого, настоящего и будущего России.

The dream of a Water of Life and Death realized in the form of stem cells, which are both Life and Death. Мечты о сказочной воде жизни и смерти сбылись в виде стволовых клеток, которые являются как водой жизни, так и смерти.

INSTANT PHOTO FROM THE PAST / МГНОВЕННОЕ ФОТО ИЗ ПРОШЛОГО

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A collection of plots that was predicted as a future in the past. Набор сюжетов о будущем, которое представляли себе в прошлом

ELIXIR OF IMMORTALITY / ЭЛИКСИР БЕССМЕРТИЯ

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GLIMPSES OF FUTURE VIDEO / КИНО БУДУЩЕГО

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Photo imitation that it was made before application of this technology, demonstrating how people percept information depending on technology medium. / Снимки, имитирующие фото, которые были сделаны до открытия этой технологии фотографии. Фото демонстрирует, как люди воспринимают информацию в зависимости от носителя этой информации.

WEBSITE SLIDESHOW / ПОКАЗ СЛАЙДОВ САЙТА

Foresightinhindsight.com database presented through the past media of a slide projector. Kоллекция предсказаний foresightinhindsight.com, представленная в форме медиа из прошлого - диапроектора.

FORESIGHT IN HINDSIGHT BOOK / КНИГА ПРОШЛОЕ БУДУЩЕГО A collection of research narratives about past and future predictions for Russia. Сборник научных о прошлом и будущем прогнозы для России.

CALENDAR OF THE FUTURE / КАЛЕНДАРЬ БУДУЩЕГО

Interactive Soviet calendar with predictions for each day. Советский интерактивный календарь с предсказаниями на каждый день.

OLD NEW PHOTO / НОВАЯ СТАРАЯ ФОТОГРАФИЯ

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Family photograph of a building with a quote from the Resolution of the Central Commute of All-Union Communist Party, 1935. Семейная фотография на фоне здания с цитатой из постановления Коммунистической партии 1935 года.

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Juxtaposition of “new” and “old”: View along the front entrances of the pavilions>

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Visitors in the Foresight in Hindsight studio pavilion

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Final preparations before the Strelka exhibition opening>

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DESIGN + RESEARCH