2018 Community Report: Connecting with Communities Every Day

Page 1

2018 COMMUNITY REPORT // Connecting with Communities Every Day



THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

FC EDMONTON SOCCER ACADEMY, EDMONTON, AB

Levelling the playing field for tomorrow’s soccer stars

CONTENTS

16

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE COMMUNITY PARTNERS WHO WE ARE FAST FACTS

4 5 6 7

BLOOM, IN SUPPORT OF NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, SASKATOON, SK

Helping parents feel even closer to their newborns in intensive care

8

CANADIAN ATHLETIC CLUB, EDMONTON, AB

The forty-year powerplay that built a hotbed of hockey

10

THE NUTTER FAMILY FOUNDATION’S DOZER DAY, RIDGEFIELD, WA

Heavy machinery proves to be a moving experience for kids with ambition

12 14

18

Building Calgary’s sense of community from the (below) ground up MS SOCIETY OF CANADA BIKE EVENT, LEDUC-CAMROSE, AB

Cranking up high-speed pedal power to overtake MS in Canada

20 22

28

NAIT BUILDING A BETTER BAT BOX PROJECT, CADOMIN MINE, AB

More microbats is better for Alberta farmers. Not such good news for insects ...

POINT TROTTER PLANT OPENING AND YW CALGARY, CALGARY, AB

31

ENACTUS CAPILANO UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP PROGRAM, NORTH VANCOUVER, BC

From lip balm and flotsam to cupcakes and candles, young entrepreneurs are reinventing the way we look at business

34

JDRF WASHINGTON, WA THE STUDY HALL SUPPORT PROGRAM, UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA GOLDEN BEARS FOOTBALL TEAM, EDMONTON, AB

A-grades on and off the field is the new tactic for UofA football

RIVERVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CARNIVAL, VANCOUVER, WA

How an old-school carnival creates new-school resources for kids

Make no bones about it — Inland workers know their fossils

FRI RESEARCH GRIZZLY BEAR STUDY, CADOMIN MINE, AB

Grizzly bears feel right at home in the midst of an active mine

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM PARTNERSHIP FOR FOSSIL SEARCH, VILLENEUVE, AB

27

Drumming up support to cure childhood diabetes

24

At Lehigh Hanson, hard work pays off — even for extended members of the family

OCEAN CONCRETE CHARITABLE MIXER TRUCK PROGRAM, SANDY MERRIMAN HOUSE, VICTORIA, BC

The mixer driver who is helping other women to regain their independence

LEHIGH HANSON SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

26

38

CONCRETE CANVAS ROCK BAY MURAL PROJECT, VICTORIA, BC

The modern art of city revitalization

40 42

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

3


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Year after year, in partnership with our employees, partners and customers, Lehigh Hanson gives support where it is needed most – directly impacting the lives of families and individuals in communities across Western Canada and the Pacific Northwest. Every step of the way, we are careful to ensure we are making products in ways that protect the health and safety of our people, conserve natural resources and habitats, and give back to local communities. It’s what we call Responsibility Mixed In. Lehigh Hanson and our affiliated companies will always work diligently to fulfill our vision of Simple Actions Build Strong Communities, with a focus on initiatives that support Arts & Education, Environment, and Health & Well-being.

4

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

Thank you for having been part of it in 2018!

Chris Ward President, Canada Region


COMMUNITY PARTNERS Alberta Cancer Foundation Alzheimer Society of Alberta and Northwest Territories Alzheimer’s Association Washington State Chapter American Red Cross Bellevue Police Department Bloom Calgary Food Bank Calgary Inter-Faith Food Bank Society Camp Fire, Snohomish County Council Canadian Athletic Club City of Delta, Tour de Delta City of Victoria Cowichan 2018 BC Summer Games Delta Farmland and Wildlife Trust Delta Hospital Foundation Dodgeball Manitoba Earth Rangers: The Kids’ Conservation Organization Edmonton Meals on Wheels Enactus FC Edmonton Foothills Academy Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society Fraser River Discovery Centre Society fRI Research The Friendly Firefighter Program Friends of Saskatchewan Children Inc. The Greater Vancouver Food Bank Habitat for Humanity – Holes for Homes Health Sciences Centre Foundation Inc.

JDRF International Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation Junior Achievement Kids Help Phone KidSport Canada – Alberta Lethbridge Food Bank Society Little League Baseball Inc Lloydminster Rescue Squad Make-A-Wish Foundation of Northern Alberta Meadow Lake Wildlife Federation Medicine Hat and District Food Bank Association Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD Canada) Motorcycle Ride for Dad Movember Canada Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada – Alberta Division The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) Northwest School Division No. 203 The Nutter Family Foundation Pediatric Oncology Family Centre of Manitoba Inc. Prince of Peace Catholic School, Calgary Catholic School Board, Prince of Peace Education Society The Prostate Cancer Fight Foundation Reach Child and Youth Development Society RE/MAX CMN Community Richard Eaton Singers Richmond Youth Football Club Riverview Elementary School Ronald McDonald House Charities of British Columbia & Yukon Ronald McDonald House Charities of Northern Alberta

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oregon and Southwest Washington Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern and Central Alberta Ronald McDonald House Charities of Western Washington & Alaska Royal Alberta Provincial Museum (RAM) Saskatoon Diversity Network The Saskatoon Downtown Youth Centre Inc. - EGADZ Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation SEDA, Inc. (Saskatoon) Sexual Assault Services of Saskatchewan Sky Valley Chamber of Commerce Sky Valley Food Bank Sport Central United Way of the Alberta Capital Region United Way of Calgary and Area United Way of the Lower Mainland United Way of Greater Victoria United Way Central & Northern Vancouver Island University Hospital Foundation University of Alberta Study Hall Support Program University of Manitoba - The Great Northern Concrete Toboggan Race Victoria Cool Aid Society Sandy Merriman House Willow Park Charity Golf Classic Winnipeg Humane Society YW Calgary

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

5


WHO WE ARE Lehigh Hanson and our affiliated companies have been leaders in the construction materials industry for over 100 years. As part of the HeidelbergCement Group, the

Our plants and mines make high-quality

company has an engineering pedigree that

cement, aggregates, ready-mix concrete

stretches back to the origins of the industry.

and concrete pipe products to the highest

Our global network of mines, plants, and

standards.

distribution hubs spans Europe, Central Asia, Asia Pacific, Africa, and North America. Lehigh Hanson Canada Region (LHC) leads a group of affiliated companies operating some of the most advanced facilities in the industry in Western Canada, and Washington and Oregon states.

6

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

We are dedicated to the communities where we live and work. There’s Responsibility Mixed In to everything we do.


40

100

+

+

The number of years LHC has been a

The number of years LHC and its affiliated companies have

FOCUSED COMPANY GIVING

GLOBAL LEADER IN THE CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS INDUSTRY.

ON LOCAL COMMUNITIES AND CAUSES.

7 CONSECUTIVE YEARS OF

IMPROVED SAFETY PERFORMANCE. World class safety culture based on our Zero Harm philosophy!

FAST FACTS

16

!

THE NUMBER OF

LHC-AFFILIATED COMPANIES producing aggregate, cement, concrete pipe and ready-mix concrete products.

REUSE OF WASTE CONCRETE We crush it, screen it and use it for bulk fills, bank protection, drainage structures and new concrete pours.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

7


HEALTH & WELL-BEING

BLOOM, IN SUPPORT OF NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, SASKATOON, SK

HELPING PARENTS FEEL EVEN CLOSER TO THEIR NEWBORNS IN INTENSIVE CARE Ten years ago, Jeff and Glenda Clezy’s baby son was born eight weeks early, with breathing difficulties. Staff in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) cared for young Rylan 24/7 for three weeks straight. Jeff, who works in Lehigh Cement’s Technical Sales in Saskatoon, vowed he would never forget their dedication.

!

FAST First-in-Canada FACT

The Saskatoon Royal University Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is the first in all of Canada to have NICView cameras which allow parents to live-stream their newborns.

Ten years on, Rylan is an athletic young boy with not a care in the world. But his dad’s thoughts sometimes drift back to the stress and helplessness of those early days in the NICU. Jeff Clezy brought Bloom to Lehigh’s attention so that the experience of today’s families might be as comfortable as possible. Two years ago the company started its support of “An Evening of Love,” a fundraising gala where Lehigh employees join Jeff to raise funds for Bloom, and all the families affected by premature births in the community. Bloom is a non-profit organization with a mission to raise funds for the Saskatoon NICU, supporting new parents. Amy Novakovski

8

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

and Tina Searcy founded Bloom in 2010 after their separate experiences at NICU. So far, they have donated $250,000, allowing the Saskatoon NICU to purchase equipment or conduct training to provide specialized care for newborns. Recently, Bloom was able to buy 20 new NICView webcams which allow families to have private access to a 24/7 livestream of their baby through an app. For parents like Jeff, who found it so hard to leave their little one to go to work, this innovation is another way that the NICU experience can be made more bearable.


We are so very grateful to all our supporters, whether those are corporate sponsors or regular gala attendees. Without all of these amazing people who support Bloom, we would be unable to give back to the NICU in Saskatoon. Being able to see how our donated funds have changed the families’ NICU experiences is phenomenal. Thank you to all for your tremendous support!” —A my Novakovski, Co-Founder, Bloom

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

9


CANADIAN ATHLETIC CLUB, EDMONTON, AB

HEALTH & WELL-BEING

ARTS & EDUCATION

The Canadian Athletic Club (CAC), a community-based organization in Edmonton, has enriched the lives of youth that have participated in its

THE FORTY-YEAR POWERPLAY THAT BUILT A HOTBED OF HOCKEY Any historian of Canadian hockey knows that 1972 was a banner year. But a few thousand miles away from the Moscow ice of the Summit Series, Ray Zimmel was quietly making his contribution to the hockey community of his beloved Edmonton, by laying the foundations for what would become the Canadian Athletic Club’s Lehigh Cement Bantam AAA team.

programs over the past eighty years. The four Zimmel brothers were honoured to be in the hockey program and the skills they gained were instrumental in their teamwork and leadership development. Ray Zimmel volunteered tirelessly for over forty years for the Canadian Athletic Club and his contribution will have a long-lasting impact on the players that were in the programs.” —K evin Zimmel, son of Ray Zimmel, CAC Alumnus

10

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

The Canadian Athletic Club (CAC) started back in 1937 to give opportunities to local athletes who showed special talent and dedication. Today, 46 years later, the club continues to advance and prepare young Edmonton players in their professional hockey, academic or personal development thanks in part to former Inland VP General Manager Ray Zimmel who dedicated his time to young players who loved hockey as much as he did. Ray began as a Bantam AAA coach in ‘72, having secured Lehigh’s support for the club. Although their father never coached them, all four of Ray’s sons played with CAC. After

coaching, Ray moved into volunteering, looking after the finances. He earned an honorary life membership with CAC in 2000, and in 2002 was presented as a life member by the Edmonton Minor Hockey Association. In honour of Ray’s retirement from CAC, Ray’s children created a $1,000 scholarship in his name for a CAC player pursuing postsecondary education. Ray was recognized by CAC for over 40 years of volunteering experience. Although he officially retired in 2014, his son Kevin recalls that Ray was still active within the alumni association until his death in September 2017.


!

FAST FACT

In 1937, sports-minded school and community league members recognized the need to give their athletes a more competitive environment in which to develop their athletic talents. From this idea, the Canadian Athletic Club was born.

Lehigh Hanson honours Ray’s legacy by sponsoring the Lehigh Cement Bantam AAA team, allowing these 14 and 15 year-olds to travel, get ice time and have some help with other hockey expenses. CAC continues to empower young players who have secured scholarships to play at university; some get to the WHL, or even the NHL. In 2018, CAC was recognized by Hockey Edmonton as their ‘Organization of the Year.’

At CAC, we are very proud of our long-term partnership with Lehigh. Since 1972, Lehigh has been a team sponsor for our organization. This level of commitment to the community by Lehigh has impacted so many youth athletes over the past 46 years. With their support, we have been able to provide opportunity for youth to participate at the highest level of hockey for their age group. The list of players that have played for Lehigh Cement Bantam AAA and have gone on to junior, college and professional hockey is impressive. Beyond that, the leadership development and positive aspects of teamwork and goal-setting has developed many community leaders.” — Richard McAdie, President of CAC

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

11


ARTS & EDUCATION

The Dozer Day preview is always a very powerful and special event for students in the Evergreen Public Schools. Evergreen staff is very appreciative of The Nutter Family Foundation and all of its partners for providing this opportunity for students with special needs to access the Dozer Day through the preview event.” —J ey Buno, Evergreen PS Special Services Director

12

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

THE NUTTER FAMILY FOUNDATION’S DOZER DAY, RIDGEFIELD, WA

HEAVY MACHINERY PROVES TO BE A MOVING EXPERIENCE FOR KIDS WITH AMBITION Visit the Clark County Fairgrounds in May and you could be forgiven for doing a double take. Is that really a kid I see driving that dozer? You’re not wrong. For a couple of crazy days, kids (and their jealous parents) get the opportunity to drive some of the biggest heavy equipment around, thanks to The Nutter Family Foundation and Cadman. Dozer Day gives kids the chance to learn about the construction and building industry with a unique hands-on experience — literally, hands on the steering wheel of a giant dozer or excavator. For some girls and boys this is the first taste they’ve ever had of a career in construction and building, even though they see buildings, roads and bridges every day.

break down barriers to understanding what the building industry is all about.

If earth-moving equipment isn’t their speed, kids can climb aboard ambulances, fire trucks and other public utility equipment; enjoy sand

For example, The Nutter Family Foundation partnered with Evergreen Public Schools to host 200 design/build-focused high school students for Dozer Day’s first ever career fair. They operated machinery and met with construction-related businesses, including many Dozer Day sponsors like Cadman. The students had access to interactive exhibits on a wide range of industry careers and actual

pits and construction toys; dig for ‘diamonds’, practice at a shooting arcade, or go on a scavenger hunt. It’s a fun-filled day designed to

job opportunities for those ready to enter the workforce; some students were even able to book interviews.


Every year one organization wins the free Friday Preview. In 2018, Evergreen Public Schools’ Special Services Children — for students with disabilities— brought two hundred kids along with their families to enjoy a day tailored to their needs. Students were visited by the Portland Rose Princesses, a group of Portland high school girls dedicated to giving back to the community, and the Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce. The team behind Dozer Day is part of The Nutter Corporation, a leading northwest heavy civil infrastructure contractor building highways, roads, railroads, docks and more in Oregon, Washington and North Dakota.

!

FAST FACT

The first ‘bulldozers’ were modified Holt farm tractors used to plow farmland; they weren’t called bulldozers until the 1930s. The versatility of these tractors in soft ground for logging and road building led to the development of the armoured tank in World War I.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

13


RIVERVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CARNIVAL, VANCOUVER, WA

ARTS & EDUCATION

HOW AN OLD-SCHOOL CARNIVAL CREATES NEW-SCHOOL RESOURCES FOR KIDS Roll up, roll up. Step right this way to help local kids get better grades, excel on the playing field — and learn to play the ukulele! That’s right. The Riverview Elementary Carnival is a marquee event with an education mission — and the winning prize is a great learning experience for all. Cadman employees are always encouraged to engage with local communities, especially through schools. Brad Barshay, who drives a concrete truck for Cadman in Vancouver, WA, also works a shift on the PTO for his son’s school. Brad thought that Cadman would like to help the annual school carnival — and brought his mixer truck along for the ride.

The outcome was a stellar event that raised close to $12,000. Over 500 community members passed through the gate to toss baseballs into wicker baskets, pop balloons with darts, splash teachers in the dunk tank, and fish and golf for prizes. The money raised is vital to the mission of PTO board members like Jen Thomas who is passionate about making

Thanks to support from our community partners and sponsors, the Riverview PTO is able to offer a free carnival to our families and the community. The funds the PTO raises throughout the year go towards special events for the school, musical instruments, emergency preparedness kits for the classrooms, teaching supplies, tutors, PE and playground equipment and much more. We greatly appreciate the support we receive from the community to make Riverview a great school.” —J enn Thomas, PTO Fundraising Coordinator, Riverview Elementary School

14

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies


sure that all children have equal access to educational opportunities. In the case of Riverview Elementary School that opportunity in 2018 came in the shape of a ukulele. Thanks to the carnival, funds were available to the music teacher to give every member of her class an instrument. The kids are so enthusiastic that they even formed their own ukulele club. Other teachers asked for and received balls, hula hoops, jump ropes for recess; chess and craft supplies; field trips; science presentations; entertainers, costumes — and even some chairs. Funding has also provided for an afterschool tutoring program, where teachers can send kids who need the extra help to get the support they need. Kids from one class rallied together to give the PTO a successful presentation on why funding should go to New Student Orientation Packets. New students now receive school supplies and a Riverview T-shirt.

Each year Riverview Elementary School in Vancouver, WA, holds a community carnival for families and friends. The past two years, we have received enough donations to have free entrance into the carnival. Our PTO has made this decision to allow all families and community members access into this great event. The funds raised from the carnival assist with more books in the library, monies for teachers to spend in their classroom, extra assemblies, recess and P.E. equipment, one-on-one math tutor during the school year and many more resources for our children. It is great to see our community partners come together to assist with the carnival every year. Each year we have many alumni and neighbors attend the carnival and they always give us positive feedback about their experience. Thank you for your donation. We have about 475 students, thirty teachers, and many more staff members impacted positively by this one event!” — Stuart Anderson, Principal, Riverview Elementary School

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

15


HEALTH & WELL-BEING

FC EDMONTON SOCCER ACADEMY, EDMONTON, AB

LEVELLING THE PLAYING FIELD FOR TOMORROW’S SOCCER STARS ARTS & EDUCATION

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to play in Ireland. The experience was amazing. It really meant a lot because I got to compete against teams from all around the world and also gave me the chance to see where my skill is at compared to theirs. The whole trip also taught me a lot about Ireland; the unique cultures, fashion and perspectives. It inspired me because it gave me a learning moment on what it is to become a professional player.” — Prince Amanda, FC Edmonton Academy player

16

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

Every young soccer player dreams of playing on an international stage. But the journey to World Cup Final glory can be a long one, especially on a low income. So when FC Edmonton hopefuls boarded their flight to compete in Ireland last summer, they could thank one of their biggest fans — Lehigh Hanson. The FC Edmonton Academy is a fully funded elite youth soccer club sponsored by brothers Tom and Dave Fath from O’Hanlon Paving. By providing players from FC Edmonton Academy a chance to play internationally, youth are inspired towards their goals and to reach their full potential. FC Edmonton Academy is dedicated to giving an equal opportunity to gifted athletes by removing cost barriers to high level soccer. Players from all backgrounds can join an elite team where an intensely competitive setting advances their skills, often leading to

scholarships to universities or a professional career. The soccer club consists of three teams: U-18 boys, U-16 boys, and U-18 girls. The Under-16 boys and Under-18 girls train with the Academy for most of the school year, until they return to their regular clubs in spring until the season’s end in September. Lehigh Hanson was able to support an Under-17 boys team, made up of U-18 and U-16 players, in their trip to Ireland in 2018. For some, it was the first time they had left Canada. This trip was an important one for several


!

FAST Football FACTS

The world’s most popular sport is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries — the ‘beautiful game’ is known as soccer in North America and football everywhere else. Soccer traces its roots back at least 3,000 years and, although China and Italy make claims, no one knows exactly where it began.

reasons according to coach Jeff Paulus. In Edmonton, Jeff sees his teams consistently top their leagues. Competing against tough European competitors, from low-income backgrounds, shows his young charges what it takes to make it on an international stage. Jeff hopes that his players returned from Ireland seeing themselves as part of a global soccer community where the bar is set very high and inspires them to develop their skills to that level. Of course, elite sport isn’t all about what happens on the field. Tom and Dave are dedicated to producing quality people as well as quality players. Youth are required to maintain their grades and show respect for their community through volunteering. Whether they go on to university, or into a professional league, FC Edmonton players always have discipline and work ethic in their kit bag.

Photo courtesy of FC Edmonton

Photo courtesy of FC Edmonton

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

17


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM PARTNERSHIP FOR FOSSIL SEARCH, VILLENEUVE, AB

ARTS & EDUCATION

ENVIRONMENT

MAKE NO BONES ABOUT IT — INLAND WORKERS KNOW THEIR FOSSILS Inland employee Gene Seal was doing what he always did in the 1980s — carefully checking the conveyor belt in front of him for clay balls. If he saw one, he plucked it out so it wouldn’t contaminate the aggregates in the crusher. But then he saw something that was neither clay nor aggregate — he’d spotted his first fossil. Thirty years later, the Villeneuve aggregate site is responsible for the largest singlesource collection of fossils at the Royal Alberta Museum (RAM); the total comes to 3,200. Gene’s attentiveness shows just how big an impact Inland’s activities can have on building up knowledge of the fossil record in the province. It’s not that easy to spot a fossil — they have jagged edges and slight discolouration. The RAM encourages workers to report anything interesting so they can take a look at what they find. In fact, curators from the Royal Alberta Museum are dependent on findings like Gene’s. Three out of every four fossils in their collection

18

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

are thanks to the eagle eyes of employees on Inland Aggregate sites. The chances of Inland workers finding fossils are much higher than when a curator visits a site. Fossils like Gene’s have been sent for carbon dating and are revealing a detailed timeline of Alberta’s prehistory. More than 10,000 years ago, the Villeneuve pit likely contained a river bed that collected the bones of animals dying along its banks. Carbon dating also shows that between 80,000 to around 22,000 years ago Alberta was inhabited predominantly by Ice Age horses; then, near the end of the Ice Age between 12,000 to 10,000 years ago, bison moved into the area to displace the horses.


!

FAST Fossil FACTS

Between 80-000 to around

22,000 years ago: The working relationship between the Quaternary (Ice Age) Palaeontology program (Royal Alberta Museum) and Inland Aggregates provides a great example of the aggregate industry meeting regulatory requirements in a way that both preserves

• Camels, similar to modern-day desert animals, used to criss-cross ancient Alberta. • The extinct short-faced bear roamed

heritage resources and minimizes impacts to day-to-day company

Alberta. Even down on four legs, it still

operations – it’s a win-win situation for all of us.”

stood approximately 6 feet high.

— Chris Jass, Quaternary Palaeontology Curator, Royal Alberta Museum

• The Jefferson’s ground sloth walked on the sides of its feet. It was smaller than a mammoth, but considerably bigger than a large bison. It may have gone extinct before the last advance of ice sheets. • The American lion was as big as an African lion. It lived in the Edmonton area as recently as 12,000 years ago.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

19


HEALTH & WELL-BEING

POINT TROTTER PLANT OPENING AND YW CALGARY, CALGARY, AB

BUILDING CALGARY’S SENSE OF COMMUNITY FROM THE (BELOW) GROUND UP ENVIRONMENT

!

FAST FACTS

In 2016, the Canadian network of Women’s Shelters and Transition Houses reported data from a “snapshot” day. On this day, 416 women and children reached out to shelters across the country. Of this number 111 were successful, the remainder were turned away due to capacity issues. YW Mary Dover House Transitional Shelter (MDH) currently provides 80 beds of safe and affordable housing, for women and women with children experiencing homelessness, as well as six emergency beds for single women.

20

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

It took 42,000 hours of hard work by 25 subcontractor teams from May 1st 2017 to March 28th 2018. An investment of $12.1 million transformed Point Trotter in just 387 (zero-incident) days into a state-of-the-art batch plant that marks a new chapter in Inland’s long-standing commitment to the local community of Calgary. The raw numbers are only part of the story. Like Lehigh Hanson’s other Calgary operations, this construction phase is only the very beginning. Inland Concrete has provided Calgary with concrete, employment and tax revenues for 25 years — a $24.3 million payroll, with 216 employees and a half million dollars in taxes annually. So the future output from Point Trotter will allow Calgary to grow in ways that aren’t linked directly to construction materials. One thing that won’t be coming from the plant is any environmental problems. Point Trotter has been designed to reduce its impact on

Calgary. It has a self-contained storm water system ensuring zero run-off into the city’s water system. Leftover concrete and water is reused, recycled or crushed on site for use in future products. Even after all that, Inland recognizes that there’s more to community than dollars, clean air and clean water — there’s the human element. Which is why alongside the physical construction of Point Trotter there was a longterm commitment to making a real connection with the people of Calgary, particularly those who are most vulnerable.


The commitment from Lehigh Hanson in support of our Domestic Violence and Crisis Programs and our Shelter and Housing has benefits that are threefold. When corporations commit to our work over the long term by making multi-year pledges, we are able to conduct better planning to ensure our valued programs and services can continue year over year.” —C indy DeVouge, Senior Development Officer; Major Giving, YW Calgary

The opening of Point Trotter was marked by a new four-year partnership between Inland Concrete and YW Calgary, a charity that provides programs and services to over 5,000 women and their families suffering from domestic abuse. There’s a real need in the city — domestic abuse has risen by 34% on a five-year average, with police called to 3,089 domestic incidents in the first nine months of 2017. Inland’s support focuses on YW’s Domestic Violence & Crisis and Shelter & Housing programs. Women and their families can find safe and secure emergency shelter with YW, then access housing, counselling, outreach, language and family access services. The goal throughout is to allow women and children in Calgary to live free of violence.

We’re so pleased to introduce Point Trotter, and to continue to partner with you in growing Calgary business, economy, and the local community. At every stage of our process, we look for ways to make cement and concrete products that are better for everyone; taking care every step of the way to make products in ways that protect the health and safety of employees, conserve natural resources and habitats, and make fewer demands on local communities.” — Chris Ward, president and CEO, Lehigh Hanson Canada Region

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

21


MS SOCIETY OF CANADA BIKE EVENT, LEDUC-CAMROSE, AB

HEALTH & WELL-BEING

Personally it’s the event itself that brings me back every year. It is very well done and there is quite a large construction industry presence, so knowing quite a few people makes the event even more fun to participate in. As for employee involvement, it is always nice to get to know peers/coworkers in a setting away from the office. I hope to see this event continue to grow next year and maybe one year challenge for top fundraising team. P.S Beer Gardens after the first day of riding is always great as well!” —S cott Casault (rider since 2012), Customer Service Manager, Materials

CRANKING UP HIGH-SPEED PEDAL POWER TO OVERTAKE MS IN CANADA When 2000 cyclists get together you know there’s going to be a lot of Lycra, lip-balm and reflective shades. But when it’s Lehigh Hanson employees getting together to fight multiple sclerosis (MS), one of Canada’s most devastating illnesses, you can be sure they’re going to bring their A game. The MS Bike road ride is a daunting two-day cycle from Leduc to Camrose. That’s 180km of blacktop under a hot summer sun. Luckily, the event finishes at the Alley Kat Beer Gardens, where live entertainment and food trucks await — along with the occasional pint. But there are some serious miles to grind out before anyone gets to look at a cold one. For the 10-strong Lehigh Hanson team of Scott Casault, Kent Majeau, Shawn Ruhl, Manny Caetano, and Christa Broadfoot, along with family and friends, it’s a labour of love. In 2018, they contributed to a $1.8 million fundraise that goes towards cures and treatment. What keeps the pedals turning is the knowledge that research is beginning to win the battle every year. In 2016, funds helped

22

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

launch the Hermès Canada, and the MS Society Wellness Research Innovation Grant, both aimed at translating lab findings into innovative wellness solutions to improve health and quality of life. In 2017, a call for proposals went out to researchers to establish the first Canadian cohort of people living with MS to study disease progression. Minocycline clinical trials demonstrated delay in MS onset in people with early signs of the disease who received this safe and inexpensive acne treatment. In 2018, Health Canada conditionally approved the first disease-modifying therapy available for early primary-progressive MS.


!

FAST FACT

Canada has one of the highest rates of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the world, with an estimated 77,000 Canadians living with the disease. While it is most often diagnosed in young adults aged 15 to 40, younger children and older adults are also diagnosed with the disease.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

23


HEALTH & WELL-BEING

THE STUDY HALL SUPPORT PROGRAM, UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA GOLDEN BEARS FOOTBALL TEAM, EDMONTON, AB

A-GRADES ON AND OFF THE FIELD IS THE NEW TACTIC FOR UofA FOOTBALL ARTS & EDUCATION

When Head Coach Chris Morris, former Edmonton Eskimos player, joined the University of Alberta (UofA) Golden Bears, the team were the lowest ranked in Canada. He quickly assessed the situation and determined that results on the field were being impacted by grades off the field — his team simply couldn’t keep hold of its best players, with 30 to 40 leaving school after Year Two. Something had to change. With financial support from Inland Concrete, Chris instituted a new Study Hall Support Program. The culture within the football team was radically changed. Now, attendance at a tutoring centre was mandatory for all 23 newly drafted players. They share their academic records to pinpoint strengths and weaknesses before they even come to school. Players plan their studies with two professors and learning strategists in advance, taking into account a 20+ hour training program every week. Then, all first-years attend the Study Hall Support

24

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

Program through both semesters, receiving help with homework, and tutors if required. Study Hall runs Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday 3-5pm. No Study Hall, no practice! After completing the first year of Study Hall, players with a GPA over 2.5 don’t have to attend Study Hall for the following years. Chris was also able to help those with very heavy workloads in engineering. First-year engineers don’t play any games so they can focus on their studies. And they get extra Study Hall time.


The Golden Bears Football Academic Support System has had an incredible impact on our program. The academic support received by our athletes positions them to flourish in academics while at the same time embracing the values imparted through participation in a team sport. Over the past 5 years, we have graduated engineers, teachers, business professionals, and many others who are now in the community impacting countless others. The strong service component of our program — and appreciation for help received

The outcomes are impressive — on the field and in the classroom. The UofA Golden Bears team now boasts a 95% academic retention rate, with 21 players who are Academic AllCanadians with GPAs of 3.2 or better; the average college team produces two to five high performing academics. In fact, the Bears have 30 students with GPAs over 3.0.

while part of our team — create a pay-it-forward mentality in our graduating players. This simply would not be possible without corporations such as Inland Concrete who generously support our vision for the development of true student athletes into community-minded leaders.” — Chris Morris, Head Coach, Golden Bears UofA Football Team

On the field, it’s a similar story. With older players now retaining their positions, the team has gone from their rank of 27th in the country to 11th. Go Bears!

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

25


ARTS & EDUCATION

LEHIGH HANSON SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

AT LEHIGH HANSON, HARD WORK PAYS OFF — EVEN FOR EXTENDED MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY. Lehigh Hanson values its employees every day — because we rely on them every day. But we know that our employees rely on their families even more. So we’re always looking for ways to show our appreciation to the extended ‘Lehigh Hanson Family’. What better way than offering students the opportunity to receive an entrance scholarship for their chosen university?

!

FAST FACTS

In 2017, there were an estimated 1.7M students at Canadian universities: 1,034,000 full-time, 281,000 part-time and 400,000 in continuing education.

26

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

Children of all Lehigh Hanson employees are eligible, provided they demonstrate excellence in their academic, volunteer, community or extracurricular endeavours. One of those deserving students is Emma Bontron who will be pursuing a degree in psychology at Kwantlen Polytechnic in Surrey, BC this year. When she graduates, Emma hopes to work with children on the autism spectrum, having already gained

experience working with people who have behavioural disabilities. Since its inception in 2003, the Scholarship Program has awarded $232,000 CAD to 45 recipients across Canada. In 2018/19, there are three entrance scholarships for first year bachelor degree programs at Canadian universities and colleges.


THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD The Quarry Life Award (QLA) is a scientific and education contest established by HeidelbergCement, Lehigh Hanson’s parent company. Environmental projects are submitted from HeidelbergCement operations all over the world and a few are chosen to receive funding for their research. At the end of the competition period, various project outcomes receive accolades. In 2018, Lehigh Hanson Canada Region was proud to be the recipient of two awards in the QLA North America competition.

ENVIRONMENT

1

ARTS & EDUCATION

The Coexistence of a Threatened Population of Grizzly Bears with Quarry Mining in Alberta, Canada

FIRST PLACE

2 SECOND PLACE

Ruling the Roost – Developing Thermally Optimal Roosts to Enhance Microbat Population Biodiversity Ruling the Roost also won in the Biodiversity Management category in the International Quarry Life Award. The innovative nature of this project and transferability to other sites globally were instrumental in winning the International Quarry Life Award.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

27


1

THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

FIRST PLACE

FRI RESEARCH GRIZZLY BEAR STUDY, CADOMIN MINE, AB

GRIZZLY BEARS FEEL RIGHT AT HOME IN THE MIDST OF AN ACTIVE MINE When you think of grizzly bears in the wild, you imagine dense forests or open hillsides. Of course, some bears choose to live close to human activity in search of food. But what about those that live near heavy industries? Can an active mine site co-exist with a grizzly population? Lehigh Cement sponsored a scientific investigation to find out.

Interacting and working with local staff at the Cadomin mine and helping them to understand more about the grizzly bears that they see regularly around their work site was a tremendous way to incorporate scientific data with local knowledge to raise our understanding of local bear populations and conservation.” —G ordon Stenhouse, Research Scientist and Program Lead, fRI Research

28

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

Grizzly bears are listed as a threatened species in Alberta, so no matter where they live it’s important to monitor their numbers to see if conservation efforts are working. A healthy grizzly population makes for a thriving ecosystem, keeping species further down the food chain in check. Gordon Stenhouse is Research Scientist and Grizzly Bear Program Lead at fRI Research in Hinton, Alberta. His team looks at the impact of primarily industrial use on the local ecology, economy, society, and culture to help make informed land decisions. Since the Cadomin Mine bear population had never been observed in detail, Gordon was keen to put them on the map.

The first phase of the project was to find a group of high school students who could participate. Brent Korobanik and Jessica Sabell from Lehigh worked tirelessly to find the right group, whilst Tim Bestland and Kent Stuehmer advocated for support of the program internally. A team of four grade-12 high school students was recruited to join Gordon in monitoring the grizzly bear activity around Cadomin Caves. Barbed wire hair snag sites were set up on the quarry property, with a scent lure to attract the bears. Lehigh employees assisted by collecting scat samples on site. A wildlife camera was set up to observe bear behaviours. Every two weeks the hair and scat samples were


THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

tested for DNA, and video was analyzed to track habitat use, movement and population numbers. What became clear is that mining is not, as some conservationists fear, detrimental to grizzly bears. The scientific data gathered by the team suggests that bear interactions with the mine doesn’t impact on their behaviour in a significant way. Bears eat, mate and hibernate normally, in spite of all of the activity, lights and noise that you would expect to find at a working mine.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

29


THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

!

FAST Furry FACT

Female grizzly bears have a reproductive strategy that biologists refer to as “delayed implantation”. Fertilized spring embryos do not immediately attach to the uterine wall. Instead, they are free floating until bears enter their winter dens. At this critical point, bears do something that is truly amazing. If they don’t have 20% body fat, they will reabsorb those embryos, and no cubs will be produced. With sufficient body fat, pregnancy continues and cubs will be born 6 to 8 weeks later.

30

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies


THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

2 SECOND PLACE

INTERNATIONAL QLA WINNER

NAIT BUILDING A BETTER BAT BOX PROJECT, CADOMIN MINE, AB

MORE MICROBATS IS BETTER FOR ALBERTA FARMERS. NOT SUCH GOOD NEWS FOR INSECTS ... In 2006, mouse-eared Myotis bats in caves in New York state developed a nasty new disease. White Nose Syndrome (WNS) is caused by a fungus that grows on the nose and flesh. The disease woke colonies up before hibernation was over. When they emerged into sub-zero air, 90-98% died. Why would Alberta farmers worry about bats in New York? Because the same kind of bats eat flying pests on the Prairies — and the disease is spreading. Lehigh Hanson takes its responsibility to local and global ecosystems very seriously. Professor David Critchley’s Building a Better Bat Box project was immediately attractive, as it achieved environmental rebalancing, whilst also protecting Albertan agriculture by saving farmers a staggering $53B a year in pest control.

Professor Critchley had already identified the Little Brown bat colony at Cadomin Caves as a population under threat from WNS. A team of 11 volunteer students drawn from NAIT’s Biological Sciences-Renewable Resources, Bachelor of Technology in Technology Management, and Alternate Energy Programs began to study the bats at Lehigh’s mine site. The plan was to develop a new type of roosting

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

31


THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

box that would protect WNS-infected bats before and after hibernation. The team’s new design helped to reduce temperature fluctuations, helping the microbats to build up their fat reserves by decreasing metabolic demand. There’s technology embedded in the design, with temperature probes, ambient light sensors and infrared ‘tripwires’.

This opportunity is and continues to be a life-changing experience for these volunteer students. The work they have been able to undertake cannot be duplicated in the classroom; they were able to move into the real world because of the QLA opportunity, enhancing

Once on site, Carlos Morales and his team from Lehigh helped to build the boxes using

their learning and growth potential.

retired products available at the mine, such as spools and drill stems. The boxes were tested in the summer of 2018, showing promising results when comparing the new design to the traditional one; the temperature fluctuations were stabilized greatly, which would render summer roosting possible.

at a crossroads in their career. This

32

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

Several of the students are no longer research partnership has solidified their drive to pursue a lifelong career in biodiversity and biological conservation.” —D ave Critchley, Chair Biological Sciences, Renewable Resources Biological Sciences Technology, School of Applied Sciences and Technology, NAIT


THE QUARRY LIFE AWARD

I am so grateful for this opportunity to be a part of such an amazing group of people who are all so passionate about the work we are doing. I have gained so much experience in biodiversity management, as well as habitat and species research.” —J enna Hlewka, NAIT Student, Researcher, Building a Better Bat Box Project

!

FAST Flying FACT

A tiny 8.5g Little Brown bat from Cadomin Cave can eat upwards of 900 insects an hour. Now multiply that by the 1.6 million bat population in Alberta. (That’s 1.44 billion insects an hour, give or take a bug or two.)

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

33


ARTS & EDUCATION ENACTUS CAPILANO UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP PROGRAM, NORTH VANCOUVER, BC

ENVIRONMENT

FROM LIP BALM AND FLOTSAM TO CUPCAKES AND CANDLES, YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS ARE REINVENTING THE WAY WE LOOK AT BUSINESS How can two students from a North Vancouver university get traction on 17 of the United Nations’ loftiest goals, all from a standing start? The solution was to find mentors, reach out to local communities — and leverage the entrepreneurial power of a non-profit organization that has a track record of making big things happen in the world of sustainable development: Enactus. Enactus operates a global community of over 69,000 students in 36 countries, with over 1,710 university programs. The focus is on student-led initiatives that identify ways to enact UN sustainable development goals in their communities through business-like entrepreneurship. Campus programs link to secondary schools to multiply the impact of each project. From there, a nationwide and

34

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

then global competition spurs participants on to even greater heights. Lehigh Materials’ funding helped kick-start the secondary student’s business ideas, and covered travel for Capilano students between high schools and to Vancouver Island and admin costs. Lehigh also sponsored a portion of the micro-loans for 90 students on the Sunshine Coast.


!

FAST FACT

Enactus has been an incredible experience and a huge part of our time at

Enactus has established the

Capilano University. Through Enactus, we were able to tackle social issues

largest global business and higher

through using entrepreneurial action. We led a team of committed, driven,

education network in the world. This

and incredible innovative people to seek problems in their community and

unique network brings together the

give back through their volunteer efforts. Being part of Enactus has been

knowledge of professional business

instrumental in shaping ourselves as future leaders.”

educators and the expertise of

—B etty Huang & Andrew Procknow, Presidents of Enactus Capilano

business leaders to focus the potential of university students preparing for leadership roles in business.

Capilano business students Betty Huang and Ivy Martin-Moore discovered Enactus through networking with other university students. They brought the Counting on Action program to North Vancouver in 2016, aligning with the city’s 2011 Sustainability Report. Counting on Action ran from September 2017 to January 2018. Essentially, Betty and Ivy connected with high schools, getting help from teachers to form an entrepreneurial club for ages 14-17 to run during school hours. The Capilano students would come every other week to host one of 10 one-hour workshops. The workshops introduced high school students to sustainability issues and business basics such as the 4 P’s, target markets,

SWOT, positioning and competitive analysis, and product manufacturing and pricing.

The results for Enactus Capilano’s 22 projects were impressive.

Basically, Betty and Ivy were helping high school students to become sustainable business execs. These youthful teams came to understand financials, production, and marketing before they had graduated.

Nine different high schools took part, representing four regions in BC: Sechelt, Gibsons, North Vancouver, and West Vancouver. Twenty-two classes, comprised of 725 students, devoted over 865 hours of time given to projects.

Key to the Enactus methodology is the competitive element which is very popular with high school students. The competition format brought an edge to their presentation skills, as well as providing exposure for the business through networking with university and industry professionals.

The outputs were considerable. Over 335 community members were empowered to take action, with over 40 lives positively impacted. Some 520lbs of waste was diverted from landfill.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

35


To be able to give a group of

1ST PLACE:

2ND PLACE

teenagers the opportunity to do good

Chap Cap, Elphinstone Secondary, Gibsons, BC (Senior Leadership)

Rhea Bath and Candle Co, Chatelech Secondary, Sechelt, BC (Senior Leadership)

The Chap Cap business started at Elphinstone Secondary on the Sunshine Coast, where over 20,000 lbs of plastic has been removed from shorelines in the past five years. Students needed no incentive to try to use their business skills to reduce that blot on the landscape. They turned their attention to plastic bottle caps

Homelessness is an issue across Canada, with over 30,000 people sleeping out of doors every night. Even on the Sunshine Coast, it’s a real problem. Chatelech Secondary’s Rhea Bath and Candle Co decided to shine some candlelight on the issue.

in their community, and to be able to feed 40 homeless people for one night and to have them be happy and thankful, is amazing. Enactus did that for us. We spent so much time on our project, we were here after and before school and we had so much fun. Our class came together as a team and we never thought that we would do that. The oldest in our class was 18 and the youngest was 15, and we were a family by the time we left. We came in second place at the CoA Competition and it was so much fun. To be able to create an impact in our community was amazing.” — Skylar Moore, Chatelech Secondary

36

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

(which have to go to landfill), upcycling them as packaging for an all-natural lip balm which they developed in partnership with the Sunshine Coast Beekeepers Association. A portion of profits is used to keep plastic off shorelines, and a portion goes to the beekeepers. The business has been so successful that everyone hopes it will continue.

Selling bath bomb products made from upcycled food and floral waste, and candles packaged in materials that would have gone to landfills, Rhea began to make money. They established nine partnerships on the Sunshine Coast community, all of which contributed either monetary or in-kind sponsorship to a banquet. Rhea invested over $800 of their profits into catering for the local homeless population, with gifts, a home-cooked meal, and quality storytelling.


3RD PLACE The Drift Store, Mountainside Secondary, North Vancouver, BC The Drift Store was created to capitalize on a local beach clean-up on the shores of Southern British Columbia. After dealing with garbage and recyclable materials, students collected driftwood that would otherwise end up creating hazards for local boat traffic. Partnering with local craftsmen around North Vancouver, The Drift Store was able to create beautiful wall hangings, candle holders, and table centrepieces to sell online and at local fairs. (The online business continues to operate profitably.) Proceeds from the business are earmarked to assist local residents in meeting onerous legal obligations when taking climate change and environmental issues to the Provincial court.

Blancakes, Mulgrave International Private School, West Vancouver, BC A class at Mulgrave International Private School created Blancakes to sell cupcakes in their school cafeteria. Every cupcake sold meant that one homeless person in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver was given a warm blanket made from upcycled vinyl signs and plastic bags which would otherwise have ended up in Vancouver’s municipal landfill.

Counting on Action was an amazing opportunity to expose my group and me to the side of business that books can’t teach. Such as the labour that goes into efficient production and the unique errors that products encounter. This program really helped me learn more about myself, my abilities and what I need to improve. I now truly appreciate what small businesses must go through.” — Ryan Russell, Argyle Secondary

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

37


HEALTH & WELL-BEING

JDRF WASHINGTON, WA

DRUMMING UP SUPPORT TO CURE CHILDHOOD DIABETES

I’m extremely grateful for the steadfast support that Cadman has provided over the past 17 years, as a partner … with me and with their support for JDRF research.” —M ike Lee, President Lakeside Industries

Mike Lee runs Lakeside Industries, one of Cadman’s oldest customers. You don’t get to run a company like Lakeside without being a self-starter and a go-getter. But when his baby daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, Mike recognized that this was a fight that needed some extra muscle. So he turned to his colleagues in the industry to lend a helping hand. Mike learned that his daughter had been born with diabetes when she was just one year old. As a result of the diagnosis, Mike resolved to find out if there was a cure — and he soon became involved with the foremost local charity investigating juvenile diabetes, JDRF Washington. JDRF, which stands for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, is dedicated to finding treatments and cures by raising funds from the community. Cadman first became a sponsor in 2001 when Mike Lee asked if they would

38

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

sponsor JDRF’s annual gala. Barry Mead, past VP at Cadman, was enthusiastic, as the company already had a personal connection with childhood diabetes, through an employee’s grandchild. Seventeen years later, a lot has changed. Mike’s daughter is now 25 years old and living life to the full. She also still supports the JDRF alongside her dad and the employees of Cadman. Together, they have raised close to $110,000 to help find the cure.


!

FAST FACT

Kids with type 1 diabetes will have the illness for life until scientists

Cadman wants to let the wider community know just how important the work of JDRF could be to kids across the state. So, next time you see a Cadman mixer truck, don’t be surprised to see a big JDRF logo on the drum.

find a cure. With type 1, the pancreas stops making its own insulin so that people need to have insulin injections to compensate.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

39


HEALTH & WELL-BEING OCEAN CONCRETE CHARITABLE MIXER TRUCK PROGRAM, SANDY MERRIMAN HOUSE, VICTORIA, BC

THE MIXER DRIVER WHO IS HELPING OTHER WOMEN TO REGAIN THEIR INDEPENDENCE

We don’t often get to hear how people are doing when they leave the shelter. It’s incredibly powerful for all of us to see the results of Kandace’s hard work and determination.

In 2018, Kandace Harry walked through the doors of Sandy Merriman House as a volunteer. Back in 2003, Kandace had walked through the same doors with her three young kids, looking for somewhere to stay after a domestic break-up. Kandace has moved on in her life — now she wants to help other women do the same. And she is using her mixer truck to spread the message.

It’s also damn cool to see our shelter’s name in such a strong setting. I want to thank Kandace for her support and generosity — and we all think “Kandace rocks!” —C hristine O’Brien, Manager, Sandy Merriman House

40

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

For Kandace, the Victoria Cool Aid Society Sandy Merriman House was a lifeline when she and her children most needed it. She credits the centre with helping her back on her feet; their emphasis on rebuilding self respect and preparing clients for the real world of work gave her the confidence to take on challenges some women might not have considered. In the years after leaving Sandy Merriman, she ran the parts department of a large retail chain.

Kandace jumped at an opportunity to drive for Ocean Concrete Victoria. When she joined the company, she started as a dump truck driver, even though she had no previous experience with heavy machinery. Then, in November 2018 she graduated to her own mixer truck which carried The Salvation Army logo. That’s when she got the opportunity to choose a new charity of her own to be featured on the side of her truck’s drum.


Driving around Victoria, Kandace’s thoughts immediately went back to her time at Sandy Merriman House. The house was originally built by female trades specifically for women facing difficulties. Today, problems such as homelessness, addiction, and domestic abuse mean that there is a constant need for counselling, food services, temporary shelter and medical advice. The Victoria Cool Aid Society, which runs the shelter, also prioritizes training to get women back into the workforce to regain their independence. As well as promoting the charity though her colourful truck logo, Kandace is looking at ways she and her children can volunteer in person, either at the shelter itself or by fundraising. She may have moved on, but she hasn’t forgotten the folks who helped her regain control of her life 15 years ago. Ocean Victoria has been running its Charitable Mixer Truck program for more than 10 years; providing an opportunity for their drivers to highlight a local charity important to them on their mixer’s drum.

!

FAST FACT

In 2018, Ocean Concrete drivers added five new charity logos to our mixer truck fleet: the Canadian Cancer Society, the Victoria Cool Aid Society, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the BCSPCA and BC Mental Health.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

41


HEALTH & WELL-BEING CONCRETE CANVAS ROCK BAY MURAL PROJECT, VICTORIA, BC

THE MODERN ART OF CITY REVITALIZATION ARTS & EDUCATION

!

FAST FACT

People have been ‘decorating’ the walls of cities for thousands of years. Early graffiti can be seen in the ancient buildings of the Egyptian, Greek and Roman empires. The word comes from the Latin for ‘scratch or scribble’.

42

//

Lehigh Hanson Canada Region affiliated companies

When Ocean Concrete paints its external walls, you can probably guess what the normal choices are: white, grey and two shades of Ocean blue. But if you are ever in the Rock Bay community of Victoria, you’ll see a much more vibrant display than you could ever have imagined. It’s the work of local artist Calvin Coles, part of an extensive city-sponsored project to bring a splash of colour to a mixed industrial zone. Calvin has been able to use the entire length of Ocean’s boundary wall to create a mural featuring his favourite subjects — Vancouver Island’s small wild birds. The result is a bright, cheerful departure from the run-of-the-mill colour schemes that tend to predominate in Rock Bay and Burnside. The result is that many of these walls suffer from graffiti. But, since the project got underway in August 2018,

vandalism has declined noticeably, and the sidewalks feel more friendly and walkable. In all, there are 14 murals in the area. A call for entries from the City of Victoria brought in responses from all over the world. Of the 40 artists who replied, 19 were chosen to bring their own distinctive style to the neighbourhood, with input from local street


artists who served as mentors throughout the project. Forty businesses, including Ocean, volunteered to donate their walls as raw canvas. The City of Victoria invested $150,000 to bring the project to life, as part of an initiative to address decades of urban neglect in Burnside and Rock Bay, two of Victoria’s older harbour locales.

The Concrete Canvas mural project was an opportunity to collaborate with the business and arts community to transform the Rock Bay neighbourhood into an outdoor art gallery. Building these unique partnerships strengthens the social and economic fabric in our community. Thank you to Ocean Concrete for stepping up and supporting this project in our community for all to enjoy.” — M ayor Lisa Helps, City of Victoria

The results certainly live up to expectations with local vendors, tenants and residents reporting new investment in the area, alongside increased civic pride and community engagement. This simple and relatively inexpensive idea is a master class in how to bring the artist community, local residents, business and government together as one.

Connecting with Communities Every Day

//

43


LehighHansonCanada.com