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A PORTFOLIO [LEE Yan] Shun


[ LEE Yan ] Shun, LEED Green Associate B4, 645 Clyde Street Pittsburgh, PA15213 412-330-0079 leeyan.ys@gmail.com

OBJECTIVE To strengthen my knowledge in urban scale design while becoming a productive team member in an architecture practice with a wide range of projects

WORK EXPERIENCE Architecture Intern | Leigh & Orange Architects | Hong Kong | Jun - Aug 2011

EDUCATION Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA. May 2014 Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) GPA 3.3 | Dean’s List for 4 Semesters Minor in Japanese Language and Studies Pickering Scholarships Recipient Danish Institute of Study Abroad Copenhagen, Denmark. Summer 2013 Tartan Abroad Award Recipient Carnegie Mellon University Qatar Doha, Qatar. Spring 2012 Tartan Abroad Award Recipient Li Po Chun United World College Hong Kong. May 2009 Bilingual International Baccalaureate Diploma

SKILLS Language English (Native) Mandarin (Native) Cantonese (Native) Japanese (Advanced) Software Rhinoceros 5.0 Google SketchUp 8 AutoCAD Grasshopper Adobe CS6 Photoshop Adobe CS6 Illustrator Adobe CS6 InDesign Vray Rendering Ecotect ArcGIS Fabrication MasterCAM RhinoCAM Lasercutting Wood and Metal Work CNC Milling 3D Printing Vacuum Forming Casting

Assisted the senior architect in creating schematic drawings and area calculations for the Queens Pier competition bidding package Estate revitalization project Produced AutoCAD drawings for the Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind Architecture Intern | Matsuda Gumi | Fukuoka, Japan | May - Jul 2010 Japanese architects Fabricated models to be presented at client meetings and networked with local designers at three open house events Produced hand drawings and models for a facade renovation competition submission

RELEVANT COURSEWORK Oakland 2050 Masterplan | Urban Design Studio | CMU | Fall 2013 Established urban scale vision and design goals for the institutional center of Pittsburgh, Coordinated and delegated work between three students in the framework group Collaborated on, compiled and published a book that represented the work of the studio Connect Uptown Design Build | Issues of Practice | CMU | Fall 2012 Analyzed and proposed a comprehensive development scheme that addresses urban, social and architectural issues for the Uptown neighborhood of Pittsburgh Phased a feasible demolition and construction sequence for a mixed-use residence in a 2640 ft2 lot located within a Local Commercial Neighborhood (LNC) zoning code Presented to representatives of Action Housing, PA in a total of 5 client meetings Al Wakrah Revitalization | Integration Studio Abroad | CMUQatar | Spring 2012 Arabian Gulf, in collaboration with designers of the existing revitalization project 2

Selected to be showcased at the “Meeting of the Minds” Symposium by Qatar Foundation

OTHERS Teaching Assistant, Architecture for Non-Majors Course, Carnegie Mellon University Candidate, Sheraton Doha Student Design Competition, Qatar Participant, Crossing Boundaries Seminar with Professor Juhani Pallasmaa, Qatar Team Leader, Habitat for Humanity Guangxi China Build Trip Participant, Tucson Cross Border Volunteer and Leadership Camp Featured Columnist, Hong Kong Rail Monthly Magazine Culinary Intern, Spoon by Alain Ducasse, InterContinental Hong Kong


Reference List Rami el Samahy Assistant Professor / Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture Founding Partner / over,under Boston, Massachusetts +1 617-230-9739 samahy@cmu.edu Dana Cupkova Assistant Professor / Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture Design Principal / EPIPHYTE Lab +1 917-863-7755 cupkova@cmu.edu Kelly Hutzell Assistant Professor / Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture Senior Associate / over,under, Boston, Massachusetts +1 617-470-2935 kellyh@andrew.cmu.edu Jonathan Kline Adjunct Assistant Professor / Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture Principal / Studio for Spatial Practice +1 412-443-4211 jonathak@andrew.cmu.edu Nicholas Lai Associate Director / Leigh & Orange Limited +852 2899 9377 nicholas.lai@leighorange.com Regina Chu Director of Learning and Development / InterContinental Hong Kong +852 2313 2488 regina.chu@ihg.com


Projects

Oakland 2050 (Separate book available) Urban.

6

Connect Uptown Design Build (Separate book available) Urban. Architecture. Interior.

10

Oneotel Urban. Architecture. Interior. Sustainable.

18

Al Wakrah Fish Village and Restaurant (Separate book available) Urban. Architecture. Interior.

24

Harvard Square Urban. Architecture.

28

Environmental School Architecture. Sustainable.

32

CMoA Film Archive Architecture. Interior.

36

Space for the Unspoken Word Urban. Interior.

38

Materials and Assembly Installation.

40

Drawings Maps. Infographics. Freehand.

42


Oakland 2050 Fall 2013. Instructors: Rami el Samahy and Jonathan Kline with classmates Claire He and Emily Puhnaty. An urban design proposal for the neighborhood of Oakland in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The overall goal of the Urban Design Framework proposal is to envision the future of the Oakland neighborhood in 2050. Oakland is home to various institutions, including universities, museums and hospitals, making it the academic, healthcare and cultural center of Pittsburgh. By taking advantage of this latent institutional resource as a catalyst, the Oakland community can achieve sustainable growth. Occupants rest of the city. In order to accomplish this, the framework proposes a better transit system that efficiently moves people in and out of the neighborhood along the Fifth and Forbes corridor, while reconnecting green amenities along Junction Hollow and the waterfront corridor that continues up the North Hills. Housing will be densified, creating ample open and public space for occupants to enjoy. These proposed urban strategies are proposed with the intention of allowing Oakland to continue to densify and diversify, equipped with a developed infrastructural network that supports various economic and social activities. Underutilized and under-maintained portions of the neighborhood will be revitalized. As a result, residents and visitors alike will be able to access the rich resources in the neighborhood with ease. The proposal is guided by three urban principles: Access, Restitch and Activate.

Aerial view


Site selection 80% Bigelow Boulevard

I-579

OAKLAND

Squirrel Hill Tunnel

Parkway East

Oakland is linked to the wider Pittsburgh region by major highways.

Riverfront

Panther Hollow

The population in Oakland increases fivefold during the day. Eighty percent of this population is affiliated to the institutions.


Sustainable growth

Leveraging institutions to Leveraging institutions to strengthen and densify a strengthen and densify a sustainable living community sustainable living community

Institutional INSTITUTIONAL

Commercial Residential RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Corridor

Framework Analysis and Proposal

Institutional

NORTH CRAIG

FORBES AND FIFTH

Commercial


Center

Gateway

Landmarks

Bus Rapid Transit

Major Paths

Commuter Rail

Major Nodes

Riverfront Streetcar

Minor Nodes

Oakland Underground

Edges

Major Institutio

Major Open Sp

Major Resident

Transit

Major Business

Visual form

GREEN SPACE ACADEMIC

INSTITUTIONAL

The Hill

Central Oakland

NON-STUDENT HOUSING STUDENT HOUSING

COMMERCIAL

Panther Hollow

Riverfront OFFICE MEDICAL

Land use

Topography


Connect Uptown | Design Build FALL 2012. Instructor: John Folan with classmates Matt Ho, Kevin Kuntz, Scott Harrison and Monica Tong. A proposal for a comprehensive development scheme that addresses urban, social and architectural issues in the Uptown neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Uptown has suffered economically since the 1970s when industries moved out which caused a flight of the wealthy population. Till now, it still has not been able to reestablish itself. Located between the two largest economic bases in Pittsburgh, Downtown and Oakland,

The project proposes various urban strategies in response to a series of studies at the city, neighborhood and building scale. This helps to discover opportunities in order to bring in missing services and amenities, as well as to make decisions for demolition, renovation and new construction. The project site of 2640ft2 is located within a Local Commercial Neighborhood (LNC) zone. The lot is situated between two drastically different street conditions: Fifth Avenue, a well traveled street with good vehicular access, and Watson Street, a small alleyway with most backyards facing it. The proposal aims to connect the residents and businesses on either side of the streets in order to foster a greater sense of community in the area. The architecture has a physical shift that creates a front to back divide that allows both a residential and commercial program to inhabit the same space. Facing the main road, a flexible commercial space on the ground floor and a single family home on the remaining two floors and basement is proposed. Passive strategies and efficient appliances are also adopted to minimize the environment impact of the building.

Project Scope & Analysis

CBD

Oakland

Uptown DOWN

TOWN

UPTOW

N OAKL

AND

Strengthen Residential Core

Neighborhood goals

10

Bring New Amenities

Branch to Other Neighborhoods


Project proposal

Seneca Street

Small cafe or food service

Watson Street

Fifth Ave.

Retail space

Flexible commercial space

Neighborhood connections

11


Adaptive transformation

AT3.02 Sectional perspective

12

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: SECTION PERSPECTIVE


1'-1021" 0'-4"

1'-1021"

1'-5"

1'-1021"

0'-5"

0'-341"

1'-1021"

0'-221"

0'-221"

0'-541"

bedroom 1 184sf

mechanical 193sf

0'-221"

study 152sf

UP 0'-941"

1'-434"

bedroom 2 132sf

store 103sf

store 34sf

0'-3"

2'-121"

0'-4"

2'-734"

bathroom 65sf

commercial 427sf

commercial 467.5sf

den 219sf

0'-3" 1'-841"

2'-734"

0'-3"

2'-734"

0'-1041"

0'-321"

0'-2"

0'-2"

0'-3"

1'-0"

0'-621"

DN 0'-234"

0'-421"

0'-421"

0'-3"

1'-1121"

2'-1034"

0'-1034"

0'-234"

0'-121"

0'-3"

UP

DN

0'-3"

0'-321"

1'-4"

1'-4"

0'-9" 1'-241"

0'-3"

1'-1021"

2'-334"

0'-9"

2'-334"

7'-534"

1'-4"

roof terrace 479sf

0'-3"

0'-221"

0'-221"

master bedroom 312sf

0'-234"

10'-121"

0'-234"

10'-121"

dining 144sf UP

0'-421" 0'-221"

0'-341"

0'-221"

DN

0'-3"

0'-221"

kitchen 194sf

1'-1121"

1'-3"

0'-441"

0'-3"

0'-4"

living 174sf

0'-221"

0'-921"

0'-1034"

0'-11"

0'-134"

0'-341"

1'-1121"

5'-621"

5'-621"

UP

store 23sf

DN

laundry 27sf

UP

0'-434"

UP

0'-641"

0'-3"

4'-7"

backyard 552sf

0'-10"

2'-341"

2'-341"

1'-1021"

Plans

North-south section

13


Construction strategies

1

EXISTING

4

RENOVATE

2

DEMOLITION

5

GLAZING

3

REMOVAL

6

SHADING

Assembly sequence

Remove 60% of the brick on the rear facade to open double height dining room to community focused Watson St.

Remove and replace existing windows

Gather Bricks on site

Remove mortar by scrubbing with hydrochloric acid

Demolish lower third of existing facade to open up the commercial space to 5th Ave.

Remove and replace existing windows

Selective demolition

14

Reuse bricks for roof garden walls and patio flooring


Ro

oft

Sec

ond

op

Pa

tio

Le

ve

l

Flo

or

First Floor

Ground Floor

Backyard perspective view from Watson Street

15


Sectional perspective

Community-based street facing back of house

16


Kitchen interior

View into double storey living space

17


ONEOTEL | Adaptive Urban Viticulture SPRING 2013. Instructor: Dana Cupkova with classmate I-Ting Wang. A proposal for an adaptive urban viticulture hotel in Ithaca, New York.

Wine culture is prominent in the region and the local climate is prime for growing grapes. The project illustrates an approach to integrate systems of building elements and viticulture to create a new hospitality experience. The architecture is a manifestation of the landscape. A family of hotel room modules aggregated according to a rule set defined within deeper spaces of the building. Hotel rooms are arranged along the outer edge of the hotel and have access to fresh air and natural light; common spaces such as wine tasting rooms are accessible to occupants and visitors alike through a series of outdoor walkways.

Siteplan

South elevation


Systems logic 4

IN

OUT

2

1 3

4

3 2

Metrics 1

1

4 2

3

4

1

3 3

2 4 1

1

4

1

2

3 2

1

1

4 3 2

1

1


Program

Wine production & common spaces

Pool and hotel rooms

Ground plan


Geothermal heating

Circulation

3

1

5

2/8 1 5

6/7

6

1-2

2

6

2

3=

3

3

7 8

3

9 4-5

2

2

Water metrics


Room module

Room interior

Vehicular Entry

Modular elements

Steel beam structure

Solar thermal panels

Recycled wood cladding Aluminum pipe louver

Bamboo interior cladding

Prefab concrete planter module

Room module material study


CARNEGIE MELLON SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE | SPRING 2013 | DESIGN STUDIO 48-405 PROFESSOR DANA CUPKOVA

Lee Yan Shun + I-Ting Wang

Room aggregation

Room study


Al Wakrah Fish Market and Restaurant SPRING 2012. Instructors: Rami el Samahy and Kelly Hutzell. A neighborhood development proposal for the southern edge of Al Wakrah village in Qatar, Doha.

houses.

Restaurant block inserted in indigenous walls with connecting catwalks

24


AL WAKRAH VILLAGE SOUTH END OPERATION Site and building analysis LLAGE SOUTH END OPERATION

AL WAKRAH VILLAGE RESTAURANT PUBLIC/ PRIVATE

Seating with expansive sea view

Existing buildings Semi public Private

Public/Private

sh market

Circulation links restaurants with fish market pedestrian access food service access -

Conditioned Semi- conditioned

Conditioned space

AL WAKRAH VILLAGE SOUTH END CIRCULATION

water courtyards for boat access

AL WAKRAH VILLAGE LAND USE

South end operation

Site circulation

Pedestrian Vehicular Water Access

Public Park

proposal wc 3.69 GL

proposal wc

wc 3.55 GL

3.55 GL

3.57 GL

proposal

proposal

kitchen

Public Residential Education Retail

0

10

20 meters

30

40

Masterplan

25


b

UP

UP

UP

a

b

a

UP

UP

UP

UP

WAKRAH VILLAGE RESTAURANT SECTION Ground plan

2m 0m Scale 1:100

4m

6m

8m

10m

UP

Plan

UP

UP

UP

aa UP

UP

Section a-a 2m 0m Scale 1:100

2m 0m Scale 1:100

Section b-b

26

4m

6m

8m

10m

4m

6m

8m

10m


AL WAKRAH VILLAGE RESTAURANT PERSPECTIVE

Water Courtyard

Boat entry

Roof terrace

Envelope assembly detail

27


Harvard Square SPRING 2011. Instructors: Teresa Bucco and Jeremy Ficca with classmates Bradley Sherburne and Scott Harrison. A proposal for the redesign of Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The site is a triangular plaza at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street and John F. Kennedy Street. It is a highly utilized space at the heart of Cambridge, frequented by local professionals and students as well as tourists. Located at the junction of Harvard University and Cambridge, it is also the site of a major MBTA Red Line subway and bus transportation hub. The program includes a subway entry and a media center as well as addressing the currently underutilized tip of the triangular square. process includes a series of casting, assembly and drawing in order to understand materiality and tectonics.

taxi stand

media center

public seating subway station

PARTI

Entry to media center and subway station

28

CIRCULATION

PROGRAM


HARVA

RD YA

BR

AT TL E

ST RE

ET

RD

MA

SSA

CH

US

ETT

SA VEN

UE

Site plan

Media center interior

29


Component design and assembly

A component piece is used to “punch out” skylights on roof surfaces and ground surfaces.

Expression of tectonics through ‘folded’ concrete and glass assembly.

b

Roof perforation

a

Ground perforation as underground skylights

a

b

Ground plan Public seating

Public square

30


Taxi stand

Public seating

View under subway canopy

Section a-a

Section b-b

31


Environmental School FALL 2011. Instructor: Kelle Brooks. A project for a kindergarten at the Beechwood Boulevard entrance area of Frick Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The site is located at the entrance of Frick Park where a natural seasonal stream runs through the park. The project examines learning environment required for unique education experiences, such as the Quaker education, and challenges the role and physical bounds of traditional classrooms. The learning experience is augmented by creating flexible learning spaces that blur the thresholds between the architecture and its environment. The architecture straddles across the stream while allowing a series of indoor and outdoor classrooms. Children will learn alongside the changing nature, instilling an understanding and appreciation of the ecological and mechanical movement of water.

Water features Roof water collection

Double wall water collection

Entry water wall

Section a-a

32


Classroom with outdoor learning space

33


a c

d

b

c

d

b

Lower plan

a

Ground plan

Section b-b

34


Classroom experience

Classroom Axonometric

Interactive corridor

Flexible classrooms

Section c-c

Section d-d

35


CMoA Film Archive FALL 2010. Instructor: Kelle Brooks. A project for a film archive affiliated to the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The site is adjacent to the Carnegie Museum of Art, a world renowned art Museum with an extensive collection. The footprint of the archive covers the whole side of the museum building, including a submerged courtyard that separate the massive museum building from the street sectionally. The project explores ways to allow the public to interact with films while providing enough storage space for a large collection of film reels. The program also includes a library, offices and public screening rooms. Outdoor and indoor common areas double as flexible seating spaces where visitors can have conversations and collaborate ideas. The outdoor seating steps also give back to the public space as a waiting area for buses.

steps, to rooms and openings.

SEATING/ BUS STOP

SUNKEN COURTYARD UP

KIOSK

WATER FOUNTAIN

ARCHIVE ENTRY

UP

MUSEUM ENTRY

Daylighting

STAFF ENTRY

Site plan

Tectonics

PUBLIC READING SPACE VIEWING GALLERY ARCHIVE

OFFICES

TECHNICAL SPACE LIBRARY OUTDOOR SEATING

Site circulation

36

Program


a Exterior common area UP

Viewing room

Library Entry UP

UP

UP

Interior common area UP

UP

Ground plan

a

Archive

Interior common area

Section a-a

37


Space for the Unspoken Word SUMMER 2013. Instructor: Eva Frederiksen.

lapidarium

viewing pods

Black diamond

Discussion spaces and walkways

38

Edges

Grid

Program

Scattering

Self organization

Circulation

discussion space


Plan

Individual viewing pod

Platform connection and interaction

Small discussion space

39


Materials and Assembly | Grid Shell Structure Fall 2010. Instructor: Dale Clifford with classmates Christina Brant, Ben Finch, Scott Harrison, Stacey Hsi, Yeliz Karadayi, Alexandre Kinney, Sydney Orthmann, Brad Sherburne, Erica Tong and Yifan Xu.

1. Rivet top A1s together 3. Rivet the X to the B1s

6. Rivet side segments to center segment to form full rib 2. Attach two B1s with a C1 to form an X

7. Rivet ribs together

5. Repeat step 2

4. Rivet A1 to A2

Assembly Sequence

Study

40

Details


3/8” Baltic Birch

1/16” Cold Rolled Steel

A-8 A1 A-9 1/16” Cold Rolled Steel

A-9

8’9”

C2 A-8 A-9 1/8” Baltic Birch

C1 A-8 B1 A-8 A2 A-9

5’7”

Sectional perspective

Elevation

A1 3/8” Baltic Birch

A1

B1

C1 B1 3/8” Baltic Birch

C2

Alluminum Pop Rivets 3/16” Diameter, 1/2 Depth

3/8” Baltic Birch

1/16” Cold Rolled Steel

C1 1/8” Baltic Birch

1/16” Cold Rolled Steel

C2

A2

A2

3/8” Baltic Birch

Outer rib assembly

Inner rib assembly

Final construction

41


Infographics

Water Infrastructure Location of Desalination Plants Haql 0.3%

Tabuk 4.88%

Duba

Al Khafji

0.19%

1.07%

Al Wajh 0.03%

Umm Lajj 0.18%

Riyadh

Al Khobar

46.15%

Yanbu

19.37%

7.08%%

Rabigh 0.06%

Jeddah 16.3%

Al Lith 7.80%

Al Makhwah 0.02%

Al Qunfudhah 0.16%

Ad Darb 0.09%

Assir 3.90%

Farasan 0.02%

location capacity (%)

Arabian Gulf

total capacity (100%)

Water infrastructure in the Gulf

Area Population

2

=100 km

=10,0000 people

Form of government: Monarchy Head of State: H.R.H. King Abdullah Bin Adulaziz Al Saud Governer H.R.H. Prince Salman Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud

1930

2

2,380,000

145

5,304

1940 408 3,024 13,317

4,114

2,262,000

1950

1,815 6,188,000

Form of government constitutional Emirate Head of state H.H. Sheikh Sabah Al- Ahmad Al- Jaber Al- Sabah

Independence: June 19, 1961

200 1960

896,750

Form of Government: Constitutional monarchy Head of state: H.M. King Hamad Bin Khalifa 67.34

1970

Independence: (from UK) Dec 2 1971

Form of goverment: Federation Ruler: H.H Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum

345,000

665

42

Independence: Dec 2, 1971

Form of government: Federation Ruler: H. H. Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan


Unwelcoming building facades

Lack of wayfinding to open s

Lack of continuous buildings setback

J

Raised buildings are unwelcoming

I H

Difficulty in gauging distance from landmark G

F

Lack of continuity between districts E

Lack of visual cue to halket D

C

Lack of neighborhood identity

A

Underutilised street corner

B

Underemphasis on public realm

43


Freehand Drawing

44


45

Profile for Lee Yan Shun

Lee Yan Shun Portfolio 2009-2014  

A documentation of architectural and urban design works at Carnegie Mellon University

Lee Yan Shun Portfolio 2009-2014  

A documentation of architectural and urban design works at Carnegie Mellon University

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