CLADmag issue4 2018

Page 66

CULTURE The Scottish Design Galleries feature around 300 exhibits telling the story of Scottish design

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taught me that transparency could be achieved in architecture using natural materials. In the Oak Room, people will feel his sensibility and respect for nature, and hopefully connect it with our design for V&A Dundee.” Of his starting point with V&A Dundee, Kuma said: “My inspiration always starts from the place where the project will be. The uniqueness of this project is in the position between the water and the city – it’s very different from a normal site as it sits between land and water. “As we started to think about the project, one of my colleages showed me a picture of the cliffs of north eastern Scotland – it’s as if the earth and water had a long conversation and finally created this stunning shape. The design of V&A Dundee attempts to translate this geographical uniqueness into the building by creating an artificial cliff.”

CLAD mag 2018 ISSUE 4

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and other visitor facilities. Here the sloped walls are lined with oak panels rather than concrete, giving a lighter, warmer feel. A central foyer on the first floor leads to the museum’s 1,100sq m temporary gallery, and the permanent Scottish Design Galleries, which tell the story of Scotland’s design heritage through a collection of 300 objects. Kengo Kuma has said he is “especially proud” of the Oak Room, which stands at the heart of the Scottish Design Galleries. The interior of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s original 1907 Ingram Street Tearooms has been painstakingly conserved and rebuilt, allowing the public to see it for the first time since it was removed from the original building in 1971. “There’s an aesthetic of simplicity and transparency that Mackintosh and Japenese culture have in common,” said Kuma. “His work