Page 1

FOHBC C/O June Lowry 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083

Bottles and Extras

Absinthe Part II Page 43

Table & Office Wares Page 50

Periodicals

September-October 2008

The official publication of the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

What is it? Page 6

Whiskey Rogues Page 29

Vol. 19 No. 3

US Postage Paid

Kansas City, MO 64108

www.FOHBC.com


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

Membership Benefits

Bottles and Extras

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors cordially invites you to join a dedicated group of individuals and clubs who collect, study and display the treasured glass and ceramic gems of yesteryear. The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors (FOHBC) is a non-profit organization supporting collectors of historical bottles, flasks, jars, and related items. The goal of the FOHBC is to promote the collection, study, preservation and display of historical bottles and related artifacts and to share this information with other collectors. Federation membership is open to any individual or club interested in the enjoyment and study of antique bottles. The Federation publication, Bottles & Extras, is well known throughout the hobby world as the leading publication for those interested in bottles and “go-withs”. The magazeine includes articles of historical interest, stories chronicling the hobby and the history of bottle collecting, digging stories, regional news, show reports, advertisements, show listings, and an auction directory. Bottles & Extras is truly the place to go when information is needed about this popular and growing hobby. In addition to providing strength to a national international organization devoted to the welfare of the hobby, your FOHBC membership benefits include: • A full year subscription the Federation’s official publication, Bottles & Extras (now published Bi-Monthly) • One free ad per yearly membership of 60 words for use for “wanted” items, trade offers, etc. • Eligibility for a discount at FOHBC sponsored shows (National or EXPOs) towards “early admission” or dealer table rent • Access to a knowledge of the world of antique bottle collecting unavailable elsewhere • Contact information for clubs devoted to the study of historical bottles • A forum for your writings, articles, and editorials regarding the hobby • Participation in the nomination and selection of Federation members for the Honor Roll and Hall of Fame • Federation-sponsored writing, show poster, and newsletter-design contests • Free publication assistance for your book or manuscript • And more... We encourage Affiliated Bottle Club memberships by offering these additional benefits to your group: • Display advertising in Bottles & Extras at an increased discount of 50% • Insertion of your bottle club show ad on the Federation website to increase your show’s exposure • Links to your club website free of charge, as well as assistance with the creation of your website • Free Federation ribbon for Most Educational Display at your show • Slide programs for use at your club meetings • Participation in Federation sponsored insurance program for your club show and any other club sponsored activities Finally… We need your support! Our continued existence is dependent upon your participation as well as expanding our membership. The Federation is the only national organization devoted to the enjoyment, study, preservation, collection, and display of historical bottles. The FOHBC welcomes individuals who would like to contribute by running for Board positions or by sharing their expertise and volunteering their talents in other areas of interest such as contributions to our publications, assistance with the Federation’s National and EXPO shows, or through membership promotion. If you haven’t yet joined our organization, please do so and begin reaping the benefits. If you are already a member, please encourage your friends and fellow collectors to JOIN US!! For more information, questions, or to join the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, please contact: June Lowry FOHBC Business Manager 401 Johnston Ct. Raymore, MO 64083 816-318-0160 OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com or visit our home page on the web at www.FOHBC.com

September-October 2008

Vol. 19 No 4

September-October 2008

No. 179

Table of Contents FOHBC Officer Listing 2008 - 2010 ........ 2 Whiskey Rogues Jack Sullivan...................................24 President’s Message ................................. 3 Barton Balls Recent Finds ............................................. 4 Mike O’Malley................................28

Plunder Chest Cecil Munsey ..................................54

At Auction ................................................ 5 Ownership Statement...............................32

401/W.H. Bard/Portland Ore Garth Ziegenhagen.........................61

Bottle Buzz............................................... 6 The Dating Game: Berney-Bond Russ Hoenig, Bill Lockhart, Pete Regional Reports ...................................... 8 Schulz, Carol Serr, Les Jordan, Bill Lindsay & Phil Perry, ..............33 Canning Fun Facts.................................. 19 Absinthe II Earl Swift Slate Cleaner Cecil Munsey ..................................43 Dave Maryo ................................... 20 Table and Office Ware from Capstan Tired Blood Barry Bernas...................................50 Bill Baab ........................................ 21

The Jar Charles Head..................................58

Classified Ads & Ad Rate Information....62 Show Biz Show Calendar................................66 Membership Additions and Changes .......69 Membership Application .........................71 Membership Benefits ..............................72

Don’t miss an issue - Please check your label for expiration information. Fair use notice: Some material above has been submitted for publication in this magazine and/or was originally published by the authors and is copyrighted. We, as a non-profit organization, offer it here as an educational tool to increase further understanding and discussion of bottle collecting and related history. We believe this constitutes “fair use” of the copyrighted material as provided for in Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. If you wish to use this material for purposes of your own that go beyond “fair use”, you must obtain permission from the copyrighted owner(s).

WHO DO I CONTACT ABOUT THE MAGAZINE? CHANGE OF ADDRESS, MISSING ISSUES, etc., contact the Business Manager June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct., Raymore, MO 64083; Phone: (816) 318-0160 or email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com To ADVERTISE, SUBSCRIBE or RENEW a subscription, see pages 64-65 for details. To SUBMIT A STORY, send a LETTER TO THE EDITOR, or have COMMENTS and concerns, Contact: June Lowry, Bottles and Extras, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 Phone: (816) 318-0160 or email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com BOTTLES AND EXTRAS © (ISSN 1050-5598) is published bi-monthly (6 issues per year) by the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc. (a non-profit IRS C3 educational organization) at 401 Johnston Court, Raymore, MO 64083; Ph: (816) 318-0160; Website: http://www.fohbc.com. Non-profit periodicals postage paid at Raymore, MO 64083 and additional mailing office, Pub. #005062. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Bottles and Extras, FOHBC, 401 Johnston Court, Raymore, MO 64083; ph: (816) 318-0160. Annual subscription rate is $30 or $45 for First Class, $50 Canada and $65 other foreign in U.S. funds. The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc. assumes no responsibility for products and services advertised in this publication. The names: Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc., and Bottles and Extras©, are registered ® names of the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc., and no use of either, other than as references, may be used without expressed written consent from the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors., Inc. Certain material contained in this publication is copyrighted by, and remains the sole property of, the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc., while others remain property of the submitting authors. Detailed information concerning a particular article may be obtained from the Editor. Printed by J-2 Printing, North Kansas City, MO 64116


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

71

Bottle and Extras Individual and Affiliated Club Membership Information Bottles and Extras

Membership in the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors includes:

Bottles and Extras

FREE ADS Send to:

June Lowry Bottles and Extras 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 or Email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Category - “WANTED” Maximum 60 words Limit - one free ad per current membership per year.

Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

Business & News

Category - “FOR SALE” Maximum 100 words Limit - 100 per issue.

Individual subscription / Membership rates for one year Second Class $30.00 (US only)

First Class $45.00 (inside US) $50.00 (Canada) $65.00 (Other foreign)

Name Associate member name(s) ($5 additional each) Street address City State Zip Telephone ( Collecting interests E-mail address

)

Single issues and back issues: $5.00 each Membership information, forms, and an online payment option are also available on the website (www.FOHBC.com) Enclose the appropriate amount payable to FOHBC and mail to: FOHBC June Lowry, Business Manager 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 Please allow 6 - 8 weeks from the time you send in your payment for the arrival of your first issue of Bottles and Extras

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors is a non-profit organization for collectors of historical bottles and related collectible items. Our primary goal is educational as it relates to the history and manufacture of historical bottles and related artifacts.

FOHBC Officers 2008-2010 President: Richard Siri, PO Box 3818, Santa Rosa, CA 95402; phone: (707) 542-6438; e-mail: rtsiri@sbcglobal.net First Vice-President: Bob Ferraro, 515 Northridge Dr, Boulder City, NV 89005; phone: (701) 293-3114; e-mail: mayorferraro@aol.com Second Vice-President: John Pastor, 5716 Versailles Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48103; phone: (734) 827-2070; e-mail: jpastor2000@sbcglobal.net Secretary: Ed Herrold, 65 Laurel Loop, Maggie Valley, NC 28571; phone: (828) 926-2513; e-mail: drbitters@mindspring.com Treasurer: Alan DeMaison, 4605 Clipper Cove, Painesville, OH 44077; phone: (440) 358-1223; e-mail: a.demaison@sbcglobal.net Historian: Richard Watson, 10 S Wendover Rd, Medford, NJ 08055; phone: (856) 983-1364; e-mail: crwatsonnj@verizon.net Editor (acting): June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083; phone: (816) 318-0161; e-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Merchandising Director: Kent Williams, 1835 Oak Ter, Newcastle, CA 95658; phone: (916) 663-1265; e-mail: KentW@ppoa.org Membership Director: Gene Bradberry, PO Box 341062, Memphis, TN 38184; phone: (901) 372-8428; e-mail: Genebsa@comcast.net Convention Director: R Wayne Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083; phone: (816) 318-0161; e-mail: JarDoctor@aol.com

Business Manager: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083; phone: (816) 318-0160; e-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Director-at-Large: Carl Sturm, 88 Sweetbriar Branch, Longwood, FL 32750; phone: (407) 332-7689; e-mail: glassmancarl@sprintmail.com Director-at-Large: Sheldon Baugh, 252 W Valley Dr, Russelville, KY 42276; phone: (270) 726-2712; e-mail: shel6943@bellsouth.net Director-at-Large: Cecil Munsey, 13541 Willow Run Rd, Poway, CA 92064; phone: (858) 487-7036; e-mail: cecilmunsey@cox.net Midwest Region Director: Jamie Houdeshell, PO Box 57, Haskins, OH 43525; phone: (419) 823-8452; e-mail: JHBottle@hotmail.com Northeast Region Director: James Bender, PO Box 162, Sprakers, NY 12166; phone: (518) 673-8833; e-mail: Jim1@frontiernet.net Southern Region Director: Ron Hands, 913 Parkside Dr, Wilson, NC 27896; phone: (252) 265-6644; e-mail: rshands225@yahoo.com Western Region Director: Bill Ham, 4237 Hendricks Rd, Lakeport, CA 95433; phone: (707) 263-6563; e-mail: Billham@sbcglobal.net Public Relations Director: James Berry, 200 Ft Watershed Rd, St. Johnsville, NY 13452; phone: (518) 568-5683; e-mail: jhberry10@yahoo.com

Bottles and Extras Affiliated club membership rates for one year $75.00 (inside US) $95.00 (Canada) $110.00 (Other foreign) Club name Mailing address City State Zip Club President Address City State Zip E-mail address Meeting location Day Club website Club newsletter name Newsletter editor Club’s show date Club’s show location

(Use extra paper if necessary) Clearly PRINT or TYPE all ad copy

Telephone (

)

Telephone (

)

Time

Enclose the appropriate amount payable to FOHBC and mail to: FOHBC June Lowry, Business Manager 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083


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Ron McCormick 1503 NW 11th Rd Gainesville, FL 32605 352-262-8672 oldflabottles@aol.com Florida flasks, Florida Bottliing Works, and Florida drug stores and pharmacies Keith McIntyre 1611 Stanford Dr Statesboro, GA 30461 912-587-9331 ogeechee_mac@yahoo.com Tommy & Sherry Mitchiner PO Box 54 Gordon, GA 31031 478-628-2373 Sherry_mitchiner @yahoo.com Georgeia blob tops and John Ryan bottles, etc Doug Nicot PO Box 121 Shortsville, NY 14548 585-289-8654 razorman@rochester.rr.com Barber bottles Eric Peirce 33092 Seawatch Dana Point, CA 92629

September-October 2008

Randy Salmons 31541 Highway 20 Fort Bragg, CA 95437 707-964-4301 Pepper sauces and Honeywell Charna Sansbury 11644 SW Ergret Cir # 1805 Lake Suzy, FL 34269 410-867-1945 Bottlemiss@aol.com Infant feeders Jason Townsend 720 N Dekalb St Sandwich, IL 60548 630-667-3357 JTins76@gmail.com Insulators

Bottles and Extras

Ralph Yoders 9767 Outville Rd SW Kirkersville, OH 43033 740-927-1029 sirpeanut@embarqmail.com Fruit jars and bottles

Changes

Jar Doctor™ YOUR COMPLETE SOURCE FOR GLASS

CLEANING EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

Larry Veneziano 27 W 115 Vale Rd West Chicago, IL 60185 630-293-1435 LarryHH@comcast.net Insulators

Designed to safely and professionally clean inside, Outside and base - all at one time. Available in white and clear PVC (3” through 7” ID) Prices ranging from $85 to $225

CLEANING MACHINES Units available, starting at $180 for small one-canister

OXIDES Polishing Aluminum, Cerium, and Tin $8, $11, and $20 per pound Cutting

September-October 2008

3

Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

Lynn Koehler PO Box 265 Niobrara, NE 68760 402-873-7147 botone@alltel.net Inks

CLEANING CANISTERS

Daniel Turner 1846 Gorham Rd Geneva, NY 14456 585-526-5352 Dturner922@hotmail.com Bitters

Bottles and Extras

President’s Message For those who don’t know me, I started collecting bottles back in the 60s and have been at it ever since. Digging, trading, buying and selling. I tell a lot of folks I collect home town bottles - I was born in San Francisco. I go after western bitters, whiskies, U.S.A. Hospital Department bottles, Lash’s and Hostetter’s bitters and the advertising that goes with them. Enough about me. As president of the FOHBC, I will do my best to grow the membership, insure that our magazine maintains the quality it has achieved, and is put out in a timely and consistent manner and promote the hobby whenever and wherever I can. The economy is tough and a lot of people are having a hard time making

ends meet, let alone spending money on hobby items. Travel is costly, with fuel at record prices, motel and food costs on a trip is also way up there. Still, bottle auction prices are holding, if not going up. Ebay sales are a little off, probably due to the quality of the items not being as stated. The sellers who give return privileges for a full refund do well and every once in awhile you can get a real deal. I’m always adding to my Hostetters collection from Ebay. Show attendance is off some because of the economy, but show sales here in the west have been pretty good. Maybe the dealers are taking less of a profit to move their stock and the customer base is down so you have to deal. The economy will get

President: Richard Siri PO Box 3818 Santa Rosa, CA 95402 (707) 542-6438 rtsiri@sbcglobal.net

better and things will get back to normal, whatever that is, and the hobby will survive. In the meantime, keep connected, check out the web site, keep your membership up so you can continue to get the magazine which will prove to be the glue that keeps the hobby together and moving forward. Maybe this is a good time to research that find you dug or bought, do an article and have it published in Bottles and Extras. Digging stories are fun, too. Be safe and stay well. Richard T. Siri, President FOHBC

Various grits of silicon carbide ranging from $6 to $12 per pound

TUMBLING COPPER

Gerry & Kathy Phifer 5201 SW - 32nd Terr. Topeka, KS 66614 785-271-6170 Jarman1@cox.net Fruit jars Kathryn Piersma 3912 Piute Dr Grandville, MI 49418 616-530-0222 BusyBeadz@att.net Glasshouse whimseys Ed Potter 82 Gabrielle St West Seneca, NY 14227 716-674-8890 Buffalo, New York bottles and Pan American items

Tod VonMechow 247 Washington Ave Phoenixville, PA 19460 610-935-0619 Tedvon@verizon.net Nancy & Ron Whisker 208 Tapeworm Rd New Bloomfield, PA 17068 717-203-4132 craftywhiskers@nmax.net Francis G Wiltz 715 S St Atchison, KS 66002 913-367-5486 Bottles

New 12 and 14 gauge chisel point in 3 sizes $8.50 per pound

We accept:

FOHBC Outgoing and Incoming Presidents

Paypal & ©

For further information, contact: R Wayne Lowry 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 JarDoctor@aol.com www.JarDoctor.com

(816) 318-0161 (816) 318-0162 (fax)

Carl Sturm, outgoing on left 2006-2008 Richard Siri, incoming on right 2008-2010


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

RECENT FINDS

Figure 1 tom and the other has a slick bottom. The biggest find so far this year goes to a previously unknown W yn n e wo o d , I. T. Hutch (Fig. 3 & 4). This bottle caused quite a stir with Oklahoma soda collectors when it was brought to light because no records exist that Wynnewood ever had a bottling works. Plus, no one has ever uncovered a Figure 2 single shard of glass in the form of a soda bottle with Wynnewood embossed on it. The story goes that two bottle diggers were digging the

old Ardmore Bottling Works location in downtown Ardmore. One of the diggers was informed that several patent medicine bottles and a bottle with Wynnewood embossed on it were uncovered across the street in another building that same week. He, in turned called his partner, and the partner quickly traded the owner out of the bottle. A background check of the building revealed that the original building was built around 1895 as a single story building with a brick basement. Between 1905 and 1915, the building served as a local pawn shop. In 1915, the building caught fire, exploded, and collapsed on itself. The building was rebuilt with all the debris pushed into the basement and covered with dirt. The owners today are in the wine business and wanted the basement re-

New Members Henet Historical Bottle Seekers Attn: Austin Jones, President 25059 Roseburgh Ln Hemet, CA 92544 951-927-9194 Nuggetup@yahoo.com Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club Attn: Michele Kotlarsky, President 2475 W Walton Blvd Waterford, MI 48329 248-673-1650 Michelek@mac.com Carl Alimonti 149 Starheim Rd Stamford, NY 12167 607-435-1654 General

Figure 3 opened to be used as a wine vault. They had the floor removed and all the dirt and debris hauled off. This only example of a Wynnewood soda bottle, several patent medicine bottles and an old safe were uncovered during the process. Thanks to the new owner’s remodeling efforts, another piece of Oklahoma's past has come to light.

Figure 4

September-October 2008

69

FOHBC MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY ADDITIONS & CHANGES

Two Pieces of Oklahoma History Surface So far this year, two important artifacts of Oklahoma's past have been uncovered by bottle diggers. Earlier this year, a previously unknown Poteau, I.T. (Indian Territory) Hutchinson (Fig. 1 & 2) was dug up in the bordering state of Arkansas near Fort Smith. Oklahoma's legendary bottle digger and author, Johnnie Fletcher and I, believe this bottle to be the earliest known variant of the four previously known Poteau, I.T. Hutches. This aqua, four-line tombstone slug plate bottle has a shorter than normal Hutchinson top on it and has the letter ''P'' in raised bumps or dots on the bottom. Normally, if a bottle has anything embossed on the bottom, it has a raised, solid letter. Of the four previously reported I.T. Hutches from this town, three have an embossed ''S'' on the bot-

Bottles and Extras

David Baumann (405) 816-1340 firstgencoltman1@cox.net

James Ayers 5186 Claudville Hwy Claudville, VA 24076 276-251-8015 rjment@swva.net Bottles, jugs, antique labels Mark Benbow 7214 Roosevelt Ave Falls Church, VA 22042 703-698-5714 mark@rustycans.com Beer cans and patent medicine bottles Ted Briley 5001 S Hickory Ave # 116 Broken Arrow, OK 74011 918-760-8274 Coca-cola bottles

Terry Burdette 3588 Riverfork Rd Waterloo, SC 29384 864-677-2122 Burdetts@prtcnet.com Fruit jars and pottery

Phil Glass 1006 Old Greensboro Rd. Thomasville, NC 27360 249-8054 Bottles@triad.rr.com Sodas, bitters, Pepsi

Harold Carlton 205 Locust St Johnson City, TN 37604 423-928-7649 Hutches, Pepsi, and local bottles

James Gray 12 Arrow St Cambridge, MA 02138 617-868-0752 Jamesgray2@mac.com Pontiled New England bottles

Kirk Humbrecht 19010 Ruth Dr Mokena, IL 60448 708-878-8392 Khumbrecht @phoenixfire.com Fire grenades and fire alarm insulators

David A. Hall 1224 McDonald Ave. Wilmington, CA 90744 310-834-6368 dcorridor@sbcglobal.net Local bottles from Long Beach, San Pedro, Wilmington (California)

Steve Kehrer Strano & Associates 705 E Hanaover St New Baden, IL 62265 618-410-4121 Kehrer00@charter.net Southern Illinois blob top and hutch type sodas

Michael Hester 2113 Washington Ave Harrisburg, PA 17109 717-232-0624 Hestermi@etown.edu Harrisburg bottles

Ray Klingensmith 1228 Highland Ave Cambridge, OH 43725 740-432-4466 Ray@poletop.com

Art Church 411 Hillside Lake Rd Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 845-705-5077 Art3672@aol.com Carter Davis 27531 Mt Nebo Rd Onancock, VA 23417 757-787-3690 IDavis@verizon.net Joseph Garlena 55 Long Ln York Haven, PA 17370 717-938-4863 joseph_garlena @us.crawco.com Inherited thousands of bottles from father Bill Geisz 4 Clive Hills Rd Edison, NJ 08818 732-549-2366 Colored pontiled medicines and sodas Justin Gilbert 56730 Blue Sky Ln Dublin, VA 24084 540-616-6517 JustinG1971@yahoo.com

Ryan Howard 260 Country By Way York, PA 17402 717-586-6347 RHoward182@hotmail.com

Ron Higgins 5127 Larchmont Dr Chesapeake Beach, MD 20732 301-855-4823

John Lee 885 E Ritchie Rd Salisbury, NC 28146 704-637-7572 leejohnh@bellsouth.net Fruit jars and related items

Roger Hill 522 Palmer Ln Menlo Park, CA 94025 650-324-4245 rogerhillusa@yahoo.com 1920s sodas

Richard Luey 600 W Avenida De La Merced Montebello, CA 90640 626-428-6011 General

Ralph Hollibaugh 2087 Glenrose Dr Redding, CA 96001 530-243-4672 California shot glasses, California back bar bottles, California liquor paper & cards

William & Peggy Mathias RR 1, Box 174 C 4 Flatrock Rd Independence, WV 26374 304-864-4392 mathiasbildo@hotmail.com Bottles and framed art prints


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

(More) Sho-Biz rittjman@aol.com or Jean Harbron, ph: (765) 644-4333. January 17 Jackson, Mississippi Mississippi Antique Bottle Show, (9am - 4pm), at the Mississippi Fairgrounds, Jackson, MS. Info: John Sharp, PO Box 601, Carthage, MS 38051, ph: (601) 506-0105, email: Johnsharp49@aol.com. February 6 & 7 Rome, Georgia The Rome Antique Bottle Club’s Annual Show & Sale at the Rome Civic Center, Turner McCall Blvd., Rome, GA. Info Jerry Mitchell. PO Box 475, Bremen, GA 30110, ph: (770) 537-3725, email: mitjt@aol.com or Bob Jenkins, 285 Oak Grove Rd., Carrolton, GA 30117, ph: (770) 8340736. January 24 Anderson, California The Superior California Antique Bottle Club’s 33rd Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 4pm), at the Shasta County Fairgrounds, Anderson, CA. Info: Mel Hammer, ph: (530) 241-4878 or Phil McDonald, ph: (530) 243-6903. February 1 South River, New Jersey The New Jersey Antique Bottle Club’s 13th Annual Show & Sale, (9am 2pm, admission $3, under 12 free), at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 88 Jackson St., South River, NJ. Sales table $30 each. Free parking & appraisals. Food available. Info: NJABC, 24 Charles St., South Jersey, NJ 08882-1603 or Joe Butewicz, ph: (732) 236-9945, email: botlman@msn.com. February 13 & 14 Las Vegas, Nevada The Las Vegas Antique Bottles & Collectibles Club’s 44th Annual Show & Sale, (early buyers: Friday, Febru-

ary 13, 11am - 5pm, general admission: Saturday, February 14, 9am 4pm), at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino, 2411 W Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV. Info: Stan Pullen, 5830 E Owens Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89110, ph: (702) 452-7218. February 20 - 21 Columbia, South Carolina The South Carolina Antique Bottle Club’s 36th Annual Antique Bottle Show & Sale, (Friday, February 20, 12 noon - 6pm, Saturday, February 21, 9am - 1pm, admission donation to Boys & Girls Club, set-up Friday, February 20, 10:30am - 12 noon), at the Meadowlake Park Center, 600 Beckman Rd., Columbia, SC. Free parking, food available, 150+ tables— always a sell-out. Info: Marty Vollmer, 1091 Daralynn Dr., Lexington, SC 29073, ph: (803) 755-9410, email: martyvollmer@aol.com or Eric Warren, ph: (803) 951-8860, email: scbottles@aol.com. Club website: www.southcarolinabottleclub.com. February 22 Enfield, Connecticut Somers Antique Bottle Club’s 39th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 8am), at the St. Bernard’s School West Campus, 232 Pearl St., Exit 47W, 191 Enfield, CT. Info: Rose Sokol, 164 Elm St., Enfield, CT 06082, ph: (806) 745-7688, email: enfieldrose@aol.com. March 7 Saint Joseph, Missouri Missouri Valley Insulator Club’s 7th Annual St. Joseph Insulator/Bottle Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm), at the American Legion Pony Express Post #359, 4826 Frederick Ave., St. Joseph, MO. Insulators, bottles, lightning rod equipment, telephones, and advertising filled 63 tables in 2008 and we have 70 tables available for 2009. Info: Dennis R Weber, 3609 Jack St., St. Joseph, MO 64507, ph: (816) 364-

September-October 2008

At Auction 1312, email: show2009@aol.com.

stjoe-

March 14 Badin, North Carolina The Uwharrie Bottle Club’s 2nd Annual Antique Bottle & Collectible Show & Sale, (8am - 3pm, set-up 6am - 8am), at the Badin Fire Department, Highway 740, Badin, NC. Free parking and appraisals. Food available. $20 for eight-foot table - 48 available. Info: Todd McSwain, 8649 EddinsPoplin Rd., Norwood, NC 28128, ph: (704) 474-0552, email: mcswain8649@alltel.net.

SUPPORT THE SHOWS

ld So

a rarity, but to find one in this unusual green coloration is a real treat. Alex was always on the prowl for the rare and unusual, and he certainly found it in this Pittsburgh ball. This one grades a 10 with some nice unevenness to the glass. Selling price $4600. Submarine Poison Cobalt blue. Embossed POISON / REGISTERED No. 336907. middle of three known sizes, three inches X 1 5/16” tall. Perfect condition. Sold on ebay 9/28/2008 for $1555.00.

March 27 - 28 Morro Bay, California The San Luis Obispo Bottle Society’s 4th Annual Show & Sale, (Friday, March 27, 3pm - 7pm and Saturday, March 28, 9am - 3pm), at the Morro Bay Veterans Hall, 209 Surf St., Morro Bay, CA. Free admission and no charge for early buyers. Info: Richard Tartaglia, ph: (805) 5437484. April 26 Rochester, New York The Genesee Valley Bottle Collectors Association’s Show & Sale (9am 3pm), at the Minett Hall, Monroe County Fairgrounds, Rochester, NY. Over 200 tables, exceptional educational displays, over 100 dealers from 14 states and Canada. Bottles, insulators, whimsies, fruit jars, poisons, inks, apothecary, stoneware, ephemera, art glass and more! Info: Show Chairmen, Aaron Weber, ph: (585) 226-6345 or Larry Fox, ph: (585) 354-8072; Dealer Chairman, Pamela Weber, ph: (585) 226-6345, email: GVBCA@frontiernet.net; Exhibit Chairman, Chris Davis, ph: (315) 331-4078, email: cdavis016@rochester.rr.com. Club website: www.gvbca.org.

5

Alex Kerr in his skeet shooting heyday

GI-94 Benjamin Franklin/Where Liberty Dwells There is my Country/ T.W. Dyott, MD/Kensington Glassworks Philadelphia. Beautiful rare copper amber color, open pontil, sheared lip seven inches tall. Brilliantly clean in a stunning copper color. Has one after manufacture flaw—flash line located on the Franklin side on the medial rib above the I in Benjamin. Sold for $1530.

Alex Kerr is well-known for his fruit jar connection, however, he is “Said to be the greatest Skeet Shooter of All Time and winner of 18 National Championships.” Here are just a few examples of his target balls and go-withs that recently sold at auction.

EE EATON GUNS & C. 53 STATE ST. CHICAGO. 1.6 ounces, 3” diam. Medium cobalt blue. This is possibly one of only two blue Eaton balls known. This is a very pretty ball in a three-piece mold. There is an interesting grouping of bubbles on the base that almost resembles a constellation in the night sky. The only flaw on this one is a partially open bubble the size of a cantaloupe seed on the side opposite the name. Otherwise a mint 9 grade with a partially open bubble. F R O M J . P A L M E R O’NEIL & CO. 1.8 ounces, 3” diameter from Pittsburgh, Pa., home of the iron curtain. A wonderful yellow green (more green than yellow) ball with a wonderful coloration deeper at the top and the bottom. It is a three-piece mold and the strike is exceptional. A grade 10 target ball. The Palmer balls in straight amber are

BOGARDUS TARGET BALL THROWER. 32 3/8” long, 11 ½” high. Here we have a rather primitive Bogardus trap. It is known that Alex Kerr collected go-withs or various target ball memorabilia in addition to his spectacular collection of balls. Although this is a relatively ordinary and standard Bogardus trap, you cannot argue its early heritage. Condition on this trap is excellent with the original felt cup liner, and the trap itself in working condition. Sold for $2600. EMBOSSED PIGEON ON TWO SIDES. 2.8 ounces, 3” diameter. An unusual piece, in the form of a clay target ball with two embossed sides, what appear to be, pigeons. It is known these are quite rare with possibly only a few known examples. It looks like they simply took a mold and pressed clay into it, joining the two pieces in the middle with a design not unlike the edge of a crimped pie. The hole or mouth protrudes directly through one of the birds. Condition is perfect as made with just a little dirt and slight stain, typical of a piece such as this. Final price $2200.


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

Bottle Buzz Send Buzz notes to : June Lowry 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 Or e-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com

This is to inform you that due to health issues, Kathy Sathe has stepped down as Editor at least for the immediate future. My sincere apologies for the lateness of this issue and, unfortunately, the November/December issue will also be somewhat late. Myself along with Martin Van Zant and others are trying to continue the quality that Kathy established, however, due to my lack of experience, I am somewhat slower, but, it will improve with time. Along those lines, if you have any articles or items of interest, regardless of size, please submit to me at the address or email above. Thank you for your support and understanding. If you have any questions or concerns about the FOHBC or the publication, please never hesitate to contact me. Again, thank you for your support in this great hobby we all enjoy. June Lowry, FOHBC Business Manager and acting Editor ——————— What is it?

Leigh Bishop, a famous UK wreck diver discovered this in a shipwreck he discovered in 2007. It sank in the English Channel in 1874 and was built in 1869. Picture attached was taken when it was full of mud recovered from 90m depth. Assistance in identification was sent through many emails from the diver to Ernie Tapanes to Ellen Gerth

to Bill Baab to Cecil Munsey and finally to Alan Blakeman who did definitely identify the article. It looked familiar to Bill Baab, but he couldn’t place it. Cecil Munsey had never seen a “bottle” like this one, but, thought it could be a nursing bottle assuming the small end has an opening with the nipple fitting on that small end and the opening in the middle, the hole through which it was filled. Alan Blakeman said, “Definitely a baby feeder - c. 1860-80, end is maybe a ground down pontil.” Thus, the mystery was solved. You can view more items recovered from this ship wreck at: http:// www.shipwreckfilms.co.uk/ page48.html ——————— Greetings Cecil, I’ve just finished your GREAT article on Absinthe, and I wanted to congratulate you on such a wonderful job that you did. Your research and presentation are impeccable. Back in the 50’s I traveled around on big bands with Larry Muhoburac, a trombone/piano player from New Orleans whose parents owned the Old Absinthe House at that time, and we jokingly called it “The Old Abthe Sin House” since we imbibed there on many visits to New Orleans. Larry has been living in Sydney, Australia for the last 48 years, and I plan to forward your article to him. I’m sure it will mean an awful lot to him, so thanks again for your wonderful writing talents. Sonny Hill ——————— Cecil, I must tell you how much I enjoyed your article, Hunt’s Remedy - that appeared in Bottles and Extras - July/

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(More) Sho-Biz

News, Notes, Letters, etc.

Message to the Membership

September-October 2008

August. It was a beautifully illustrated and well written article. Well Done!! Dewey Heetderks Thanks, Dewey. I enjoyed doing it as I do all of my articles. It is especially nice to get a bit of mail indicating my work was read. Cecil ——————— HUNT’S REMEDY article questioned! (Bottles & Extras, July–August 2008, pp. 28-31) by Cecil Munsey I recently received an email from Richard Sheaff of Scottsdale, AZ who indicated he was “shocked and disappointed” with my recent article about Hunt’s Remedy. He indicated that, in his opinion, a portion of the article was “…plagerized [sic], simply lifted word-for-word from material I wrote years ago for the Little Rhody bottle club, and is posted on their web pages.” He continued, “Much of the other material in your story was lifted from sources which you do list under ‘References’ but do not properly credit, nor put within quotation marks all the material lifted word-for-word.” He also writes, “All and all [sic], a shameful and glaring unprofessional act of intellectual dishonesty.” He requested that Bottles & Extras “…publish some sort of correction notice in the next issue of the magazine.” I offer, here, an explanation instead of the requested “correction.” My understanding of plagiarism, regarding research and writing, is that I am being accused (according to the dictionary) of infringement of copyright, piracy, theft, stealing. To avoid any kind of research misunderstanding, I included the standard “Fair Use

Fire Department, US Route 104, Scriba, NY. Info: Barry L Haynes, PO Box 900, Mexico, NY 13114, ph: (315) 963-0922 or John Golly, 4 Vinette Rd., Central Square, NY 13036, ph: (315) 668-8350, email: bygolley@msn.com. October 26 Glendale Heights, Illinois 1st Chicago Bottle Club’s 39th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm) at the Ramada Inn, 780 E. North Ave (1/2 block west of I-355), Glendale Heights, IL. Info: John & Claudia Panek, 1790 Hickory Knoll, Deerfield, IL 60015, ph: (847) 945-5493, email: paperbottle1@aol.com. November 2 Elkton, Maryland Tri-State Collectors and Diggers Club’s 36th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm) at the Singerly Fire Hall, Routes 279 & 213, Elkton, MD. Info: Dave Brown, ph: (302) 738-9960. November 7 & 8 Tulare, California Golden Gate Insulator Club’s 40th Annual Tulare Collectible Show will be held at the Tulare Veteran’s Memorial Building, 1771 East Tulare Ave., Tulare, CA 93274. Info: Dave Brown, ph: (559) 936-7790, email: 1skychair@msn.com or Bob Merzoian, ph: (559) 781-6319, email: bobmerzoian@mac.com November 8 Belleville, Illinois The Eastside Antique Bottle & Jar Show and Collinsville Beer Can & Breweriana Show have been merged to create a Super show! (9am - 3pm, early buyers 7:30am) at the Belle Clair Fairgrounds, Routes 13 & 159, Belleville, IL. Info: Bill Cress, ph: (618) 466-3513 or Kevin Kious, ph: (618) 346-2634 or Curt Faulkenberry, ph: (636) 797-5220.

November 8 De Funiak Springs, Florida Emerald Coast Bottle Club’s Annual Bottle & Collectibles Show & Sale, (9am - 4pm) at the De Funiak Springs Community Complex (just north of I10), De Funiak Springs, FL. Info: Bobby Vaughn, ph: (850) 415-5521, email: bd2hg75@gmail.com or Alan McCarthy, ph: (850) 769-3984. November 9 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania The Pittsburgh Antique Bottle Club’s Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 7am), at the The Ice Garden, Rostraver Township, Exit 46B of I-70, 4.1 miles north. Info: Bob DeCroo, 694 Fayette City Rd., Fayette City, PA 15438, ph: (724) 326-8741 or Jay Hawkins, 1280 Mt. Pleasant Rd., West Newton, PA 15089, ph: (724) 872-6013. November 9 Oakland New Jersey North Jersey Antique Bottle Collectors Association’s 39th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 8am), at the Oakland Elks Club, 33 Ramapo Valley Rd., Oakland, NJ. Info: Ken, ph: (973) 907-7351 or Jim, ph: (515) 454-8993. November 15 Chehalis, Washington The Washington Bottle Collectors Association Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm with set-up Friday, November 14 1pm - 7pm), at the Southwest Washington Fairgrounds, Chehalis, WA. Info: Pete Hendricks, ph: (253) 335-1732 or Warren Lhotka, ph: (206) 3298412, email: wlbottleguy@yahoo.com, website: http:// www.wbcaweb.org. November 22 Terre Haute, Indiana The Wabash Valley Antique Bottle & Pottery Club’s 11th Annual Show &

Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 7am), at the Shadow Barn Auction Barn, 1517 Maple Ave., Terre Haute, IN. Bottle auction Friday, November 21st at 7pm. Info: Ned Pennington, 367 S 22nd St., Terre Haute, IN 47803, ph: (812) 234-2214, email: squarenail@verizon.net. November 23 Greensboro, North Carolina Southeast Bottle Club’s 7th Annual Bottle & Collectibles Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm with dealer set-up from 7am - 9am, no early buyers), at the Greensboro Farmer’s Curb Market, Greensboro, NC. Info: Reggie Lynch. Ph: (704) 221-6489, website: h tt p:/ / www. a nt iqu e bo tt le s/ co m/ greensboro. November 30 Bethlehem, Pennsylvania The Forks of the Delaware Bottle Collectors Association’s 35th Annual Show & Sal, (9am - 3 pm, early buyers 7:30am), at the Bethlehem Catholic High School, Madison & Dewberry Avenues, Bethlehem, PA. Info: Bill Hegedus, 20 Cambridge Place, Catasauqua, PA 18032, ph: (610) 2645945. December 6 Auburn, California 49er Historical Bottle Association’s 31st Annual Show & Sale, (9am 3pm, early buyers Friday, December 5 2pm - 8pm), at the Gold County Fairgrounds, Auburn, CA. Info; Steve Abbott, ph: (916) 631-8019, email: foabbott@comcast.net. January 11 Muncie, Indiana Midwest Antique Fruit Jar & Bottle Club’s Winter Show & Sale (9am 2pm), at the Horizon Convention Center, 401 S High St., Muncie, IN 47305. Info: Dave Rittenhouse, 1008 S 900 W, Farmland, IN 47340, ph: (765) 4 6 8 - 8 0 9 1, e m a i l:


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

FOHBC Sho-Biz

Calendar of bottle shows and bottle related events FOHBC Sho-Biz is published in the interest of the hobby. Federation affiliated clubs are noted. Information on up-coming collecting events is welcome, but space is limited. Please send at least three months in advance, including telephone number to: FOHBC Sho-Biz, C/O June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 or E-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com. Show schedules are subject to change. Please call before traveling long distances. All listings published here will also be published on the website: http://www.FOHBC.com.

October 4 Point Pleasant, West Virginia West Virginia State Farm Museum Antique Bottle Show at the WV State Farm Museum, Point Pleasant, WV (9am - 3pm). Held during the Fall Festival. Info: Charlie Perry, 39304 Bradbury Rd, Middleport, OH 45760, (740) 992-5088, email: Perrycola@ suddenlink.net October 4 Richmond, Virginia The Richmond Area Bottle Collectors Association, 37th Annual Show & Sale, 9am - 3pm; early buyers 7:30am) at the Showplace Annex, 3002 Mechanicsville Tpk, Richmond, VA. Info: Marvin Croker, (804) 275-1101 or Ed Faulkner (804) 739-2951, email: Faulkner@antiquebottles.com October 5 Dryden, New York The Fingerlake Bottle Collectors Association’s 39th Annual Antique Bottle, Jar & Collectibles Show & Sale (Sun. 9am - 3pm, admission $2; early bird 8am, admission $10; set-up Sun. 5:30am) at the Dryden Fire Hall, Neptune Hose CO., Rt. 13, Dryden, NY (located between Cortland and Ithaca on Rt. 13 - weekend before the Keene show). Info: Tom Kanalley, show Co-Chair, Cortland, NY, ph: (607) 7 5 3 - 7 2 5 0 , e m a i l : tkanalle@twcny.com; or George Blaasch, show Co-Chair, ph: (607) 589-6436, email: gblaasch@aol.com or Toby Dean, President, email: toby@tobiasdean.com. October 5 Chelsea, Michigan The Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club’s 33rd Annual Show (Sun. 9am 2pm, admission $2 with children under 12 free, set-up Sun. 6am) at the

Chelsea Conference Center, 164 Commerce Park Dr., Chelsea, MI. Free appraisals, free items for kids, free parking, food available on site, variety of glass. Info: Michele Kotlarsky, President, Box 210145, Auburn Hills, MI 48321, ph: (248) 673-1650, email: M i c h e l e K@ ma c . c o m o r Mi k e Bruner, show Host, 6576 Balmoral Ter., Clarkston, MI 48346, ph: (248) 425-3223, email: abbott4girl@sbcglobal.net. Website: http:// hvbic.org. October 10 - 11 Phoenix, Arizona The Phoenix Antiques, Bottle, & Collectibles Club’s Annual Show & Sale, (Fri. 10am - 5pm & Sat. 8am - 4pm, early buyers: Fri. 10am), at the North Phoenix Baptist Church, 5757 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ. Info: Betty Harnett, ph: (602) 317-4438, email: bettchem@cox.net. October 10 - 11 Moncks Corner, South Carolina The Berkeley Antique Bottle & Collectibles show at Berkeley Industries, Moncks Corner, SC. Info: Libby Kilgallen, ph: (843) 761-0316, email: lkilgallen@bciservices.org. October 11 Santa Rosa, California The Northwestern Bottle Collectors Association’s Annual Show & Sale, (10am - 4pm, early buyers 8am) at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, Finley Hall Bldg., Santa Rosa, CA, Info: Bev Siri, ph: (707) 542-6438. October 12 Keene, New Hampshire The Yankee Bottle Club’s 41st Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2:30pm, early buyers 8am) at the Keene High School, Arch Street, Keene, NH, Info:

Creighton Hall, 382 Court St., Keen, NH 03431, ph: (603) 352-2959. October 18 Louisburg, North Carolina The Raleigh Bottle Club Annual Show & Sale, (8:30am - 2pm, admission $3; early admission 7am, admission $10) at 111 South Church Street, Louisburg, NC. Info: Barton Weeks, show Chairman, ph: (336) 508-2759, email: bweeks6@triad.rr.com or Donnie Medlin, Co-chair, ph: (919) 496-1367, email: donniepepsinut@msn.com. All s h o w i n fo a l so a v a i l a bl e at www.raleighbottleclub.org. Club email: raleighbottleclub@gmail.com. October 18 Canyonville, Oregon Jefferson State Antique Bottle & Collectible Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm, early buyers: Fri., October 17, 12 noon - 7pm), at the Seven Feathers Hotel & Casino Resort, 146 Chief Miwaleta Lane (I-5 - exit 99), Canyonville, OR 97417. Info: Bruce Silva, PO Box 1565, Jacksonville, OR 97530, ph: (541) 899-8411, email: jsglass@q.com. Show website: www.ecandm.com/canyonville/. October 19 Findlay, Ohio The Findlay Antique Bottle Club’s 32nd Annual Show & Sale, (9am 3pm), at “The Old Barn Auction House”, one mile west of I-75 on Rt. 224, Findlay, OH. Info: Fred Curtis, 1635 Washington Ave., Findlay, OH 45840, ph: (419) 424-0486, email: fabc@wcoil.com. October 19 Scriba, New York Empire State Bottle Collectors Association’s 10th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm) at the Scriba Volunteer

Bottles and Extras

Notice” at the conclusion of my article. [It’s worthy to note, none of the material questioned was published as copyrighted material and that “Fair use” indicates the public (including non-profit organizations such as FOHBC) is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for educational purposes as stated in our bylaws, “…to increase further understanding and discussion of bottle collecting and related history.”] Regarding the questioning of my references, I offer the facts that the article cited six books from 1941 to 1994; two periodicals 1905 and 1938; six Internet references (only three of which the editor chose to publish?). Addendum: I think readers of Bottles & Extras would appreciate knowing, according to Mr. Sheaf, he designed the 1998 commemorative 32¢ U.S. postage stamp honoring the 1906 Pure Food and Drugs Act that was featured in the article as Figure 20. Editors note: missing internet references: http://littlerhodybottleclub.org/researc h/clarkewme.html http://littlerhodybottleclub.org/bottleb ook/newfinds11.html http://littlerhodybottleclub.org/bottleb ook/newfinds9.html

——————— Dear Ms Sathe, My company recently launched a new message board/bulletin board website called HobbyNotes.com. We think our site could be a great place for your group's membership to safely exchange messages and information about the group's activities. Membership is free. Our site was designed from the bottom up to be very user-friendly. It's not like what you may have seen before...it is simple and easy to use for anyone, even people new to the Internet. The site is monitored by a Site Administrator. You can easily see all the unique features and how the site works (without joining) by selecting the "How the Site Works" link on our home page. You can easily link your HobbyNotes profile to your own website. If you like our site, we would like to

September-October 2008

encourage you and the membership of your group to take advantage of HobbyNotes.com, and I would like to personally invite you to give me any comments or feedback about our new site. Sincerely, Peter Fitzgerald ——————— As you know, collectors are driven by a passion unlike any other hobby. Traditionally, collectors would record and keep track of their collectibles using paper notebooks and simple computer programs. With this approach, however, collections could only be shared within the collector’s own real-life social circles. All that is about to change with today’s launch of Collectionbuddy. C o l l e c t i o n b u d d y (www.collectionbuddy.com) is a new online resource and social network aimed at the huge community of collectors around the world that want an easy way to capture, catalog and share their collectibles; interact with other enthusiasts; and discover new collectibles to acquire. I thought it might be of interest to your community of bottle collectors. We also invite you to either register for your own account or use the following demo account to see what Collectionbuddy has to offer: http://www.collectionbuddy.com/login username: demo@collectionbuddy.com password: demo ——————— Pioneer antiquer Ralph Kovel dies Ralph M. Kovel, who with wife Terry made the collecting of antiques including bottles and pottery popular, died Aug. 28 from complications of hip surgery. He was 88. Their "Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide," as well as other books on silver and American art pottery, were written for average collectors and history buffs. Their intensive research, aided and abetted by a staff of 14 from their home in Shaker Heights, Ohio near Cleveland, was spread far and wide through syndicated newspaper columns, newsletters and television. "The Kovels were the first to get

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information to people about antiques, a once secretive business," said S. Clayton Pennington, editor of Maine Antique Digest. They were on top of all kinds of collecting, chronicling the highs and lows of hot collectibles, whether Tiffany glass, McDonald’s Happy Meal toys, vintage egg beaters or Roseville Pottery. "Our one big joke is that we finally got everything in the house to be old — including us," said Terry, his wife of 58 years. Other survivors include a daughter, Karen "Kim" Kovel of Miami Beach, Fla., who is a part of the family business, and a son, Lee Kovel, a non-collector according to his mother and who believes in clutter-free living.


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September-October 2008

appraisals, and early bird admission are advertised! Some recent programs included Kanalley, who showed slides of the 2002 FOHBC National Show in Syracuse. Tom was on the committee and is a well-known New York State collector. In April, Kurt Kabalac presented "Glidden Pottery," made at Alfred (N.Y.) University for 17 years, closing in 1951. Kanalley was the speaker once again in May, speaking on "Black Glass." The club recently voted to donate $150 to the National Bottle Museum.

Northeast Regional News Chris Davis 522 Woodhill Newark, NY 14513 (315) 331-4078 cdavis016@rochester.rr.com THE POTOMAC PONTIL, the newsletter of the Potomac Bottle Collectors, serving the national capital, includes a very informative and nicely illustrated article on "The Top Ten Baltimore Shot Glasses," by Jack Sullivan, in the July-August issue. The club doesn't meet in the summer, but some recent May meeting news included a visitor who brought a large crate of bottles to the meeting. Most were Samuel Palmer sodas, some being amber. A photograph showed the bottles as being dug, with dirt still intact. A few club members were able to buy some. Club member Roland Longerbeam was shown with a large display of fruit jars he brought for show and tell. This is one of the highlights of the Potomac club's meetings. The FINGER LAKES BOTTLE COLLECTORS, headquartered in Ithaca, NY, in the heart of the beautiful Finger Lakes Region, publish a newsletter, The Applied Lip. Editor is Abby Nash, former professor of wine at Cornell. The program for May was a different one - club vice president Jay Travis >>> presented "The Bottles of Deadwood, South Dakota." I would have liked to >>> attend that one, having in interest in the history of the American West! The club holds two flea markets each year, in the spring and fall, in addition to their annual bottle show in early October. These are all held at the same location at the Dryden Fire Hall, midway between Ithaca and Cortland on busy Rt. 13. The 39th Annual Antique Bottle, Jar & Collectible Show & Sale will be Sunday, October 5th. Show chairs are George Blassch and Tom Kanalley. 40 sales tables, free bottle

The PITTSBURGH ANTIQUE BOTTLE CLUB's newsletter is titled The Probe. The logo is very appropriately a rustic outhouse, complete with a half-moon in the door. The July meeting minutes, very complete with a good amount of light-hearted humor, included information on who from the club was attending the York Expo. Bob DeCroo and Eng Johnson will be setting up as dealers. It was hoped that one member would make it across Pennsylvania on the Turnpike without stopping to dig! The temporary librarian, Chris Oskin, indicated the late fee for books not returned in time would be a pontilled Pittsburgh soda! The club brainsormed about ways to increase membership at meetings, including promoting the club through word of mouth at flea markets, shows, and antique shops, print business cards with the club mission statement as well as meeting and contact information, publish directions to the meetings, and survey members to find out their likes and dislikes. A number of very interesting digging and auction stories were described. A recent program was scheduled on dolls, but the speaker couldn't make it. The club filled in with quite a display of assorted china doll heads and various other body parts, as dug. August's speaker was Mike Woshner, an expert on gutta-percha. He's the author of "India-Rubber and GuttaPercha in the Civil War Era." Quite

Bottles and Extras

renowned, Mike's expertise involves the history, patents and novel applications of rubber, hard rubber and guttapercha. I always think of fruit jar closures when I think of gutta-percha. The GREATER BUFFALO BOTTLE COLLECTORS' newsletter, The Travelers' Companion, brings the news that the July meeting held at the Flying Bison Brewing Co., was a big success. It's the only brewery in town that bottles beer (also on draft). Specialties include Boch, Gold and Aviator Red, its signature brand. The logo? An American bison head, of course! The newsletter goes on to say, "Suitably impressed with Flying Bison's fine beers, we were treated to a tour of the brewery's facilities with Tim (Herzog) expertly explaining the brewing process and answering any questions thrown at him by the tourists. Tim, in addition to being a master brewer, is a walking encyclopedia on beer, the brewing industry and anything else beer." The club offers a long distance membership at 50% the price of regular membership for those who can't make many meetings. Newsletters are received by mail or email. The club is really trying to promote newsletters sent by email. One of the advantages, besides savings on postage, is color pictures. Each newsletter also features a full page of members' display ads. Auction news included an outstanding stoneware water cooler from St. Johnsbury, Vt., with a Civil War soldier and his wife, in cobalt. The soldier was identified as General Asa Peabody Blunt, and his wife, Mary. The complete record of his service was detailed. With rim chips, this fine piece brought $88,000! Secretary Joe Guerra was elated to acquire a rare beer glass, acidetched "Superior Ale, Buffalo CoOperative Brewing Co." The glass itself is very thin, making Joe wonder if it was to be used for drinking, or merely advertising? Where did he find it? On Ebay, where else?! The club has an interesting way to decide who will do the task

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

Brand Deepwell Beverage / Cabin Creek Land Company, Decota, WV. Also any obscure West Virginia sodas or medicines - Hutch or slug plate - no ACL Also Crawford Bottling Works, Leewod, WV Hutch. Contact: John Akers, Ph: (304) 343-8716, E-mail: Mulecreekjohn@aol.com Wanted: Help! Help me to acquire Washington pumpkinseeds or flat flasks or dandys, rare medicines and Washington Territory. Also western pumpkinseeds. Looking for MK Gottsteins (Washington Territory). MK Gottsteins has picture of Indian in a canoe WT. Contact: Steve Hinsch, 8609 236th SW, Edmonds, WA 98026, Ph: (425) 2258810. Wanted: Buying Pre-pro Missouri whiskey shorts, advertising, go-withs, jugs, and back-bar bottles. Will buy individual items or complete collections. Price and describe. Send to: Fred Sweeney: P.O. Box 936: Shawnee Mission, KS 66201; E-mail: Fred@creekspeak.com. Wanted: Blob top sodas - cobalt, green, amber and Louisville, KY any color. Also want Louisville medicines. Call 502-863-0689. No calls after 7 pm Eastern Time please. Wanted: Miami, Florida milk bottles, hutches, sodas. Also Miami, FL souvenir china. Email: JSmiafl@juno.com.

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Rosenbaum’s, etc. Also looking for photograph of San Francisco Glass Works display of wares during the 1865 to 1868 time period. Contact: Warren Friedrich, 11422 Ridge Rd. Nevada City, CA 95959, ph: (530) 265-5204. Wanted: Mississippi & Louisiana jugs., postcards, Confederate items and early postmarked envelopes - I also trade and sell. Contact: HL Hill Jr, 1036 Briarwood Dr, Jackson, MS 39211, ph: (601) 957-0354 (home) or (601) 955-0288 (cell), email: sonnyhill@bellsouth.net. Wanted: Highest price paid for San Diego, California bottles. All types wanted, ACL’s, embossed, etc. If it has San Diego on it, I’m interested. Contact: Mike Bryant, ph: (858) 581-2787, email: sdmike@san.rr.com Wanted: Blobtop, Hutchinson, or bitters bottles from Missouri and Kansas towns especially Kansas City, Missouri. No hutch or blobtops from St. Louis unless pontiled. Also wanted - Sweet Springs Mineral Waters from Saline County, Missouri. Any pontiled medicine from Missouri except St. Louis. Any Block, Brandon, or Kirrmeyer bottles from Leavenworth, Kansas. Contact: Sam Lawson, ph: (816) 746-6136, email: SDLLL6508@aol.com. Wanted: Pre-1940s original oil and watercolor paintings with California and Nevada landscapes as the subject matter. Contact: John Shuler, 1167 Chaparral Ct., Minden, NV 89423, ph: (775) 720-4723.

Wanted: sample bitters - Sarasina, Dr. Lawrence, Morning Star, etc. Contact: David Mott, Ph: (315) 668-6958; Email: dmott8@twcny.rr.com. Wanted: Bottles and related items of southeast Michigan (Detroit area) - conducting research and assembling informational data base on bottles of this area - interested to learn of any unusual or rare bottles to document their existence. Specifically looking for these bottles: Dr. Ferris's India Tonic, Simoneau's Hall of Pharmacy, McGraw's Gargling Oil and any early Detroit stoneware items. Contact: Mike Brodzik, Ph: (586) 219-9980 or E-mail: bottlemike@wowway.com.

12th Annual Capital District Antique Bottle, Insulator, & Table-top Collectibles Show Saturday September 20th, 2008

Wanted: Better fruit jars for my collections. Particularly interested in pint automatic sealer, The Champion or Van Vliet. I am also looking for good colored Mason Improved type jars. Call (618) 520-7111 or E-mail: pmurfe@sbcglobal.net.

70 plus sales tables available Hot food & beverages will be available Displays General admission - $3 (no early admission)

9am to 2:30 pm St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church 440 Whitehall Road, Albany, NY

Wanted: Rare San Diego milk bottles and associated trivia. Please call (619) 470-0680. Wanted: Evansville, Indiana blobs, hutch, sodas, beer, and items marked Graham Glass. Contact: Tim Pillow, Ph: (812) 477-2148 or E-mail: Hoosierhiker@aol.com. Wanted: Early Western bitters such as Cassin’s Lacour’s

Featuring 70+ tables

For Dealer contracts & general show information contact: Fran Hughes at (518) 377-7134 or email: fhughes3@nycap.rr.com


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pay a good price for I need it to complete this part of my collection. Contact: Bill Dudley, 1947 Tahoe Dr., Xenia, OH 45385 or call (937) 3728567. Wanted: Need a Crystal Spring Saratoga Mineral Water bottle in ANY condition! Contact: Howard Dean P.O. Box 115, Westernville, NY 13486, Ph: (315) 827-4606. Wanted: Central New York bottles, especially from Auburn. Free background check information and appraisals of these bottles and go-withs. Contact: Tom Kanalley, Ph: (607) 7537250. Wanted: Quality U.S. poison bottles and Marinette, Wis. and Menominee, Mich. bottles and brewery items. Contact: Henry & Toni Johnston, N4123 W. Townline Rd., Marinette, WI 54146, Ph: (715) 923-9351 or E-mail: poisonman@cybrzn.com. Wanted: New old stock bails for blob top beers. Contact: Doug Farmer, Ph: (260) 672-1186 or E-mail: ftwynbrew@aol.com. Wanted: S.T. Suit, Distiller, Suitland and Maryland stoneware jugs and other items relating to this company. I also want trade tokens of all kinids from saloons, mines, general merchandise stores, glass manufacturers, etc. Good prices paid for anything I can use. Contact: David E Schenkman, P.O. Box 366, Bryantown, MD 20617, Ph: (301) 274-3441 or E-mail: dave@turtlehillbanjo.com. Wanted: Philadelphia strap-sided or seamed whiskey flasks. I collect and catalog these and also have an interest in Thomas H. Dillon (THD), Philadelphia mineral water bottles. Please contact me if you have any in your collection or any you wish to sell. Contact: Art Miron, Ph: (215) 248-4612 or Email: jestar484@verizon.net. Wanted: Geogia pottery, milk bottles, antiques. Have some items to trade. Always looking for Georgia items!

September-October 2008

Contact: Paul Irby, 5981 River Oaks Dr., Flowers Branch, GA 30542, Ph: (770) 967-3946 or E-mail: Irbybottles@juno.com. Wanted: Target balls - any common colorful target ball will do. I am looking for a true turtles ink. Contact: Mark Weber, 99 Churchhill Rd., Ledyard, CT 06339, Ph: (860) 4648046 or E-mail: MarkCWeber@aol.com. Wanted: Lighthouses. Want Sol Frank’s large Seaworth’s Globe and Castillian. Mint only. Yes, still buying other "top end" bitters! Thank you. Contact: Jeff Burkhardt, Ph: (262) 573-6468 or E-mail: froglegs13@msn.com. Wanted: Pre-1915 (especially 19th century) bottles in most categories. Still need a couple of J.J. Butler inks and female medicines. If in North Georgia, check out my booth in REMEMBER WHEN ANTIQUES, Hwy 53, 10 miles west of Gainesville, Ph: (770) 888-2991, for a variety of antique bottles, pottery, insulators and small antiques. Contact: Jim Scharnagel, 3601 Laura Ln., Gainesville, GA 30506, Ph: (770) 536-5690. Wanted: Souvenir china and souvenir scenic custard glasses in excellent condition depicting views from American towns & villages, resorts, World’s Fairs, etc. Avidly sought. Preference is for scenes from New York state, New England and most states west of Mississippi River. Many thanks! Contact: Burton Spiller, 22 Tobey Brook, Pittsford, NY 14534, Ph: (585) 264-8968 or E-mail: bottlebug@aol.com. Wanted: Wm. W. Well’s Liniment, Freehold, N.J., pontiled or BIMAL, smooth-base version. Contact: Bob Randolph, 1564 Horseshoe Dr., Manasquan, NJ 08736-2704, Ph: (732) 223-6938 or E-mail: randgal@aol.com. Wanted: Hotchkiss and other Essential Oils bottles. Pepper-

Bottles and Extras

mint/Spearming/Wintergreen. H.G. Hotchkiss (Lyons, N.Y.); L.B. Hotchkiss (Phelps, N.Y.); Hale & Parshall (Lyons, N.Y.); Peirson & Perkins (Newark, N.Y.); M.H. Dillenbeck (Lyons, N.Y.); Peppermint Producers (Lyons, N.Y.); A.M. Todd (Kalamazoo, Mich.) and others. Contact: Richard Kelley, Ph: (315) 9466 3 1 6 o r E - m a i l : Kelleye@redsuspenders.com. Wanted: Baby nursing bottles, colognes, bottles (nipples, bottle covers, brushes, utensils, etc.). Eye wash cups, insulators, glass candy containers. Send list with descriptions, condition & price to: Marliman@juno.com or mail to: Joan B Roth, 405 Camelia Trail, St. Augustine, FL 32086. Wanted: Past issues of Bottles and Extras. If you have issues you would like to dispose of, please consider donating them to the FOHBC. We have new members regularly request old issues. Contact: June Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0160, email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com. Wanted: Glass Chatter newsletters from the Midwest Antique Fruit Jar & Bottle Club, especially ones from the 70s and 80s. (I have none prior to April, 1977) Also looking for any old bottle magazines. Send list of what you might have. Contact: June Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0160, email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com. Wanted: Embossed whiskey - C.J. Stublin - The Dalles, Oregon WITHOUT inside screw. Contact: James O. Dennis, Ph: (541) 298-1979. Wanted: Looking for Oklahoma IT Hutches. Contact: John Witney, Ph: (918)835-8823. Wanted: Femail cures and trade cards or advertisements for same Email: Jmshier@aol.com. Wanted: Harley's Peruvian Bank Bitters / W D Souders & Co Muncie Ind. I have two from Cincinnati, but, need one from Muncie. Also wanted Cabin

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

of hospitality each month. The winner of the raffle drawing the month before gets the honors!

monthly raffles. The newsletter also included some information on "flint glass."

The WHITTLE MARK EAST is the newsletter of the Merrimack Valley Antique Bottle Club, of North Chelmsford, Mass. The July meeting was the annual pizza social. The bottle themes included Independence Day, fire grenades, or your best recent find. Twenty members attended the June meeting, bringing over 60 bottles! The show and tell was extremely well-received and called "spectacular." Way to go! The club owns a display cabinet, which was available for the upcoming show on Sept. 28th in Lowell, Mass., at the Lowell Elks Club. It was requested that those doing shows and flea markets please take flyers and be sure and talk up the show. These are among the two best ways of advertising! Members donate bottles for the

The MOHAWK VALLEY ANTIQUE BOTTLE CLUB's newsletter, Bottles Along the Mohawk, featured information on the July speakers right on the front page. "Glass Insulators" was a power point presentation by Ron Weir and Todd Zinkovitch. It was the club's first-ever power point program. The club meets in a library, which has a power point projector mounted on the ceiling of the meeting room. Members were urged to attend! Club president Fred Capozzella was highly complimented for his June program on Utica Breweries. This was held at the Oneida County Historical Society for their Utica Monday Night lecture series. Fred's program was the best attended to date! The club held their picnic in June, which was very well attended. Tailgating at this meeting was some of the colors and shapes. John Panek displayed his collection of advertising shoe brushes (all Chicago, of course), which included wooden, celluloid and metal tops. Dorothy Furman displayed a collection of pewter thimbles. Dan Puzzo displayed his instant collection of sterling silver souvenir spoons from Woodstock garnered in one purchase on Ebay. Ron Neumann Sr., had a collection of inks in very nice colors. Jeff Dahlberg displayed a collection of outhouses from his extensive collection. The June ABCNI newsletter also had pictures from the club’s recent show and sale. The program for the July meeting was given by Ron Neumann Sr. He never fails to come up with something new from his vast collection. And I don’t think he has even tapped his sheds. He showed us some of his pictorals, which he said he likes to collect. They say one pictoral is worth a hundred plain bottles. Among the sodas that Ron showed were Standard Bottling Co., Flag

Midwest Regional News Joe Coulson 10515 Colingswood Lane Fishers, IN 46038 (317) 915-0665 jcoulson@leader.com The hot summer months are upon us. Everyone is getting ready to head to the Expo! Let’s see what the Midwest clubs were up to in May and June (please don’t forget to send in those newsletters and notes, because we LOVE to hear from you and would like to share that info with others). Antique Bottle Club of Northern Illinois Dorothy Furman is the newsletter editor of the ABCNI, and Jeff Dahlberg is president. The club has been holding its meetings at the Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbeck. The program for the ABCNI June meeting was “Mini-Collection Night.” Dennis Klinkhammer showed a nice collection of salt shakers in various

9

best they've had, with many unusal items offered. September featured a mini-show, or an auction. Here's something - the Club BBQ and Dive was held July 27th. Host members Bob and Linda Kennerknecht live on Okara Lake are hosts. Members Frank >> Starczek and Dan Weeden scubadived for bottles and other treasures! I'm anxious to hear the results! The EMPIRE STATE BOTTLE COLLECTORS of Syracuse don't meet in the summer, but preparations are being made for the 10th Annual Fall Antiques, Bottles & More Show & Sale. This will be held on Sunday, October 19th (9-3), at the Scriba Fire Hall, Rt. 104-E, Scriba, N.Y. (just east of Oswego). Show chair is Barry Haynes, who does a great job. Look for 60 tables, appraisals, educational displays, very good food, and more!

Bros., Massachusetts; Thomas F. Donahue, New York; Rayner’s Specialties, New York; Aquos Beverages, Indianapolis, Ind.; Hutchinsons from Engles’s Bottling Works Cincinnati, Ohio; Poles & Rosen Newark, N.J. Figural embossed beers from Ind. Brg. Assn. Marion Indiana (Lion); George Bechtel Brewing Co. (Knight); E.J. O’Connor, S. Amboy N.J. (Anchor); E. S. Pierce Co, Mass. (Eagle); Beadlestone & Woerz Empire Brewery (Woman & Eagle); D.J. Whelan, Troy N.Y.; Schweppes (standing Lion); P.J. Whelan, Troy N.Y. (Star). He also showed many more beers plus milks and whiskeys. Findlay Antique Bottle Club Tom Brown (newsletter editor) of the FABC submitted the June and July newsletters (Whittle Marks). Tom typically reprints several Bottles & Extras articles for club members in their newsletter. Recently this included “Step Aboard Arabia” by Steve Ketcham; “The People’s Favorite Bitters” by Jeff Wichmann; and “Jimmy Carter & Billy Carter: Bottle Collector & Can Collector” by Cecil


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Munsey. Tom also keeps club members up-to-date with highlights from “The Milk Route”. The FABC has a good website with pictures from its annual shows. You should check it out: http://fabclub.freeyellow.com/home.ht ml. Richard Elwood is the club president. Monthly club meetings are held at the University of Findlay. To find out more about its monthly newsletter, “Whittle Marks,” send a note to: Findlay Antique Bottle Club, P.O. Box 1329, Findlay, OH 45839. The club’s 32nd Annual Bottle Show and Sale will be October 19th, 2008. Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club Michele and Shaun Kotlarsky are newsletter editors for “The Embossing,” the monthly newsletter of the Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club. Bob Powell is the club president. For the May meeting, the club had a slide show, “and a special thank you goes out to Rod Krupka for not only loaning us his projector but organizing the slides so they would work in it, and reorganize them into the one that was returned to the Bottle Federation! The slide show this month was on Fire Extinguisher Grenades by Byron and Vicky Martin.” [EDITOR'S NOTE: for all of the clubs reading this, you might also want to take advantage of the Federation’s slide show loan program for your own club]. “We had a show and tell while Rod helped get the slides into another device to be used with his projector. Bill had the club’s 3rd show ribbon from 1979. Les & Judy had some items they purchased at the Wheaton show. A Diamond insulator, a Brookfield with amber swirls, a Chicago and a WFG Co. cornflower blue crackled. Of course, Judy had some fairy lights. There was a ‘thumbprint’ Wes Morland red and white one she bought at a garage sale which was made prior to 1984, an amber one marked with W ‘Irish Waterford.’ She also had a 7-up green 4-pieced one that was older than Fenton. Earnie had a cider bottle that was amber and from Muskegon. It

September-October 2008

said Chumard’s on it. Michele had some flyers and brochures from the Ephinany Glass Co. open house in Pontiac and will bring a slide show of same to a meeting soon. Her paperweight she purchased from there was a pink one. Rod had a sign from Ypsi, Ypsilanti Mellencamp’s for Clothing – it was metal. He also brought a ‘Sutton’s Hardware’ pail from Howell, which was below the Opera House.” The HVBIC meetings are held the 2nd Monday of the month at 7:30pm at the First National Bank, 8080 Challis Rd., Brighton, Mich. You can find out more about the HVBIC online at their website: http://hvbic.org. The monthly newsletter can be viewed there also. Iowa Antique Bottleers Mark Wiseman (newsletter editor) does a wonderful job each month reporting the IAB happenings. Mark submitted the IAB newsletters for May through July. The IAB’s April meeting theme was “Black and Blue” glass bottles, “and there were plenty of these brought along with many other great show and tell items. The Morrison Grundy County Museum space we use was even more open on the north side, and there was a fine potluck lunch enjoyed by all.” “Jack La Baume brought his very fine collection of black glass bottles. Chuck Erb brought cobalt bottles including one embossed ‘Rheumagon’ he found in the basement of a burned out Garden Grove, Iowa drugstore, and seven different sizes of triangular one wing Owl Drug bottles. Reid Palmer brought more Mary Gregory type items. Jim Weeks brought a cobalt ‘H.K. Mulford Co. Philadelphia,’ a cobalt insulator, as well as a salt cellar in blue and white Akron Agate. Percy Poulin brought cobalt bottles, a cobalt cone ink, umbrella ink, a squat and funnel ink, and a black glass seal bottle ‘LM & C’ found with four others in a wall in Dubuque, Iowa. Kevin Williams brought a lamp that he bought at Goodwill and then removed the paint so it was clear (an idea he got from Steve Showers) and put

Bottles and Extras

shards from Colfax pottery/Red wing jugs from Colfax inside and it really looked great. Jeff Krapfl brought a grouping of very rare bottles and stoneware items. Among them was an unknown drugstore bottle --- City Drug Store, Chas. J. Brayton (monogram) Dubuque, Iowa --- and three unknown crock bottles, all stamped ‘Krueger Bro. Ossian, Iowa,’ all a little different in glaze but the same shape, (one with brown or no glaze) that Jeff thinks were likely made at the Fayette Pottery in the 1860s.” Mike Magee submitted a copy of an old newspaper article that was shown in the June IAB newsletter. From the May 26, 1911 Waterloo Courier, “Bitters Proved Too Lively Tonic. Muscatine druggist arrested as bootlegger. Proprietor, Leading Church Man, Pleaded Ignorance of Charge. Muscatine, Ia., May 26, ‘Centennial bitters,’ a tonic guaranteed to liven one up and containing 30 percent alcohol, is the latest ‘booze’ which has been given local citizens a touch of high life. As a result of selling the same, Theodore Keutchman, a prominent druggist of this city, was placed under arrest yesterday and it is now up to him to explain to the court why he should not stand trial for bootlegging. "Keutchman’s sales increased rapidly of late, according to the police; in fact, he had quite a run on this particular bitters which was not as bitter as it might seem, but which had a greasy taste after swallowing. Several with beautiful buns and a bottle of the tonic were picked up recently and brought to jail. As a result, a police investigation was ordered and Keutchman was taken into custody. "Keutchman is prominent in church circles here and his arrest has caused a mild sensation. He is assistant superintendent at the United Brethren Sunday school. He pleaded ignorance.” Mike Magee provided more research details about “Theodore Keuchmann” that were printed in the IAB newsletter.

Bottles and Extras

Mark Weber, 99 Churchhill Rd., Ledyard, CT 06339, Ph: (860) 464-8046 or E-mail: MarkCWeber@aol.com. FOR SALE: BENNINGTON POTTERY: (1) Bennington Coachman, 1849 mark, Rockingham glaze, 10" tall, similar to Barrett color plate G, 1st row, center, perfect, $875. (2) Toby snuff jar, 1849 mark, removable hat, 4 1/2" tall, looks like Barrett, plate 418, #2, except Rockingham glaze, perfect, $1495. (3) Ben Franklin toby pitcher, 5 7/8" tall, Rockingham glaze, similar to Barrett plate 416, #3, dime-size pressure ding in center of base, otherwise perfect, $225. Postage & insurance extra. Have other Benningtons. Contact: Don Fritschel, Ph: (303) 499-2437 or E-mail: donfrits@aol.com.

September-October 2008

FOR SALE: Bottle Collector Jimmie Brown of Bloomfield, NM passed away in February, 2008. His widow, Faye, has asked me to sell hi Hutchinson’s. Faye has a number of blobs, a large number of painted Label sodas. Also Coke, Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Big Chief, and numerous other sodas. If interested, contact Faye, ph: (505) 632-2460. Hutchinson’s with number from each state: Florida (1), Iowa (1), Illinois (1), Kansas (1), Minnesota (1), New Jersey (22) and 2 gravitators, New York (30) & 1 gravitator & 1 floating ball (no ball), Ohio (1), Pennsylvania (8), slick (1), Utah (2). $10 each plus shipping. Send long SASE (2 stamps) for a list to Zang Wood, 1612 Camino Rio, Farmington, NM 87401, ph: (505) 327-1316. Checks or money orders made payable to Faye Brown.

FOR SALE: The time has come that we must sell ALL the Bottles and Collectibles we have dug and purchased during the past 40 years! Failing health as put us on the NO SHOW LIST for some time now. If interested or know anyone who might be interested, please contact Richard L. Wilcox, 7422 Park Dr., Mechanicsville, VA 23111, Ph: (804) 746-9854; E-mail: ilcox7422@aol.com.

KETCHUP, PICKLES, SAUCES 19th Century Food in Glass Betty Zumwalt, author 498 pages of pictures & research of glass containers the early food Industry utilized Smyth Bound - $25

FOR SALE: Houghton & Dalton Pottery, authored by Jim Houdeshell, 1610 S Main St.; Findlay, OH 45840. $6 per copy. Call Ph: (419) 423-2895 or E-mail: Jdmmh@woh.rr.com.

The Glass Artisan’s Bottle/Glass Cleaning Service

FOR SALE: Many different type fruit jars - over 600 of them. Also painted label and embossed soda bottles for sale. Call (970) 434-5697 Art or Cheryl Pickrell. FOR SALE OR TRADE: Quart black-amber Magic Star; dark-green Mason's Patent Nov. 30th 1856 halfgallon (smooth-lip version); quart Fink and Nasse embossed in slugplate circle (Cohansey-style); pint whittled amber jar base embossed Putnam; quart yellow-amber trademark Lightning; pint Ball Perfection (no lid or band). Contact: Ph: (618) 520-7111 or E-mail: pmurfe@sbcglobal.net.

Mark West Publishers PO Box 1914 Sandpoint, ID 86864

Many years of cleaning service with dealer and collector satisfaction. Your items are treated as if they were my own and with close attention to detail .

Prices start at $15 Contact: STEVE (414) 281-5885 glassartisan@yahoo.com

IT ALWAYS PAYS TO ADVERTISE!!!!! Send in your for sale items!

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WANTED WANTED Southern Illinois blob top and Hutchinson-style soda bottles. No painted labels Steve Kehrer (618) 410-4121 Kehrer00@charter.net Wanted: Tampa alligator Hutch. Highest price paid for FLA BREWING CO, TAMPA, FLA with embossed alligator. Must be Hutch finish, not Baltimore loop. Contact: R.J. Brown, 4114 W Mullen Ave, Tampa, FL 33609, (813) 286-9686, email: RBrown4134@aol.com. Wanted: Fruit Jar Newsletter issues: April 1981, June 1981 through March 1982, July 1982, September 1982, December 1982 through June 1983, August 1983, October 1983 through January 1984, March 1984, July 1984 through November 1984, January 1985, February 1985, April 1985 through September, 1985. Contact: June Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0160, email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Wanted: Sealfast Sold By jars, unusual Hirsch Bros items, unusual Flaccus items, and/or unusual pint jars. Contact: R Wayne Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0161, email: JarDoctor@aol.com. WANTED Levitan and Bagan, Chicago, IL bottles of any/all kinds. Seltzer and soda bottles are known. Company belonged to my greatgrandfather during the early 1900s. Known to have been delivered at some time by Seipp’s Brewery wagons. Tony Hofeld 8724 Ferris Avenue Morton Grove, IL 60053 Ph: (847) 966-0909 Email: ahofeld@aol.com

Wanted: ATTENTION - PLEASE HELP! I am looking for a fruit jar marked PATENT APPL’D FOR on the side of the jar. No other markings. Red Book #9 listed as #2293. I will


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Classified Ads FOR SALE FOR SALE: Hutchinson list #1: Alabama (1), Colorado (2), Hawaii (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Mississippi (1), New Jersey (5), New York (5), West Virginia (1), Wisconsin (3), and Mavericks (1). Hutchinson list #2: Alabama (1), Arizona (1), Colorado (2), Hawaii (1), Kansas (1), Louisiana (1), Missouri (1), New York (1), North Carolina (1), Oregon (1), Texas (1), Utah Territory (1), Chattanooga Glass Co. (1), Virginia (1), Medicated Root Beer (1), Hawthorn Spring Saratoga (2), Highrock Congress Springs Saratoga (1), Guilford, Bt Mineral Spring Water (1), Pennsylvania (20). Contact: Zang Wood, 1612 Camino Rio, Farmington, NM 87401. Ph: (5050 327-1316. FOR SALE: Beautiful mediumamber Reno Brewing Co., Reno, Nev. blob beer, pint, $50. Aqua, tooled, crown, slug plate, L. Rosenfeld Co., Council Bluffs, Iowa, $45. Tooled, four-mold, crown, San Jose Soda Works, A.J. Henry, Prop., San Jose, Cal., $45. Pint, applied top Udolpho Wolfe's Aromatic Schnapps, beautiful citron-green, $35. Deco soda, clear, crown, Silver State Soda, embossed with pack mule and miner, scalloped, $50. Half-pint fruit jar, clear, lid and bail, embossed Quong Hop & Co., 12oz Net with the same Chinese writing, $30. Dr. Ordways Celebrated Pain Destroyer, pontiled, 12-sided, aqua, rolled-lip, original label, cork, inside residue, $65. Amber square quart, tooled top, Veronica Mineral Water, $65. Contact: Jean M Pouliot, Box 205, West Glacier, MT 59936, Ph: (406) 888-9092. FOR SALE: Bitters bottle, Old Sachem Bitters and Wigwam Tonic, mint condition, black glass. This sexy barrel I have never read or heard about in black glass. If you collect any of the barrels, you might want to add this sweetheart to your collection. Contact:

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

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Classifeds: 10 cents per word 15 cents per bold word $2 minimum monthly charge ad should be typed or printed

*Consecutive issues with NO changes Camera ready copy preferred but not required for display ads

*****50% DISCOUNT***** For FOHBC member clubs All ads must be paid for in advance Make checks payable to FOHBC (Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors) Send payment to: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 Send ad copy and/or questions to: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 (816) 318-0160, fax: (816) 318-0162 AD DEADLINES Issue Date

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Bottles and Extras

In the July IAB newsletter, it was reported that the “State Historical Society of Iowa will have an exhibit of Iowa pottery beginning in September. Mike Magee proposed that the Fall IAB meeting be held at the Iowa Genealogical Society building which is across the street from SHSI. That would make it convenient for those attending to visit the exhibit.” The IAB is seriously pursuing rubbings (and photographs are helpful) of Iowa bottles that are unlisted in the book, “The Antique Bottles of Iowa, 1846 – 1915”. Please contact Mike Burggraaf at 641-469-6018 or QRSGLASS@iowatelecom.net. The IAB newsletters always contain wonderful digging stories by Mark Wiseman. He has a regular column, “The Digger’s Scoop,” that tells of his local digging adventures with his dog, the old truck, and various digging friends that join him. You can find out more about IAB membership ($15/yr.) from Tom Southard, 2815 Druid Hill, Des Moines, IA 50315. Midwest Antique Fruit Jar & Bottle Club The MAFJBC has members nationwide and is heavily fruit jar focused. Their meetings are held the first Monday of the month at 1:30 p.m. in the Cantina at Minnetrista, which is located in Muncie, Ind. Dave Rittenhouse is the club president. At the May meeting, club members were asked to bring amber jars or bottles. The Midwest Glass Chatter (their newsletter) is always loaded with pictures of the many items that are brought to the meeting. Jean Harbron brought an amber half-gallon Globe fruit jar that had once belonged to her “Dad’s first cousin’s wife.” A family member had said, “What are you doing, giving her that old ugly jar?!” (not realizing that people love to collect them). Lou Ebert displayed a very large amber advertising beer bottle (no label) (base: Phelps Mfg. Co. / Terre Haute, Ind.). The bottle was a whopping 20 inches tall and 5 7/16” in diameter. The bottle had a ground lip and would have held approximately 4 ¼ quarts! Charles Wil-

September-October 2008

liams brought many examples of irradiated (“nuked”) jars which had turned an easily identifiable brown amber color. Buyers need to beware when they are purchasing amber jars. Dave Rittenhouse shared an amber pint bottle of Rittenhouse Straight Rye Whiskey (with original label; no immediate relation to his family!). Dick Cole brought a variety of amber Anchor Hocking commemorative bottles (one was shaped like a book and another was shaped like a baseball). Joe Coulson shared some Anchor Hocking special run bottles, too. All of these would have been produced in limited numbers. The MAFJBC has a website: http://www.fruitjar.org. Meeting details as well as lots of pictures from its semi-annual shows can be found there. Pictures from the July show and sale were just posted. The next show and sale will be January 11th, 2009 at the Horizon Convention Center in Muncie. Minnesota’s First Antique Bottle Club Gwen Seeley forwarded us copies of their January and February newsletters, “The Bottle Digger’s Dope.” Gwen reports that due to her health she finds it necessary to resign her role as editor. She continues as coeditor, and Barb Robertus has assumed her editor duties. The newsletter's May issue reports that Gary Essig has passed away. Gary and Dianne were among of the first couples to join the club. “Gary is the brother of members Denny and Mary Essig. Gary had been battling cancer for more than five years. We remember all the great times we had with the both of hem. Dianne was our 3rd show chairman and what a great job she did. We looked over our albums from our early days, and found this of Gary. [picture of Gary in a night gown and night cap and carrying a candle]. Photo shows Gary in costume! When we were much ‘younger,’ our bottle club had many costume parties, where you would come dressed as a bottle. In this case Gary was the NIGHT CAP BITTERS.

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Note cap and candle! We have missed Gary and Dianne very much as friends and bottle collectors. They have lived in Eugene, Oregon, leaving Minneapolis in the early 1970s.” The club does not print newsletters in June, July and August. It will not be until the September issue that we hear back from them. Membership in the MFABC is $10/yr. For more information, please contact Linda Sandell, 7735 Silver Lake Road #208, Moundsview, MN 55112. North Star Historical Bottle Association Doug Shilson is editor of the North Star Historical Bottle News. Doug does a great job each month reporting the club’s latest happenings. He puts a lot of effort into recording all the details that take place. Steve Ketcham is club president. Doug tells us in the club’s June newsletter about the recent passing of one of a long-time club member, John Larson. “Well, here we go again. I’m very sorry to report, but want to, because this was one individual who not only had been a part of my life, but part of our organization almost from the beginning! John, Jack, Big John, whatever you called him, had better be either of these three names or else you ‘might’ get a shovel over your head. Or, don’t want to be in the same area while digging for bottles. As you can guess by the name of Big John, he was big. Over 300 pounds big. John Larson was born John Raymond Larson, July 26, 1938. I remember the time we had met, it was at the time I-94 was being thought of. The area was on the west side of I-94 on a steep hill in an area where the homes were being torn down but in an area just above the diggings of the future of I-94. Not quite as deep (as it is today). Plenty of room to just let the dirt and sand and those millions of broken glass shards slither down the banks to be picked up by those giant Caterpillar scrapers (one scoop and 10 yards of dirt are gone in a second). In those wild days, digging was free to anyone that ventured to dig and scoop up their finds. But, watch it! This huge moun-


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tain of a man was lurking nearby. You see, John had a sign that said, this is HIS diggings, stay away. No claim jumping on my findings. I thought about this guy who would have said such a thing. Until I met him. Yes, he was big, and yes he was always lurking nearby. You couldn’t miss him. The friendship began when we would share our digging finds. No bottle exchanged hands. At least with Big John. It was his space, and I mean lots of space. I was digging in the many trash pits that dotted the area. Some outhouse outlines we did find, and hundreds of bottles etc. would be for our taking, and we did get to know one another. And it was on a daily basis of conversing with John that we became friends. Talking about the history of where we were digging and all those beautiful Victorian homes that were being razed. What a shame, but at that time, we were interested in those unusual shaped and odd-colored glass bottles of all sizes. It would be no problem to find several hundred bottles for our taking. We had it all to ourselves, that is until more interested bottle hounds found the same area. It got to a point, that if we didn’t dig out our area entirely, those ‘Claim Jumpers’ (as John would call them) would dig the rest. Sometimes in the middle of the night! And here is where John got quite irate! To the point, if anyone of those ‘youngsters’ got in his way, be rest assured you would have a shovel laid upon your head! Talk about the banter that went back and forth! (Priceless) On one of those diggings with John, he told me he was going to work for the City of Minneapolis. Since, I had been working for the city as an equipment driver for a couple of years, I asked him what department? He started out as laborer, meaning any place the construction crews would dig up many more bottles, and John liked that job very much. We would get together on digging sites and swap stories about the ‘goofy’ foremen we had to work for. And then John became a lead man. Had his own city truck and was in charge of certain ar-

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eas to maintain the sewers (always on the lookout for dump sites). John had several digging partners, including Vern Dotseth, Charlie Farley, Al Lagan and dug alongside of others. Later on after retiring, I had dug with John on several other occasions. He had the darndest luck. I was digging on one side of a yard, John on the other. I dug up several medicines, John dug up a small Geo Benz Bitters. Such luck John had! Vern Dotseth (close friend and main digging partner) and John were seen on TV and also were mentioned in the Minneapolis papers in an area of western downtown Minneapolis, holding old fruit jars! One time after I had retired, John called me, asking to come over to the sewer dept. It seems John had too many lockers! (Lockers were meant for clothes, as his boss said). It seems that John not only had very few of his clothes, but lots of cat food and many dug bottles he was storing in three large lockers. (John took care of feeding the cat. It was a gray gnarly looking cat with green eyes and a bit of one ear gone!) But he loved animals. And besides, the cat was a good mouser, John said! We both retired from the city after 30 plus years. After asking John to join our newly formed bottle club time and time again and told him what he was missing, he relented a few years later. John & Brenda Larson became members #118, April 1974. John liked our monthly meetings, especially the treats. He sure had a sweet tooth. John had a favorite chair he would like to sit on. The rest of us used those foldup metal chairs, and he had a spot near the door. His favorite companion at all times was a glden Lab named Ginger. If this dog barked, I never heard a noise! Many times during the summer months John would come by early in the morning to have a can of cold pop. And we would talk of the days digging together plus the days' events and digging partners and the bottles he would find along with them. Some of the finds he would bring were stoneware beers from Mankato, St. Paul, and

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Wisconsin that were debossed on the side. Twice he showed some nice bitters in amber plus local druggists bottles. It was a rare event that John would give away anything. But two bottles are in my collection --- a druggist bottle, T.K. Gray / Minneapolis and the other, a Spa Bottling Co., St. Paul. Not the rarest of bottles, but when I look at these two, I will always remember John and what he meant to me! John was a special person at our yearly bottle shows. Sometimes he would get into town after traveling from his place in Arizona and couldn’t wait to wake me up at the Days Inn. He needed his coffee and those rolls we had for the dealers and members. You see, John was the enforcer, the ‘Cop,’ the security for our bottle show and sale each year. He would get dressed in different types of historical clothes. One time he came in a Civil War dress ‘Blues.’ Boy, did he look sharp and was the talk of the show. At our last show, John was not feeling well and couldn’t make it. We sure missed him. Just his presence would deter anyone from making a mistake by doing something foolish. His partner at the door was Gwen Seeley. John was four-times larger than Gwen. I depended on Gwen, as I would call her my little sergeant at the door. Actually, it got so I depended on both of them. What a combination to have. Big John and the little Seargeant. No one would get past these two, not unless you paid your 3 bucks, that is. Wear Your Name Tag" was one of John’s favorite sayings at our bottle shows. Or you would feel the wrath of ‘Big’ John. What could be better? ‘Big’ John, Vern Dotseth, Charley Farley and Dave Vollmar guarding our precious bottles at our shows each year. John did have his soft side. ‘The other John.’ His nickname could have been ‘Teddy Bear,’ and he expressed it at our meetings at my home. His love and compassion of digging for ‘ol’ bottles with his favorite partner, Vern, were second to none! Couldn’t wait for the times he would dig with

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shine, not because it was shattered into a thousand pieces like I’d assumed the day before. It looked exactly like it did when it was placed on the little girl’s grave. With trembling hands, I reached down and retrieved "The Jar" and within a few minutes had returned it to its rightful place – the center of little Helen Marie Sims’ grave.

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409/W.H. Bard/Portland, Ore. An Unlisted Oregon Flask By Garth Ziegenhagen

As I was rounding the corner at an earlier Chico Bottle Show, I was very surprised to find an Oregon flask AUTHOR’S NOTE: This is a ficthat I nor anytional store and its sole purpose is to body else I could bring into focus many of the problems find had ever plaguing our beloved hobby. However, heard of before. the old city cemetery does in exist in A t P e t e South Pittsburg and I have visited it Hendrick’s table many times. I got the idea for the story was this flask, while reminiscing about one of my “409/W.H. visits there with "Cousin Billy" where B a r d / P o rt l a n d , I remembered seeing an intact UOre.” that Pete had received from a SAV-IT jar. Since that time, efforts friend in Longview, Washington. I have been made to restore the cemewas even more excited when I found tery. Pete and he was willing to let it go at Charles D. Head a very reasonable price - you know 23549-001 how some sellers are often off lookPO Box 150160 ing for bottles at a bottle show! Atlanta, GA 30315 We, in Oregon are fortunate to have had John Thomas and Bob Barnett to catalog bottles and publish some excellent Oregon resource books on the history of these bottles. We also owe a great deal of gratitude to the bottle collectors of Oregon who have shared their knowledge and bottles with the authors of these books. I doubt if anyone else will be able to 1 year Air Mail publish specific bottle books like John and Bob. It is very rare to find subscription an embossed whiskey not already re$60 searched and the history uncovered. Unfortunately, none of the books listed this flask, therefore, it was up to Established 1979 me to find out who this person was, The world’s first full color bottle magazine when he was in Portland, and where the saloon was located. simply got Better and Bigger. I do have some research books, Packed Full of the information you need on the UK & world wide bottle scene. but soon discovered that W.H. Bard Well-researched articles & all the latest finds. was not listed in any Portland census Upcoming sales and full show calendar. or directory up until 1910. In the 1910 census, he was boarding in SeatPersonal check, Mastercard/Visa, even cash! tle and in 1911, he was the President BBR, Elsecar Heritage Center, Barnsley, and manager of the Mt. Hood Commercial Co, while boarding at 744 2, Yorkshire, S74 8HJ, England Kearny. In the same 1911 directory, Ph: 011-44-1226-745156 Fax: 011-44-1226-321561 he was listed as owner of a saloon at

Full Colour

BBR

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409 Washington, thus, the 409 on the first line of the dandy flask he had made. An advertisement on page 1627 of the directory listed: Family Liquor Department Mt. Hood Commercial Co. Merchant’s Lunch & Buffet Imported Lunch Delicacies 409 Washington Street The saloon was also listed in the 1912 directory, but, that was the end of the listings and probably why there were not many bottles made for this saloon. In 1913, at the age of 60, W.H. Bard was listed as a lawyer at 224225 Abington Bldg. and owned a house at 1125 Francis Avenue and still operated a Mt. Hood Commercial Co., but was no longer the owner of a saloon. How quickly he seemed to have become a lawyer - probably realizing that prohibition was coming, and, thus, being a lawyer was more lucrative than a saloon owner. Still it seems, he would be a person dealing with other people’s problems, but, could charge more. He remained a lawyer until his death in 1921 at the age of 68. AUTHOR’S NOTE: If anyone else out there owns one of these flasks, or comes across it, at least now you know some of it’s history. History is the reason I collect bottles and I think we, as bottle collectors, have contributed to the preservation of history more then non-bottle collectors will ever realize. As for unlisted Oregon bottles, and “go-withs”, it might be wise to save past issues of The Stumptown Report edited by Bill Bogynska and published by the Oregon Bottle Collectors Association. Garth Ziegenhagen 2596 SW Pumich Ave Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-4776 zigs@bendcable.com


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busy as heck and that my phone’s been on the blink for a while. Benny said he knew of a very old cemetery in South Pittsburg, Tenn., that he’d like to go look over and if I wanted to, I could go with him. It dated all the way back to the Civil War and while we may not find any old bottles to speak of, it would be an interesting way to spend a day in which to catch up on what’s been happening with one another these past few months. I couldn’t think of any kind of excuse to avoid going with him and, anyway, I love history and always enjoyed checking out old cemeteries. I couldn’t think of any mischief he could get into so I agreed to go with him. We stopped off for breakfast at The Pirate restaurant (Benny’s treat) and then headed to the old city cemetery perched on a knoll behind the old McReynolds High School now being used as a city maintenance shop. The cemetery exceeded all my expectations as it covered some 30 acres and nearly all the tombstones and grave markers dated to the early to late1800s. Some of the graves were marked by just a small creek rock, while others had gargantuan monoliths that would have made a pharaoh envious. Many graves had no markers at all. In one section, Benny and I found a number of Union soldier’s graves, results of a Civil War battle at Fort McCook at the mouth of Battlecreek on the Tennessee River in 1862-64. Large oaks, hickory and pines shaded the graves of the rich and the very poor, those long forgotten and the ones found in history books, such as James Bowron, one of the town’s founding fathers. There were few flowers, flags or accouterments on the majority of the graves, but the cemetery was adorned with pretty spring flowers, budding dogwood trees, a recent growth of grass and sweetsmelling honeysuckle. Here and there scattered among the adults’ graves were those of small children and babies, a heart-breaking sight indeed. Most had markers of some kind, usually a little lamb

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perched on the top of the stone, or an angel with outstretched wings. Cast iron rabbits or puppy dogs were in graves of infants whose parents could not afford the more ornate markers. The cast iron figurines were probably made at either the Blacklock or the Lodge foundries in South Pittsburg. Other graves were decorated by vases and fruit jars full of flowers, but few of the vessels had survived many years of neglect. All were empty, stained and cracked or broken, probably by rain water being frozen during the winter.

Toward the close of our visit, Benny and I found one of the tiniest graves in the cemetery. It was all by itself beneath a splendid holly tree. The little lamb stop the stone was a tribute to the fallen angel underneath. The stone was carved with HELEN MARIE SIMS / TWIN OF / LEONA CHRISTINE SIMS / B MAY 11, 1906 / D AUG 31, 1909. We wondered what misfortune had fallen upon the child to cause her to die at such a tender age. Perhaps the dreaded typhoid fever, cholera or another disease had snuffed out the child’s life. In the center of the child’s grave was the smallest bell-shaped, half-pint U-SAV-IT jar that I’d ever seen. The little jar sparkled and glittered in the late afternoon sun as if had been manufactured that very day, The onslaught of more than 80 years of weather had not dimmed its shine. Benny spotted the jar and loudly proclaimed, "That’s Mine!" Before I could utter a word of protest, he

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snatched up the jar, turned on his heels and ran out of the cemetery. Horrified by such an outrage, I ran after and soon caught up with him. I told him that stealing from a cemetery, especially off a child’s grave, was about as low as anyone could stoop and I’d not stand for it. I demanded he return the jar immediately. Benny said the jar was extremely rare and that he’d been looking for one of that size for a decade. If he left it on the grave, it would eventually get broken by the elements and he intended to keep it. "But placing that jar on the grave of their child was one of the last acts of love that her parents could have performed for her," I remonstrated. "It’s a sacrilege for you to remove it!" We had by now reached the fourlane highway that we had to cross to reach our trucks parked in front of the restaurant. Smirking, he turned to me and replied, "I’ll worry about that sacrilege business when I meet my maker," and stepped off the curb into the busy highway. Big Mistake! He stepped right into the path of Mr. Robert William Coffman’s fully loaded pulpwood truck and into the arms of his maker as well. Droplets of Benny’s blood rained down upon me, but that didn’t numb my mind nearly as much as did the sound of little Helen Marie’s jar breaking. I knew that the love and affection that her parents had memorialized in the jar was now shattered into a thousand pieces. After a lengthy interview with the police and a night of fitful sleep, I awoke the following morning hoping it was all a bad dream. But once I turned on my radio, I heard the announcer making much ado about the previous day’s tragic accident. I’d misplaced my wristwatch and, thinking I’d lost it when I made a grab for Benny to keep him from being hit by the truck, I returned to the accident scene. There on the edge of the highway, beside a remnant of yellow police tape, was not my wristwatch, but the tiny U-SAV-IT jar. It sparkled and glittered in the early morning sun-

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him. He was very concerned with the cancer operations on his head, and not feeling well, like the ‘ol’ John that I knew. The only time he could not make it in to one of the last meetings was foretold by the onset of his cancer. Sat in his truck with Ginger by his side. I could tell you many more stories that John and I shared, but! Yup, all of us will miss the Big Lug! Just another great bottle collector, gone! See ya later, John! For more information on joining the NSHBA, please contact Doug Shilson: 3308 32 Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55406-2015. The club does not meet in the months of June, July and August. Ohio Bottle Club Phyllis Koch (editor) and Donna Gray (secretary) always do a very nice job with The Ohio Swirl, the OBC’s newsletter. John Fifer is the club president. The program for the OBC’s April 24th meeting was “Dyke Toy and Marble Company of Akron, Ohio.” The program was introduced by Bill Koster, and presented by David Rotilie, Bill Elders, Bill Cody and Bill Koster. Donna captured these details: “In 1884, Samuel Dyke opened Dyke Toy and Marble in downtown Akron on the site that had once been Lock 3 of the Ohio Canal. The factory originally produced toy clay marbles for sale to the neighboring Merrill Pottery Company. Sam Dyke revolutionized the marble business when he invented machinery to mass-produce toy marbles out of clay. By 1890, the factory was producing over one million clay toy marbles each day. By 1891, Sam founded The American Marble and Toy Manufacturing Company, the largest 19th century toy company in the United States. Besides marbles, it also produced miniature jugs, pots, shoes, animals and many other items. The factory burned to the ground in 1904. Bill Cody researched the disaster. After midnight on September 6, 1904, the factory burned down. Word quickly spread and soon children came to the site to take pocketsful of mar-

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bles. Police tried to keep the children from the charred remains. The city then ordered everything to be buried at the site, including the thousands of toys and marbles. Currently, Bill is looking for a catalog of company items – something that documents all toys the company produced. Starting in the mid-1990s, the City of Akron began to tear down and remodel the vacant O’Neil's Department Store and tear up the adjacent parking deck. Part of the land was to be a park – Lock 3 Park – which is on the site of the historic American Marble and Toy Manufacturing Company. This was an opportunity not to be missed by some Ohio Bottle Club members. David Rotilie said he started digging when the O’Neil's store was being torn down. Using Sanborn maps, he said he went down ten feet. In the early days, ‘they didn’t bother me;’ they thought I was nuts!’ He found many little jugs (some had political labels), little boots (which had contained snuff), little banks, flower pots and much more. Dave said he spent a good part of a couple years in the ground! Many digging days were from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. He shared much of what he found with the historical society and kept some for himself. Bill Elders also was at the scene. He told the club interesting – and sometimes funny – personal stories about the digging. When the city closed down the digging, Bill was given another week to dig. He accepted the offer, including responsibility for insurance, and invited others to dig with him. Bill Koster and Tom Haas dug at the O’Neil's site. On one occasion after hearing about the building teardown, he and Tom went to the back area where Merrill Pottery was located. Going down the steps, they met Dave Rotilie and Bill Cody, who were leaving – tired from digging all night. Bill and Tom just started raking – and pulled out 29 beer bottles! They also kept good pieces with names – to get an idea of all the companies and places where the company shipped the bottles.

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Bill recommended that the club take a trip to the American Toy Marble Museum in downtown Akron. The museum opened in 2002, and features large collections of Akron marbles, toys, and artifacts. The June newsletter also contained an article by Jack Sullivan, “The Short but Happy Life of the Match Safe,” and an article by Bill Elder, “Picker and Digger.” The July newsletter contained another one of Jack’s articles titled “The Great Lakes Expo: From Hist’ry to Glitzy.” The program for the OBC’s May 29th meeting was “Milk Bottles of Wayne, Medina and Summit counties.” The program was introduced by Bill Koster, and presented by Jim Cady, Ralph Bowman, David Lehman, Wilbur Bowers, Adam Koch and Bill Koster. Bill said that our club has many milk bottle collectors. Some years back, diggers hated milk bottles. Everybody wanted bottles such as inks, flasks, and bitters. Now, however, some milk bottles sell for $500 or more. Still, even some one-of-a-kind milk bottles don’t bring in the money they should. This club has sold over 250 milk bottle books. The OBC recently lost long-time members George Tomko and Hiram Wilkinson. For more information on joining the OBC, please contact Berny Baldwin (treasurer), 1931 Thorpe Circle, Brunswick, OH 44212. The club also has a new website which can be found at: http://www.ohiobottleclub.com. Details about its milk bottle book can be found there also. Wabash Valley Antique Bottle & Pottery Club Martin Van Zant is newsletter editor for The Wabash Cannonball, the WVABPC’s monthly newsletter. Peggy Zimmer is the club president. Ed Newman tells us the following in the secretary’s report in the June issue: “Hi, everyone, we only had 6 members at the June meeting. This was a nice laid-back summer meeting with lots of stories and gossip. The club picnic was held at the railroad


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shelter at Deming Park. "The date for our show weekend is as follows --- Friday evening, November 21st, for the auction and Saturday the 22nd is our show. This would be a good time to be thinking of some better items for the auction. "This meeting we had a lot of good show and tell. Ned Pennington brought a nice group of early German half-post bottles with some crude looking paint, a beautiful teal wax

sealer jar in mint shape and a reproduction he bought on Ebay. Martin Van Zant, Bill Granger and Doug Smith have been digging some great stuff. Martin and Bill brought in a really cool ice blue blob top soda, a really good-looking ladies leg in black glass, early almost pontiled blob top soda from (guess you had to be there), a crock wax sealer and a handled jug. Martin had a pontiled Indian medicine, pontiled balsam, pontiled scroll and

other nice things. I asked them where they had been digging and they said in the small town of 'None of Your Business.' Huh, I never heard of that town.” The WVABPC holds monthly meetings at Shadows Auction Barn, 1517 Maple Ave., Terre Haute, Ind. Club dues are $10/yr. For more information, please contact Gary Zimmer (treasurer), 10655 Atherton Rd., Rosedale, IN 47874.

pesticides used to get rid of them. Did you know that there are at least 92 different species of bed bugs? I didn’t think so! There were two great digging stories, one by Fletcher and the other by Ed Stewart, in the July issue. The first involved Fletcher, longtime digging buddy Ed Tardy, and Randy Yarberry, all meeting in St. Joseph, Mo. Tardy provided an Extend-A-Probe, which allows sections to be added to lengthen the probe. Yarberry had a device called a Quad Pod, similar to a tripod, but with four legs. Made from heavy duty conduit, it came in five-foot sections and provided a stable base for a pulley. A rope ran through the pulley, allowing buckets of dirt and debris to be pulled from the center of the privy pits. These guys are serious diggers. Among the prizes dug from five pits were a cobalt Sanford’s Radical Cure and a small mini jug with Buffalo Saloon and picture of a buffalo / F.L. Bauer on one side and L.B. & Co. / Handmade / Paducah Club / Kentucky / Finest Whiskey on the other. This is an extremely rare mini jug produced at the Bauer Pottery in Paducah, Ky. St. Joseph drug store bottles include The Elfred Drug Co. / Frederick Ave. / Cor. 9th and Francis Sts.; William Loving / Pharmacist; J.T. Meadows / Pharmacist, and Geo. W. Lormor / Opera House Drug Store.. Stewart’s story was titled "The Drugstore Hole" and took place be-

tween he and Kenny Burbrink on a Wichita, Kan., construction site. Among bottles found were a very rare Joe. Gerteis / Wichita Kas., Hutchinson, and Wichita drug bottles embossed G. Gehring <scales> / Druggist; Established / 1870 / Aldrich & Brown (in ribbon) <mortar & pestle> / 36 Main St.; M.P. Barnes & Sin / The Druggist <mortar & pestle> / 100 Douglas Ave.; <Star> Israel Bros. / Drug & Grocery Store; Dr. L. Saur & Son / Druggists; Chas. Lawrence / Druggist / <CL monogram>. The drug store bottles dated from the late 1870s to the mid 1880s and included some previously unknown examples. Fletcher included no fewer than 21 color photos with his Missouri story, while Stewart included five color photos and one black-and-white vintage photo with his. Those didn’t include photos of a previously unknown Wynnewood / Bottling / Works / Wynnewood, I.T. (Indian Territory) Hutchinson and a Maurice / Well Water / Mangum, Tex. bottle on the front page, as well as color photos (10) of Oklahoma items sold on eBay. The Horse Creek Bottle Club’s June meeting was held at the private museum of Kenny Jarrett in Jackson, S.C. Kenny is owner of Jarrett Rifles, manufacturer of custom sporting rifles, and a super collector of all things South Carolina. His collections range from the prehistoric to the American Revolution to the Civil War and beyond. He also is a worldwide hunter of big game and mounts of his trophies are everywhere. He has a developing in-

Southern Regional News Bill Baab 2352 Devere Street Augusta, GA 30904 (706) 736-8097 riverswamper@comcast.net Mark Wiseman, a member of the Iowa Antique Bottleers, enjoys writing about his digging finds and that’s OK by Johnnie Fletcher, president of the Oklahoma Territory Bottle & Relic Club. Wiseman pens "Iowa Digging" (with Elsie the Pup) and Fletcher used the Mother’s Day 2007 story to fill eight of the Oklahoma Territory News’ 14-page June issue. Another digger, Ed Stewart, filled the final two of the newsy pages. Still other pages were taken up by the two covers and a want ad and Oklahoma Bottles Sold on eBay section. Among the bottles found were many Des Moines, Iowa drug store bottles, including Webb Souers, L.H. Bush, Hufford Bros., J.P. Kelly and Opera House Pharmacy. The best of the lot was a teal green Harlan Bros. / Kirkwood House Drug Store / Des Moines. Stewart, Kenny Burbrink and the latter’s son, Casey, did some digging in St. Joseph, Mo., and one of the neatest bottles found was Dead Stuck for Bugs. It features an embossed bed bug with a pin stuck through it. Bed bugs were a problem in many homes during the 19th and early 20th centuries and "Dead Stuck" was one of several

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a reliable supply. To show me the simple process of making something out of nothing, Benny took one of the labels: "Stories Flux Mixture, A Safe, Sure and Effectual Cure, Dr. J.H. Stories, Dayton, Tenn." He glued it onto the front panel of an aqua cork stopper medicine bottle. "There," he exclaimed, "I just made thirty bucks!" Then he took me out to his storage barn and I must admit that I was impressed by his setup. On the floor and on a long work bench were every types and sizes of plain stoneware jugs. He took one off the bench and showed me what was stenciled on it: "Coca-Cola Bottling Works, Pikeville, Tenn." I was dumfounded and asked him why in the world didn’t he have this rare jug in a safer place. He let out a loud guffaw! "You nitwit, the stenciling on the jug is fake. I personally etched that wording onto it less than a week ago!" He switched on his computer and showed me a mate to that jug listed on eBay. With two days left, bids were already up to $587.25. "But how do you get away with such fraud?" I asked. He said the jug’s photo wasn’t sharp, but "people will buy absolutely anything marked CocaCola and rarely check to see if an item is authentic. Should a buyer deem the stenciling on the jug has been faked, I always give a refund under the condition that they withdraw their negative feedback. This has only happened twice since I started doing this and twice out of 63 jug sales is not a bad average at all, don’t you think?" He took me out to his garage where he showed me something else. He took an unembossed, coffinshaped flask and right before my eyes etched 18th Ala. Rangers (large horseshoe in the center). C.S.A. "This will bring at least $40 on eBay before the week is out," he declared. I asked him if wasn’t he afraid of being caught and sent to jail. "The folks at eBay have never taken any action in any of the fraud claims filed against him and anybody else that I know of. I think the higher-ups at eBay are more concerned about mak-

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ing a buck than protecting their customers from scam artists like me! "If you think my Civil War flask is something, you need to check out my nice assortment of name brand siphons. I buy them for three bucks each from a foreign country, etch them with some bottler’s name along with a well-known brand name, list them on Bay and watch the bids go out of sight! Surely you don’t think I can afford this nice house, a new pickup truck and two ATVs on just my salary as assistant manager at the hardware store?" I just shook my head in disbelief. Two weeks later, Benny asked if I wanted to ride with him to check out the new antique mall in Madison, Ala., as he heard it had a nice assortment of bottles. Despite reservations, I agreed. Once there, I was surprised to find an old friend behind the store’s counter. Barry Lewis and his wife had been in the antiques business for at least 20 years and I’d stopped by one of their earlier stores in Huntsville, Ala. I used to shop at their store, but more often than not stop by to sell the Lewises something I’d found and had no desire to keep. After chatting with Barry for a few minutes, Benny and I went to the area of the store where antique bottles were lined up along a wall shelf. I showed Benny a number of nice poison bottles, including an embossed amber skull in triangular shape. I couldn’t afford it. We browsed around the store and I bought a 1908 vintage post card showing the Portland Dixie Cement Plant in Richard City, Tenn. You can imagine my astonishment and dismay when Benny pulled onto the highway and then began pulling poison bottles from his pockets, including the amber skull I’d admired so much! "These are yours," Benny said. "I saw that you liked them and thought I’d save you a few bucks by getting them the five-finger discount way!" "My lord, Benny! What have you done? Stolen bottles from my good friends! "Awww shucks," he replied. "They won’t miss a few bottles and if they do, we both know they have insurance and they can always claim

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double the value of what I actually took." "Yes, and then their insurance rates will go out of sight!" I accepted the bottles and later returned them with an explanation on how they ended in my possession. I assured the Lewises that Benny would not be back in their store again, at least, not with me. That little incident didn’t dampen Benny’s friendship for me. I saw him three weeks after he’d attended the Jackson (Miss.) Antique Bottle Show, gloating over some of the "bargains" he got there. The "bargains" he obtained by catching some dealers away from their sales tables, swapping price stickers and purchasing the bottles from whoever was minding the tables. Benny showed me his best "bargain," a bottle that had been marked $200 that he was able to buy for just $20 after swapping price stickers. He also got a WW LAKE’S / C E LERY T ON IC B OT T L IN G WORKS / JACKSON, MISS.. He said the celery tonic was actually his second choice at M. Robert Wagner’s table, but seeing as how the young fellow at the table didn’t have a key to a locked display case which held a mint BIEDENHARN / CANDY CO. / VICKSBURG, MISS. embossed Hutchinson soda bottle, he had to settle for it. It was at this point that I decided it was high time for me to part company with Benny and make it a permanent separation. After all, I had many friends in the antique bottle collecting hobby and here I was associated with a fellow with absolutely no morals. It also was slowly dawning on me that Benny was using me to get close to others in the hobby in order to steal from them later. I managed to avoid Benny for the better part of six months. Then by chance I happened to run into him at the First Monday Flea Market on the Scottsboro, Ala., courthouse square. He was glad to see me and I sort of felt kinda bad when he asked why I had not dropped by or answered messages he’d left on my telephone answering machine. I told him I’d been


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September-October 2008

The Jar

Stealing Artifacts from Cemetery Plots Can be Fatal By Charles David Head Everything that Benny Height got involved in turned to gold and, if not for King Midas, he would have had no equal to this day. If it did not benefit Benny in some way, he would not have anything to do with it. Had it not been for one very bad mistake, ol’ Benny would still be alive today and I wouldn’t be writing this story. Actually, this has more of a resemblance to an obituary than a story, but I assure you that it’s quite an interesting one, especially if you stick around long enough to hear about THE JAR! On the surface, Benny seemed to be an ordinary, happy-go-lucky, hardworking, likeable kind of fellow. But beneath all that charm and radiant smile, he was as crooked as a box of fish hooks. He was such a good scam artist that he could have sold a hairbrush to Kojak! I first met Benny while hunting antique bottles in Orme, Tennessee, a quaint little community set at the foot of the Cumberland Plateau, mostly forgotten about nowadays. It was once a thriving coal mining town at the turn of the 20th century. Benny was in the midst of a trip to the Marion County Jail when I happened by chance to drive by and spot Deputy Lancaster putting him into the back seat of the patrol car. Crime being virtually nonexistent in Orme, I rolled to a stop beside the deputy to see what the handcuffed miscreant had done to bring out the long arm of the law. Having gone to school with Deputy Lancaster, I had no qualms about inquiring about what Benny had done. Congratulating the deputy for having the good fortune to be close by when the call came in, he could not help but chuckle as he recounted Mr. Height’s crime to me. Benny had been caught redhanded digging up Mr. Hunter Steele’s back yard in search for antique bottles. Mr. Steele operated a

very successful landscaping company in the county and his nicely manicured lawn was a shrine that clearly showcased his talent as one of the best landscapers in the business. Arriving home from an early Sunday morning fishing trip, Mr. Steele was not at all happy to find someone digging up his back yard. Even though Benny had assured Mr. Steele that he only meant to dig for old bottles on the property next door to his (where the old city dump had recently been rediscovered after a 100-year hiatus), the irate landscaper would listen to no such bunk. He called the law and demanded someone come and remove the human backhoe off his property immediately or else he’d be inclined to take the fellow fishing with him that afternoon and use him for bait! Not wanting to see someone go to jail for "accidentally" straying across someone’s property line while searching for antique bottles (since I’d come close to doing just that), I asked Deputy Lancaster if the matter could be resolved. He said it was up to Mr. Steele as he was the complainant and, since he had not yet signed the arrest warrant, it would be easy to drop the whole affair. Having once worked for Mr. Steele and still being in his good graces, it was relatively easy for me to talk him into letting Mr. Height go. After all, Mr. Steele had a business to run and he’d have to spend a number of days in court should he care to pursue the matter. I had to reassure Mr. Steele that his damaged yard would be restored before the week was out and that Benny would never step foot onto the property once the yard work was done. A handshake sealed the deal and Benny was set free. He was delirious with joy after I had saved him from a trip to the county lockup and more or less adopted me as his best friend then and

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there. He accompanied me on several bottle digs and always seemed to find something worthwhile. During one of my visits to his home in Scottsboro, Ala., Benny astonished me by showing several boxes of Hutchinsons and straight-sided sodas that he had irradiated . What once were clear bottles were now dark purple! Benny said that he used to just irradiate unembossed milk bottles to peddle as flower vases at bottle shows, but had noticed that often the color appeared more of a cobalt blue color rather than a dark purple. Thus inspired, he began to irradiate common embossed clear sodas that he than sold on eBay and at antique bottle shows as very rare cobalt blue variations. He said most people didn’t know the difference, but when hit by negative feedback on eBay, he always refunded the money so as to retain his 100 percent favorable rating. Of course, he rarely got any negative feedback because he intentionally hid the bidders’ IDs to make it difficult for others to contact them and warn them that they were buying altered products! Benny said he raked in most of his money selling irradiated bottles as the real thing, since few people knew the difference. He gleefully quoted P.T. Barnum: "There’s a sucker born every minute!" He had only just begun and seeing that he had my undivided attention, he really got fired up. He showed me a five-inch-high stack of patent medicine labels along with three shelves of plain cork-top, recessed paneled medicine and extract bottles. The bottles were worth very little, he said, until he pasted on the labels. He said he was getting $20 for the labeled ones. He said he often felt like a Baptist preacher when he "married" a paper label to a plain bottle. The plain bottles many collectors call "Plain Janes" he obtained from antique stores or from one of his ads in bottle collector magazines for a dollar or so. That saved him time and trouble of having to wash the plain bottles he’d been digging, plus he had

Bottles and Extras

terest in antique bottles and pottery and showed a pontiled Sands Sarsaparilla to his guests. "I just love pontiled bottles," he said. The club did not meet in July. My wife, Bea, and I enjoy sharing our collection of bottles with John Q. Public. Bob Riddick of Lexington, S.C., who is a member of our club as well as the South Carolina Bottle Club, joined me in an exhibit at the Aiken County (S.C.) Public Library for the month of June. Bob has an outstanding collection of Aiken bottles, while our collection of Augusta bottles on display included the small size River Swamp Chill & Fever Cure whose embossed alligator wowed visitors. Then Bea and I took nearly 100 bottles to the Washington (Ga.) History Museum for a three-month-long exhibit that ended Sept. 30. Included in the display was a Dead Stuck for Bugs (see above), a cobalt eightsided, iron-pontiled S.P. Knickerbocker Soda Water from New York, several Saratoga Springs mineral waters, a 1730s English mallet bottle found in Beech Island, S.C., near Augusta, a 1790s English onion bottle, a Bumstead’s Worm Syrup from Philadelphia ("This Bottle Has Killed 100 Worms"), a Mrs. Winslow’s Sooth-

September-October 2008

ing Syrup and Mrs. Winslow’s Toothing Syrup, a cobalt Casper’s Whiskey ("Made by Honest North Carolina People"), a J.J.W. Peters, Hamburg gin (with embossed German shorthaired pointer), a HunterFisherman calabash, several applied color label bottles and many other Augusta bottles. Appropriate labels accompanied all. The South Carolina Bottle Club’s Jim Edenfield displayed South Carolina Dispensary bottles and jugs at the Sumter (S.C.) Museum in June. The Raleigh Bottle Club’s Marshall Clements was singing the "Computer Blues" during June and July because his PC collapsed and he was forced to utilize one at the public library to work on issues of his Bottle Talk newsletter. His May issue’s cover featured a photo of the rare aqua blobtop S.R. Carrington Bottling Works from Durham, N.C. Club member Robert Creech entertained his fellow members with a video presentation during the April meeting. Included was a collection of photos from the club’s early years as well as collections of current members. The Pepsi-Cola Company each year sent out quality control representatives to test the water and sugar

content at its bottlers. Member Bart Weeks showed a Pepsi sugar tester in its box – a very unusual "go-with." Finally, club member Dean Haley needs help in identifying a Marine Hospital Service bottle. The clear, drug store-like bottle is embossed Marine Hospital Service 1798 – U S – 1871 in a circular slug plate with two crossed anchors in the center. He would like to know its age and origin. Dean can be reached at connerhaley@aol.com. Editor Melissa Milner featured pre-Prohibition shot glasses in the June issue of The Groundhog Gazette, newsletter of The State of Franklin (Tenn.) Antique Bottle & Collectors Association. She noted that such glasses are typically two inches in height, made of thin glass and have acid-etched messages or names. While the Volstead Act enacted by Congress in 1919 went into effect nationwide in 1920, Maine went dry in 1851 and Kansas in 1880, probably the reason no shot glasses or liquor advertising are known from those states. Melissa downloaded 13 shot glass photos to complement the article.

his email is: Nu ggetup@yahoo.com. We’ve had contact with our club in Hawaii and the president will keep in touch if something newsworthy catches his attention. We know that we will be receiving newsletters from clubs not mentioned in this issue when the summer heat leaves and fall settles in.

Jill is focused on salts. Mike Henness seems to be out to break his own record in bringing in some “killer” raffle bottles. You won’t believe this, or maybe you will, Mike got to take one of his own raffle donations back home with him. As a raffle winner he chose his aqua G138 Washington-Taylor Flask. There were four other winners. Wyatt Lake won the yellow amber Doyles Hop Bitters. Mike Lake got to take an open pontil, Keene, New Hampshire aqua pickle bottle. An amber 6-log Drake's Plantation Bitters ended up with Mike McKillop. One of the raffle bottles was donated by Jerry and went home with Jim Kuykendall. Five important issues were discussed and passed at the club’s executive board meeting. For example some of the issues involved charitable con-

Western Regional News Ken Lawler & “Dar” 6677 Oak Forest Drive Oak Park, CA 91377 (818) 889-5451 kenlawler@roadrunner.com We have a new club out here on the West Coast. Even though we are not writing about them in this issue we would like to introduce them. The club is named the “Hemet Historical Bottle Seekers.” When they get fully set up we expect to receive word from them as to their progress. At that time we will include them in our column. In the meanwhile if any of you out there would like to contact the club the president is Austin Jones and

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Forty-Niner Historical Bottle Association – Bottle Bug Briefs There is nothing like starting out with news that the club has two new members. President Jerry introduced two guests at the club’s April meeting. They signed on at that very meeting and the club learned what they collect. Roger is into Western sodas, plus a variety of other items. It seems that


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tributions, tentative scheduling of a picnic and changing the club’s “show name.” One issue of changing the club’s meeting place is still in the discussion stage. It was left that this issue is recognized as an “action motion with more information to come.” Here are Jerry Rickner’s comments regarding a program he presented at their April meeting: “It was my turn to present the program for the evening. I had recently bought a collection that had several old labeled medicines in it. I showed about 40 of them from opium for babies to furniture polish. I think the program was a success because there was a standing ovation at the end. I’m not sure if they were applauding the program or were glad it was over.” We think that the readers will choose to opt for Jerry having done a great job. Los Angles Historical Bottle Club – The Whittlemark Vice President Randy Selenak had an interesting paragraph in his June Announcements portion of the club’s newsletter. Randy wrote about a new event that the club got invol ved in. Here is what he says is coming up in the club’s future: “Internet Bottle Auction." There will be a 10% seller’s premium that will totally benefit the LAHBC. That means the bottles offered to the auction will not be a donation. The consignors receive 90% of the hammer price and the remaining 10% goes into club coffers. This will be the first time that the club has been able to offer this kind of opportunity to their members. On the third Thursday evening in May club members found themselves totally absorbed in the club’s annual auction, in lieu of a regular meeting. Ken Lawler wrote an article calling out the fact that the club’s two Randys “graciously volunteered to act as auctioneers.” Randy Driskill was definitely in his comfort zone with conducting the auction with humor. Randy Selenak was keeping an eye on things and got into the action, too. Dwayne Anthony volunteered to be the runner delivering the items from the auctioneer to the winner. He spent

September-October 2008

a lot of time on his feet as did the two auctioneers. One outstanding action of the evening was the bidding on the Stoll Beer. Dave Garcia and Bob Manthorne did some competitive bidding for that Stoll beauty. Dave’s picture of Dwayne handing Dave the Stoll made it into the June issue of the The Whittlemark. The club treasury has an additional $1,500 or more, thanks to the bunch of bottle huggers who were definitely in the bidding mood. Club hero Tom Hanna was the official site manager saving tables for the picnic again this year. On June 8th, he hit the Arroyo Seco Park in Pasadena at 5:30 a.m. The temperature stayed a pretty consistent 70. Ken Lawler wrote an article on the annual club picnic in which he tells that twenty-two folks showed up. As promised Pam and Randy set up three grills. Pam did her famous tri-tip roast, and sausages and hamburgers were added this year as promised. Ken states in his article that “there were baked beans, green salads, deviled eggs, breads and spreads, cakes, cookies, pies and ice cream.” A raffle was held and four good bottles went to the winners. A drawing was held for a member’s only item. Dave Garcia won that item which was a fivegallon, wide-mouth ceramic jug embossed with Douglass Clay Products Co. Los Angeles, Cal. That jug was a beauty and caught the attention of many of the members. Ken wrote that “Dave Garcia challenged Don Wippert to a game of ‘shoes’ while Dave’s young son and his mother were flying a kite.” Ken ended his article like this: “A lot of bottle tales and talk were exchanged over plates of good food. I think it was a really nice picnic. The food was wonderful, the weather was nice, the people only the best!” Antique Bottle Collectors of Colorado – Dump Digger’s Gazette The first item of interest under “Club News” that got our attention is that there was a club dig held in August. We hope that we will be able to give this dig some coverage in a future column.

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Also announced is that “Future Programs for the Club meetings include ‘Colorado Ghost Towns’ by Ron Ruhoff in September and in October we will hear Dave Cheadle give a program about ‘Fall Theme’ Trade Cards.” Here is something to check on if you haven’t already seen it. President Rick advises in his May President’s Message that Zang Wood has a great article in the May issue of the Antique Bottle and Glass Collector. He noted that Zang is the author of a book entitled, “New Mexico Blobs – Hutches – Mineral Waters.” President Rick definitely has an open mind when it comes to what the members of his club collect. He says that club members have vast interests in collecting. He encourages people to collect “all types of antiques and collectibles.” He feels that variety is what creates a more interesting collection. Rick realizes that some club members are getting restless. He knows that when the snow melts and the weather warms that people are out on the road. He says that club members “are getting the itch to dig, go to garage sales, antique shops, estate sales, auctions, etc.” With that in mind we are betting that some members will be having some pretty exciting “Show and Tell” items to share when club meetings resume in the fall. Northwestern Bottle Collectors Association – The Outhouse Scoop During the club’s April meeting President Leisa asked club members a much-asked question. She asked what she could do to generate more interest in club meetings. Hubby Lou suggested a guest speaker. That idea was well received by club member Richard Siri. He readily volunteered to be the first guest speaker. The “Show and Tell” portion of the meeting brought forth many good items of interest. Leisa brought a late 1800s French fashion doll. She told of purchasing her doll at a yard sale while in Morro Bay. The doll is in good shape and is valued at $2,500. Nice selection, Leisa. Mike Van

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Figure 15 it is often difficult to differentiate between Dutch, English and American types because glasshouses made use of Dutch craftsmen, and vice versa. There are si milar problems when dating is att e m p t e d . Unlike wine and other early Figure 16 glass bottles, the glass seals occasionally found on case bottles are seldom dated, since gin does not need aging. Case bottles blown before the mid-1800s, approximately, have scars on their base left by the breaking off of the pontil rod, while later types (eighteenth and nineteenth century) were blown in dip molds. Beyond the mountain man period (1840s–plus) plate molds were used in the manufacturing of case bottles. This improvement made possible a variety of embossments. They are numerous on the late nineteenth-century bottles. That innovation can be used, by those looking for authentic bottles to include in their rendezvous equipment camp. In addition to a range of lettering usually identifying the company whose product the bottle contained there were many figures and designs such as people, animals, birds, stars and crests – none of these embossed containers from the post 1840-period would have been available to frontiersmen.

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COLLECTING NOTE:

Periodicals: Shafer, James F., II “Sealed in Glass,” Western Collector, Vol VII, March, 1969.

Obtaining examples of the bottles discussed in this article is not particularly difficult or unreasonably expensive – that statement is not true when one is looking to obtain specifically historic or museum-quality pieces. To shop for authentic bottles to include as part of your camp, a good place to start is the Internet auction site http://www.ebay.com/ using one of the following categories: “king’s bottle;” “onion bottle;” “squat bottle;” “mallet bottle;” “Dunmore bottle;” “Wistarburg bottle;” “demijohn bottle;” “carboy bottle;” “seal bottle;” “utility bottle;” “utility jar.” Any and all of the above types may be found more easily in the large general category, “black glass container.” Then there are, of course, the usual places such as flea markets, garage sales, estate sales, auctions or antiques stores. Bibliography Books: Beare, Nikki. Bottle Bonanza. Florida: Hurricane House Publishers, Inc., 1965. Davis, Derek C. English Bottles & Decanters – 1650-1900. New York: The World Publishing Company, 1972. McKearin, George and Helen. American Glass. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc. 1941 and 1968. Munsey, Cecil. The Illustrated Guide to COLLECTING BOTTLES. New York: Hawthorn Books, Inc. 1970. Munsey, Cecil. Would You Believe. San Diego, California: Neyenesch, Inc., 1968. Monroe, Loretta. Old Bottles Found Along the Florida Keys. Coral Gables, Florida: Wake-Brook House, 1967. Van den Bossche, Willy. Antique Glass Bottles. Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: Antique Collectors’ Club, 2001.

“Bottle Seal Cannot be Counterfeited,” Scientific American, Vol. CLI, October, 1934. Hudson, J. P. “17th-Century Glass Wine Bottles and Seals Excavated at Jamestown,” Journal of Glass Studies, 1967. Hume, Ivor Noel. “17thCenturyVirginians Seal; Detective Story in Glass; Sealed Wine Bottles,” Antiques, Vol LXXII, September, 1957. Correspondence: Robert J. Merada, of the Florida Frontiersmen, to author, March 2004. Internet: “An Estate of a Mountain Man” by M i k e M o o r e – http://klesinger.com/jbp/estate.html James Baird died on November 4, 1826 in El Paso. An inventory was made of his belongings at that time, with witnesses to approve the writing to be correct. “Language of the Rendezvous” by Coon ‘n Crockett Muzzloaders, Grand Forks, North Dakota http://www.cooncrockett.org/cnc~glos .htm “A Glossary of American Mountain Men Terms, Words & Expressions” compiled by Walt Hayward & Brad McDade of The American Mountain Men http://xmission.com.~drudy/amm/glas s.hetm Cecil Munsey 13541 Willow Run Road Poway, CA 92064-1733 phone: 858-487-7036 email: cecilmunsey@cox.net gmail: cecilmunsey@gmail.com website: CecilMunsey.com More than 1200 free-to-copy wellresearched articles and other materials of interest to bottle collectors


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olive oil, anisette, and so forth; the same holds true for unmarked bottles and the large demijohns or carboys. Of the liquids other than wine that were put in bottles generally thought of as wine containers, rum was, no doubt the most popular. Seals on wine bottles may also carry the date the bottle was manufactured or first used, and are especially helpful in dating the containers. Such dates, however, are not necessarily indicative of the period the bottle was used because glass bottles were relatively expensive in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and were often used and reused until broken. Utility and Other Black Glass Bottles Utility bottles and other black glass containers are also among the historic bottles that belonged in a

Figure 11 mountain man’s “Plunder Chest.” (Fig. 11) is an example of a freeblown utility (or snuff) jar that was made in New England between 18001830. It is cylindrical, black glass and has an applied collared mouth with a laid on ring. (Fig. 12) pictures an early freeblown utility bottle, from New England. It was made during the 17801840 period. It is eight inches tall and approximately five inches wide.

Format 12 (Fig. 13) is a typical black glass wine bottle of the early 1800s. This is probably one of the easiest to obtain free-blown bottles that may have graced the plunder chest of a typical frontiersman. These bottles were made by the thousands and were often used and reused because of their durability. (This particular bottle recently sold on eBay for $25.)

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American trappers and traders – especially at rendezvous of mountain men. Trade goods almost always contained a few bottles of “fire water” – (This term comes from the Indian practice of throwing a cup of whiskey into a fire to see if it would burn. If it would not flame up, it would not be accepted.) Bottles used to contain those three alcoholic beverages had to travel some rough sea voyages and land trips to reach the places where they were consumed. To keep such bottles from breaking during shipment, case bottles were designed to fit in boxes made especially for that purpose (Fig. 14). Containers for alcoholic beverages have been many and varied over the centuries. A variety of stoneware bottles were used as were many cylindrical glass bottles, but the most predominant of all gin containers has been square-bodied case bottles. The term “case bottle” originally referred to an octagonal bottle (Fig. 15). During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries case bottles were used extensively by chemists and apothecaries; since gin was originally dis-

Figure 14

Figure 13 Case Bottles Rum, gin and whiskey were favored “hard” beverages of pioneering

pensed as a medicine it is safe to assume that from its inception it was distributed in case bottles. Case bottles of the seventeenth century differ little from those of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but the earlier examples were almost straight-sided, whereas the later types were more tapered (Fig. 16). It can be supposed that it made no difference to traders and trappers but

Bottles and Extras

Wormer is going into a “research” mode with his purchase of a deed to a piece of property in Napa that is dated 1867. He’s working on checking out where the property is located. That was a good find. You never know what gems are in among items for sale. We have personally realized that folks should carefully look through every item displayed for sale. John Hemphill added a personal touch by bringing in bottles that belonged to his father. He let the members do a “hands on” as the bottles made their way around the meeting. The bottles consisted of a clear “Roth and Company whiskey and some amber rectangular quarts, Lea & Perrins Worcester, Old Campe Rye Whiskey and a Homer's California Ginger Brandy.” Chuck Ingram showed a clear Whitman & Greene San Francisco whiskey in two different sizes. “Bill Ham finished the evening with an overview of Rosenbaums Bitters. Bill does a really good job and is well informed.” Oregon Bottle Collectors Association – The Stumptown Report Additional information on new member Arlie Anderson appeared in the recent issue under “New Member – Update.” It is reported that Arlie has been attending OBCA shows for about seven years. He first started attending OBCA shows after picking up a show flyer while he and his wife were checking out some antique shops in Medford and Jacksonville. His interest in collecting bottles goes back in years to Rhode Island on the East Coast. He lived there for some years after being discharged from the Navy. The most important part of his background is that a friend back in the area lived in an old farm house and invited him to dig for bottles. “When he actually found one, he was hooked. His taste is for the unusual or uncommon colors and/or shapes.” There was no shortage of items brought to the June meeting. We feel that Secretary Bill captured the whole evening in great detail. He wrote that the theme for “Show and Tell” was food and drink bottles. Then his notes

September-October 2008

went on with what members brought in. Perhaps Mark had one of the more personal stories to tell in that he told folks that his grandfather ran a saloon in Sandy. The next comment was that his grandfather somehow got himself kicked out of the Christian Church. The kicker is that his grandfather then became mayor! This next item sounds like another family story should accompany it. Mark showed a Junker’s Confectionery and Restaurant framed 1925 calendar. In addition to the intriguing information above, he showed a green blob top bottle embossed Mineral Water with Honesdale Soda Works in weak lettering on the back. He mentioned that Kim dug it in New York! He also brought in many other great items of interest such as his pontiled mustard with a rolled lip that caught our interest. Jeremy brought in a couple of items, one of which was an amethyst The Owl Pharmacy Co., Seven Troughs, Nev., drug bottle. Bill mentioned that “It is one of Nevada’s top bottles and is really a killer.” Many members brought in great finds. It is always amazing to see how much variety there is in any given “Show and Tell” segment of a meeting. We read where Mark and Scott are not going to dig back East this spring. There is always next year. Maybe the gas prices will be better. Surely we jest! We know your club is shutting down for the summer, as are some others. However, we look forward to your resuming your meetings in September and we will be watching for your newsletters. San Diego Antique Bottle and Collectibles Club – The Bottleneck This club has joined the ranks of being among some other clubs who will be in “summer shut-down” mode for newsletters and meetings. No doubt that some of this club’s members will be vacationing and milling about in antique stores hopefully “helping the economy. Perhaps some of the treasures found and acquired during the summer will pay off in being used for future “Show and Tell”

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segments. In spite of the intense heat, we hope to learn of some serious digging that took place during the summer months. During the May meeting club members welcomed “new member” John Crihfield. New members will probably see more of their names in print when they bring in their finds into meetings and share information about them during the “Show and Tell” part of meetings. Welcome aboard! The club’s May meeting sounded too good to be true! However, it turns out that it was more than good. In fact Secretary Jim reported that the “evening’s program consisted of a fascinating slide show.” We read that the program was a slide show by Matt Lawson and Kevin Westfall. They explained the art and science of bottle digging. Jim further stated in his notes, “Great job, guys! If not for the late hour, I think most of us were ready to grab our probes and shovels and head for the Gaslamp!” We don’t think Mike Bryant will mind us mentioning some of the highlights from his “Two Great Finds in One Month” article that appeared in the June 2008 issue. It starts out that Mike and Frank Pekerak (club “Prez Sez” guy) went “San Diego milk bottle” hunting one morning. They went to a house to look at some milk bottles. They ended up in the garage and this is when the story gets really good. Mike says, “Frank came up to me and asked if I had seen the metal plaque hanging on the wall. I had not, and he said you better get over there and look. I was dumbfounded when I saw what it was. This was the metal (copper) name plate for the San Diego Brewing Co. that was attached to the wall outside the brewery. The building stood at 32nd & Bay Front from 1908 until it was torn down in 1945.” Guess where that copper name plate is now? Mike further explains another person’s good buy that was brought to the May meeting for show and tell. Keith Baumgartner purchased a nice looking whiskey bottle with a complete label at the swap meet one week-


18

end. Mike said that Keith didn’t spend much time checking out his bottle. However, Keith learned at the meeting that he owns “the finest labeled example of this bottle.” Members had not seen such a fine example. Mike ends his article by saying “Oh, I almost forgot, Keith paid a $1 for it. Way to go, Keith!” Las Vegas Antique Bottles and Collectibles – The Punkin Seed The club’s board has approved club bus trips for the next 12 months. As a result a June bus trip to Prescott was chaired by Louise Colluci and Dennis Larson. Secretary Rebecca wrote a trip report. From reading about the serenading bus driver to the bingo-playing gigglers it is our assumption that everyone put their heart into this trip. They enjoyed good food and shopped well. The trip report reads like members of the group each bagged a bunch of miscellaneous treasures and dropped back into their seats on the bus feeling pretty darn satisfied. Rebecca said, “We got back into Las Vegas at dusk and went home excited that our next meeting was only three days away.” In the June issue of this club’s newsletter, Editors Dottie and Dick Daugherty placed a notice on the front page to alert club members that “we, the editors are trying out a new format for the Club Newsletter.” The editors have three main reasons for the new format. They shared those with the club, as well. One reason is that “The commercial Zerox machines that print the 100 copies of The Punkin Seed each month have not been satisfactory in the folding process of the masters we take to them.” It was stated that several machines have the same printer problem. The editors are trying to satisfy postal guidelines for mailing folded and tabbed newsletters. The second reason is a pretty hefty one. As many editors realize, there are laborintensive efforts involved in putting the newsletter together, getting it published and on the road to club members. These editors consistently issue a newsletter every month. The editors

September-October 2008

went on to explain their suggestion. They said that they have converted their guest bedroom into “The Punkin Seed Room.” This is how the editors closed in on their idea: “We have the room and the time and we’d like to attempt to by-pass the commercial printer and see if it is feasible time and money-wise to print the 100 newsletters in ‘The Punkin Seed Room’ each month.” Additionally, “To cut costs, we want to see if a shorter page newsletter could be ‘home made’ and put in envelopes for mailing and still contain enough of the education and information you members have been accustomed to receiving.” It is the intention of the editors to try the envelope mailing method at least one time. If favorable comments are received by the membership, the new method will continue. Reno Antique Bottle Club – Digger’s Dirt One of the club’s latest programs was presented by Alan Bruner. He showed slides that was evidence of his 750-mile backpack walk “from the most southern point of Nevada to the northern border of Oregon and Nevada.” He explained that he traveled across deserts, mountains and through the U.S. Government secret area “51” near Tonopah. His slides were of remote Nevada. What a treat club members had that evening. Most members would never have had any idea of what the remote area of Nevada looks like. Alan had put 750 miles on one pair of boots. Who knows how many miles he had on them prior to his “one-man” trek. Here is a new approach. This club “received a letter from Adrian S. Janit, Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. He asked if any of our club members would like to participate in a questionnaire about collecting. Most everyone raised their hand. Doctor Janit will pay the club $1.50 for each form returned.” It is estimated that the questionnaires would take about five minutes to complete. Six club members (Marty Hall, Bill Metscher, Helene Walker, Maryann Lawrence, Duane Warth and Russ

Bottles and Extras

Umbraco) decided to make one of their meetings more interesting by bringing in several items for display. Some of those items included ghost town signs, bicentennial signs and ranged all the way to “pictures of a collection of deer and elk, which had locked horns and were unable to free themselves.” At the same meeting some club members made donations. We read that “Dave Abel donated a Steinmetz medicine from Carson City. Marty furnished a beautiful fluted neck Lashes Bitters. Mary Warth donated a nice soda. Susan Pelt donated a book about Nevada and slot machines. Bill Metscher furnished some 2008 calendars from the Nellis Air Force Group.” Back in May we exchanged an email with Prez Marty. During that email exchange Marty commented on an experience he had survived. We think we remember that we encouraged him to write about it in a future newsletter. It would definitely make a “killer” story. Let’s see how many from the Reno club read the Bottles and Extras magazine and start asking Marty, “What experience?” New Mexico Historical Bottle Society On June 26th we received the club’s “2nd meaty newsletter of the 2008 season.” That is what President Jerry Simmons says in his “Notes from the President.” We tend to agree with Jerry after reviewing the newsletter and learning how busy club members have been during the first five months of this year. It seems that these folks have a couple of hobbies that compliment each other, digging and being invited over to someone’s home for chow! Jerry mentions club members digging in Albuquerque and Carthage. He also mentions the “chow” part in that Jim Garcia had club members over for a “fantastic pre-show meeting and barbeque.” We read that the Carthage trip gave folks a walking workout. Carthage has been noted as a “good future dig/get together site” for club members. The real

Bottles and Extras

Demijohns and Carboys While one doesn’t very often see them at a rendezvous, very large glass containers known as demijohns and carboys are worthy of a separate discussion. These bottles command attention mainly because of their size. They sometimes are large enough to contain ten or more gallons and weigh up to thirty or forty pounds empty, although both types are normally manufactured to hold from one to ten gallons. Demijohns were usually manufactured in a bulbous or bladder

September-October 2008

came popular when the use of molds became the most efficient method. Both were bulk containers that were reused until broken. Originally almost all of these large bottles were

Figure 7 covered with wicker baskets (Fig. 7) or wooden boxes to reduce the chance of breakage. The earliest of these bottles were made in dark green to black glass but an amber specimen is sometimes located. Nineteenth-century examples are found in aqua and clear glass in addition to the common dark green and black glass, and are of the blown-in-mold type.

Figure 5 shape (Fig. 5) and have rather long necks; carboys, on the other hand, were generally cylindrical in shape and had short necks. From all indications demijohns were more popular in the early days when free blowing was the most practical method of producing bottles (Fig. 6), and carboys be-

Figure 6

Seal Bottles The practice of attaching glass seals to the shoulders or sometimes the bodies of wine bottles began in England in the 1600s. Some of the earliest found bear dates from the 1650s. Seal bottles (Fig. 8) were not a new idea when adopted by the English; they go back to Roman times. On glass bottles, seals were applied after the bottles were completed but not annealed (cooled). A glob of glass was taken from the furnace and lightly fused to the hot bottle, then while the glob was still hot it was impressed with a stamp rather like a stamp used for impressing sealing wax. The stamp would, of course, have lettering and/or design cut in backwards on it. (Such a process should not be confused with the later

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practice of embossed lettering achieved by either carving into the bottle mold, or on plates that were inserted into the mold.)

Figure 8

On wine bottles, seals were first used as identifying marks for taverns and persons of the upper class (Figs. 9 & 10). Later the custom spread to

Figure 9

Figure 10 shipping agents, merchants, and distillers. Before the 1800s wine bottle seals were the exception rather than the rule. Not all bottles bearing seals were wine containers. Some seal-bearing bottles contained mineral water, rum,


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September-October 2008

Authentic Bottles as Part of Your “Plunder Chest” or Camp By Cecil Munsey

Copyright© 2004 - 2008 [This article was written originally for Muzzle Blasts magazine, the official publication of the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association (NMLRA). It deals with teaching “Mountain Men”, “Historical Re-enactors” and “Rendezvous” fans about collecting and including original period bottles in their activities. Photographs courtesy of W. Van den Bossche and F. Weegenaar.]

Black glass bottles, as pictured on the famous NMLRA target (Fig. 1), were among the first containers of liquids to come to America from Europe. While mountain men, like Jedediah Smith and Jim Bridger, carried some glass containers as they roamed and worked in frontier Amer-

The glass was so dark that at first glance it appeared to be black. Interestingly enough, black glass is a very durable glass, and therefore better, because it can withstand a great deal more exposure to the natural elements than can glass of other colors. Squat Wine Bottles Squat wine bottles (Fig. 2), made in the 1600s–1800s, are one of the types of early bottles most desired by

Bottles and Extras

The Dutch also made squat wine bottles during the seventeenth century. The Dutch version is usually found with a comparatively longer neck than the English model (Fig. 3). Another difference between the two types of free-blown squat wine bottles can be found by examining their bases. English bottles of this type have an almost nonexistent basal kickup (bottom of the container pushed up into the interior during construction) and a rather small pontil (rod) scar, while Dutch versions have a rather severe basal kick-up and a large pontil scar (Fig. 4). Still another difference can be found on the bottlenecks: The Dutch examples feature flat wraparound rims, whereas the English

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

“biggie” seems to have been the King-

ston, New Mexico trip. Looking at the full-page picture of the mountain area in the newsletter makes one feel like they are flying over the mountains under their own power. There are multiple pictures from the place they stayed to bottles galore and “smiling” Pete “hitting paydirt!!” We have to mention Zang Wood. He’s pictured with Pete after Pete handed him a “Black, Range, Soda Works New Mexico” soda. This may be a first, but folks actually thought that this is

the first time that they had seen Zang almost speechless. People who know Zang will appreciate and understand this comment A couple of terrific articles also appeared in this issue of the newsletter. Greg and Marcia Hoglin told of their Michigan bottle dig. They threw in a couple of pictures so that we could see that they were serious about this dig. Mike Dickman supplied “Poisonland.” Mike had an entire page of excellent quality pictures of two skull poisons. One is a cobalt and the

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other is clear. The detail in the pictures is outstanding. The schedule of four meetings a year appears to work well for the club. The meetings and digs end up being well attended. Jerry had told us some time ago that the club tries to have a club dig every time they have a meeting. The “combo” works for this club. Who said “digging” opportunities were best in the 1960s? These folks will have none of that, thank you!

Canning History Fun Facts 1795

Napoleon offers a 12,000 franc prize for a method of preserving food for his armies which had such long, vulnerable supply lines that hunger began to tax their fighting strength.

1810

Nicolas Appert, a French confectioner, wins the prize. He experimented in preserving food by sterilization by sealing food tightly inside a glass bottle or jar and then heating it.

Also in 1810 Figure 2

British merchant Peter Durand received a patent from King George III for a tin plated iron can to be used as a food container, allowing sterilized food to be preserved more effectively.

Now for the rest of the story: Canned rations provided to soldiers and explorers saved legions from sure starvation and the cans were useful for ocean voyages, during which glass bottles tended to break, and soon the British Navy was dining on canned vegetables and meat. So far, so good, but, what Durand (and everyone else for that matter) forgot to invent was a way to open the cans. For 50 years, getting into your pork ‘n’ beans required the use of a hammer and chisel. Figure 1 ica, few examples remain today. Those bottles that do exist mostly belong to private collectors and museums. The bottle category is generically called “black-glass” because iron slag was added to the basic glass mixture of sand, soda, and lime to produce a very dark glass. Until approximately the mid1800s it was believed that dark glass (“black glass”) was the best glass. This belief probably stemmed from the demand for dark glass containers by merchants of wine and spirits after they discovered their products would keep better in dark containers. Glassmakers catered to the demand by making a very cheap “’black glass.”

1858

Ezra Warner, an American, patented the can opener. An intimidating combination of bayonet and sickle and it was adopted by the US military during the Civil War. (Note the year – it should be very familiar to jar collectors)

Figure 3 black powder aficionados who are concerned with the authenticity of their equipment (gear). They come in a wide variety of sizes and because they were free-blown no two are alike in shape. Squat wine bottles have several names including “king’s,” “onion,” “squat,” “mallet,” “Dunmore,” and “Wistarburg” – take your choice. Squat wine bottles were made in England from about 1600 to 1830; it is not likely that any were made in America but if they were it would be difficult if not impossible to differentiate between the two types.

However, it was not particularly convenient. Early openers were stationed at grocery stores and clerks did the honor of opening the cans. 1870

Figure 4 specimens have an applied collar (laid-on ring).

William Lyman patented a very easy to use can opener with a wheel that rolls and cuts around the rim of the can, thus, cans could be opened at home!


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September-October 2008

Earl Swift’s Slate Cleaner Patented May 8th, 1877 By Dave Maryo

Sometimes you find a bottle is not what it first appears. This is one of those bottles. This little cobalt blue bottle looks like an ink, but it is a slate cleaner bottle. Slate cleaners were needed at a time when the old oneroom school houses used chalk on slate for their daily lessons. But some students used pencils to mark on the slate that could not be wiped off like chalk. The pencil marks were difficult to remove and required a good washing, leaving the slate wet and not suitable for chalk until it was dry. That’s when Earl Swift and other inventors created slate cleaners and tools to remove the pencil marks. The

bottle was originally fitted with a sponge over a cork held in place by wire. The cork had a central opening to allow the cleaning liquid to soak the sponge when the bottle was turned upside down. The bottom end of the bottle was threaded to attach a nut to hold piece of chamois skin over a pad to wipe the slate dry. After resting in the ground for more than a hundred years only the glass bottle remains. Dave Maryo (760) 617-5788 Dave@bottleauction.com

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

This capstan monogrammed example is 4 3/4th inches tall and is capable of holding about 9-ounces of liquid when filled to the lip. Its outer diameter at the mouth is 2 3/8th inches or 60 millimeters. A slightly angled inward and smooth outer body terminates at a 2 1/8th inches wide base. The applied color Capstan Glass Company insignia on this outer surface is 1 9/16th inches in height. Internally, there are fourteen, very lightly pressed vertical flutes arranged side by side. These slightly visible features appear to have rounded upward tops and rounded downward bottoms. Convex to the touch throughout their length, these panels have sides which slant inward from top (1/2 inch) to bottom (7/16th inch). The underneath side of the base on this example carries no embossing whatsoever. Without an employee verbal history report, speculation is the only tool left to suggest why this specimen was ever pressed and decorated. I’ve lumped the ash trays, ice crusher and ice bucket in with it to support a possible story line which is, at the very least, believable. Is it the correct reason? Only time will tell. Paperweight The last piece of office ware is seen in Figure 9. Many glass companies had paperweights manufactured as advertisement mementos but none that I’ve seen have ever solely used the firm’s trademark in this role.

September-October 2008 th

53 office windows you will find the paper weight a handy desk accessory. We will gladly send paper weights to packing company executives on request.”3

th

x 2 5/8 inch square base that is 1/4 inch in height. On the obverse of each side panel is embossing which spells out – CAPSTAN – GLASS – COMPANY – CONNELLSVILLE. This paperweight was first advertised by itself in April 1923. A February 1937 sales pitch was the last time it was shown. The text, which accompanied the initial marketing ploy, follows: “In the Capstan glass paper weight we have visualized our Trade Mark, which has come to mean quality glass containers, fair dealing, and prompt service to the users of packers’ ware. With the coming of Spring and open

1

Tumblers, Jars and Bottles; A Product Identification Guide for the Capstan Glass Company, South Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Barry L. Bernas, 239 Ridge Avenue, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 17325, 2007, pgs. 21-22 and 31-32 2 Ibid, pg. 68. The advertisement for this tumbler indicated it had a capacity of twelve and three-eighths ounces. 3 Ibid, pg. 132

Postscript I think you’ll agree with my comment that the pieces of glassware that I just introduced are anomalies, especially when discussing the glass container products turned out by factory hands from the Capstan Glass Company. If we only knew the purpose for which these decorative items were made, we could better understand why Capstan officials seemingly moved into another area of the glass industry and added these novelty pieces to their tumbler, jar and bottle lines. Maybe, it had something to do with the impending merger of its parent organization, the Anchor Cap Corporation, with the Hocking Glass Company in late 1937 or perhaps, another strategy played out altogether. Right now, the distance between that rationale and explanation continues to increase in time, causing the real reason to continually fade from crystal clarity into opaque obscurity. This trend doesn’t bode well for determining the reason any time soon. I can use your help. If you have other pieces of Capstan marked ware that are outside of the tumbler, jar and bottle categories, I would truly appreciate a direct contact. That way, we can discuss and record your find and then put forth your discovery for the benefit of all enthusiasts in our hobby. Barry L. Bernas 239 Ridge Avenue Gettysburg, PA 17325 (717) 338-9539 barryb6110@aol.com

Figure 9 Being 3 1/8th inches tall, this novel promotional device has a 2 5/8th

Ad for Capstan from the January, 1934 edition of The Glass Packer


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

at the top provide the support for a shiny metal carrying handle. In my opinion, the decorations on the outer and inner body of this pail are extraordinary.

Figure 5 profiles the fully assembled ice crusher. Ironically, I’ve seen the same style of crushing tool atop a Hazel Atlas Glass Company marked applied color banded tumbler. On the HA trademarked example, the container was internally fluted and carried the identical red-black-red-black-red outer design as the Capstan 595 version. Which one came before the other? I can’t say one way or the other. If nothing else, my encounter with a twin from another glass maker indicated one of two things to me. Either there was an intense head to head competition on-going between both firms in the mid-1930s for a bigger piece of the glass container market or the assembler of the ice crusher got a better deal for the glass bottom from whomever made it second. Ice Bucket To complement the ash trays and hand operated ice crusher, the next Capstan oddity is a depression green colored ice bucket. It is pictured in Figure 6. This beautifully crafted model is 5 7/8th inches tall. Across the outer top lip, the distance measures 5 1/16th inches. Its circular side wall angles inward from top to bottom, drawing the exterior diameter of its base down to 4 inches. Two circular glass bosses

Figure 6 The slant exterior surface has a smooth backdrop for other objects and patterns that have been engraved thereon. Along the top just under the lip are twelve finger tip shaped forms cut into the exterior wall in a downward position. Two inches down from the mouth is a 1/8th inch wide line, running around the bucket. Two inches up for the base is a matching companion. On the front and back between both horizontal features is a flower motif. It is composed of six, 5/16th inch in diameter circles arranged in a circular pattern. To the right and left of this form are leaves in the shape of an arrowhead. Turning to the interior, twelve panels are pressed onto this surface. Rounded upward at the top and rounded downward at the bottom, these flutes have sides which angle slightly inward from top (1 1/4th inches) to bottom (1 inch). Convex shaped throughout their length, these decorative features are connected side by side around the inner circumference of the ice bucket. In the center of its circular base is an impressive and strongly embossed 5/8th of an inch tall capstan. Figure 7 refers.

September-October 2008

Got Tired Blood? Get Blood Life!

South Georgia pharmacist’s formula reportedly cured what ailed you By Bill Baab

Figure 7

Figure 5

Bottles and Extras

I’ve seen other examples of this ice bucket in the same color with a matching engraved outer pattern and an exactly molded inner motif. However, these models didn’t have any maker’s logo embossed on the base. I’m presuming Capstan Glass coopted this popular design for their purposes. If the engraving was done by their personnel in the South Connellsville, Pennsylvania factory, this craftsmanship represents an impressive step upward for their product line. Monogrammed Glass Adding to the prior trio, the glass in Figure 8 completes the presumed customer entertainment set.

Redden Whitaker Adams knew as a child what he wanted to be when he grew up, and it wasn’t a policeman or a fireman. His notion of becoming a druggist came to fruition perhaps sooner than he expected. Born October 23, 1885 in the tiny Thomas County town of Boston in southwest Georgia, Adams left an indelible mark on his birthplace by developing a formula that reportedly benefited people who lacked energy, a common complaint during that day as well as the present. Blood Life was guaranteed under the Pure Food and Drug Act of June 30, 1906 and was assigned No. 7692. It was produced in unique, dark amber, embossed flask-like bottles and labeled "The Great and General Tonic and Blood Purifier." One bottle sold for a dollar or a bargain six bottles for $5. Nearing his 17th birthday on Oct. 23, 1902, he became a pharmacist’s apprentice in Madison, Florida and with Bruce Pharmacy in Tifton, Georgia. He became a registered pharmacist in Florida on June 17, 1903, and earned his permanent druggist’s li-

Figure 8 I called this specimen a glass because it neither has the weight nor stouter construction qualities noted in the Capstan tumbler line. Additionally, it isn’t embossed with a Company trademark on its base. That logo appears on the front in the applied color red.

J. C. Adams and Sons Drugstore

cense No. 958 in Georgia on July 12, 1903 to become what is believed to be the youngest licensed pharmacist in that state’s history. Two years later, he joined his father, James C. Adams, and his brother, Denzil Roy Adams, in purchasing the City Drug Store in their hometown of Boston from Dr. Henry C. Vann (1850-1933). The drug store

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had been in business under various owners since 1882. Among other things, the Blood Life Company’s product, operating under the Adams Drug Company roof, claimed to be a remedy for scrofula (swellings of the lymph glands in the neck), rheumatism, syphilitic sores, old sores, boils and pimples and other skin eruptions, erysipelas (skin condition with a fever), cancerous humor (humor defined as a normal body fluid), salt rheum and other general diseases resulting in impure blood. Adams’ grandson, Jim Mayo of Weaverville, North Carolina, discovered a number of artifacts in the attic of the old drug store, including bot-

tles, broadsides, labels, colorful wrappers and wooden crates. Later, he found his grandfather’s "Private Formulae" book dated 1902. In it was the recipe for Blood Life and many other concoctions. Principal ingredient, according to the formula book, was potassium iodide. A medical reference book noted that "in regions where little iodine is obtained in the diet, iodides are completely effective in the prevention of goiter. . .widely employed in the treatment of bronchitis and asthma." It’s also been used in the treatment of diseases found in cattle, the reference book text reported.


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

gie

Blood Life wrapper

Free Library to Boston. It opened in 1914. He also owned more than 1,400 acres of land and his wife spearheaded the founding of the Boston Red Cross, according to newspaper articles of that era. Boston, named in honor of Capt. Thomas M. Boston, dates to 1830 and was incorporated by an act of the Georgia Legislature on Oct. 24, 1870. A member of the Georgia Pharmaceutical Association, during World War I Adams volunteered his services to the American Red Cross. Compensated only for expenses, he was commissioned a lieutenant and assigned to the American Expeditionary Force (AEF). Red Cross archives noted in their "Co m mi s s io n to Greece Reports Red Cross insignias

printed by P.D. Sakellarios in Athens on July 1, 1919" that Lt. R.W. Adams established a refugee station in a mosque in Serres and that "he remained in charge throughout the period of active distribution.".

Lily & Mary Adams Blood Life broadside

The Adamses were prominent in Boston’s social life. He played first chair violin in the "Boston Symphony Orchestra" (11 players under the direction of H.C. Witt), and he and his wife, Lily, were largely responsible for bringing a Carne- R. W. Adams & wife (on left)

Calling card used while in Greece

While stationed there, he was promoted to captain and honored by having the "Decoration of the Silver Cross of Our Order of St. Sauveur" conferred upon him by the nation’s king. The monarch also pinned the Medal of Military Valor, Fourth Class, on Adams’ chest "for the principal part he took in the distribution of aid to the inhabitants of Serres, acting personally and exposing himself while doing so, to the danger of being attacked by the (typhus) epidemic raging in the town, exceeding in activity and self-denial, working methodically

Bottles and Extras

extant today. If you have a better explanation for their presence, other than what I’ve laid out in my supposition, I’d surely like to hear from you. Ash Trays Figure 2 contains a picture of two sizes of octagonal ash trays that carry the Capstan Glass trademark. On the left, the black glass

Figure 2 specimen is 5 7/8th inches wide, 5 7/8th inches long and weighs two pounds two and one-fourth ounces. At its summit, the side walls are 1 3/16th inches tall. Four semicircular shaped depressions are formed onto the outer top ledge. Due to their size, they most likely were meant as a resting place for lighted cigars. The circular indentation in the center of this ash tray is 9/16th of an inch in depth and has an outer diameter of 4 9/16th inches. Boldly embossed in the center of this region is an 11/16th inch tall capstan, proudly facing upward and announcing its presence for all to see. The underneath side of the lefthand model has a slightly raised, flat, 3/16th inch wide, octagonal bearing surface. At its innermost point, there is a 3/16th inch slanted inward segment which blends into a 4 1/8th inch wide and 4 1/8th inch long flat and unembossed octagonal surface. If the heavy left-hand example was for cigars, then its mate to the right could have been for cigarettes. This black glass specimen is 4 inches wide, 3 15/16th inches long and weighs ten and one-half ounces. The vertical outer side wall is 3/4th of an inch tall. Similar to its counterpart, there are also four semicircular shaped depressions along the top outer surface. Unlike its mate to the left, these half circle indentations are shallower in construction and probably intended as a place rest for lighted

September-October 2008

cigarettes. The center of this ash tray’s top has a 5/8th inch slanted depression that merges into a flat circular recession which has a 2 3/8th inches outer diameter. Directly in the center of this region is an upward facing, 7/16th inch tall Capstan Glass trademark. Turning this model over, we find a flat, 3/16th inch wide, octagonal bearing surface. At its innermost point, there is a 3/16th inch slanted inward segment which blends into a 3 1/8th inch wide by 3 1/8th inch long flat and unembossed octagonal surface.

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vertically oriented flutes. These identical panels have a convex shape throughout their length. Designed with rounded upward tops, curved downward bottoms and canted inward sides (1/4th inch wide at the top and 3/16th inch wide at the bottom), these curved outward features are connected side by side around the inner circumference of the tumbler. The circular base on this banded model has an outer diameter of 2 9/16th inches. Figure 4 has a picture of this part.

Ice Crusher The second specialty piece is composed of a tumbler from Capstan Glass and an ice crushing mechanism from the Schulte Brass Manufacturing Company of Norwood, Ohio. Figure 3 shows each section.

Figure 4

Figure 3 Regarding the container, this vessel is 5 5/8th inches tall and holds 13fluid ounces when filled to the overflow point.2 It has a smooth sealing area at the outer lip vice an Anchor finish which is usually comprised of a vertical surface and knurling. To properly seal this container, a 70 millimeter size of metal push-down cap would suffice. The exterior side wall on this specimen is smooth and slants ever so slightly inward from top to bottom. Around it are five applied color bands in a red-black-red-black-red sequence. The red lines are 1/8th inch in width and the black ones are twice that size or 1/4th inch wide. Internally, there are thirty-two

In the center, the trademark for the Capstan Glass Company is strongly embossed. Underneath it is the mold number 595 while over the same symbol is the series number 13. The ice crushing apparatus on the right in Figure 3 consists of a black wooden handle connected to a thin circular metal support bar. At the end of this rod is a round metallic plate carrying nine pointed downward prongs constructed of the same material. Around the support bar is a shinny metal top with the phrase – PAT.PEND. – stamped into its top surface. On the interior of the cap is stenciling in black letters. It spells out Schulte Brass Mfg Co. on one line with Norwood, Ohio below it. I presume this information is the manufacturer’s name and location of his business. Unfortunately, a quick search of the Internet website for the United States Patent and Trademark office failed to turn up a patent for this hand ice crushing mechanism.


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September-October 2008

Table and Office Ware from Capstan By Barry Bernas

More Than A Glass Container Maker The officers and employees of the Capstan Glass Company prided themselves on being able to develop, manufacture, market and sell glass containers in large quantities. The fact that many labeled examples still exist today attest to the success this company had in convincing food packers to use Capstan Glass vessels as the outer wrapper for their various products. Based on this corporation strong point, I naturally expected only tumblers, jars and bottles to have been turned out in this firm’s factory located in South Connellsville, Pennsylvania. When asked on previous occasions if Capstan ever made items other than food containers, I always responded in the negative because none were ever advertised and, more importantly, I’d never run across a monogrammed specimen. However, after years of collecting examples from this company, I’ve recently discovered that trademarked pieces were also manufactured which didn’t exactly fit into the category of a glass food container. Although relative few in number so far, these oddities will be the subject of this article. Tableware? The first odd item is a two-piece set of matching shakers made by Capstan.

Figure 1

The specimens in Figure 1 are both 4 9/16th inches in height and weigh 7 3/4th-ounces each. The box quilted outer design on these roundedsquare shaped shakers was quite popular during the later years of the 1920s and throughout the 1930s. Besides Capstan Glass, I’ve seen editions with similar motifs from the well-known glass houses of Hazel Atlas and Owens-Illinois, just to name a few manufacturers. On the outer body of these two containers, there is a checker board pattern composed of 1/4th inch squares which are lined up in rows on three sides. This attractive motif starts just below the vessel’s curved shoulder and ends at a point above the bottom parting line. On the front of the jars in Figure 1, there is a smooth 2 x 2 inch label space positioned between two rows of squares each above and below this promotional area. In the center of the blank segment is a rectangular shaped raised area with rounded corners that is 1 9/16th inches wide and 11/16th inch in height. On the outside surface of this geometric form is either the embossed word SALT or PEPPER in 5/16th inch high capital letters. The four sided, cup bottom mold style of base on both models has a Capstan Glass nautical logo in the center with the mold number 5984 below it and the series numbers 5 (salt) and 2 (pepper) above the trademark. Due to the absence of Company ephemera, it isn’t known whether these embossed examples were made to market a specific brand for one or more commercial packers of food seasonings or were sold without contents in small general, grocery and/or department stores or supply outlets. Certainly, each scenario is believable on its own merits. I prefer the latter course but I’ll leave you to decide for yourself which one is most appealing.

Bottles and Extras

Office Ware? The next four pieces surely don’t fit into any glass food container category that I’ve encountered. Collectively, these models have a common theme. I’ve often wondered if they were manufactured for a specific Company purpose. Between 1919 and 1938, Capstan Glass opened and staffed district sales offices in major food packing centers around our nation. Starting with seven cities in 1921, the firm’s complement grew by 1934 to eighteen country wide and two in Canada.1 In these offices, part of the daily routine for the sales personnel involved meeting with customers to determine their packing needs and to demonstrate how Capstan could solve any of their problems. Undoubtedly, this corporate philosophy of personal contact necessitated many face to face meetings. Whether at corporate headquarters in the South Connellsville or in their many satellite places of business, the ash trays, ice bucket, ice crusher and monogrammed glass that I’ll describe in follow on subsections may well have played vital refreshment and relaxation support roles. As office accessories, this set probably served their Capstan masters nobly during the closing of deals between Company officials and packing industry counterparts and/or potential clients. Initially when I came across the four items, I was dumbfounded. Throughout my prior research into the history of the Capstan Glass Company, Corporation executives and marketers constantly emphasized that the output of their factory comprised tumblers, jars and bottles. At no time did they mention or even allude to ash trays, ice crushers, ice buckets and monogrammed glasses being in their line of wares. Coupling this factor with the color of the items and applied designs thereon, I had and now still have a major head scratching conundrum to resolve. If these entertainment accoutrements weren’t turned out specifically for Company executives in offices nationwide and in Canada, I’m at a loss for why they are

Bottles and Extras

and in a suitable way, overcoming the great difficulties of communication, inadequacy of personnel, and means of transport and succeeding in relieving at the critical moment the bareness and poverty of the needy population of the town." "His comrades around him were dying of typhus," his grandson noted, "but ironically, he never got sick until

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16 years later when he came down with typhoid fever. We later found his day-to-day diary from 1918 to 1919, medals and certificates documenting the extraordinary event." Adams operated the Boston drug store until retiring during the early 1950s. He died Jan. 18, 1974, at the age of 88. His grandson donated R.W. Adams’ artifacts to the Agrirama (a museum devoted to farm life and agriculture) in Tifton, Ga., where in 1975 the office of Dr. Vann was relocated. The Thomas County History Museum in Thomasville, Ga., also received some of the artifacts including many photos and negatives.

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R. W. Adams with Greek soldier

AUTHOR’S NOTE: I am indebted to Jim Mayo and his family; Ephraim J. Rotter, curator of collections, Thomas County Museum of History, Thomasville, Ga., and Neetika K. Gujral, Presidential Intern, Hazel Braugh Records Center & Archives, American National Red Cross.

Medal of Our Savior front (top) and back (below)

Bill Baab 2352 Devere Street Augusta, GA 30904 (706) 736-8097 riverswamper@comcast.net US Bronze insignia

Hung Over? Try this Even after retirement and late in life, Redden Whitaker Adams kept prescribing. "My husband, Jimmy, woke up one morning with a terrific hangover," recalled Mary Ann Mayo Brown of Valdosta, Ga. "Pop (Adams’ nickname) told him what to mix: In an iced tea glass filled halfway with water, add some creme de menthe, an aspirin, an Alka-Seltzer tablet and a couple of ice cubes. Mix it well and then drink it through a straw. "It worked!" Medal of Military Worth ribbon and box


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September-October 2008

Whiskey Rogues: Duffy and Gambrill By Jack Sullivan Special to Bottles and Extras

Distillers Walter B. Duffy of Rochester, New York, and George T. Gambrill of Baltimore, Maryland, probably never met during their lifetimes. But their stories bear striking similarities and they surely would

Figure 1 - Walter B. Duffy have recognized in one another the incontrovertible fact that each man was a “whiskey rogue.” Let’s begin with Duffy, seen here in maturity (Fig. 1). His story begins in Canada where he was born in 1840, about two years before his father Edmund emigrated to Rochester, New York, and opened a cider refining business. It was a successful enterprise. Edmund soon expanded into selling “wines, liquors, cordials and cigars.” In an 1861 ad he also claimed to be a “rectifier” -- that is, a refiner and blender of whiskey. The elder Duffy eventually brought young Walter into the business and left it to him when he died during the 1870s. Walter in the meantime had served as an officer in the Union Army during the Civil War and had married in 1868. Upon inheriting the company he promptly expanded the business into other products. In 1881 a Rochester business

directory lists Duffy as a distiller and rectifier of alcohol, “French spirits” (brandy), malt, wheat, rye and bourbon whiskeys. The 1880s were a time when patent medicines began their meteoric rise in popularity by aggressive advertising and other ploys. Many whiskey makers began to advertise their wares as being “for medicinal use” without being specific as to the ills they were meant to remedy. Duffy took a different approach. He decided to straddle the divide between selling the 15 cent saloon shot and hawking his booze as a cure for specific diseases. Thus, early in the 1880s was born the Celebrated Duffy’s Malt Whiskey, which Walter advertised as the “greatest known heart tonic.” He also claimed that his product could cure consumption (tuberculosis), bronchitis, dyspepsia (chronic indigestion), and even malaria. In and Out of Trouble In 1884 Duffy left Rochester for Baltimore, a brash young man “hoping to cash in on Baltimore’s prestige,” according to one author. He set up a large rectifying plant downtown and contracted for ad space across all 1,684 pages of Wood’s 1886 Baltimore City Directory to proclaim: “Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey!....Cures Malaria, Price One Dollar Per Bottle...Sold by Druggists, Grocers and Dealers.” He also launched Maryland Star Rye Whiskey in three grades. This onslaught, however, left the Baltimore drinking public considerably less than impressed. Sluggish sales soon landed the overextended entrepreneur in financial hot water. On November 16, 1886, the New York Times headlined: “The

Figure 2 - Rochester Distilling logo

Bottles and Extras

Duffy Failure: Creditors Looking for Mr. Duffy and Looking in Vain.” A complicated financial deal had failed, one of Duffy’s partners was headed for Honduras, and he himself was lying low. Duffy’s plant in Maryland went into receivership in 1887 and he fled back to Rochester, leaving behind a howling mob of creditors. Despite this setback he remained president of the Rochester Distilling Company (Fig. 2) and continued to produce his purported anti-malaria liquor. The success of Duffy’s Malt Whiskey as a cure almost certainly helped solve Walter’s bankruptcy

Figure 3 - 1898 Rochester Distilling letterhead woes. What Duffy had failed to sell in Baltimore began to attract a national clientele. Before long Duffy was looking once again to expand outside Rochester. This time he headed west to Kentucky. There, in 1887, George T. Stagg with other local whiskey men had incorporated the Stagg and O.F.C. (Old Fire Copper) distillery in a brand new facility at Frankfort. When Stagg retired because of ill health in 1890, Duffy purchased a majority interest. In 1892 he was elected president of the corporation. A 1898 letterhead depicts the Rochester rectifying plant and the Frankfort facility, now called the O.F.C. and Carlisle Distillery (Fig. 3). Reflecting these two properties, Duffy later would call his business holdings “The Kentucky and New York Company, Distillers.” In 1890 Duffy merged his cidermaking operation with that of Samuel R. Mott. a Bouckville, New York, businessman who also had started a

Bottles and Extras

they are sold and resold, and may eventually be offered in good faith by less knowledgeable sellers unaware that they are not the real thing. “The word “absinthe” is something of a magic bullet for a French antique dealer – it instantly increases the value of the associated antique ten or twenty fold. So unsurprisingly, items made for use with other liqueurs of the period – bitters, gentians [tonic liquor extracted from gentian root] – are often hopefully described as absinthe antiques. Even more commonly, items made after 1920 for the pastis [aniseed-flavored aperitif] market, are sold as absinthe period antiques. Almost all the so-called “absinthe fountains” on the market were in reality made for use with pastis in the 1930’s. “So in summary, as in all fields of antique collecting, caveat emptor. [Amen!] Buy only from someone you trust, with the requisite specialist expertise. As with all fields of antiques, new collectors in particular should exercise great caution in buying, particular if they are offered what appears to be a ‘bargain.’ Rare absinthe spoons are traded within a fairly small body of knowledgeable collectors and dealers, who are well aware of their value. A spoon from an unknown source offered at well below market value may well be faked.”

Selected Bibliography Books: Adams, Jad. Hideous Absinthe: A history of the Devil in a bottle, University of Wisconsin Press, 2004. Crowley, Aleister. The Green Goddess, International Publishing Co, New York, 1918. Lanier, Doris. Absinthe: The Cocaine of the Nineteenth Century, Jefferson, 1994. Munsey, Cecil. Illustrated Guide to Collecting Bottles, Hawthorn Book, Inc., New York, 1970.

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Periodicals: Glass, Erin. The ‘green fairy’ tale – Fabled absinthe, making a comeback, sparks new controversy, San Diego Union-Tribune, April 23, 2008. Heilig, Sterling. Absinthe Drinking, Atlanta Constitution, Aug. 19, 1894. Huffington, Ariana Stassinopoulos. Creator and Destroyer, The Atlantic, June, 1988. Marrus, Michael R. Social Drinking in the Belle Epoque, Journal of Social History. Vol. 7, No. 4, Winter, 1974. Internet: Arnold, Wilfred Niels. Absinthe – Scientific American http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id= absinthe-history& Viktor Oliva (April 24, 1861–April 5, 1928) – Czech painter and illustrator. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viktor_Ol iva Vincent Van Gogh – Medical Records. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_ Van_Gogh#Medical_records

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Fair use notice: Some material in this article was originally published by the sources above and is copyrighted. We, as a non-profit organization, offer it here as an educational tool to increase further understanding and discussion of bottle collecting and related history. We believe this constitutes “fair use” of the copyrighted material as provided for in Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. If you wish to use this material for purposes of your own that go beyond “fair use,” you must obtain permission from the copyright owner(s). Cecil Munsey 13541 Willow Run Road Poway, CA 92064-1733 phone: 858-487-7036 email: cecilmunsey@cox.net gmail: cecilmunsey@gmail.com website: CecilMunsey.com More than 1200 free-to-copy wellresearched articles and other materials of interest to bottle collectors


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Miscellaneous items of absinthe paraphernalia from “Belle Époque” (French for “Beautiful Era”) – the years between the Franco-Prussian War and World War I, are many and varied. In addition to those items already pictured and discussed there were, spoon holders, advertising mats for card or dice games, wormwood labels (Fig. 24), large and small advertising posters, postcards (Fig. 25), books, catalogues, journals, apothecary bottles (Fig. 26), brochures, menus, early photographs, tin advertising signs such as the one in (Fig. 27), Impressionistic paintings, porcelain match strikers (Fig. 28), and other items too numerous to mention. All such things are of great interest to collectors but as always, collectors need to adopt the attitude and caution recommended all the way back to Greek and Roman times – caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

Figure 24 ***** Fakes & Forgeries – advice from a French antiques dealer

September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

markets, is faked or incorrectly described one way or the other. “Many of the rarest absinthe spoons (and other items such as fountains and spoonholders) have been reproduced as modern replicas. There is nothing at all wrong with this of course - we sell replicas, clearly marked as such, ourselves. However unscrupulous sellers occasionally try to pass them off as originals. Fortunately they are easy to recognize, and will only fool a beginner. “More dangerous are outright fakes, made with the intention to deceive. These can be hard to distinguish from originals, especially just on the basis of photographs. Since individual absinthe spoons can be worth several thousand dollars, the potential for profit on the faker’s side is obvious. There are several very active makers of faked absinthe spoons in France, who are continually refining their skills. It’s for this reason that I generally don’t post detailed guide- Figure 27 lines for distinguishing faked from genuine spoons on my website – I ers were improving their product and and a few French collectors did this in eliminating their mistakes in response the past, and then found that the fak- to the information we had so helpfully provided them!

“This fascinating field, is a minefield for the unwary collector. 80% of what’s sold on eBay, or in flea

Figure 25

Figure 26

Figure 28 “The danger with fakes of course is that once they get into circulation

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

cider business in 1842. The resulting entity was known as the Duffy-Mott Company, Inc., with its principal processing plant located at first in New York City. That company, in which Duffy had a major interest, increased its assets, product lines and markets nationwide. It eventually moved to Hamlin, New York. With a guaranteed supply of Kentucky whiskey from Frankfort for his

Figure 4 Tomley Rye shot glass

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Figure 6 - Hiram Cronk funeral scenes funeral in New York City (Fig. 6). Whether Walter Duffy attended is unknown. Duffy’s unsupported claim that “malt whiskey” really was medicine even convinced some Temperance advocates. Duffy backed up his fiction by concocting a story that his remedy was made from a formula worked out fifty years earlier by “one

hand mirror (Fig. 7), the old gent also appeared on Duffy’s trade cards (Fig. 8), blotters (Fig. 9), posters (Fig. 10), and a paper label that was applied to the base of each bottle (Fig. 11).

Figure 5 Seneca Chief shot glass

Rochester rectifying and blending facility, Duffy introduced a number of other liquor brands. They included Tromley Rye (Fig. 4), Seneca Chief (Fig. 5), Genesee, Kentucky Raider and Elite whiskeys. These were regional labels; the flagship brand remained Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey. Its owner energetically marketed it to a wide audience, placing his advertising in national magazines and major newspapers all over America. Hiram Cronk Testifies -- and Dies One of Duffy’s most celebrated ads featured Hiram Cronk of Ava, New York. At 105 years old Hiram was accounted the last surviving veteran of the War of 1812. Cronk was quoted saying: “For many years Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey has been my only medicine. I take a dessert spoonful of the tonic three times a day with my meals, and when I go to bed. I am thankful to Duffy’s for it gives me a good appetite and keeps me strong and well in my old age.” His daughter confirmed that Hiram was “keen in mind and rugged in strength” thanks to Duffy’s. Ironically, two weeks after the ad ran in the Washington Post of April 30, 1905, it was followed by a Post news story reporting Cronk’s death. Hiram got a hero’s

Figure 7 - Duffy oval hand mirror of the World’s Greatest Chemists.” The distiller featured a trade mark of the bearded scientist who apparently had discovered this wonder liquid. Shown here on the back of a giveaway

Figure 10 - 1904 Duffy poster Duffy insisted that his product was protected from infringement by “low grade impure whiskey” by “the Pat-

Figure 8 - Duffy trade card

Figure 11 - Duffy paper label

Figure 9 - Duffy ink blotter

ented Bottle--Round, Amber Colored, and with Duffy blown into the glass.” (Fig. 12). Bottle diggers all over the country regularly find them. A cache of five recently


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surfaced in Sacramento, California, far from Rochester. The bottle also featured a patent number on the base (Fig. 13). To validate his therapeutic claims, Duffy gave away glass medicine spoons rather than shot glasses (Fig. 14).

Figure 12 - Duffy embossed quart bottle

The Feds Do Duffy a Favor Enter Washington, D.C. officialdom. In order to help pay the expenses of the Spanish American

Figure 13 - base of bottle with patent notice War, Congress had passed a special tax on patent medicines. On July 5, 1898, the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, N.B. Scott, wrote to the local collector of revenues in Rochester ruling that: “Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey, is by being advertised as a cure for consumption, dyspepsia, ma-

laria, etc., liable to a stamp tax as a medicinal article....” A background memo elaborated that although

Bottles and Extras

testimonials to its healing effects by alleged clergymen and Temperance workers. Nevertheless, Adams’ revelations failed to dampen sales. Dr. Wylie’s Frustration The first head of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Harvey W. Wylie (Fig. 15) similarly sought to

Bottles and Extras

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Pitchers were sometimes used instead carafes or topettes to drip water over the sugar cube, through the spoon and into the glass of absinthe. They were made in zoomorphic (figural) designs of ceramic, glass, and sometimes metal. These special-

Figure 14 - Duffy “medicinal” spoon Duffy’s contained nothing but distilled spirits, it was a patent medicine “by the manner in which it is presented to the public.” The ruling decreed a tax of two cents per bottle. We can imagine Commissioner Scott laughing about sticking it to Duffy as he signed the order. Historian Gordon Wood once wrote: “History does not teach lots of little lessons. Insofar as it teaches any lessons, it teaches only one big one: that nothing ever works out quite the way its managers intended or expected.” Certainly Walter Duffy well understood that big lesson. To the chagrin of numerous federal officials, he exploited the unplanned-for to his considerable financial benefit. In reality, the Feds did Duffy two enormous, if unintended, favors. Estimates are that before it was repealed after the war, the stamp tax cost him about $40,000, not an inconsiderable sum. At the same time, however, it exempted him from hundreds of thousands in federal and state liquor taxes and allowed him to advertise with some legitimacy as “the only whiskey recognized by the Government as medicine” -- a claim that turned out to be worth millions. Even Samuel Hopkins Adams, whose series of articles in Colliers Magazine in 1905-1906 led to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act, admitted that Duffy was partially justified in his claim of Federal recognition of his whiskey as medicine. Nevertheless, this famous “muckraker” took particular aim at Duffy’s product, because of its claims to “cure” and its inferiority even as whiskey. He also exposed as phony newspaper

Figure 15 - Dr. Harvey W. Wylie shut Duffy down. He ended frustrated with Washington bureaucratic footdragging: “I stated that Duffy's Malt Whisky was one of the most gigantic frauds of the age and a flagrant violation of the law, and that there was no necessity that we delay at all in the matter.” After his pleas for prosecution were ignored for two years, the doctor denounced the “determined efforts of my colleagues to protect Duffy’s Pure Malt Whisky from being molested either by seizure or bringing any criminal case against the maker.” Dr. Wylie left office in 1909 without ever having laid a glove on Duffy. The only official to win a case against the distiller was Duffy’s fellow Irishman, Patrick W. Cullinan. As the New York Commissioner of Excise, Cullinan in 1905 went to court claiming that Duffy’s was nothing more than sweetened whiskey and subject to state liquor taxes. The company countered with eleven physicians, four of them members of the Rochester Health Department, who swore their belief that the whiskey contained drugs that made it real continued on page 29

Figure 21

Figure 23 ized pitchers required small pouring areas (Fig. 21) so that the mixing ritual could be accomplished easily and were filled in the back (Fig. 22).

Figure 22

Fountains – Found in larger cafes or bistros, absinthe fountains were

dispensers of water for mixing drinks of the green faerie. Fountains had as few as one spigot or as many as six. In Fig. 23 there is pictured beautifully acid-etched a Rene' Lalique 4robinette fountain.


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heavily gilded, rather than relatively plain as here. It fluoresces a bright lime-green under long-range ultra violet light (Fig. 15).

Bottles and Extras

Carafes and topettes for water are also among the collectible paraphernalia for drinking absinthe. Carafes often carried advertising for the various brands of absinthe advertising (Figs. 18; 19). Topettes, like carafes,

Figure 16

Figure 13

Figure 17 Glass Mould used to make absinthe glasses (Figs. 16; 17) open and closed.

Figure 19 are sometimes open-topped and feature dose markings such as the one shown here as Fig. 20.

Figure 14 Fig. 14 is a Baccarat absinthe set of two glasses, sugar-cube bowl with top and a tray â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all in gilt-rimmed opalescent (milk) glass dating from 18301860.

Figure 15 Baccarat made this opaque milky glass, dosed with uranium dioxide, until 1890, although towards the end of this period it was usually more

Figure 18

Figure 20

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Bottles and Extras

Barton Balls

Figure 1 Many glass target balls will have rough, jagged, and sometimes misshapen necks. Like many glass products of the time, they were hand blown into molds. Unlike other glass products, their sole purpose was their destruction. Armed with this knowledge. glass blowers were not always delicate in removing the blow pipe from the ball. There was no reason to be concerned with the finish or look of the neck. In grade school I was required to memorize a spelling rule. It began with, “I before E except after C”. The exception in target balls is the ground mouth. There are target balls where the jagged edge is ground to a smooth finish. In this article we will discuss some of the most beautiful target balls ever found. Among them is the most exceptional ground mouth target ball I have ever seen. Are adjectives such as spectacular, stunning, magnificent, outstanding, dazzling, exceptional, and extraordinary a little over the top when used to describe a target ball? Not if you have a Barton Ball in hand. The Barton Balls were found in an old storage building under renovation in England in 2005. The storage building was located on the shooting grounds of a well known English fam-

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Spoons were very much a part of the ritual of preparing and using absinthe. Perforated for holding the sugar cube over the glass, perhaps they are the quintessential absinthe accoutrement. Usually made from plated brass, tin or nickel, they are found in an extraordinary wide range of designs. Figs. 5 & 6 are in the shape of the Eiffel Tower and commemorates its opening in 1889. Fig. 7

Exciting Find of Rare target balls By Mike O’Malley ily. The name of the family has been closely guarded and is unknown to me. In the find were two target ball variants - one with the normal target ball neck, the other a wide ground mouth neck. Each of these variants came in two variants - one is cobalt blue the other a sand ball with a pebble effect in powder blue. The normal neck balls (Fig. 2 & 4) were found loose and scattered about the building. The ground mouth wide neck balls (Fig. 1 & 3) were neatly packed in straw and contained in two wooden crates. Stenciled on the crates were the words “E Barton & Son’s Stourbridge, Purveyors of fine glass shooting Targets”. To describe these balls as cobalt blue and pebble blue is not completely accurate. The cobalt balls are islands of dark blue with fine clear raised lines surrounding each island. The sand ball is almost impossible to explain. To describe them as spectacular would be an understatement. I will accompany this article a caveat. Until you have held the Barton Ball in hand, you have not seen it. Many of you probably saw the Barton Balls at the 2008 FOHBC National Bottle Expo in York, Pennsylvania. Since the find in 2005 another variant of the Barton Ball has been dis-

Bottles and Extras

Figure 3

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Glasses used in the preparation and drinking of absinthe are often Pontarlier style (Fig. 10) made famous in a painting by Charles Maire. Glasses are about 6 inches tall and 3 inches in diameter (Fig. 11). The volume of these collectible glasses is 10 ounces, “…helping the drinker to appreciate delicate aromas

Figure 5

covered. Rumors are now circulating in the target ball world that there may be more. Figure 6 is an absinthe spoon made by hand in a 1914 World War I trench by a greenfaerie-inspired soldier. One of Martha Stewart’s absinthe spoon favorites is shown is shown here as Fig. 8. This spoon was manufactured in the U.S. by silversmiths Reed & Barton and has “Café Lafayette NY” engraved on the handle.

Figure 9 Figure 11 orful and nicely printed. A few bottles with seals applied after the bottles were made are found occasionally. No embossed bottles used for absinthe are known to exist.

Figure 4 How exciting it is to be a collector! We are filled with questions. If we are very fortunate, we will sometimes find an answer to a question we had not yet thought to ask.

and flavors from the absinthes without overflowing.” Fig. 12 is of a 3-hole silver brouilleur (strainer) that sits on top of the glass. Fig. 13 is a 1920 Tarragona 2-piece cut-glass dripper and matching brouilleur.

Figure 7

Figure 8 If you have questions or interest in target balls, please contact me. Mike O’Malley 1702 Mystery Hill Pleasant Hill, MO 64080 816-540-3635 Mikeomal@earthlink.net Figure 2

Bottles used to contain absinthe are not as easy to acquire, as is some of the other paraphernalia/memorabilia. Bottles were covered and pictured extensively in Part I of this 2-part series. The bottle pictured here, as Fig. 9, is typical of absinthe bottles in general. A standard green-glass winebottle shape was almost always employed and the paper labels were col-

Figure 10

Figure 12


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absinthe collectibles in an interview with “Vanity Fair” magazine in 2001 helps to verify the above and her designing an absinthe spoon for K-Mart to sell exclusively confirms the collecting fad even more. Many of us who desire to learn more about the lost world of absinthe and La Fée Verte (Green Faerie), unless we find a forgotten bottle of pre-ban absinthe will have to do it vicariously, not as an absintheur but as a student of absinthe antiques and absinthiana. The antiques are available and eagerly gathered by a variety of collectors. Strange rituals By 1870 the poor, the bourgeoisie and the bohemians all drank absinthe in their own circles, but they adopted different approaches to the drink, so that the use of absinthe by different groups came to reflect the social status of the drinker. The rich would therefore drink higher-quality or “Healthier” absinthe made from wine alcohol rather than “industrial” alcohol. There were other means of determining class. The bourgeoisie could drink absinthe only as an aperitif (before and/or after dinner). The impoverished absinthe drinker would take it at any time. The other way to differentiate between classes was by the addition of absinthe paraphernalia – the collectibles of today. The extent to which a differential could be made in the cost of the drink was limited, but this was not true of the impedimenta (equipment) used to drink it, which could be crafted and decorated with expensive materials. All that was required to drink absinthe was a bottle of it, some water and perhaps some sugar to sweeten to taste. Sugar was used to render the drink palatable to most people, though it will not dissolve in alcohol at the concentrations that are common in absinthe, so a drinker could pour water in to lower the alcohol content and then add sugar. Without question, absinthe owed a great deal of its popularity to the elaborate ritual that went along with

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drinking it. Because of its high alcohol proof and bitter taste (the Greek word for absinthe translates into “undrinkable”) it had to be diluted and sweetened to make it palatable to the average drinker. And who would have guessed the hassle of making a drink drinkable would become a stroke of marketing genius? Here’s the traditional method: First one poured roughly three ounces of absinthe into a heavy parfait-style stemmed glass. A perforated spoon (sometimes very elaborately so) was set upon the rim of the glass and on the spoon was placed a cube of sugar. Ice-cold water then was ever so slowly dripped from a glass carafe, designed specifically for that purpose, onto the cube. The sugar dissolved and pouring continued until the ratio of water to absinthe was two to five parts, depending upon one’s taste and fortitude. The emerald liquor released a floral bouquet and clouds into a pale opalescent green or yellow, right before one’s eyes, filling one with a sense of creation and mystery. The clouding effect was called la louche (pronounced loosh) and occurred be-

Figure 3 cause the herbal oils were not soluble in water. The mix was given a spin with the spoon and drink was drunk like it was dripped – slowly (Fig. 3). If that’s not dramatic enough, some aficionados liked to dip the sugar cube in the absinthe and set it aflame, allowing the sugar to caramelize. A testament to its proof, absinthe was very flammable and burned with a pleasing blue hue. Any drink with that kind of pres-

Bottles and Extras

entation is bound to impress. Even those who are revolted by the taste are likely to be silenced by the sheer spectacle of the event. There is a certain sense of superiority that goes along with the ritual: “While the peasants in the corner merely pour their booze in a glass and lap it down like wild animals, the smart people, the insiders in the know, are engaging in nothing less than alcoholic alchemy!” – Jad Adams That spectacle helped create a social phenomenon that became known as l’heure verte, the green hour. The unsophisticated watched the sophisticated elite exercise the ritual and soon enough everyone wanted to be included. Paraphernalia From the above description of the absinthe ritual regularly followed by someone preparing and consuming absinthe, it is not difficult to predict the paraphernalia Ms Stewart and other collectors would seek and include in their collections. The following, are examples of absinthe spoons, glasses (some that even glow green because of their uranium content), absinthe fountains, carafes and pitchers, art nouveau-style advertising cartons and posters, catalogues, invoices and ephemera from the leading absinthe distillers, books, journals and newspapers of every description, propaganda from the antiabsinthe temperance movement, and counter-propaganda from the equally passionate supporters of the Green Fairy.

Figure 4

Prohibitionist memorabilia such as the Swiss “Devil Bell” was used by those who wanted the use of absinthe outlawed (Fig. 4). Switzerland banned absinthe in 1905, followed by the United States in 1912 and France in 1915.

Bottles and Extras continued from page 26

medicine. The New York Supreme Court, however, ultimately supported Cullinan and made the drink subject to the liquor tax. This proved to be only a slight setback to Duffy as the profits continued to roll in. Duffy Becomes a Multimillionaire As a result of this soaring success, the formerly bankrupt Walter Duffy now was on his way to becoming a multimillionaire. His first wife, Theresa, had died in 1885 and in 1892 he married Loretta Putnam, a woman with an artistic bent and a taste for fine furnishings. She filled their sprawling Lake Avenue mansion (Fig. 16) in Rochester -- described as “palatial” --with a lavish assemblage of antiques and paintings. When some items went to auction in 1913, the auctioneer’s catalogue exclaimed: “What wealth! The mansion and its furnishings particularly were on display to the the city’s bluebloods at the 1907 marriage of a daughter, Harriet Jane Duffy, to the son of a railroad executive. The ceremony was held in the private chapel of the Catholic bishop of the Rochester diocese. The bishop also presided over the nuptials. The wedding breakfast was held in the Duffy’s Lake Avenue home. According to a contemporary press account: “The house was beautifully decorated with Killarney and American Beauty roses and Japanese lilies. Dossenbach’s Orchestra furnished music.” During the late 1800s and early 1900s, Duffy became one of Rochester’s leading business figures. He was

September-October 2008

president of the Flower City Bank and the German American Bank. He was a principal stockholder in a enterprise that owned hotels and theaters, including the Rochester Hotel (Fig. 17), the National Theater in Rochester and the Schubert Theater in New York City. He also was a director of the Pfaudler Company, which manufactured glasslined tanks for storing and transporting beer and other products. Ignoring the fraudulent source of his money, a 1902 book entitled “Notable Men of Rochester and Vicinity” prominently featured his photo. At his death, age 70 in 1911, the New York Times, which earlier had highlighted his bankruptcy, called Duffy “one of Rochester’s best known business men and financiers” and listed the many companies on which he held executive and director positions. After Duffy’s Demise With Walter’s death Duffy’s Malt Whiskey underwent significant

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tiny. As an ad (Fig. 18) from 1915 indicates, Duffy’s got the message. It makes no claims beyond being a “tonic stimulant” and a “household remedy.” Moreover, the name of the firm has been changed to the Duffy Malt Whiskey Company. Prohibition brought still other alterations. The word “whiskey” now became anathema. So Duffy’s became a tonic. The operation moved to Los Angeles and the name changed to Duffy’s Laboratory, Ltd. Even the depiction of the Old Chemist changed on the label of the bottles (Fig.19) as did the e m b o s s i n g Figure 19 (Fig. 20). The prodDuffy Malt Tonic bottle uct itself appears to

Figure 18 - 1915 ad for Duffy Malt whiskey changes. Dr. Wylie had warned the patent medicine industry that using the word “cure” in advertising would subject products to particular scru-

Figure 16 - Duffy mansion at 116 Lake St.

Figure 20 - detail of Tonic bottle embossing have remained essentially whiskey: The alcoholic content was

Figure 17 - Hotel Rochester (postcard)


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listed as “not over” 40 percent. Forty percent alcohol is 80 proof, similar to bourbon. Whether the “Dry Police” eventually caught up with Duffy’s Malt Whiskey is not clear but by 1926 the company that Walter built was forever out of business. Nevertheless, Duffy himself had gone from bankruptcy to riches, helped immeasurably by his ability to profit by the fumbling of his adversaries.

to declare bankruptcy, unable to pay a host of creditors. Later he would claim that he had been drawn into the affairs of Gambrill Bros., his grain dealer relatives, and being young and

Bottles and Extras

Gambrill ... Baltimore, Md.” (Fig. 24). A labeled pint from the distillery claims to be “The Purest Rye Whiskey in the United States.” (Fig. 25) Gambrill also issued embossed mini bottles (Fig. 26) and at

Figure 22 - Eutaw House, Baltimore

Figure 21 - Gambrill’s Mill Monacacy, Maryland Meet George T. Gambrill Behind many pre-Prohibition whiskey brands lie stories, but few have the soap opera quality of Maryland’s Roxbury Rye. Its saga begins with its founder, George T. Gambrill, whose reputation as a scoundrel seems to have pursued him throughout a long life. Gambrill is a familiar name in Maryland. The patriarch of the Gambrill clan was Augustine Gambrill, a plantation owner and one of the founders of Anne Arundel County in Maryland. Another ancestor was James Gambrill who bought the grain mill at Monacacy, Maryland, in 1856 (Fig. 21) only to find it 10 years later the centerpiece for a Civil War battle. A 1973 genealogical publication records three hundred years of the family in the state. Many Gambrills, George included, were involved in the grain and milling trade, principally in Baltimore. One observer has called the extended family “a milling dynasty.” Born about 1845, George’s first brush with the courts was in 1864 when, in his late teens, he was forced

naive, made the fall guy. Besides, he avowed, he had paid off his all creditors by 1868. In 1870, according to Baltimore city directories, George was back in business as a principal in Gambrill & Williar, grain dealers. Their offices were in the posh Eutaw House, a downtown hotel (Fig. 22) where Edgar Allen Poe is said to have written “The Raven.” Ten years later we find George with another grain firm, Trail & Gambrill. Since wheat, rye and corn are the basis of whiskeys, it seems a natural move for him to branch out from grain to grain alcohol as an ingredient in spirituous liquids. By the 1890 census he is recorded as a distiller. Gambrill Rides Roxbury Rye In 1893 Gambrill registered Roxbury Rye as a brand with the government, with a distillery in Roxbury, Maryland, a village in Washington County about twenty-three miles from Baltimore. Despite being located in Maryland, he incorporated the company in West Virginia, probably to avoid taxes. An energetic salesman, Gambrill built Roxbury Rye into a nationally recognized brand in relatively few years. He merchandised his liquor in attractive quart bottles. Shown here is one with original label featuring George’s initials in a logo (Fig. 23). The bottles themselves were embossed in script that read: “Roxbury Rye...Geo. T.

Figure 23 Roxbury Rye labeled quart

Figure 25 Roxbury Rye labeled pint

Figure 27 Roxbury Rye decanter

Figure 24 Roxbury Rye embossed bottle

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ABSINTHE! Part II - The Paraphernalia The return of le Fee Verte - “The Green Faerie” By Cecil Munsey Copyright© 2008

Born Martha Helen Kostyra on August 3, 1941 (Fig. 1), this maven is an American business magnate, author, editor and homemaker advocate. She is also a former stockbroker and fashion model. Over the last two decades she has held a prominent position in the publishing industry; as the author of several books, hundreds of articles on the domestic arts, editor of a national housekeeping magazine, host of a popular daytime television program, and commercial spokeswoman for K-Mart. In 2001 Ladies Home Journal named her the third most powerful woman in America. In antiques shops, at antiques auctions, and at antiques shows she is recognized for her habit of collecting of old absinthe paraphernalia. She is better known, in those venues, as Martha Stewart – check Fig. 1 again and see if you now recognize her.

Figure 26 Roxbury Rye Mini bottle least one attractive back-of-the-bar decanter (Fig. 27). Before long Gambrill’s distillery was Mar yland’s sixth largest in terms of capacity. It also maintained impressive sales offices in Baltimore at 115 West Baltimore St. In 1900 Roxbury Rye was important enough to

Figure 1 Ms. Stewart came by her interest in collecting the paraphernalia used to support the culture of the “Green Faerie” most likely during her college years at Barnard. Initially she intended to major in chemistry, but switched to Art and European History, and later to Architectural History, any or all of which would have brought her in appreciative contact with historical and cultural phenomena associated with absinthiana. Her studies of European history

and art would have made her aware that in many paintings, novels and memoirs of the “Belle Époque” or “beautiful era” before the first world war, absinthe cast its green haze of creative inspiration over a generation of Parisian artists. One of the most famous paintings on the subject, Glass of Absinthe, by Degas in 1870, depicts a couple seated in a café (Fig. 2). The man drinks a red wine, while the woman consuming absinthe looks lost with a glazed empty expression in her eyes.

Figure 2 Absinthe also made an appearance in the work of Vincent Van Gogh. Three years before his death, Van Gogh painted "L'Absinthe," a canvas where "la fee verte" (green faerie) appears all-consuming. Absinthe is everywhere–the tablecloth, the reflections in the water carafe, even the street outside has the green colors of absinthe. Most scholars believe Van Gogh drank absinthe frequently, and some say he was addicted to it. However, in his letters he expresses abhorrence for both the drink and those who drank it regularly. Still, the psychosis he experienced is consistent with acute alcoholism or "absinthism."

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Writers too, found inspiration in the green world of absinthe. The poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine would drink absinthe together and play sadistic games with each other. Eventually Verlaine shot Rimbaud and was sentenced to prison. In the tragic aftermath of this incident Rimbaud gave up absinthe and poetry. Verlaine, who had sung the praises of absinthe in his youth, damned it on his deathbed. However, after leaving prison, poverty-stricken and alone, he continued to drink la fée verte. Alfred Jarry, eccentric author of a scandalous French absurdist play, Ubu Roi, was known to drink absinthe straight. Jarry claimed that absinthe helped him fuse together dream and reality, art and life. Ernest Hemingway never made such claims, but he did continue to drink it long after it was legally banned. And references to absinthe appear in many of his writings, including Death In The Afternoon and For Whom The Bell Tolls. Speaking of his own personal experience with absinthe: “The absinthe made everything seem better. I drank it without sugar in the dripping glass, and it was pleasantly bitter. I poured the water directly into it and stirred it instead of letting it drip. I stirred the ice around with a spoon in the brownish, cloudy mixture. I was very drunk. I was drunker than I ever remembered having been.” - Ernest Hemingway While anti-absinthe laws had slackened over the 20th century, absinthe’s stigma lingered amidst the perpetual recycling of misinformation by journalists, historians and producers alike. There was the dreadful but unconfirmed fear that absinthe rendered its drinkers both bad and mad. More than ever, the confusion begs to be conquered: Absinthe has reemerged from obscurity, into a sought-after “fad.” Paraphernalia such as bottles, spoons, drinking glasses and fountains, antique or not, fetch improbable prices. Martha Stewart show cashing

her


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Schadlich, Louis and Nancy Schadlich 1984 “The ‘MASS. SEAL’ on Milk Bottles and Jars.” Unpublished manuscript, Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Toulouse, Julian Harrison 1971 Bottle Makers and Their Marks. Thomas Nelson, New York. Footnotes: 1 Porter (2002b) noted that “in 1900 the Berney Glass Company had been formed in Bradford to make glass and glassware in the Bradford Flint Glass Bottle Co. plant which they had acquired. They made a green glass at that plant with which they made bottles, flasks, etc.” The Bradford Flint Glass Bottle Co., however, was a separate company that operated from at least 1896 to at least 1907. 2 The Tuna Glass Co. was in business prior to 1898, when the factory burned down. The plant was rebuilt the following year. Tuna produced glass sporadically until February

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Bottles and Extras

1907, when operations were moved to Clarksburg, West Virginia. The plant was then operated by the Bradford Flint Glass Bottle Co. 3 The Thomas Registers (1907:202; 1912:481; 1914:532; 1915:578; 1916:600; 1917:730; 1918:810; 1918:827; 1920782; 1921:782), however, listed the plant until at least 1921. The Registers were notoriously lax about checking up on closings. The Carolina Glass Co., for example, was closed by 1912. Despite solid local records supporting the 1912 closing, the company continued to be listed in the Thomas Registers until at least 1921. To further confuse the issue, Owens-Illinois historical records mention the Bradford plant in 1917 (Hoenig 2007a). This could reflect a continued ownership of the plant, even though it was not in production. This speculation could also apply to the continued listings in the Thomas Registers. 4 Toulouse (1971:70) claimed the name of the older plant was

“Cleveland” – but that was the name of the first plant manager (Hoenig 2007c). 5 This could have been a baseplate sent to Clarion from the Columbus plant. See Discussion and Conclusions section. 6 These were revived from OwensIllinois records. 7 Owens-Illinois officially adopted the I-in-an-oval mark to replace its more complex I-i n-an-ovalsuperimposed-on-an-elongated-diamond logo in 1954, although, of course, older molds were used until they wore out.

Please send any comments to: Bill Lockhart 1313 14th St., Apt. 21 Alamogordo, NM 88310 (575) 439-8158 Bottlebill@tularosa.net bottlebill@tularosa.net

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Bottles and Extras

be among a handful of American distilleries exhibiting at the Paris Exposition. Gambrill prospered. Married by now to Margaret, he fathered a son he named after himself. Junior would go on to Yale University, graduating in 1907. Life was good for George. Stolen Coal and Fatal Fires But Gambrill continually found it difficult to play it straight. By 1901 he was back in court fighting a case brought against him by a man named John Schooley. Schooley claimed that Gambrill had reneged on a deal to give him lodging, money and distillery warehousing space in return for overseeing the Roxbury operation. Schooley also claimed slander because of a letter allegedly written by Gambrill saying Schooley “stole my coal.” In addition to denying that the letter was in his handwriting, Gambrill made a bizarre defense claiming that he really wasn’t in the distillery business at all since his entire product for five years -- 3,000 barrels of whiskey -- had been promised to Steinhardt Brothers of New York City and that, in effect, the Steinhardts were running his distillery. The court rejected that notion and quickly found for Schooley. A 1902 appeal by Gambrill failed. Meanwhile, Roxbury’s Baltimore sales operation was taking a hit. On the afternoon of Jan. 4, 1901, a fire broke out in an adjoining building and spread to Gambrill’s Baltimore Street offices. According to a New York Times account, the Roxbury Rye

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Figure 28 - Baltimore file photograph

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Company, mostly from water damage, lost $10,000 in inventory and the building was damaged to the extent of $510,000. All losses were said to be covered by insurance. The cause of the fire was never discovered. But a far more devastating Figure 29 - Roxbury Rye Figure 30 - Roxbury Rye fire would visit tan jug brown and white jug Gambrill’s sales operation barely three years later. The Secretary of the American Bar AssoGreat Baltimore Fire of February ciation. Hinkley had the goods on 1904 (Fig. 28) destroyed his building Gambrill. His written opinion deand all the contents. Not long after, scribed the financial shenanigans the Fisher Bros. Co., a local liquor Gambrill had accomplished to swindle distributor, claimed in ads to be the his creditors, chief among them the “successors to George T. Gambrill, Merchant’s Bank of Baltimore, an distiller....” This firm first shows up institution with a “hard nosed” reputain Baltimore directories in 1899. It tion. Hinkley concluded that the finantoo was displaced by the fire, moving temporarily to 406 W. Camden. By cial losses added up to something 1905 Fisher Bros. was in permanent more than mismanagement. They quarters at 124 W. Baltimore Av. and were out and out fraud. As a result advertising as “agents” for Roxbury Gambrill was hauled into court in 1910, accused of putting up the same Rye. whiskey as collateral for separate, forfeited loans totaling a half million dolJail Time for George? In 1905 Gambrill, still running the lars. He was tried, found guilty, and distillery at Roxbury, registered the sentenced to four years in prison. Alrye brand again with the government, though he appealed, his Roxbury disthis time as a product of the Roxbury tillery was shut down and George exDistilling Co. Once again George ited the whiskey business. He sold was having problems the brand name to other Baltimore interests. As a result Roxbury Rye keeping on the right side of the law. A continue to be sold until Prohibition grain speculator, he (Figs. 29, 30). bet the wrong way on wheat prices, lost The End of the Story Meanwhile, Gambrill vigorously his shirt, and once was resisting going to jail. He filed again was unable to motions left and right, appealing his pay creditors. The special mas- conviction, much as he had against ter in bankruptcy for John Schooley. A dozen years later, the case was a distin- for murky reasons, he still had not guished Baltimore served a single day behind bars. Inlawyer named John stead, according to U.S. Census reHinkley, who twice cords, he was residing comfortably was elected National with Margaret in a four-story Balti-


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more row house in the 700 block of St. Paul Street, shown here in a contemporary photo (Fig. 31). He also

Figure 31 - Townhouses

at 711 - 715 St. Paul St. Baltimore, Maryland

was working as an executive with the Gambrill Grain Products Co., located at 1311 Bolton St. While awaiting the outcome of his legal battles, George watched the onset of Prohibition in 1920. The whiskey he created and brought into national prominence disappeared forever. Finally in 1922, a judge quashed the fraud conviction citing Gambrill’s failing health and advanced years (about 77). It may have been the old fellow’s last con game: George managed to live another eight years, dying at the age of 85. Despite Duffy’s brief and disastrous foray into the Baltimore whiskey scene, it is unlikely that he and Gambrill ever met. The two years Walter was in the city, George was hard at work in the grain trade. But their careers had remarkable similarities: Both came from well-off families in whiskey-related businesses. Both suffered bankruptcy early in their careers and emerged unscathed. Both built a whiskey brand into national prominence. Both had government officialdom frequently hard on their heels. Both showed exceptional abilities to evade attempts to punish them for

Bottles and Extras

alleged misdeeds. Both died rich men. Finally, both wrote their names in whiskey history as among the American distilling industry’s most colorful and successful rogues. That is why, with mixed emotions, we remember the lives of Walter B. Duffy and George T. Gambrill. ************* Notes: The information for this article was researched from a wide range of internet and printed sources. Prominent among them were the New York Times online archives. A compilation of Samuel Hopkins Adams’ articles on the patent medicine industry, called The Great American Fraud, similarly is available online. The pictures of Walter Duffy and his mansion are through the great courtesy of the Rochester and Monroe Country Public Library. Among principal sources on George Gambrill was Jim Bready’s excellent article on Maryland whiskey for the Winter 1990 issue of the Maryland Historical Magazine. Portions of this article appeared earlier in the Potomac Pontil, newsletter of the Potomac Bottle Club. ****************

Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation, as required by 39 U.S.C. 3685. Publication title: Bottles and Extras. Publication Number: 0052-62. Filing date: August 1, 2008. Published quarterly, 6 times per year. Annual Subscription Price: $30. Office of Publication: 401 Johnston Ct, Cass County, Raymore, MO 64083. Contact person: June Lowry, (816) 318-0160. Address of General Business Office of Publisher: June Lowry 401 Johnston Court, Raymore, MO 64083-9246. Publisher: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083. Editor: Kathy Hopson-Sathe, 341 Yellowstone Dr, Fletcher, NC 28732. Owner: Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, 3706 Deerfield Cove, Shelby County, Memphis TN 38135. Stock holders holding 1% or more of total amount of stock: none. The known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1% or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: none. The purpose, function and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes has not changed during preceding 12 months. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: November, 2007. The average number of copies each issue during the preceding 12 months: a) Total number of copies - Net Press Run..... 1217; b) Paid and/or requested circulation- 1) Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions... 974; 2) Paid In-County Subscriptions... 2; 3) Sales through Dealers and Carriers, Street Venders and Counter sales, and other non-USPS Paid Distribution...0. Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS...111. c) Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation... 1087; d) Free distribution by mail, samples, complimentary and other free copies... 1) Outside County... 0; 2) In-County... 0; 3) Other Classes... 0; e) Free Distribution Outside the Mail... 130; f) Total Free Distribution... 130; g) Total distribution... 1217; h) Copies Not Distributed... 0; i) Total...1217. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 89.32%. Number Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: a) Total number of copies Net Press Run... 1200; b) Paid and/or requested circulation- 1) Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions... 953; 2) Paid In-County Subscriptions... 2; 3) Sales through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, and Counter sales, and Other nonUSPS Paid Distribution... 0; 4) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS... 128, c) Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation... 1083; d) Free distribution by mail, samples, complimentary and other free copies... 1) Outside County...0; 2) In-County... 0; 3) Other Classes... 0; e) Free Distribution Outside the Mail... 117; f) Total Free Distribution... 117; g) Total Distribution... 1200; h) Copies Not Distributed... 0; i) Total... 1200. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation... 90.25%. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. June Lowry, Publisher, 08/01/08.

Bottles and Extras

1910b “Pith of the Week’s News: All the New of the Glass Trade Compiled in Condensed Form for Quick Reading.” Commoner and Glassworker 28(13):1. Creamery and Milk Plant Monthly 1922 “New Milk Bottle Factory.” Creamery and Milk Plant Monthly 11(9):64-65. Giarde, Jeffery L. 1980 Glass Milk Bottles: Their Makers and Marks. Time Travelers Press, Bryn Mawr, California. Glassworker 1917 “Berney-Bond Glass Co.” Glassworker 35(48):7. Glass Industry 1927 “Milk Bottle Companies Merge.” Glass Industry 8(6):151. Hoenig, Russell 2007a Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Smethport, Hazlehurst, and Bradford plants of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. and their predecessors. Information obtained from McKean County newspapers. On file with authors. 2007b Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details on Hazelhurst, engraving of codes, and Berney-Bond bottles. Information from historical sources, OwensIllinois Glass Co. records, and empirical evidence derived from the observation of 315 Berney-Bond milk bottles. 2007c Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Clarion plant of the Berney-Bond Glass Co., and empirical observations of Berney-Bond bottles. On file with authors. 2008a Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Bond Glass Co. and various operations at Bradford and Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania. 2008b Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details about the Berney-Bond Glass Co. factories at Bradford and Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania.

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2008c Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Smethport, Hazlehurst, and Bradford plants of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. and their predecessors. Information obtained from McKean County newspapers. On file with authors. 2008d Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Clarion plant of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. Information obtained from Owens-Illinois Glass Co. records. On file with authors. Jones, May 1966 The Bottle Trail, Volume 6. Nara Vista, New Mexico. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 1913 “The Present Status of the Glass Bottle and Hollow Ware Industries in the United States.” Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 5(11):951954. “Keystone” 1918 “Repairs at Berney-Bond.” Glassworker 26(47):12. Mayer, Charles C. 1908 “From the Mountain District.” Commoner & Glass Worker 26(29):12. 1910 “From the Northern District.” Commoner and Glassworker 28(28):3-5. McKean Democrat 1897 Advertisement: “The Glass Factory,” December 10. Milk Dealer 1916 Advertisement: “At Last We Have It.” Milk Dealer 6(1):58-59. 1922 Advertisement: Automatically Processed Milk Bottles of Quality.” Milk Dealer 11(10):37. 1924 Advertisement: Automatically Processed Milk Bottles of Quality.” Milk Dealer 13(10):2. 1925 Advertisement: Automatically Processed Milk Bottles of Quality.” Milk Dealer 14(6):41. 1929 Advertisement: “You Can’t ‘Recondition’ a Milk Bottle.” Milk Dealer 19(3):19.

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1930 Advertisement: “Bottles That come Back are the Only Bottles That Pay Profits.” Milk Dealer 19(11):29. 1932 Advertisement: “Nationwide Service.” Milk Dealer 21(4):35. National Glass Budget 1909 “Hayes on Bottle Machines.” National Glass Budget 25(11):1. New York Times 1930 “Listings Approved by Stock Exchange: Owens-Illinois Glass Reveals Purchase of Berney-Bond for 47,274 Shares.” New York Times, June 30. Owens-Illinois Glass Co. 1930 “Twenty-Third Annual Report of Owens-Illinois Glass Company for the Year Ended December 31, 1930.” Owens-Illinois Glass Co., Toledo, Ohio. Paquette, Jack K. 1994 The Glassmakers: A History of Owens-Illinois, Incorporated. Trumpeting Angel Press, Toledo, Ohio. Pollard, Gordon 1993 Bottles and Business in Plattsburgh, New York: 100 Years of Embossed Bottles as Historical Artifacts. Clinton County Historical Association, Plattsburgh. Porter, Ross 2002a “1895: Smethport Bottling Works manufacturer of glass bottles.” A webpage of Planet Smethport. http://www.smethporthistory.org/e.wa terstreet/bottlefactory/berney_bond_p g.htm#smehtport%20glass 2002b “1900's: Berney-Bond Glass Co.” A webpage of Planet S m e t h p o r t . http://www.smethporthistory.org/haze lhurst/hazelhurst.b.b.htm Schadlich, Louis [ca. 1990] “Milk Bottles Marked by Manufacturers and Jobbers.” Unpublished manuscript


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number that was assigned to each milk bottle manufacturer (Milk Dealer 1916:58-59). This study, too, is in its infancy, but the number used by Berney-Bond and later Owens-Illinois was “48.” In many states, the code BB48 (or BBGCO48) with the word “SEALED” was sufficient. Minnesota established a unique system, where “48” above a line with “MINN” below was surrounded by a triangle (Figure 13). Initially, the mark appeared on the shoulder of Minnesota milk bottles, but, at a point we have not yet discovered, the mark migrated to the heel. From at least 1940, the “MINN” triangle was commonly found on milk bottles, regardless of the state. Although our sample is painfully small, the triangles seem to have initially used “BB48” but simplified the code to “48” in the mid1950s. Discussions and Conclusions BBGCo (1905-ca. 1915) Although this mark could have been used by the Bartlesville Bottle & Glass Co., the lack of the ampersand makes it a less likely choice. Of the remaining companies with the proper initials, only the Berney-Bond Glass Co. is a likely choice. The initials match exactly; the time period fits both the bottles and the business dates; the Hazelhurst plant was known to have made catsup bottles; and there are no other likely choices. Because all examples we have found were mouth blown, they were likely made between 1905 and ca. 1915. BBGCO48 (ca. 1913-1931) and BB48 (ca. 1913-1949) These marks were certainly used by the Berney-Bond Glass Co. The BBGCO48 mark was used by BerneyBond between ca. 1920 and 1930, although some of the later marks (19251931) have date codes embossed on the bases, and the mark was still used by Owens-Illinois in 1931 and later. The BB48 mark was used by BerneyBond from ca. 1920 until the sale to

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Owens-Illinois in 1930, again accompanied by date codes on the base as early as 1925. BB48 is much more common than the BBGCO48 logo. Although we may never know the full story, the use of two different marks may reflect a division by plant. There is no indication that the plants at Bradford or Smethport ever made milk bottles. However, the Hazelhurst plant seems to have made milk bottles. Since this appears likely (although not currently fully supported by historical data), the use of two marks would make sense to identify different plants, with Hazelhurst, the smaller factory, using the BBGCO48 mark (since BBGCO48 bottles are much less common). When the Hazelhurst plant ceased milk bottle production ca. 1926, the mark may have transferred to the Columbus plant (formerly the Winslow Glass Co.), where it would have been used until the sale to Owens-Illinois in 1930. This hypothesis fits current testing, but it should by no means be taken as absolute. Owens-Illinois continued to use the BB48 mark at the former BerneyBond plants (#17 & #18) until at least 1951 (along with using the molds at plants #7 and #9 from 1948). BB48 is accompanied by the Owens-Illinois mark and date codes from at least 1938 to 1956, although its use after ca. 1947 was sporadic. The BBGCO48 mark is distinctly associated with the Massachusetts BB seal, beginning at some point after 1918 (probably ca. 1920), although we have found no examples of the BB48 mark associated with the seal. “BB,” “BB48,” and “48” are associated with seals from other states. When Owens-Illinois entered milk bottle production, it used both the manufacturer’s mark and seals acquired from Berney-Bond, now the property of Owens-Illinois. Thus, the company was spared the extra trouble to establish both a number and specific contracts with the individual states. In addition, most (possibly all) Owens-Illinois bottles were marked “SEALED BB48” – allowing the company to use the Berney-Bond logo

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to comply with the seal laws of other states. Acknowledgments We send our gratitude to OwensIllinois, Inc. for allowing us access to its information and allowing us to publish non-proprietary information. Our thanks to Al Morin, of Dracut, Massachusetts, for his help in our study of Massachusetts seals on milk bottles. Al has searched his collection several times in response to our questions, including the one about BB seals and marks. Thanks also to Brad Blodgett, another Massachusetts resident, who has also been searching his collection for us. A final thanks to Laura Brown of Vassalboro, Maine, for her help with Maine-seal milk bottles and Maine historical records. Sources Cited: American Glass Review 1927 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1928 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1931 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1934 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Includes reprint of the Glass Trade Directory for 1904. Commoner Publishing Co., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Blodget, Bradford G. 2006 “Milk Bottles from the Heart of the Commonwealth: A Collector’s Guide to the Milk Bottles from the City of Worcester, Massachusetts, 1890-2006.” Unpublished manuscript. Bristow, A.E. 1917 “Factories Report Good Runs.” Glassworker 35(36):1, 8-9. Commoner and Glassworker 1910a “At Berney-Bond Co’s Smethport Plant.” Commoner and Glassworker 28(3):7.

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The Dating Game - Berney-Bond Glass Company

By Russ Hoenig, Bill Lockhart, Pete Schulz, Carol Serr, Les Jordan, Bill Lindsey and Phil Perry The history of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. is very complex, colorful, and (in places) confused. The story cannot be fully told without including the plants and companies that led to the formation of both the Berney Glass Co. and the Bond Glass Co. Thus, we have included historical snapshots of a few of the earlier plants. The Berney-Bond story also includes four Pennsylvania towns: Bradford, Hazelhurst, Smethport and Clarion – and eventually Columbus, Ohio. Although we have separated the histories to conform to our usual template, this story is really more of a web or a weaving. Histories Berney Glass Co. Bradford, Pennsylvania (ca. 1897-1904) The roots of the Berney Glass Co., began about 1894 with the erection of the Seamless Bottle Co., plant in Bradford. By 1895, the plant was operated by the McKean Glass Co., and it was taken over by the Bradford City Glass Bottle Co., the following year. (Hoenig 2008a). The Berney Glass Co., apparently gained control of the Bradford City Glass Bottle Co., when the company incorporated on November 28, 1900, although the company claimed 1895 (the date for McKean) as its initial date (Hoenig 2008a). 1 (Hoenig 2008b). The 1904 glass factory list noted that the Berney Glass Co., in Bradford used one continuous tank with eight rings to make beer bottles (American Glass Review 1934:165). The merger that created Berney-Bond took place on September 29, 1904 (Hoenig 2008c). Berney Glass Co. Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania

Although we have heard rumors of a Berney Glass Co., plant in Hazelhurst, these actually referred to an office for the company. The Hazelhurst Window Glass Co., incorporated on January

5, 1899, was owned by F.P. Hazelton, one of the principals in the later Berney-Bond enterprise. The office for both Berney Glass and the Window Glass Co., were listed at 80 or 82 Mechanic Street in Bradford. Bond Glass Co. Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania (1902-1904) On October 31, 1901, M.N. Allen, a local contractor, announced his intention to build a bottle house in Hazelhurst. Allen almost certainly was referring to the “Bond Bottle Co.,” factory that was erected December 5. The stockholders, A.J. Bond, J.H. Leslie, C.E. Hazelton, A.M. Mayer, John Ley and H.L. Stoner, planned to file for incorporation on December 26 (Hoenig 2008c; 2008a). Porter (2002b) stated that “in 1902, the Bond Glass Company was formed in Hazel Hurst to make bottles etc.” This almost certainly referred to either the opening of the plant or the beginning of production. The plant made “prescription, liquor and proprietary ware” at a single continuous tank in 1904. A.J. Bond was president of the corporation, with C.E. Hazelton as vice president (American Glass Review 1934:165). The Bond Glass Co., merged with the Berney Glass Co. to form BerneyBond on September 24, 1904 (Hoenig 2007a). Toulouse (1971:70-71) noted that the Bond Glass Co., began in Hazelhurst ca. 1897, but he may have been confused with the Berney Glass Co., in Bradford (see above). Berney-Bond Glass Co. (1904-1930) The Berney Glass Co., merged with the Bond Glass Co., on September 24, 1904 (Hoenig 2007a), and the Hazelton family continued to be an important part of the corporation. By 1908, the company was “probably the largest producers of exclusively flint bottles” (Mayer 1908:12). In 1913, the three plants used four continuous tanks with 32 rings to produce a

“general line” of bottles (Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 1913:953). By 1917, semiautomatic machines were installed in “all three plants” at some point “during the past two years,” making flint, amber and green bottles, “their sale being chiefly in the eastern markets” (Glassworker 1917:7). The same year, management became nervous about the impending Volstead Act (Prohibition) and sought another venue for glass production. They chose milk bottles and began experimentation for modifying their existing Lynch machines. This culminated in the Lynch-Budd machines, which were not too successful. Berney-Bond cooperated with outside companies to eventually create the highly successful Miller-Budd (MB) machine that was very successful at the Clarion plant. The MB was often colloquially called the Milk Bottle machine (Hoenig 2008d). Urban Bowes became the director of manufacturing in 1924 and instituted many progressive ideas into the business (Hoenig 2008d). Although Berney-Bond was best known for making milk bottles, the company advertised “soda, beer, ammonia or miscellaneous bottle[s]” made by automatic machines in 1925 (Milk Dealer 1925). On February 15, 1926, Berney-Bond signed an eight-year agreement with the Hartford-Empire Co., to use up to 25 of the Hartford feeders, including 12 Howards in Clarion and four in Hazelhurst (Hoenig 2008d). By 1927, Berney-Bond purchased the Winslow Glass Co., Columbus, Ohio. The company was listed as making “flint proprietary, carbonated beverages, liquors, milk jars,” all by machine at three continuous tanks with 12 rings. The following year (1928), the company added another tank, bringing the total to four continuous tanks with 17 rings (American Glass Review 1927:127; 1928:128). Although not listed until 1928, the


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fourth tank was the one at the former Winslow plant in Columbus. According to Paquette (1994:80), Owens-Illinois bought the BerneyBond Glass Co., and the Atlantic Bottle Co., in 1930, when it decided to seriously enter milk bottle production. Owens-Illinois actually purchased “the entire assets of Berney-Bond Glass Company, except certain natural gas properties” on January 1, 1930 (Owens-Illinois 1930:9; New York Times 6/26/1930). The Columbus plant (#18) closed in 1948; the Clarion plant (#17) remains in business today. The story of the sale is worth repeating. Early in 1930, OwensIllinois representatives arrived at Clarion to discuss the purchase. However, they left with a misunderstanding that the deal was complete. Meanwhile, Berney-Bond continued production as usual. In May, Owens-Illinois representatives followed up and were surprised to find Berney-Bond still operating as usual. An actual agreement was reached by August 26, and Berney-Bond turned the books over to Owens-Illinois on August 30. Each plant, however, had its own story. Bradford, Pennsylvania (1904-1910) The former Berney Glass Co., factory became the Bradford plant for Berney-Bond, when the company formed on September 29, 1904. When a tank burst at the Hazelhurst plant in 1905, the workers apparently came to Bradford. The Bradford plant burned to the ground on October 10, 1906, and the workers went back to Hazelhurst. The Bradford and Hazelhurst units seemed to have a symbiotic relationship during the first few years. The plant apparently remained nonexistent for a few years, but BerneyBond acquired the old Tuna Glass Co. plant2 and began production on September 29, 1909 (Hoenig 2008a; 2008b). The new Bradford plant used employees imported from Smethport, while that plant was rebuilt. BerneyBond announced plans to use up to 250 people in the Bradford plant.

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When the first Smethport tank was fired on October 14, 1909, management told the Smethport workers at Bradford that they would go home when the second tank was up, around Christmas of that year. This corresponds well with the closing of the plant (below) (Hoenig 2007b). The plant had only a single continuous tank with 14 rings, making flint bottles (Hoenig 2007a). Toulouse (1971:72-73) and Giarde (1980:15) both claimed that the Bradford plant closed permanently in 1909, and this is supported by local newspaper coverage, noting that the plant was shut down January 1, 1910, because of a local gas shortage. Because of the oil boom in Bradford, the area became “dirty, muddy, oily and full of society’s worst” by 1910. As a result, many of the glass workers, especially the married ones, moved to Clarion. The Hazeltons and Budds led the exodus – except mother Hazelton, who kept the family mansion in Bradford. Clarion was a nice, clean town in comparison (Hoenig 2007c; 2007a). The Commoner and Glassworker (1910b:1) confirmed the shutdown stating, “Owing to a shortage of gas the Berney-Bond Glass Co.’s Bradford, Pa., plant shut down and an additional force will be employed at their Hazelhurst plant.”3 Smethport (1907-1918) The Haines Flint Bottle Co., closed on January 31, 1907, but the plant did not become the BerneyBond Glass Co., until March, 21, 1907. By 1908, the factory had two tanks and operated eight shops on each one. One of the products was quart grape juice bottles. The plant also ran a slightly smaller night crew by October 1909. On April 23, 1910, the factory made beer, soda, and prescription bottles. Although three machines were reportedly used in 1909, the plant only operated hand shops in 1910. By October, the factory ran eight shops on the day shift and six at night (Commoner and Glassworker 1910a:7; Hoenig 2007a). We can find no indication that this plant ever produced milk bottles.

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By mid-1917, the plant operated two one-man Gump-Johnson machines and was waiting for two more to be installed. The plant also ran ten “blow” shops (hand production). The factory burned on May 2, 1918, destroying the three Gump-Johnson machines and two Jersey Devils that had been installed by then. The plant was never rebuilt, and the remains were demolished in August 1928 (Bristow 1917:9; Hoenig 2007a; Porter 2002b). Hazelhurst (1904-1928) The former Bond plant at Hazelhurst became the Berney-Bond factory on September 24, 1904. On January 19, 1905, a tank burst (apparently the only one operating at that time), and the plant was shut down. The workers apparently went to Bradford. When the Bradford factory burned in 1906, the workers returned to Hazelhurst (Hoenig 2008b). The plant apparently operated a single continuous tank and made grape juice, catsup and some halfgallon grape juice bottles by 1908. Three machines were installed in 1909 but were removed the following year, when the plant operated two shifts, making 4- to 32-ounce items (Hoenig 2007a). The National Glass Budget (1909) noted that four Johnny Bull (United) machines at Hazelhurst were making “grape juice, catsups, beers and quart brandies.” These were almost certainly the machines that were later removed. By September 24, 1910, the entire plant had shifted to grape juice bottle production (Hoenig 2007a). The plant burned on February 15, 1917, but was rebuilt and operating again by April 23. At that point, the factory had four two-man Jersey machines, producing green (aqua) beer and ammonia bottles. By February 2, 1922, the plant was not in operation and had been idle for some time. At this point, we can only speculate that the onset of Prohibition in 1920 had removed the need for the factory’s beer bottle manufacturing. By mid1923, however, production had resumed (Bristow 1917:8; Hoenig 2007a).

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was altered. The second anomaly was a milk bottle embossed 2 I-in-an-Ovalsuperimposed-over-an-elongateddiamond 6. This was a gallon bottle, and it probably indicates that manufacture of the larger containers was transferred to the Huntington, West Virginia, plant by 1936 (although 1946 is a possibility). That would probably have included moving all existing larger molds from the former Berney-Bond plants. Owens-Illinois embossed “M” codes on milk bottle heels to designate container styles. These were followed by a 3- to 4-digit mold code (M-xxxx). These should not be confused with the other “M” codes described above. Hoenig (2007c) provided the following list: “M” = Gallon milks “MH”= light weight milks “ML” = standard weight milks “MX or MLX” = standard weight milks with headspace 1/4" below cap seat “MY or MHX” = light weight milks with headspace 1/4" below cap seat “MZ”= non-returnable milks. State Seals with “BB” and no Owens-Illinois logo (ca. 1919-1929) State Seals with “BB” plus Owens-Illinois logo (ca. 1930-1947) Beginning in 1900, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts required that all milk bottles used by dairies in the state bear a “seal” to guarantee the volume of the container. Originally, these were etched on the sides of the bottles by local “sealers” in locations throughout the state. From late 1909 to 1947, however, glass factories selling bottles to dairies within the state were required to emboss their containers with a Massachusetts seal. The most typical format placed the seal on the shoulder of each bottle, usually in a circular shape embossed “MASS (arch) / {factory designator initials} / SEAL (inverted arch).” These often appeared in a small plate mold. The mark used by BerneyBond was “BB” (Blodget 2006:8; Schadlich [ca. 199 0]; Schadlich & Schadlich 1984). The company used

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the “BB” in the Massachusetts seal from as early as 1920 to 1930, when Owens-Illinois acquired the plants. Berney-Bond was not mentioned in the 1918 Massachusetts Department of Standards Bulletin #11 but did appear in the 1928 bulletin #25. Owens-Illinois continued to use the “BB” in the Massachusetts seal after its acquisition of Berney-Bond in 1930 (Figure 11), probably until the repeal of the law in 1947. This may have induced Owens-Illinois to continue applying the “BB48” mark to

Figure 11: Massachusetts BB Seal (ebay) milk bottle heels from the former Berney-Bond plants, when it entered into milk bottle production in 1930. It is probably no coincidence that the use of “BB48” dropped off sharply after 1947. Codes used after 1947 probably reflect a continued use of the old molds rather than an intentional use of the seal after the cessation of the law. Although our sample is small (ca. 20 bottles in the study by Russ Hoenig and an unknown number in the collection of Al Morin), all bottles embossed with the Massachusetts BB seal but no Owens-Illinois manufacturer’s mark on the base, are heelmarked with BBGCO48. At this point, we have not found a single bottle with both the Massachusetts BB seal and the BB48 heelcode. At least three other states (Maine, Rhode Island, and Pennsylvania) also had seal laws. The Maine seal laws took effect in 1913 and ended (like Massachusetts) in 1947. The study of seal laws in the other two states remains in its infancy, although most

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states became interested in checking milk bottles for proper capacity and using some system to regulate the dairies or the manufacturer s about the same time – the teen years of the 20th century. All three states eventually required the seal on the shoulder of the bottle. The Berney-Bond/OwensIllinois seal for Rhode Island was con-

Figure 12: Maine 48 seal (ebay) figured “R.I. (arch) / BB (horizontal) / SEAL (inverted arch).” Maine was similar: “MAINE (arch) / 48 (horizontal) / SEAL (inverted arch)” (Figure 12). We have not found a Berney-Bond example of the Pennsylvania shoulder seal yet, but the general configuration is “SEALED (arch) / {number} (horizontal) / PA. (inverted arch).” In addition, several other states, including West Virginia, Michigan, and Wisconsin, initiated systems that required the word SEALED and a

Figure 13: Minnesota 48 triangle (California State Park Collection)


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The initial letter or double letter (see above) was often followed by another letter or a three-digit number that noted styles of the neck area. These included: “F” = shallow flutes in the neck “110” = long, narrow vertical neck and shoulder ribs “115” = vertical ribs in neck “120” = wide fluted or petaled neck “130” = wide vertical shallow ribs “135” = 4 rows of dimples “140” = wide diagonal “X” pattern around neck “145” = 1 horizontal rib around neck “150” = 3 rows of dimples “155” = 1 narrow scallop line around neck with 6 points “160” = 14, 1" long vertical ribs in neck “180” = narrow, fine line, swirled ribs in neck Another set of codes we have observed on Berney-Bond milk bottle heels begins with the letter “M.” These were embossed near the mold seam. The “M” can appear alone or may be followed by two-digit (occasionally three-digit) numbers (e.g., “M10,” “M16,” “M21,” “M25,” “M26,” “M28,” “M30,” “M58,” or “M188”). In examining identical pairs of bottles, Hoenig (2007c) observed that bottles embossed on the heels with the “M” also had capacity information in an arch at the shoulder (e.g. ONE QUART), while the identical bottle with no “M” lacked the capacity designation. The meaning of the accompanying numbers is currently unknown. BB48 and the Owens-Illinois Diamond OI mark (1930-at least 1962) According to Giarde (1980:15), the BB48 mark continued in use in “the following decades” after OwensIllinois bought Berney-Bond. The mark appeared not only on milk bottles made by the former Berney-Bond plants but on those made by other Owens-Illinois factories as well. We

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have recorded a sample of over 80 milk bottles (from collections and eBay) with BB48 marks on the heels and Owens-Illinois marks (including date codes on the bases). Our sample disclosed only four Owens-Illinois plants using the BB48 mark. Two are intuitively obvious. One was factory #17, the former

Figure 9: Owens-Illinois mark from Clarion Plant (double digit) (Hoenig) Berney-Bond plant at Clarion, Pennsylvania. The second was plant #18, the former Berney-Bond plant at Columbus, Ohio. Date codes from plant #17 ranged between 0 and 9; 42 through 51 (Figure 9); 61 and 62 on handi-square bottles. Plant #18 codes extended between 0 and 8; 46 through 48. This requires an explanation of Owens-Illinois date codes (see Lockhart 2004 for a more complete discussion of Owens-Illinois marks and date codes). Single digit codes can equal the last number of the dates from about 1930 to the mid-1940s (“8” = 1938; “0” = 1940; “1” = 1941, etc.). We have recorded single-digit codes rang-

Figure 10: Owens-Illinois mark from Clarion Plant (single digit) (Hoenig) ing from 0-9 without an accompanying “Duraglas” logo (Figure 10) and 0-5 with “Duraglas” – as well as single examples of “6” and “8” with the logo. Two-digit codes indicate the last two digits of the year the bottle was made (“46” = 1946, etc.). Twodigit date codes first appeared in conjunction with the BB48 marks in 1946 and continued until at least 1962, although the ones made after 1949 were not made at Clarion. Owens-Illinois acquired the Berney-Bond plants in 1930 and al-

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most certainly continued to fill existing orders and/or wear out existing molds with the older Berney-Bond marks until at least 1931. This suggests that the BB48 mark with no date codes was used during the first one or two years after the transfer. Possibly as early as 1931, the company used BB48 along with the Owens-Illinois mark and date codes. The presence of “Duraglas” on a base indicates that a bottle could not have been made prior to 1940, the year the process was initiated. However, the Duraglas process was not used on all milk bottles. Combining single-digit date codes with Duraglas markings suggests that both plant #17 and plant #18 used the combined BB48 and Owens-Illinois marks with date codes from at least 1936 to ca. 1951. However, the plants seem to have dropped the Duraglas mark from milk bottles in 1952. The other plants that used the BB48 mark were the former Illinois Glass Co. plant at Alton, Illinois (#7), and the former American Bottle Co. factory at Streator, Illinois (#9). Date codes we have recorded for Plant #7 were “8,” “9,” “47,” and “48”; those from Plant #9 included “8,” “47,” “48,” and “49.” These data suggest that some of the Berney-Bond molds were shipped to the Alton and Streator plants after the Columbus plant closed in 1948, and the Clarion plant was converted to other glassware in 1947 (Hoenig 2007c; Toulouse 1971:73). The marks continued in use until the body molds wore out. On occasional specimens, BB48 shows up on bottles as late as 1958 for Alton (#7) and 1961 for Streator (#9). We discovered two anomalies in the California State Park milk bottle collection in Sacramento. One bottle was embossed with BB48 on the heel and 17 I-in-an-Oval 57 on the base.7 The use of the more recent mark, coupled with the 1957 date code, places this bottle well outside the typical usage of the BB48 mark. Apparently, someone at one of the Midwest plants (Streator or Alton) found an old mold and failed to change the plant code when the date code on the baseplate

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By 1925, ads listed both the Hazelhurst and Clarion plants as still making beer bottles as well as soda, ammonia and milk bottles. The plant made milk bottles until 1928 (but may have ceased milk bottle production when Berney-Bond acquired the Winslow plants that year). The plant probably did not operate too often. By at least September 9, 1928, the factory used Lynch machines with automatic feeders, employing 12-14 people (Hoenig 2007b; 2008c). The plant closed on December 28, 1928, apparently the last date it operated for Berney-Bond, although it continued to be listed in company ads during 1929. The Pierce Glass Company of Port Allegany leased the plant on May 30, 1929. Pierce used Lynch machines to make its bottles, probably the ones owned by Berney-Bond. When the lease expired in the fall of 1929, Berney-Bond closed the plant. In 1930, the Owens-Illinois Glass Co., had obtained all the Berney-Bond factories, but, on March 5, 1931, OwensIllinois removed all the machinery from Hazelhurst and razed the buildings (Hoenig 2007a; Porter 2002b). Clarion (1912-1930) In 1912, Berney-Bond acquired the old Pearl Glass Co., in Clarion, Pennsylvania,4 a plant that made a variety of bottle types. From its inception, the Clarion plant maintained the three continuous tanks it inherited from Pearl, although one was occasionally idle. In 1913, Clarion began installing semiautomatic machines (Hoenig 2007c). A significant amount of production revolved around bottles connected with alcohol. Because of the threat of Prohibition, the management began to be concerned and looked into milk bottle production as an alternative, with Clarion as the main production center for the new product. By 1917, George Howard (of the Howard Machine Co.) and the Hazeltons developed suspended gob feeders. At the same time, Clinton Budd had developed and put into production what became the Lynch-Budd machine to manufacture milk bottles. These later

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developed into the Miller-Budd machines (Hoenig 2007c). Clarion had eight machines by 1918 as well as a few hand shops. One tank used “one No-Boy Lynch machine; three Twenty Century machines and eight blow shops” (“Keystone” 1918:12). By 1920, all production was conducted by 12-13 milk bottle machines. However, a serious fire on December 16, 1920, halted production for six weeks. The plant continued to use three tanks when production resumed (Hoenig 2007c; 2008d). The plant burned to the ground on September 28, 1922 (Hoenig 2008d). As a result, a “new milk bottle factory” was being opened by the company at Clarion later that year (Creamery and Milk Plant Monthly 1922:64). By 1923, the plant was fully operational with 12 Howard feeders and one experimental feeder running at two continuous tanks. Thirteen milk bottle machines made between five and fifteen bottles per minute. The plant had its own large mold and machine shop (Hoenig 2008d). The factory remained in use and was part of the sale to OwensIllinois in 1930. During the Great Depression (under Owens-Illinois), the Clarion plant operated on a cash basis – no credit. The machines were idled until a paying order was received. Until the mid-1930s, production was sporadic. Because of the rise in popularity of waxed paper milk cartons, the Clarion plant began a transition from milk bottle production to food and liquor bottles in 1944. The plant began transferring molds to the Midwest plants that still made milk bottles. By ca. 1956, the transfer was complete, and Clarion’s heyday as a milk bottle production facility was over (Hoenig 2007a). Columbus, Ohio (1927-1930) When Berney-Bond acquired the Winslow Glass Co. on May 1, 1927, the factory became the company’s Columbus plant, continuing to produce milk bottles. The plant used four Tucker, Reeves & Beatty feeders (Hoenig 2008d). In 1930, the factory,

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along with the rest of Berney-Bond, was sold to Owens-Illinois (Glass Industry 1927:151; Toulouse 1971:7073). Chronology of Berney-Bond Plants and Their Former Names Smethport, Pennsylvania (1907-1918) [Haines Flint Bottle Co.] Bradford, Pennsylvania (1904-1910) [Berney Glass Co.] Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania (1904-1928) [Bond Glass Co.] Clarion, Pennsylvania (1912-present) [Pearl Glass Co.] Columbus, Ohio (1927-1948) [Winslow Glass Co.] Containers and Marks BBGCo (ca. 1905-1915) Jones (1966:15) suggested Bryce Bros. Glass Co., as the user of this mark, but Bryce Brothers only made tableware. This mark was probably used by the Berney-Bond Glass Co. Strangely, Toulouse (1971:70) did not include this in his list of Berney-Bond marks. The “BBGCo” is usually slightly arched, although the curvature can vary (Figures 1 & 2). The mark is usually found on the bases of colorless catsup bottles that can solarize to an amethyst color. The marks are also found on flasks (horizontal) and prescription bottles (slight arch). Although our sample is small, we have not found the mark on any other bottle type. Some marks are unaccompanied by numbers, while others have one- to three-digit numbers embossed on the base below the mark. The examples we have seen include “2,” “263,” and “315” – possibly catalog codes. Bottles in our current sample are all mouth-blown, suggesting a use between 1904 and at least the ca. 1920 period when Berney-Bond ceased hand production. This date is predicated on the transition to milk bottle production at Clarion. The Hazelhurst plant made catsup bottles by at least 1908, although we have found no other references to them. Of course, this does not rule out production of


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Figure 1: BBGCo mark (Lockhart)

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L52, E4, etc.), while others embossed their marks on one part of the bottle and the numerical code on another (e.g., the Thatcher MTC mark on the base or one part of the heel and the number “11” on another part of the heel). Berney-Bond chose or was assigned number 48. At this point, we have no idea how or why this numbering system evolved or who devised it. Giarde (1980:14-16) noted the BBGCO48 mark as being used by Berney-Bond (Figure 3) between 1920 and 1930 along with two-digit date codes on at least some milk bottles. It

Figure 3: BBGCO48 mark (California State Park Collection)

Figure 2: BBGCo mark (slight arch) (Tucson Urban Renewal Collection) catsup bottles at other plants or later at Hazelhurst. A colorless soda or beer bottle with a lightning stopper and BBGCo embossed on its base was offered on eBay, but we cannot confirm the mark in association with this bottle type; the seller failed to include a photo. However, Pollard (1993:51, 56-57, 92, 135) noted a blob-top soda bottle embossed “BBGCo / 551” on the base. The bottling company was open from 1900-1915, easily within the dates when Berney-Bond was making bottles. BBGCO48 (ca. 1917-1930) With Owens-Illinois basemarks (1930-ca. 1946) At some point between ca. 1905 and ca. 1910, glass houses began marking their bottles with the combination of a manufacturer’s mark (often a single letter) and a single- or doubledigit numerical code that designated each company. Many companies used their marks in conjunction with the number (e.g., BBGCO48, LGCo / 1,

is important to note that Giarde only associated the BBGCO48 and BB48 marks with milk bottles, an observation confirmed by our empirical observation. Giarde also noted that BBGCO48 also appeared on “round milk bottles together with the OwensIllinois mark.” At this point, we have recorded Owens-Illinois basemarks

Bottles and Extras

conjunction with the Winslow “W” mark. Virtually all manufacturers continued to fill existing orders of a company they had acquired and to use old molds until they wore out. If a former firm’s mark appeared on a heel, it was generally ignored. Thus, bottles with two makers’ marks, under these circumstances, are not uncommon. We have observed several bottles with this combination of marks. Milk bottles embossed BBGCO48 on the heels are occasionally marked on the bases with date codes, although our sample of these is very small. We have recorded two-digit codes of 2531 as well as one base with “W 28” and two with “38B.” This pattern fits the date codes used with the BB48 mark (see below). In addition, we have observed some bases marked with single-digit numbers, including: “3,” “6,” and “9,” as well as a single base embossed “J18” or “J1B.” Although these may possibly have been date codes, their meaning is currently unverified. We have discovered several early milk bottles with BBGCO48 embossed on the heel that also have a small “H” embossed elsewhere on the heel. This “H” likely indicates the Hazelhurst plant. These were probably made between ca. 1913 and 1928 (see Discussion and Conclusions section below). We have observed milk

Bottles and Extras

found on cottage cheese jars (Figure 6). These were advertised (showing

Figure 6: BB (cottage cheese jars) (Berney-Bond catalog—Hoenig) the mark) in at least one Berney-Bond catalog, and they are found on actual cottage cheese jars. BB48 (ca.1918-1930) Both Toulouse (1971:70) and Giarde (1980:14-15) dated the BB48 mark (Figure 7) as being used from

Figure 7: BB48 mark (Hoenig)

Figure 4: BBGCO48 mark with Owens-Illinois logo (ebay) with BBGCO48 heelmarks only from plant #17 (Figure 4), the former Berney-Bond plant at Clarion, Pennsylvania. Single-digit date codes in our sample range from “0” to “9” (probably indicating 1930 to 1939, although the “0” may indicate 1940) and are never accompanied by the Owens-Illinois “Duraglas” mark. As with the BB48 mark (see below), Giarde (1980:16) observed that the BBGCO48 mark was also used in

Figure 5: Small “H” on heel (Hoenig) bottles with the “H” on the heel and date codes of “26” and “28” on the base (Figure 5). BB The heelmark “BB” with no accompanying “48” is apparently only

1920 to 1930. Giarde (1980:15) also stated, “While the company used several different marks, it is doubtful that milk bottles will be found without a numeral “48” being included with the mark.” Berney-Bond advertised the BB48 mark by at least July 1922 (Milk Dealer 1922). However, a 1924 ad (Milk Dealer 1924) may provide a better clue to when the BB48 mark was first used. The ad noted: “Four years ago BB 48 Milk Bottles of Quality were only a thought; today they are recognized as leaders of quality.” This statement suggests that the BB48 logo was first used ca. 1920.

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Giarde (1980:16) also described a milk bottle with BB48 (presumably on the heel) and the Winslow “W” embossed on the base. As noted above (see BBGCO48 mark), marks from acquired companies were often continued for one or more years after the sale.5 BB48 marks appear exclusively on the heels of milk bottles. They may be accompanied by numbers, although these are not date codes (see Other Berney-Bond Codes below). Most BB48 milk bottles are unaccompanied by date codes, but some have two-digit, basal date codes ranging from 25-30, with individual codes of “28 W,” “SP 29,” “31B” and “31W.” A few bases were embossed with single-digit codes of “1” and “8.” While these may have been date codes, this has not been fully demonstrated. The accompanying letters are perplexing. Giarde (1980:140) noted that the “W” could indicate the former Winslow Glass plant. Although we considered the possibility that the “SP” could mean Smethport and the “B” could equal Bradford, the date codes on the bases do not fit the timeframe when the plants were open. In addition, there is no evidence that either plant made milk bottles. The “W” could indicate Winslow, but that does not account for the meanings of the other letters. Giarde (1980:141) noted that it is possible for bottles made at Winslow during the 19301931 period to be embossed with three marks, the Winslow 5W, BerneyBond BB48 (or BBGCO48), and the Owens-Illinois OI-Diamond mark. Berney-Bond took advantage of the Winslow reputation. Ads in 1929 referred to “Berney-Bond-Winslow tou ghn ess” or “Be rne y- Bon dWinslow bottles.” In addition, the ads illustrated a bottle embossed on the heel with BB48 followed by a dash then the Winslow 5W logo – with the “5” nestled between the “legs” of the “W” (e.g., Milk Dealer 1929) (Figure 8). Owens-Illinois also took advantage of both logos (now its property), when it acquired Berney-Bond in 1930. An August 1930 ad identified the company as the Berney-Bond

37

Milk Bottle Division of the OwensIllinois Glass Co. The ad illustrated the same bottle marked with both the BB48 and 5W logos (Milk Dealer 1930). It was not until 1932 that O w e n s Illinois ads dropped the 5W logo. A January ad s h o w e d Figure 8: BB48 mark BB48 on the with Winslow 5W logo (Milk Dealer heel roll and 1929) the OwensIllinois logo on the base (Milk Dealer 1932). Other Berney-Bond Codes Additional codes appeared on the heels of Berney-Bond bottles (marked with both BBGCO48 and BB48). Hoenig (2007c) provided code interpretations as of 1922.6 The initial letter in a heelmark indicated the “family” to which the bottle belonged, based on height, diameter, shoulder springline (i.e., contour), decoration, and lettering. The following are dimensions for quart bottles: “A” = 9 1/2" x 3 27/32" “B” = 9" x 3 7/8" “C” = 9 1/4" x 3 15/16" “D” = 9 1/2" x 3 27/32" “H” = 9 1/2" x 3 13/16" “X” = 9 1/4" x 3 7/8" “Z” = 9 1/2" x 3 7/8" Actual codes we have recorded, however, include: A half-pints, pints, quarts AX half-pints, pints, quarts B half-pints, pints, quarts BX pints, quarts C quarts D pints, quarts F quarts T quarts XX quarts Z quarts


36

Figure 1: BBGCo mark (Lockhart)

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L52, E4, etc.), while others embossed their marks on one part of the bottle and the numerical code on another (e.g., the Thatcher MTC mark on the base or one part of the heel and the number “11” on another part of the heel). Berney-Bond chose or was assigned number 48. At this point, we have no idea how or why this numbering system evolved or who devised it. Giarde (1980:14-16) noted the BBGCO48 mark as being used by Berney-Bond (Figure 3) between 1920 and 1930 along with two-digit date codes on at least some milk bottles. It

Figure 3: BBGCO48 mark (California State Park Collection)

Figure 2: BBGCo mark (slight arch) (Tucson Urban Renewal Collection) catsup bottles at other plants or later at Hazelhurst. A colorless soda or beer bottle with a lightning stopper and BBGCo embossed on its base was offered on eBay, but we cannot confirm the mark in association with this bottle type; the seller failed to include a photo. However, Pollard (1993:51, 56-57, 92, 135) noted a blob-top soda bottle embossed “BBGCo / 551” on the base. The bottling company was open from 1900-1915, easily within the dates when Berney-Bond was making bottles. BBGCO48 (ca. 1917-1930) With Owens-Illinois basemarks (1930-ca. 1946) At some point between ca. 1905 and ca. 1910, glass houses began marking their bottles with the combination of a manufacturer’s mark (often a single letter) and a single- or doubledigit numerical code that designated each company. Many companies used their marks in conjunction with the number (e.g., BBGCO48, LGCo / 1,

is important to note that Giarde only associated the BBGCO48 and BB48 marks with milk bottles, an observation confirmed by our empirical observation. Giarde also noted that BBGCO48 also appeared on “round milk bottles together with the OwensIllinois mark.” At this point, we have recorded Owens-Illinois basemarks

Bottles and Extras

conjunction with the Winslow “W” mark. Virtually all manufacturers continued to fill existing orders of a company they had acquired and to use old molds until they wore out. If a former firm’s mark appeared on a heel, it was generally ignored. Thus, bottles with two makers’ marks, under these circumstances, are not uncommon. We have observed several bottles with this combination of marks. Milk bottles embossed BBGCO48 on the heels are occasionally marked on the bases with date codes, although our sample of these is very small. We have recorded two-digit codes of 2531 as well as one base with “W 28” and two with “38B.” This pattern fits the date codes used with the BB48 mark (see below). In addition, we have observed some bases marked with single-digit numbers, including: “3,” “6,” and “9,” as well as a single base embossed “J18” or “J1B.” Although these may possibly have been date codes, their meaning is currently unverified. We have discovered several early milk bottles with BBGCO48 embossed on the heel that also have a small “H” embossed elsewhere on the heel. This “H” likely indicates the Hazelhurst plant. These were probably made between ca. 1913 and 1928 (see Discussion and Conclusions section below). We have observed milk

Bottles and Extras

found on cottage cheese jars (Figure 6). These were advertised (showing

Figure 6: BB (cottage cheese jars) (Berney-Bond catalog—Hoenig) the mark) in at least one Berney-Bond catalog, and they are found on actual cottage cheese jars. BB48 (ca.1918-1930) Both Toulouse (1971:70) and Giarde (1980:14-15) dated the BB48 mark (Figure 7) as being used from

Figure 7: BB48 mark (Hoenig)

Figure 4: BBGCO48 mark with Owens-Illinois logo (ebay) with BBGCO48 heelmarks only from plant #17 (Figure 4), the former Berney-Bond plant at Clarion, Pennsylvania. Single-digit date codes in our sample range from “0” to “9” (probably indicating 1930 to 1939, although the “0” may indicate 1940) and are never accompanied by the Owens-Illinois “Duraglas” mark. As with the BB48 mark (see below), Giarde (1980:16) observed that the BBGCO48 mark was also used in

Figure 5: Small “H” on heel (Hoenig) bottles with the “H” on the heel and date codes of “26” and “28” on the base (Figure 5). BB The heelmark “BB” with no accompanying “48” is apparently only

1920 to 1930. Giarde (1980:15) also stated, “While the company used several different marks, it is doubtful that milk bottles will be found without a numeral “48” being included with the mark.” Berney-Bond advertised the BB48 mark by at least July 1922 (Milk Dealer 1922). However, a 1924 ad (Milk Dealer 1924) may provide a better clue to when the BB48 mark was first used. The ad noted: “Four years ago BB 48 Milk Bottles of Quality were only a thought; today they are recognized as leaders of quality.” This statement suggests that the BB48 logo was first used ca. 1920.

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Giarde (1980:16) also described a milk bottle with BB48 (presumably on the heel) and the Winslow “W” embossed on the base. As noted above (see BBGCO48 mark), marks from acquired companies were often continued for one or more years after the sale.5 BB48 marks appear exclusively on the heels of milk bottles. They may be accompanied by numbers, although these are not date codes (see Other Berney-Bond Codes below). Most BB48 milk bottles are unaccompanied by date codes, but some have two-digit, basal date codes ranging from 25-30, with individual codes of “28 W,” “SP 29,” “31B” and “31W.” A few bases were embossed with single-digit codes of “1” and “8.” While these may have been date codes, this has not been fully demonstrated. The accompanying letters are perplexing. Giarde (1980:140) noted that the “W” could indicate the former Winslow Glass plant. Although we considered the possibility that the “SP” could mean Smethport and the “B” could equal Bradford, the date codes on the bases do not fit the timeframe when the plants were open. In addition, there is no evidence that either plant made milk bottles. The “W” could indicate Winslow, but that does not account for the meanings of the other letters. Giarde (1980:141) noted that it is possible for bottles made at Winslow during the 19301931 period to be embossed with three marks, the Winslow 5W, BerneyBond BB48 (or BBGCO48), and the Owens-Illinois OI-Diamond mark. Berney-Bond took advantage of the Winslow reputation. Ads in 1929 referred to “Berney-Bond-Winslow tou ghn ess” or “Be rne y- Bon dWinslow bottles.” In addition, the ads illustrated a bottle embossed on the heel with BB48 followed by a dash then the Winslow 5W logo – with the “5” nestled between the “legs” of the “W” (e.g., Milk Dealer 1929) (Figure 8). Owens-Illinois also took advantage of both logos (now its property), when it acquired Berney-Bond in 1930. An August 1930 ad identified the company as the Berney-Bond

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Milk Bottle Division of the OwensIllinois Glass Co. The ad illustrated the same bottle marked with both the BB48 and 5W logos (Milk Dealer 1930). It was not until 1932 that O w e n s Illinois ads dropped the 5W logo. A January ad s h o w e d Figure 8: BB48 mark BB48 on the with Winslow 5W logo (Milk Dealer heel roll and 1929) the OwensIllinois logo on the base (Milk Dealer 1932). Other Berney-Bond Codes Additional codes appeared on the heels of Berney-Bond bottles (marked with both BBGCO48 and BB48). Hoenig (2007c) provided code interpretations as of 1922.6 The initial letter in a heelmark indicated the “family” to which the bottle belonged, based on height, diameter, shoulder springline (i.e., contour), decoration, and lettering. The following are dimensions for quart bottles: “A” = 9 1/2" x 3 27/32" “B” = 9" x 3 7/8" “C” = 9 1/4" x 3 15/16" “D” = 9 1/2" x 3 27/32" “H” = 9 1/2" x 3 13/16" “X” = 9 1/4" x 3 7/8" “Z” = 9 1/2" x 3 7/8" Actual codes we have recorded, however, include: A half-pints, pints, quarts AX half-pints, pints, quarts B half-pints, pints, quarts BX pints, quarts C quarts D pints, quarts F quarts T quarts XX quarts Z quarts


38

The initial letter or double letter (see above) was often followed by another letter or a three-digit number that noted styles of the neck area. These included: “F” = shallow flutes in the neck “110” = long, narrow vertical neck and shoulder ribs “115” = vertical ribs in neck “120” = wide fluted or petaled neck “130” = wide vertical shallow ribs “135” = 4 rows of dimples “140” = wide diagonal “X” pattern around neck “145” = 1 horizontal rib around neck “150” = 3 rows of dimples “155” = 1 narrow scallop line around neck with 6 points “160” = 14, 1" long vertical ribs in neck “180” = narrow, fine line, swirled ribs in neck Another set of codes we have observed on Berney-Bond milk bottle heels begins with the letter “M.” These were embossed near the mold seam. The “M” can appear alone or may be followed by two-digit (occasionally three-digit) numbers (e.g., “M10,” “M16,” “M21,” “M25,” “M26,” “M28,” “M30,” “M58,” or “M188”). In examining identical pairs of bottles, Hoenig (2007c) observed that bottles embossed on the heels with the “M” also had capacity information in an arch at the shoulder (e.g. ONE QUART), while the identical bottle with no “M” lacked the capacity designation. The meaning of the accompanying numbers is currently unknown. BB48 and the Owens-Illinois Diamond OI mark (1930-at least 1962) According to Giarde (1980:15), the BB48 mark continued in use in “the following decades” after OwensIllinois bought Berney-Bond. The mark appeared not only on milk bottles made by the former Berney-Bond plants but on those made by other Owens-Illinois factories as well. We

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have recorded a sample of over 80 milk bottles (from collections and eBay) with BB48 marks on the heels and Owens-Illinois marks (including date codes on the bases). Our sample disclosed only four Owens-Illinois plants using the BB48 mark. Two are intuitively obvious. One was factory #17, the former

Figure 9: Owens-Illinois mark from Clarion Plant (double digit) (Hoenig) Berney-Bond plant at Clarion, Pennsylvania. The second was plant #18, the former Berney-Bond plant at Columbus, Ohio. Date codes from plant #17 ranged between 0 and 9; 42 through 51 (Figure 9); 61 and 62 on handi-square bottles. Plant #18 codes extended between 0 and 8; 46 through 48. This requires an explanation of Owens-Illinois date codes (see Lockhart 2004 for a more complete discussion of Owens-Illinois marks and date codes). Single digit codes can equal the last number of the dates from about 1930 to the mid-1940s (“8” = 1938; “0” = 1940; “1” = 1941, etc.). We have recorded single-digit codes rang-

Figure 10: Owens-Illinois mark from Clarion Plant (single digit) (Hoenig) ing from 0-9 without an accompanying “Duraglas” logo (Figure 10) and 0-5 with “Duraglas” – as well as single examples of “6” and “8” with the logo. Two-digit codes indicate the last two digits of the year the bottle was made (“46” = 1946, etc.). Twodigit date codes first appeared in conjunction with the BB48 marks in 1946 and continued until at least 1962, although the ones made after 1949 were not made at Clarion. Owens-Illinois acquired the Berney-Bond plants in 1930 and al-

Bottles and Extras

most certainly continued to fill existing orders and/or wear out existing molds with the older Berney-Bond marks until at least 1931. This suggests that the BB48 mark with no date codes was used during the first one or two years after the transfer. Possibly as early as 1931, the company used BB48 along with the Owens-Illinois mark and date codes. The presence of “Duraglas” on a base indicates that a bottle could not have been made prior to 1940, the year the process was initiated. However, the Duraglas process was not used on all milk bottles. Combining single-digit date codes with Duraglas markings suggests that both plant #17 and plant #18 used the combined BB48 and Owens-Illinois marks with date codes from at least 1936 to ca. 1951. However, the plants seem to have dropped the Duraglas mark from milk bottles in 1952. The other plants that used the BB48 mark were the former Illinois Glass Co. plant at Alton, Illinois (#7), and the former American Bottle Co. factory at Streator, Illinois (#9). Date codes we have recorded for Plant #7 were “8,” “9,” “47,” and “48”; those from Plant #9 included “8,” “47,” “48,” and “49.” These data suggest that some of the Berney-Bond molds were shipped to the Alton and Streator plants after the Columbus plant closed in 1948, and the Clarion plant was converted to other glassware in 1947 (Hoenig 2007c; Toulouse 1971:73). The marks continued in use until the body molds wore out. On occasional specimens, BB48 shows up on bottles as late as 1958 for Alton (#7) and 1961 for Streator (#9). We discovered two anomalies in the California State Park milk bottle collection in Sacramento. One bottle was embossed with BB48 on the heel and 17 I-in-an-Oval 57 on the base.7 The use of the more recent mark, coupled with the 1957 date code, places this bottle well outside the typical usage of the BB48 mark. Apparently, someone at one of the Midwest plants (Streator or Alton) found an old mold and failed to change the plant code when the date code on the baseplate

Bottles and Extras

By 1925, ads listed both the Hazelhurst and Clarion plants as still making beer bottles as well as soda, ammonia and milk bottles. The plant made milk bottles until 1928 (but may have ceased milk bottle production when Berney-Bond acquired the Winslow plants that year). The plant probably did not operate too often. By at least September 9, 1928, the factory used Lynch machines with automatic feeders, employing 12-14 people (Hoenig 2007b; 2008c). The plant closed on December 28, 1928, apparently the last date it operated for Berney-Bond, although it continued to be listed in company ads during 1929. The Pierce Glass Company of Port Allegany leased the plant on May 30, 1929. Pierce used Lynch machines to make its bottles, probably the ones owned by Berney-Bond. When the lease expired in the fall of 1929, Berney-Bond closed the plant. In 1930, the Owens-Illinois Glass Co., had obtained all the Berney-Bond factories, but, on March 5, 1931, OwensIllinois removed all the machinery from Hazelhurst and razed the buildings (Hoenig 2007a; Porter 2002b). Clarion (1912-1930) In 1912, Berney-Bond acquired the old Pearl Glass Co., in Clarion, Pennsylvania,4 a plant that made a variety of bottle types. From its inception, the Clarion plant maintained the three continuous tanks it inherited from Pearl, although one was occasionally idle. In 1913, Clarion began installing semiautomatic machines (Hoenig 2007c). A significant amount of production revolved around bottles connected with alcohol. Because of the threat of Prohibition, the management began to be concerned and looked into milk bottle production as an alternative, with Clarion as the main production center for the new product. By 1917, George Howard (of the Howard Machine Co.) and the Hazeltons developed suspended gob feeders. At the same time, Clinton Budd had developed and put into production what became the Lynch-Budd machine to manufacture milk bottles. These later

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developed into the Miller-Budd machines (Hoenig 2007c). Clarion had eight machines by 1918 as well as a few hand shops. One tank used “one No-Boy Lynch machine; three Twenty Century machines and eight blow shops” (“Keystone” 1918:12). By 1920, all production was conducted by 12-13 milk bottle machines. However, a serious fire on December 16, 1920, halted production for six weeks. The plant continued to use three tanks when production resumed (Hoenig 2007c; 2008d). The plant burned to the ground on September 28, 1922 (Hoenig 2008d). As a result, a “new milk bottle factory” was being opened by the company at Clarion later that year (Creamery and Milk Plant Monthly 1922:64). By 1923, the plant was fully operational with 12 Howard feeders and one experimental feeder running at two continuous tanks. Thirteen milk bottle machines made between five and fifteen bottles per minute. The plant had its own large mold and machine shop (Hoenig 2008d). The factory remained in use and was part of the sale to OwensIllinois in 1930. During the Great Depression (under Owens-Illinois), the Clarion plant operated on a cash basis – no credit. The machines were idled until a paying order was received. Until the mid-1930s, production was sporadic. Because of the rise in popularity of waxed paper milk cartons, the Clarion plant began a transition from milk bottle production to food and liquor bottles in 1944. The plant began transferring molds to the Midwest plants that still made milk bottles. By ca. 1956, the transfer was complete, and Clarion’s heyday as a milk bottle production facility was over (Hoenig 2007a). Columbus, Ohio (1927-1930) When Berney-Bond acquired the Winslow Glass Co. on May 1, 1927, the factory became the company’s Columbus plant, continuing to produce milk bottles. The plant used four Tucker, Reeves & Beatty feeders (Hoenig 2008d). In 1930, the factory,

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along with the rest of Berney-Bond, was sold to Owens-Illinois (Glass Industry 1927:151; Toulouse 1971:7073). Chronology of Berney-Bond Plants and Their Former Names Smethport, Pennsylvania (1907-1918) [Haines Flint Bottle Co.] Bradford, Pennsylvania (1904-1910) [Berney Glass Co.] Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania (1904-1928) [Bond Glass Co.] Clarion, Pennsylvania (1912-present) [Pearl Glass Co.] Columbus, Ohio (1927-1948) [Winslow Glass Co.] Containers and Marks BBGCo (ca. 1905-1915) Jones (1966:15) suggested Bryce Bros. Glass Co., as the user of this mark, but Bryce Brothers only made tableware. This mark was probably used by the Berney-Bond Glass Co. Strangely, Toulouse (1971:70) did not include this in his list of Berney-Bond marks. The “BBGCo” is usually slightly arched, although the curvature can vary (Figures 1 & 2). The mark is usually found on the bases of colorless catsup bottles that can solarize to an amethyst color. The marks are also found on flasks (horizontal) and prescription bottles (slight arch). Although our sample is small, we have not found the mark on any other bottle type. Some marks are unaccompanied by numbers, while others have one- to three-digit numbers embossed on the base below the mark. The examples we have seen include “2,” “263,” and “315” – possibly catalog codes. Bottles in our current sample are all mouth-blown, suggesting a use between 1904 and at least the ca. 1920 period when Berney-Bond ceased hand production. This date is predicated on the transition to milk bottle production at Clarion. The Hazelhurst plant made catsup bottles by at least 1908, although we have found no other references to them. Of course, this does not rule out production of


34

fourth tank was the one at the former Winslow plant in Columbus. According to Paquette (1994:80), Owens-Illinois bought the BerneyBond Glass Co., and the Atlantic Bottle Co., in 1930, when it decided to seriously enter milk bottle production. Owens-Illinois actually purchased “the entire assets of Berney-Bond Glass Company, except certain natural gas properties” on January 1, 1930 (Owens-Illinois 1930:9; New York Times 6/26/1930). The Columbus plant (#18) closed in 1948; the Clarion plant (#17) remains in business today. The story of the sale is worth repeating. Early in 1930, OwensIllinois representatives arrived at Clarion to discuss the purchase. However, they left with a misunderstanding that the deal was complete. Meanwhile, Berney-Bond continued production as usual. In May, Owens-Illinois representatives followed up and were surprised to find Berney-Bond still operating as usual. An actual agreement was reached by August 26, and Berney-Bond turned the books over to Owens-Illinois on August 30. Each plant, however, had its own story. Bradford, Pennsylvania (1904-1910) The former Berney Glass Co., factory became the Bradford plant for Berney-Bond, when the company formed on September 29, 1904. When a tank burst at the Hazelhurst plant in 1905, the workers apparently came to Bradford. The Bradford plant burned to the ground on October 10, 1906, and the workers went back to Hazelhurst. The Bradford and Hazelhurst units seemed to have a symbiotic relationship during the first few years. The plant apparently remained nonexistent for a few years, but BerneyBond acquired the old Tuna Glass Co. plant2 and began production on September 29, 1909 (Hoenig 2008a; 2008b). The new Bradford plant used employees imported from Smethport, while that plant was rebuilt. BerneyBond announced plans to use up to 250 people in the Bradford plant.

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When the first Smethport tank was fired on October 14, 1909, management told the Smethport workers at Bradford that they would go home when the second tank was up, around Christmas of that year. This corresponds well with the closing of the plant (below) (Hoenig 2007b). The plant had only a single continuous tank with 14 rings, making flint bottles (Hoenig 2007a). Toulouse (1971:72-73) and Giarde (1980:15) both claimed that the Bradford plant closed permanently in 1909, and this is supported by local newspaper coverage, noting that the plant was shut down January 1, 1910, because of a local gas shortage. Because of the oil boom in Bradford, the area became “dirty, muddy, oily and full of society’s worst” by 1910. As a result, many of the glass workers, especially the married ones, moved to Clarion. The Hazeltons and Budds led the exodus – except mother Hazelton, who kept the family mansion in Bradford. Clarion was a nice, clean town in comparison (Hoenig 2007c; 2007a). The Commoner and Glassworker (1910b:1) confirmed the shutdown stating, “Owing to a shortage of gas the Berney-Bond Glass Co.’s Bradford, Pa., plant shut down and an additional force will be employed at their Hazelhurst plant.”3 Smethport (1907-1918) The Haines Flint Bottle Co., closed on January 31, 1907, but the plant did not become the BerneyBond Glass Co., until March, 21, 1907. By 1908, the factory had two tanks and operated eight shops on each one. One of the products was quart grape juice bottles. The plant also ran a slightly smaller night crew by October 1909. On April 23, 1910, the factory made beer, soda, and prescription bottles. Although three machines were reportedly used in 1909, the plant only operated hand shops in 1910. By October, the factory ran eight shops on the day shift and six at night (Commoner and Glassworker 1910a:7; Hoenig 2007a). We can find no indication that this plant ever produced milk bottles.

Bottles and Extras

By mid-1917, the plant operated two one-man Gump-Johnson machines and was waiting for two more to be installed. The plant also ran ten “blow” shops (hand production). The factory burned on May 2, 1918, destroying the three Gump-Johnson machines and two Jersey Devils that had been installed by then. The plant was never rebuilt, and the remains were demolished in August 1928 (Bristow 1917:9; Hoenig 2007a; Porter 2002b). Hazelhurst (1904-1928) The former Bond plant at Hazelhurst became the Berney-Bond factory on September 24, 1904. On January 19, 1905, a tank burst (apparently the only one operating at that time), and the plant was shut down. The workers apparently went to Bradford. When the Bradford factory burned in 1906, the workers returned to Hazelhurst (Hoenig 2008b). The plant apparently operated a single continuous tank and made grape juice, catsup and some halfgallon grape juice bottles by 1908. Three machines were installed in 1909 but were removed the following year, when the plant operated two shifts, making 4- to 32-ounce items (Hoenig 2007a). The National Glass Budget (1909) noted that four Johnny Bull (United) machines at Hazelhurst were making “grape juice, catsups, beers and quart brandies.” These were almost certainly the machines that were later removed. By September 24, 1910, the entire plant had shifted to grape juice bottle production (Hoenig 2007a). The plant burned on February 15, 1917, but was rebuilt and operating again by April 23. At that point, the factory had four two-man Jersey machines, producing green (aqua) beer and ammonia bottles. By February 2, 1922, the plant was not in operation and had been idle for some time. At this point, we can only speculate that the onset of Prohibition in 1920 had removed the need for the factory’s beer bottle manufacturing. By mid1923, however, production had resumed (Bristow 1917:8; Hoenig 2007a).

Bottles and Extras

was altered. The second anomaly was a milk bottle embossed 2 I-in-an-Ovalsuperimposed-over-an-elongateddiamond 6. This was a gallon bottle, and it probably indicates that manufacture of the larger containers was transferred to the Huntington, West Virginia, plant by 1936 (although 1946 is a possibility). That would probably have included moving all existing larger molds from the former Berney-Bond plants. Owens-Illinois embossed “M” codes on milk bottle heels to designate container styles. These were followed by a 3- to 4-digit mold code (M-xxxx). These should not be confused with the other “M” codes described above. Hoenig (2007c) provided the following list: “M” = Gallon milks “MH”= light weight milks “ML” = standard weight milks “MX or MLX” = standard weight milks with headspace 1/4" below cap seat “MY or MHX” = light weight milks with headspace 1/4" below cap seat “MZ”= non-returnable milks. State Seals with “BB” and no Owens-Illinois logo (ca. 1919-1929) State Seals with “BB” plus Owens-Illinois logo (ca. 1930-1947) Beginning in 1900, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts required that all milk bottles used by dairies in the state bear a “seal” to guarantee the volume of the container. Originally, these were etched on the sides of the bottles by local “sealers” in locations throughout the state. From late 1909 to 1947, however, glass factories selling bottles to dairies within the state were required to emboss their containers with a Massachusetts seal. The most typical format placed the seal on the shoulder of each bottle, usually in a circular shape embossed “MASS (arch) / {factory designator initials} / SEAL (inverted arch).” These often appeared in a small plate mold. The mark used by BerneyBond was “BB” (Blodget 2006:8; Schadlich [ca. 199 0]; Schadlich & Schadlich 1984). The company used

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the “BB” in the Massachusetts seal from as early as 1920 to 1930, when Owens-Illinois acquired the plants. Berney-Bond was not mentioned in the 1918 Massachusetts Department of Standards Bulletin #11 but did appear in the 1928 bulletin #25. Owens-Illinois continued to use the “BB” in the Massachusetts seal after its acquisition of Berney-Bond in 1930 (Figure 11), probably until the repeal of the law in 1947. This may have induced Owens-Illinois to continue applying the “BB48” mark to

Figure 11: Massachusetts BB Seal (ebay) milk bottle heels from the former Berney-Bond plants, when it entered into milk bottle production in 1930. It is probably no coincidence that the use of “BB48” dropped off sharply after 1947. Codes used after 1947 probably reflect a continued use of the old molds rather than an intentional use of the seal after the cessation of the law. Although our sample is small (ca. 20 bottles in the study by Russ Hoenig and an unknown number in the collection of Al Morin), all bottles embossed with the Massachusetts BB seal but no Owens-Illinois manufacturer’s mark on the base, are heelmarked with BBGCO48. At this point, we have not found a single bottle with both the Massachusetts BB seal and the BB48 heelcode. At least three other states (Maine, Rhode Island, and Pennsylvania) also had seal laws. The Maine seal laws took effect in 1913 and ended (like Massachusetts) in 1947. The study of seal laws in the other two states remains in its infancy, although most

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states became interested in checking milk bottles for proper capacity and using some system to regulate the dairies or the manufacturer s about the same time – the teen years of the 20th century. All three states eventually required the seal on the shoulder of the bottle. The Berney-Bond/OwensIllinois seal for Rhode Island was con-

Figure 12: Maine 48 seal (ebay) figured “R.I. (arch) / BB (horizontal) / SEAL (inverted arch).” Maine was similar: “MAINE (arch) / 48 (horizontal) / SEAL (inverted arch)” (Figure 12). We have not found a Berney-Bond example of the Pennsylvania shoulder seal yet, but the general configuration is “SEALED (arch) / {number} (horizontal) / PA. (inverted arch).” In addition, several other states, including West Virginia, Michigan, and Wisconsin, initiated systems that required the word SEALED and a

Figure 13: Minnesota 48 triangle (California State Park Collection)


40

number that was assigned to each milk bottle manufacturer (Milk Dealer 1916:58-59). This study, too, is in its infancy, but the number used by Berney-Bond and later Owens-Illinois was “48.” In many states, the code BB48 (or BBGCO48) with the word “SEALED” was sufficient. Minnesota established a unique system, where “48” above a line with “MINN” below was surrounded by a triangle (Figure 13). Initially, the mark appeared on the shoulder of Minnesota milk bottles, but, at a point we have not yet discovered, the mark migrated to the heel. From at least 1940, the “MINN” triangle was commonly found on milk bottles, regardless of the state. Although our sample is painfully small, the triangles seem to have initially used “BB48” but simplified the code to “48” in the mid1950s. Discussions and Conclusions BBGCo (1905-ca. 1915) Although this mark could have been used by the Bartlesville Bottle & Glass Co., the lack of the ampersand makes it a less likely choice. Of the remaining companies with the proper initials, only the Berney-Bond Glass Co. is a likely choice. The initials match exactly; the time period fits both the bottles and the business dates; the Hazelhurst plant was known to have made catsup bottles; and there are no other likely choices. Because all examples we have found were mouth blown, they were likely made between 1905 and ca. 1915. BBGCO48 (ca. 1913-1931) and BB48 (ca. 1913-1949) These marks were certainly used by the Berney-Bond Glass Co. The BBGCO48 mark was used by BerneyBond between ca. 1920 and 1930, although some of the later marks (19251931) have date codes embossed on the bases, and the mark was still used by Owens-Illinois in 1931 and later. The BB48 mark was used by BerneyBond from ca. 1920 until the sale to

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Owens-Illinois in 1930, again accompanied by date codes on the base as early as 1925. BB48 is much more common than the BBGCO48 logo. Although we may never know the full story, the use of two different marks may reflect a division by plant. There is no indication that the plants at Bradford or Smethport ever made milk bottles. However, the Hazelhurst plant seems to have made milk bottles. Since this appears likely (although not currently fully supported by historical data), the use of two marks would make sense to identify different plants, with Hazelhurst, the smaller factory, using the BBGCO48 mark (since BBGCO48 bottles are much less common). When the Hazelhurst plant ceased milk bottle production ca. 1926, the mark may have transferred to the Columbus plant (formerly the Winslow Glass Co.), where it would have been used until the sale to Owens-Illinois in 1930. This hypothesis fits current testing, but it should by no means be taken as absolute. Owens-Illinois continued to use the BB48 mark at the former BerneyBond plants (#17 & #18) until at least 1951 (along with using the molds at plants #7 and #9 from 1948). BB48 is accompanied by the Owens-Illinois mark and date codes from at least 1938 to 1956, although its use after ca. 1947 was sporadic. The BBGCO48 mark is distinctly associated with the Massachusetts BB seal, beginning at some point after 1918 (probably ca. 1920), although we have found no examples of the BB48 mark associated with the seal. “BB,” “BB48,” and “48” are associated with seals from other states. When Owens-Illinois entered milk bottle production, it used both the manufacturer’s mark and seals acquired from Berney-Bond, now the property of Owens-Illinois. Thus, the company was spared the extra trouble to establish both a number and specific contracts with the individual states. In addition, most (possibly all) Owens-Illinois bottles were marked “SEALED BB48” – allowing the company to use the Berney-Bond logo

Bottles and Extras

to comply with the seal laws of other states. Acknowledgments We send our gratitude to OwensIllinois, Inc. for allowing us access to its information and allowing us to publish non-proprietary information. Our thanks to Al Morin, of Dracut, Massachusetts, for his help in our study of Massachusetts seals on milk bottles. Al has searched his collection several times in response to our questions, including the one about BB seals and marks. Thanks also to Brad Blodgett, another Massachusetts resident, who has also been searching his collection for us. A final thanks to Laura Brown of Vassalboro, Maine, for her help with Maine-seal milk bottles and Maine historical records. Sources Cited: American Glass Review 1927 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1928 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1931 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1934 “Glass Factory Yearbook and Directory.” American Glass Review, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Includes reprint of the Glass Trade Directory for 1904. Commoner Publishing Co., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Blodget, Bradford G. 2006 “Milk Bottles from the Heart of the Commonwealth: A Collector’s Guide to the Milk Bottles from the City of Worcester, Massachusetts, 1890-2006.” Unpublished manuscript. Bristow, A.E. 1917 “Factories Report Good Runs.” Glassworker 35(36):1, 8-9. Commoner and Glassworker 1910a “At Berney-Bond Co’s Smethport Plant.” Commoner and Glassworker 28(3):7.

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The Dating Game - Berney-Bond Glass Company

By Russ Hoenig, Bill Lockhart, Pete Schulz, Carol Serr, Les Jordan, Bill Lindsey and Phil Perry The history of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. is very complex, colorful, and (in places) confused. The story cannot be fully told without including the plants and companies that led to the formation of both the Berney Glass Co. and the Bond Glass Co. Thus, we have included historical snapshots of a few of the earlier plants. The Berney-Bond story also includes four Pennsylvania towns: Bradford, Hazelhurst, Smethport and Clarion – and eventually Columbus, Ohio. Although we have separated the histories to conform to our usual template, this story is really more of a web or a weaving. Histories Berney Glass Co. Bradford, Pennsylvania (ca. 1897-1904) The roots of the Berney Glass Co., began about 1894 with the erection of the Seamless Bottle Co., plant in Bradford. By 1895, the plant was operated by the McKean Glass Co., and it was taken over by the Bradford City Glass Bottle Co., the following year. (Hoenig 2008a). The Berney Glass Co., apparently gained control of the Bradford City Glass Bottle Co., when the company incorporated on November 28, 1900, although the company claimed 1895 (the date for McKean) as its initial date (Hoenig 2008a). 1 (Hoenig 2008b). The 1904 glass factory list noted that the Berney Glass Co., in Bradford used one continuous tank with eight rings to make beer bottles (American Glass Review 1934:165). The merger that created Berney-Bond took place on September 29, 1904 (Hoenig 2008c). Berney Glass Co. Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania

Although we have heard rumors of a Berney Glass Co., plant in Hazelhurst, these actually referred to an office for the company. The Hazelhurst Window Glass Co., incorporated on January

5, 1899, was owned by F.P. Hazelton, one of the principals in the later Berney-Bond enterprise. The office for both Berney Glass and the Window Glass Co., were listed at 80 or 82 Mechanic Street in Bradford. Bond Glass Co. Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania (1902-1904) On October 31, 1901, M.N. Allen, a local contractor, announced his intention to build a bottle house in Hazelhurst. Allen almost certainly was referring to the “Bond Bottle Co.,” factory that was erected December 5. The stockholders, A.J. Bond, J.H. Leslie, C.E. Hazelton, A.M. Mayer, John Ley and H.L. Stoner, planned to file for incorporation on December 26 (Hoenig 2008c; 2008a). Porter (2002b) stated that “in 1902, the Bond Glass Company was formed in Hazel Hurst to make bottles etc.” This almost certainly referred to either the opening of the plant or the beginning of production. The plant made “prescription, liquor and proprietary ware” at a single continuous tank in 1904. A.J. Bond was president of the corporation, with C.E. Hazelton as vice president (American Glass Review 1934:165). The Bond Glass Co., merged with the Berney Glass Co. to form BerneyBond on September 24, 1904 (Hoenig 2007a). Toulouse (1971:70-71) noted that the Bond Glass Co., began in Hazelhurst ca. 1897, but he may have been confused with the Berney Glass Co., in Bradford (see above). Berney-Bond Glass Co. (1904-1930) The Berney Glass Co., merged with the Bond Glass Co., on September 24, 1904 (Hoenig 2007a), and the Hazelton family continued to be an important part of the corporation. By 1908, the company was “probably the largest producers of exclusively flint bottles” (Mayer 1908:12). In 1913, the three plants used four continuous tanks with 32 rings to produce a

“general line” of bottles (Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 1913:953). By 1917, semiautomatic machines were installed in “all three plants” at some point “during the past two years,” making flint, amber and green bottles, “their sale being chiefly in the eastern markets” (Glassworker 1917:7). The same year, management became nervous about the impending Volstead Act (Prohibition) and sought another venue for glass production. They chose milk bottles and began experimentation for modifying their existing Lynch machines. This culminated in the Lynch-Budd machines, which were not too successful. Berney-Bond cooperated with outside companies to eventually create the highly successful Miller-Budd (MB) machine that was very successful at the Clarion plant. The MB was often colloquially called the Milk Bottle machine (Hoenig 2008d). Urban Bowes became the director of manufacturing in 1924 and instituted many progressive ideas into the business (Hoenig 2008d). Although Berney-Bond was best known for making milk bottles, the company advertised “soda, beer, ammonia or miscellaneous bottle[s]” made by automatic machines in 1925 (Milk Dealer 1925). On February 15, 1926, Berney-Bond signed an eight-year agreement with the Hartford-Empire Co., to use up to 25 of the Hartford feeders, including 12 Howards in Clarion and four in Hazelhurst (Hoenig 2008d). By 1927, Berney-Bond purchased the Winslow Glass Co., Columbus, Ohio. The company was listed as making “flint proprietary, carbonated beverages, liquors, milk jars,” all by machine at three continuous tanks with 12 rings. The following year (1928), the company added another tank, bringing the total to four continuous tanks with 17 rings (American Glass Review 1927:127; 1928:128). Although not listed until 1928, the


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more row house in the 700 block of St. Paul Street, shown here in a contemporary photo (Fig. 31). He also

Figure 31 - Townhouses

at 711 - 715 St. Paul St. Baltimore, Maryland

was working as an executive with the Gambrill Grain Products Co., located at 1311 Bolton St. While awaiting the outcome of his legal battles, George watched the onset of Prohibition in 1920. The whiskey he created and brought into national prominence disappeared forever. Finally in 1922, a judge quashed the fraud conviction citing Gambrill’s failing health and advanced years (about 77). It may have been the old fellow’s last con game: George managed to live another eight years, dying at the age of 85. Despite Duffy’s brief and disastrous foray into the Baltimore whiskey scene, it is unlikely that he and Gambrill ever met. The two years Walter was in the city, George was hard at work in the grain trade. But their careers had remarkable similarities: Both came from well-off families in whiskey-related businesses. Both suffered bankruptcy early in their careers and emerged unscathed. Both built a whiskey brand into national prominence. Both had government officialdom frequently hard on their heels. Both showed exceptional abilities to evade attempts to punish them for

Bottles and Extras

alleged misdeeds. Both died rich men. Finally, both wrote their names in whiskey history as among the American distilling industry’s most colorful and successful rogues. That is why, with mixed emotions, we remember the lives of Walter B. Duffy and George T. Gambrill. ************* Notes: The information for this article was researched from a wide range of internet and printed sources. Prominent among them were the New York Times online archives. A compilation of Samuel Hopkins Adams’ articles on the patent medicine industry, called The Great American Fraud, similarly is available online. The pictures of Walter Duffy and his mansion are through the great courtesy of the Rochester and Monroe Country Public Library. Among principal sources on George Gambrill was Jim Bready’s excellent article on Maryland whiskey for the Winter 1990 issue of the Maryland Historical Magazine. Portions of this article appeared earlier in the Potomac Pontil, newsletter of the Potomac Bottle Club. ****************

Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation, as required by 39 U.S.C. 3685. Publication title: Bottles and Extras. Publication Number: 0052-62. Filing date: August 1, 2008. Published quarterly, 6 times per year. Annual Subscription Price: $30. Office of Publication: 401 Johnston Ct, Cass County, Raymore, MO 64083. Contact person: June Lowry, (816) 318-0160. Address of General Business Office of Publisher: June Lowry 401 Johnston Court, Raymore, MO 64083-9246. Publisher: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083. Editor: Kathy Hopson-Sathe, 341 Yellowstone Dr, Fletcher, NC 28732. Owner: Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, 3706 Deerfield Cove, Shelby County, Memphis TN 38135. Stock holders holding 1% or more of total amount of stock: none. The known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1% or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: none. The purpose, function and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes has not changed during preceding 12 months. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: November, 2007. The average number of copies each issue during the preceding 12 months: a) Total number of copies - Net Press Run..... 1217; b) Paid and/or requested circulation- 1) Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions... 974; 2) Paid In-County Subscriptions... 2; 3) Sales through Dealers and Carriers, Street Venders and Counter sales, and other non-USPS Paid Distribution...0. Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS...111. c) Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation... 1087; d) Free distribution by mail, samples, complimentary and other free copies... 1) Outside County... 0; 2) In-County... 0; 3) Other Classes... 0; e) Free Distribution Outside the Mail... 130; f) Total Free Distribution... 130; g) Total distribution... 1217; h) Copies Not Distributed... 0; i) Total...1217. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 89.32%. Number Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: a) Total number of copies Net Press Run... 1200; b) Paid and/or requested circulation- 1) Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions... 953; 2) Paid In-County Subscriptions... 2; 3) Sales through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, and Counter sales, and Other nonUSPS Paid Distribution... 0; 4) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS... 128, c) Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation... 1083; d) Free distribution by mail, samples, complimentary and other free copies... 1) Outside County...0; 2) In-County... 0; 3) Other Classes... 0; e) Free Distribution Outside the Mail... 117; f) Total Free Distribution... 117; g) Total Distribution... 1200; h) Copies Not Distributed... 0; i) Total... 1200. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation... 90.25%. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. June Lowry, Publisher, 08/01/08.

Bottles and Extras

1910b “Pith of the Week’s News: All the New of the Glass Trade Compiled in Condensed Form for Quick Reading.” Commoner and Glassworker 28(13):1. Creamery and Milk Plant Monthly 1922 “New Milk Bottle Factory.” Creamery and Milk Plant Monthly 11(9):64-65. Giarde, Jeffery L. 1980 Glass Milk Bottles: Their Makers and Marks. Time Travelers Press, Bryn Mawr, California. Glassworker 1917 “Berney-Bond Glass Co.” Glassworker 35(48):7. Glass Industry 1927 “Milk Bottle Companies Merge.” Glass Industry 8(6):151. Hoenig, Russell 2007a Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Smethport, Hazlehurst, and Bradford plants of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. and their predecessors. Information obtained from McKean County newspapers. On file with authors. 2007b Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details on Hazelhurst, engraving of codes, and Berney-Bond bottles. Information from historical sources, OwensIllinois Glass Co. records, and empirical evidence derived from the observation of 315 Berney-Bond milk bottles. 2007c Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Clarion plant of the Berney-Bond Glass Co., and empirical observations of Berney-Bond bottles. On file with authors. 2008a Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Bond Glass Co. and various operations at Bradford and Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania. 2008b Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details about the Berney-Bond Glass Co. factories at Bradford and Hazelhurst, Pennsylvania.

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2008c Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Smethport, Hazlehurst, and Bradford plants of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. and their predecessors. Information obtained from McKean County newspapers. On file with authors. 2008d Untitled, unpublished manuscript, with historical details of the Clarion plant of the Berney-Bond Glass Co. Information obtained from Owens-Illinois Glass Co. records. On file with authors. Jones, May 1966 The Bottle Trail, Volume 6. Nara Vista, New Mexico. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 1913 “The Present Status of the Glass Bottle and Hollow Ware Industries in the United States.” Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 5(11):951954. “Keystone” 1918 “Repairs at Berney-Bond.” Glassworker 26(47):12. Mayer, Charles C. 1908 “From the Mountain District.” Commoner & Glass Worker 26(29):12. 1910 “From the Northern District.” Commoner and Glassworker 28(28):3-5. McKean Democrat 1897 Advertisement: “The Glass Factory,” December 10. Milk Dealer 1916 Advertisement: “At Last We Have It.” Milk Dealer 6(1):58-59. 1922 Advertisement: Automatically Processed Milk Bottles of Quality.” Milk Dealer 11(10):37. 1924 Advertisement: Automatically Processed Milk Bottles of Quality.” Milk Dealer 13(10):2. 1925 Advertisement: Automatically Processed Milk Bottles of Quality.” Milk Dealer 14(6):41. 1929 Advertisement: “You Can’t ‘Recondition’ a Milk Bottle.” Milk Dealer 19(3):19.

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1930 Advertisement: “Bottles That come Back are the Only Bottles That Pay Profits.” Milk Dealer 19(11):29. 1932 Advertisement: “Nationwide Service.” Milk Dealer 21(4):35. National Glass Budget 1909 “Hayes on Bottle Machines.” National Glass Budget 25(11):1. New York Times 1930 “Listings Approved by Stock Exchange: Owens-Illinois Glass Reveals Purchase of Berney-Bond for 47,274 Shares.” New York Times, June 30. Owens-Illinois Glass Co. 1930 “Twenty-Third Annual Report of Owens-Illinois Glass Company for the Year Ended December 31, 1930.” Owens-Illinois Glass Co., Toledo, Ohio. Paquette, Jack K. 1994 The Glassmakers: A History of Owens-Illinois, Incorporated. Trumpeting Angel Press, Toledo, Ohio. Pollard, Gordon 1993 Bottles and Business in Plattsburgh, New York: 100 Years of Embossed Bottles as Historical Artifacts. Clinton County Historical Association, Plattsburgh. Porter, Ross 2002a “1895: Smethport Bottling Works manufacturer of glass bottles.” A webpage of Planet Smethport. http://www.smethporthistory.org/e.wa terstreet/bottlefactory/berney_bond_p g.htm#smehtport%20glass 2002b “1900's: Berney-Bond Glass Co.” A webpage of Planet S m e t h p o r t . http://www.smethporthistory.org/haze lhurst/hazelhurst.b.b.htm Schadlich, Louis [ca. 1990] “Milk Bottles Marked by Manufacturers and Jobbers.” Unpublished manuscript


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Schadlich, Louis and Nancy Schadlich 1984 “The ‘MASS. SEAL’ on Milk Bottles and Jars.” Unpublished manuscript, Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Toulouse, Julian Harrison 1971 Bottle Makers and Their Marks. Thomas Nelson, New York. Footnotes: 1 Porter (2002b) noted that “in 1900 the Berney Glass Company had been formed in Bradford to make glass and glassware in the Bradford Flint Glass Bottle Co. plant which they had acquired. They made a green glass at that plant with which they made bottles, flasks, etc.” The Bradford Flint Glass Bottle Co., however, was a separate company that operated from at least 1896 to at least 1907. 2 The Tuna Glass Co. was in business prior to 1898, when the factory burned down. The plant was rebuilt the following year. Tuna produced glass sporadically until February

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Bottles and Extras

1907, when operations were moved to Clarksburg, West Virginia. The plant was then operated by the Bradford Flint Glass Bottle Co. 3 The Thomas Registers (1907:202; 1912:481; 1914:532; 1915:578; 1916:600; 1917:730; 1918:810; 1918:827; 1920782; 1921:782), however, listed the plant until at least 1921. The Registers were notoriously lax about checking up on closings. The Carolina Glass Co., for example, was closed by 1912. Despite solid local records supporting the 1912 closing, the company continued to be listed in the Thomas Registers until at least 1921. To further confuse the issue, Owens-Illinois historical records mention the Bradford plant in 1917 (Hoenig 2007a). This could reflect a continued ownership of the plant, even though it was not in production. This speculation could also apply to the continued listings in the Thomas Registers. 4 Toulouse (1971:70) claimed the name of the older plant was

“Cleveland” – but that was the name of the first plant manager (Hoenig 2007c). 5 This could have been a baseplate sent to Clarion from the Columbus plant. See Discussion and Conclusions section. 6 These were revived from OwensIllinois records. 7 Owens-Illinois officially adopted the I-in-an-oval mark to replace its more complex I-i n-an-ovalsuperimposed-on-an-elongated-diamond logo in 1954, although, of course, older molds were used until they wore out.

Please send any comments to: Bill Lockhart 1313 14th St., Apt. 21 Alamogordo, NM 88310 (575) 439-8158 Bottlebill@tularosa.net bottlebill@tularosa.net

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be among a handful of American distilleries exhibiting at the Paris Exposition. Gambrill prospered. Married by now to Margaret, he fathered a son he named after himself. Junior would go on to Yale University, graduating in 1907. Life was good for George. Stolen Coal and Fatal Fires But Gambrill continually found it difficult to play it straight. By 1901 he was back in court fighting a case brought against him by a man named John Schooley. Schooley claimed that Gambrill had reneged on a deal to give him lodging, money and distillery warehousing space in return for overseeing the Roxbury operation. Schooley also claimed slander because of a letter allegedly written by Gambrill saying Schooley “stole my coal.” In addition to denying that the letter was in his handwriting, Gambrill made a bizarre defense claiming that he really wasn’t in the distillery business at all since his entire product for five years -- 3,000 barrels of whiskey -- had been promised to Steinhardt Brothers of New York City and that, in effect, the Steinhardts were running his distillery. The court rejected that notion and quickly found for Schooley. A 1902 appeal by Gambrill failed. Meanwhile, Roxbury’s Baltimore sales operation was taking a hit. On the afternoon of Jan. 4, 1901, a fire broke out in an adjoining building and spread to Gambrill’s Baltimore Street offices. According to a New York Times account, the Roxbury Rye

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Figure 28 - Baltimore file photograph

September-October 2008

31

Company, mostly from water damage, lost $10,000 in inventory and the building was damaged to the extent of $510,000. All losses were said to be covered by insurance. The cause of the fire was never discovered. But a far more devastating Figure 29 - Roxbury Rye Figure 30 - Roxbury Rye fire would visit tan jug brown and white jug Gambrill’s sales operation barely three years later. The Secretary of the American Bar AssoGreat Baltimore Fire of February ciation. Hinkley had the goods on 1904 (Fig. 28) destroyed his building Gambrill. His written opinion deand all the contents. Not long after, scribed the financial shenanigans the Fisher Bros. Co., a local liquor Gambrill had accomplished to swindle distributor, claimed in ads to be the his creditors, chief among them the “successors to George T. Gambrill, Merchant’s Bank of Baltimore, an distiller....” This firm first shows up institution with a “hard nosed” reputain Baltimore directories in 1899. It tion. Hinkley concluded that the finantoo was displaced by the fire, moving temporarily to 406 W. Camden. By cial losses added up to something 1905 Fisher Bros. was in permanent more than mismanagement. They quarters at 124 W. Baltimore Av. and were out and out fraud. As a result advertising as “agents” for Roxbury Gambrill was hauled into court in 1910, accused of putting up the same Rye. whiskey as collateral for separate, forfeited loans totaling a half million dolJail Time for George? In 1905 Gambrill, still running the lars. He was tried, found guilty, and distillery at Roxbury, registered the sentenced to four years in prison. Alrye brand again with the government, though he appealed, his Roxbury disthis time as a product of the Roxbury tillery was shut down and George exDistilling Co. Once again George ited the whiskey business. He sold was having problems the brand name to other Baltimore interests. As a result Roxbury Rye keeping on the right side of the law. A continue to be sold until Prohibition grain speculator, he (Figs. 29, 30). bet the wrong way on wheat prices, lost The End of the Story Meanwhile, Gambrill vigorously his shirt, and once was resisting going to jail. He filed again was unable to motions left and right, appealing his pay creditors. The special mas- conviction, much as he had against ter in bankruptcy for John Schooley. A dozen years later, the case was a distin- for murky reasons, he still had not guished Baltimore served a single day behind bars. Inlawyer named John stead, according to U.S. Census reHinkley, who twice cords, he was residing comfortably was elected National with Margaret in a four-story Balti-


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listed as “not over” 40 percent. Forty percent alcohol is 80 proof, similar to bourbon. Whether the “Dry Police” eventually caught up with Duffy’s Malt Whiskey is not clear but by 1926 the company that Walter built was forever out of business. Nevertheless, Duffy himself had gone from bankruptcy to riches, helped immeasurably by his ability to profit by the fumbling of his adversaries.

to declare bankruptcy, unable to pay a host of creditors. Later he would claim that he had been drawn into the affairs of Gambrill Bros., his grain dealer relatives, and being young and

Bottles and Extras

Gambrill ... Baltimore, Md.” (Fig. 24). A labeled pint from the distillery claims to be “The Purest Rye Whiskey in the United States.” (Fig. 25) Gambrill also issued embossed mini bottles (Fig. 26) and at

Figure 22 - Eutaw House, Baltimore

Figure 21 - Gambrill’s Mill Monacacy, Maryland Meet George T. Gambrill Behind many pre-Prohibition whiskey brands lie stories, but few have the soap opera quality of Maryland’s Roxbury Rye. Its saga begins with its founder, George T. Gambrill, whose reputation as a scoundrel seems to have pursued him throughout a long life. Gambrill is a familiar name in Maryland. The patriarch of the Gambrill clan was Augustine Gambrill, a plantation owner and one of the founders of Anne Arundel County in Maryland. Another ancestor was James Gambrill who bought the grain mill at Monacacy, Maryland, in 1856 (Fig. 21) only to find it 10 years later the centerpiece for a Civil War battle. A 1973 genealogical publication records three hundred years of the family in the state. Many Gambrills, George included, were involved in the grain and milling trade, principally in Baltimore. One observer has called the extended family “a milling dynasty.” Born about 1845, George’s first brush with the courts was in 1864 when, in his late teens, he was forced

naive, made the fall guy. Besides, he avowed, he had paid off his all creditors by 1868. In 1870, according to Baltimore city directories, George was back in business as a principal in Gambrill & Williar, grain dealers. Their offices were in the posh Eutaw House, a downtown hotel (Fig. 22) where Edgar Allen Poe is said to have written “The Raven.” Ten years later we find George with another grain firm, Trail & Gambrill. Since wheat, rye and corn are the basis of whiskeys, it seems a natural move for him to branch out from grain to grain alcohol as an ingredient in spirituous liquids. By the 1890 census he is recorded as a distiller. Gambrill Rides Roxbury Rye In 1893 Gambrill registered Roxbury Rye as a brand with the government, with a distillery in Roxbury, Maryland, a village in Washington County about twenty-three miles from Baltimore. Despite being located in Maryland, he incorporated the company in West Virginia, probably to avoid taxes. An energetic salesman, Gambrill built Roxbury Rye into a nationally recognized brand in relatively few years. He merchandised his liquor in attractive quart bottles. Shown here is one with original label featuring George’s initials in a logo (Fig. 23). The bottles themselves were embossed in script that read: “Roxbury Rye...Geo. T.

Figure 23 Roxbury Rye labeled quart

Figure 25 Roxbury Rye labeled pint

Figure 27 Roxbury Rye decanter

Figure 24 Roxbury Rye embossed bottle

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ABSINTHE! Part II - The Paraphernalia The return of le Fee Verte - “The Green Faerie” By Cecil Munsey Copyright© 2008

Born Martha Helen Kostyra on August 3, 1941 (Fig. 1), this maven is an American business magnate, author, editor and homemaker advocate. She is also a former stockbroker and fashion model. Over the last two decades she has held a prominent position in the publishing industry; as the author of several books, hundreds of articles on the domestic arts, editor of a national housekeeping magazine, host of a popular daytime television program, and commercial spokeswoman for K-Mart. In 2001 Ladies Home Journal named her the third most powerful woman in America. In antiques shops, at antiques auctions, and at antiques shows she is recognized for her habit of collecting of old absinthe paraphernalia. She is better known, in those venues, as Martha Stewart – check Fig. 1 again and see if you now recognize her.

Figure 26 Roxbury Rye Mini bottle least one attractive back-of-the-bar decanter (Fig. 27). Before long Gambrill’s distillery was Mar yland’s sixth largest in terms of capacity. It also maintained impressive sales offices in Baltimore at 115 West Baltimore St. In 1900 Roxbury Rye was important enough to

Figure 1 Ms. Stewart came by her interest in collecting the paraphernalia used to support the culture of the “Green Faerie” most likely during her college years at Barnard. Initially she intended to major in chemistry, but switched to Art and European History, and later to Architectural History, any or all of which would have brought her in appreciative contact with historical and cultural phenomena associated with absinthiana. Her studies of European history

and art would have made her aware that in many paintings, novels and memoirs of the “Belle Époque” or “beautiful era” before the first world war, absinthe cast its green haze of creative inspiration over a generation of Parisian artists. One of the most famous paintings on the subject, Glass of Absinthe, by Degas in 1870, depicts a couple seated in a café (Fig. 2). The man drinks a red wine, while the woman consuming absinthe looks lost with a glazed empty expression in her eyes.

Figure 2 Absinthe also made an appearance in the work of Vincent Van Gogh. Three years before his death, Van Gogh painted "L'Absinthe," a canvas where "la fee verte" (green faerie) appears all-consuming. Absinthe is everywhere–the tablecloth, the reflections in the water carafe, even the street outside has the green colors of absinthe. Most scholars believe Van Gogh drank absinthe frequently, and some say he was addicted to it. However, in his letters he expresses abhorrence for both the drink and those who drank it regularly. Still, the psychosis he experienced is consistent with acute alcoholism or "absinthism."

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Writers too, found inspiration in the green world of absinthe. The poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine would drink absinthe together and play sadistic games with each other. Eventually Verlaine shot Rimbaud and was sentenced to prison. In the tragic aftermath of this incident Rimbaud gave up absinthe and poetry. Verlaine, who had sung the praises of absinthe in his youth, damned it on his deathbed. However, after leaving prison, poverty-stricken and alone, he continued to drink la fée verte. Alfred Jarry, eccentric author of a scandalous French absurdist play, Ubu Roi, was known to drink absinthe straight. Jarry claimed that absinthe helped him fuse together dream and reality, art and life. Ernest Hemingway never made such claims, but he did continue to drink it long after it was legally banned. And references to absinthe appear in many of his writings, including Death In The Afternoon and For Whom The Bell Tolls. Speaking of his own personal experience with absinthe: “The absinthe made everything seem better. I drank it without sugar in the dripping glass, and it was pleasantly bitter. I poured the water directly into it and stirred it instead of letting it drip. I stirred the ice around with a spoon in the brownish, cloudy mixture. I was very drunk. I was drunker than I ever remembered having been.” - Ernest Hemingway While anti-absinthe laws had slackened over the 20th century, absinthe’s stigma lingered amidst the perpetual recycling of misinformation by journalists, historians and producers alike. There was the dreadful but unconfirmed fear that absinthe rendered its drinkers both bad and mad. More than ever, the confusion begs to be conquered: Absinthe has reemerged from obscurity, into a sought-after “fad.” Paraphernalia such as bottles, spoons, drinking glasses and fountains, antique or not, fetch improbable prices. Martha Stewart show cashing

her


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absinthe collectibles in an interview with “Vanity Fair” magazine in 2001 helps to verify the above and her designing an absinthe spoon for K-Mart to sell exclusively confirms the collecting fad even more. Many of us who desire to learn more about the lost world of absinthe and La Fée Verte (Green Faerie), unless we find a forgotten bottle of pre-ban absinthe will have to do it vicariously, not as an absintheur but as a student of absinthe antiques and absinthiana. The antiques are available and eagerly gathered by a variety of collectors. Strange rituals By 1870 the poor, the bourgeoisie and the bohemians all drank absinthe in their own circles, but they adopted different approaches to the drink, so that the use of absinthe by different groups came to reflect the social status of the drinker. The rich would therefore drink higher-quality or “Healthier” absinthe made from wine alcohol rather than “industrial” alcohol. There were other means of determining class. The bourgeoisie could drink absinthe only as an aperitif (before and/or after dinner). The impoverished absinthe drinker would take it at any time. The other way to differentiate between classes was by the addition of absinthe paraphernalia – the collectibles of today. The extent to which a differential could be made in the cost of the drink was limited, but this was not true of the impedimenta (equipment) used to drink it, which could be crafted and decorated with expensive materials. All that was required to drink absinthe was a bottle of it, some water and perhaps some sugar to sweeten to taste. Sugar was used to render the drink palatable to most people, though it will not dissolve in alcohol at the concentrations that are common in absinthe, so a drinker could pour water in to lower the alcohol content and then add sugar. Without question, absinthe owed a great deal of its popularity to the elaborate ritual that went along with

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drinking it. Because of its high alcohol proof and bitter taste (the Greek word for absinthe translates into “undrinkable”) it had to be diluted and sweetened to make it palatable to the average drinker. And who would have guessed the hassle of making a drink drinkable would become a stroke of marketing genius? Here’s the traditional method: First one poured roughly three ounces of absinthe into a heavy parfait-style stemmed glass. A perforated spoon (sometimes very elaborately so) was set upon the rim of the glass and on the spoon was placed a cube of sugar. Ice-cold water then was ever so slowly dripped from a glass carafe, designed specifically for that purpose, onto the cube. The sugar dissolved and pouring continued until the ratio of water to absinthe was two to five parts, depending upon one’s taste and fortitude. The emerald liquor released a floral bouquet and clouds into a pale opalescent green or yellow, right before one’s eyes, filling one with a sense of creation and mystery. The clouding effect was called la louche (pronounced loosh) and occurred be-

Figure 3 cause the herbal oils were not soluble in water. The mix was given a spin with the spoon and drink was drunk like it was dripped – slowly (Fig. 3). If that’s not dramatic enough, some aficionados liked to dip the sugar cube in the absinthe and set it aflame, allowing the sugar to caramelize. A testament to its proof, absinthe was very flammable and burned with a pleasing blue hue. Any drink with that kind of pres-

Bottles and Extras

entation is bound to impress. Even those who are revolted by the taste are likely to be silenced by the sheer spectacle of the event. There is a certain sense of superiority that goes along with the ritual: “While the peasants in the corner merely pour their booze in a glass and lap it down like wild animals, the smart people, the insiders in the know, are engaging in nothing less than alcoholic alchemy!” – Jad Adams That spectacle helped create a social phenomenon that became known as l’heure verte, the green hour. The unsophisticated watched the sophisticated elite exercise the ritual and soon enough everyone wanted to be included. Paraphernalia From the above description of the absinthe ritual regularly followed by someone preparing and consuming absinthe, it is not difficult to predict the paraphernalia Ms Stewart and other collectors would seek and include in their collections. The following, are examples of absinthe spoons, glasses (some that even glow green because of their uranium content), absinthe fountains, carafes and pitchers, art nouveau-style advertising cartons and posters, catalogues, invoices and ephemera from the leading absinthe distillers, books, journals and newspapers of every description, propaganda from the antiabsinthe temperance movement, and counter-propaganda from the equally passionate supporters of the Green Fairy.

Figure 4

Prohibitionist memorabilia such as the Swiss “Devil Bell” was used by those who wanted the use of absinthe outlawed (Fig. 4). Switzerland banned absinthe in 1905, followed by the United States in 1912 and France in 1915.

Bottles and Extras continued from page 26

medicine. The New York Supreme Court, however, ultimately supported Cullinan and made the drink subject to the liquor tax. This proved to be only a slight setback to Duffy as the profits continued to roll in. Duffy Becomes a Multimillionaire As a result of this soaring success, the formerly bankrupt Walter Duffy now was on his way to becoming a multimillionaire. His first wife, Theresa, had died in 1885 and in 1892 he married Loretta Putnam, a woman with an artistic bent and a taste for fine furnishings. She filled their sprawling Lake Avenue mansion (Fig. 16) in Rochester -- described as “palatial” --with a lavish assemblage of antiques and paintings. When some items went to auction in 1913, the auctioneer’s catalogue exclaimed: “What wealth! The mansion and its furnishings particularly were on display to the the city’s bluebloods at the 1907 marriage of a daughter, Harriet Jane Duffy, to the son of a railroad executive. The ceremony was held in the private chapel of the Catholic bishop of the Rochester diocese. The bishop also presided over the nuptials. The wedding breakfast was held in the Duffy’s Lake Avenue home. According to a contemporary press account: “The house was beautifully decorated with Killarney and American Beauty roses and Japanese lilies. Dossenbach’s Orchestra furnished music.” During the late 1800s and early 1900s, Duffy became one of Rochester’s leading business figures. He was

September-October 2008

president of the Flower City Bank and the German American Bank. He was a principal stockholder in a enterprise that owned hotels and theaters, including the Rochester Hotel (Fig. 17), the National Theater in Rochester and the Schubert Theater in New York City. He also was a director of the Pfaudler Company, which manufactured glasslined tanks for storing and transporting beer and other products. Ignoring the fraudulent source of his money, a 1902 book entitled “Notable Men of Rochester and Vicinity” prominently featured his photo. At his death, age 70 in 1911, the New York Times, which earlier had highlighted his bankruptcy, called Duffy “one of Rochester’s best known business men and financiers” and listed the many companies on which he held executive and director positions. After Duffy’s Demise With Walter’s death Duffy’s Malt Whiskey underwent significant

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tiny. As an ad (Fig. 18) from 1915 indicates, Duffy’s got the message. It makes no claims beyond being a “tonic stimulant” and a “household remedy.” Moreover, the name of the firm has been changed to the Duffy Malt Whiskey Company. Prohibition brought still other alterations. The word “whiskey” now became anathema. So Duffy’s became a tonic. The operation moved to Los Angeles and the name changed to Duffy’s Laboratory, Ltd. Even the depiction of the Old Chemist changed on the label of the bottles (Fig.19) as did the e m b o s s i n g Figure 19 (Fig. 20). The prodDuffy Malt Tonic bottle uct itself appears to

Figure 18 - 1915 ad for Duffy Malt whiskey changes. Dr. Wylie had warned the patent medicine industry that using the word “cure” in advertising would subject products to particular scru-

Figure 16 - Duffy mansion at 116 Lake St.

Figure 20 - detail of Tonic bottle embossing have remained essentially whiskey: The alcoholic content was

Figure 17 - Hotel Rochester (postcard)


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Barton Balls

Figure 1 Many glass target balls will have rough, jagged, and sometimes misshapen necks. Like many glass products of the time, they were hand blown into molds. Unlike other glass products, their sole purpose was their destruction. Armed with this knowledge. glass blowers were not always delicate in removing the blow pipe from the ball. There was no reason to be concerned with the finish or look of the neck. In grade school I was required to memorize a spelling rule. It began with, “I before E except after C”. The exception in target balls is the ground mouth. There are target balls where the jagged edge is ground to a smooth finish. In this article we will discuss some of the most beautiful target balls ever found. Among them is the most exceptional ground mouth target ball I have ever seen. Are adjectives such as spectacular, stunning, magnificent, outstanding, dazzling, exceptional, and extraordinary a little over the top when used to describe a target ball? Not if you have a Barton Ball in hand. The Barton Balls were found in an old storage building under renovation in England in 2005. The storage building was located on the shooting grounds of a well known English fam-

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Spoons were very much a part of the ritual of preparing and using absinthe. Perforated for holding the sugar cube over the glass, perhaps they are the quintessential absinthe accoutrement. Usually made from plated brass, tin or nickel, they are found in an extraordinary wide range of designs. Figs. 5 & 6 are in the shape of the Eiffel Tower and commemorates its opening in 1889. Fig. 7

Exciting Find of Rare target balls By Mike O’Malley ily. The name of the family has been closely guarded and is unknown to me. In the find were two target ball variants - one with the normal target ball neck, the other a wide ground mouth neck. Each of these variants came in two variants - one is cobalt blue the other a sand ball with a pebble effect in powder blue. The normal neck balls (Fig. 2 & 4) were found loose and scattered about the building. The ground mouth wide neck balls (Fig. 1 & 3) were neatly packed in straw and contained in two wooden crates. Stenciled on the crates were the words “E Barton & Son’s Stourbridge, Purveyors of fine glass shooting Targets”. To describe these balls as cobalt blue and pebble blue is not completely accurate. The cobalt balls are islands of dark blue with fine clear raised lines surrounding each island. The sand ball is almost impossible to explain. To describe them as spectacular would be an understatement. I will accompany this article a caveat. Until you have held the Barton Ball in hand, you have not seen it. Many of you probably saw the Barton Balls at the 2008 FOHBC National Bottle Expo in York, Pennsylvania. Since the find in 2005 another variant of the Barton Ball has been dis-

Bottles and Extras

Figure 3

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Glasses used in the preparation and drinking of absinthe are often Pontarlier style (Fig. 10) made famous in a painting by Charles Maire. Glasses are about 6 inches tall and 3 inches in diameter (Fig. 11). The volume of these collectible glasses is 10 ounces, “…helping the drinker to appreciate delicate aromas

Figure 5

covered. Rumors are now circulating in the target ball world that there may be more. Figure 6 is an absinthe spoon made by hand in a 1914 World War I trench by a greenfaerie-inspired soldier. One of Martha Stewart’s absinthe spoon favorites is shown is shown here as Fig. 8. This spoon was manufactured in the U.S. by silversmiths Reed & Barton and has “Café Lafayette NY” engraved on the handle.

Figure 9 Figure 11 orful and nicely printed. A few bottles with seals applied after the bottles were made are found occasionally. No embossed bottles used for absinthe are known to exist.

Figure 4 How exciting it is to be a collector! We are filled with questions. If we are very fortunate, we will sometimes find an answer to a question we had not yet thought to ask.

and flavors from the absinthes without overflowing.” Fig. 12 is of a 3-hole silver brouilleur (strainer) that sits on top of the glass. Fig. 13 is a 1920 Tarragona 2-piece cut-glass dripper and matching brouilleur.

Figure 7

Figure 8 If you have questions or interest in target balls, please contact me. Mike O’Malley 1702 Mystery Hill Pleasant Hill, MO 64080 816-540-3635 Mikeomal@earthlink.net Figure 2

Bottles used to contain absinthe are not as easy to acquire, as is some of the other paraphernalia/memorabilia. Bottles were covered and pictured extensively in Part I of this 2-part series. The bottle pictured here, as Fig. 9, is typical of absinthe bottles in general. A standard green-glass winebottle shape was almost always employed and the paper labels were col-

Figure 10

Figure 12


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heavily gilded, rather than relatively plain as here. It fluoresces a bright lime-green under long-range ultra violet light (Fig. 15).

Bottles and Extras

Carafes and topettes for water are also among the collectible paraphernalia for drinking absinthe. Carafes often carried advertising for the various brands of absinthe advertising (Figs. 18; 19). Topettes, like carafes,

Figure 16

Figure 13

Figure 17 Glass Mould used to make absinthe glasses (Figs. 16; 17) open and closed.

Figure 19 are sometimes open-topped and feature dose markings such as the one shown here as Fig. 20.

Figure 14 Fig. 14 is a Baccarat absinthe set of two glasses, sugar-cube bowl with top and a tray â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all in gilt-rimmed opalescent (milk) glass dating from 18301860.

Figure 15 Baccarat made this opaque milky glass, dosed with uranium dioxide, until 1890, although towards the end of this period it was usually more

Figure 18

Figure 20

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surfaced in Sacramento, California, far from Rochester. The bottle also featured a patent number on the base (Fig. 13). To validate his therapeutic claims, Duffy gave away glass medicine spoons rather than shot glasses (Fig. 14).

Figure 12 - Duffy embossed quart bottle

The Feds Do Duffy a Favor Enter Washington, D.C. officialdom. In order to help pay the expenses of the Spanish American

Figure 13 - base of bottle with patent notice War, Congress had passed a special tax on patent medicines. On July 5, 1898, the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, N.B. Scott, wrote to the local collector of revenues in Rochester ruling that: “Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey, is by being advertised as a cure for consumption, dyspepsia, ma-

laria, etc., liable to a stamp tax as a medicinal article....” A background memo elaborated that although

Bottles and Extras

testimonials to its healing effects by alleged clergymen and Temperance workers. Nevertheless, Adams’ revelations failed to dampen sales. Dr. Wylie’s Frustration The first head of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Harvey W. Wylie (Fig. 15) similarly sought to

Bottles and Extras

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Pitchers were sometimes used instead carafes or topettes to drip water over the sugar cube, through the spoon and into the glass of absinthe. They were made in zoomorphic (figural) designs of ceramic, glass, and sometimes metal. These special-

Figure 14 - Duffy “medicinal” spoon Duffy’s contained nothing but distilled spirits, it was a patent medicine “by the manner in which it is presented to the public.” The ruling decreed a tax of two cents per bottle. We can imagine Commissioner Scott laughing about sticking it to Duffy as he signed the order. Historian Gordon Wood once wrote: “History does not teach lots of little lessons. Insofar as it teaches any lessons, it teaches only one big one: that nothing ever works out quite the way its managers intended or expected.” Certainly Walter Duffy well understood that big lesson. To the chagrin of numerous federal officials, he exploited the unplanned-for to his considerable financial benefit. In reality, the Feds did Duffy two enormous, if unintended, favors. Estimates are that before it was repealed after the war, the stamp tax cost him about $40,000, not an inconsiderable sum. At the same time, however, it exempted him from hundreds of thousands in federal and state liquor taxes and allowed him to advertise with some legitimacy as “the only whiskey recognized by the Government as medicine” -- a claim that turned out to be worth millions. Even Samuel Hopkins Adams, whose series of articles in Colliers Magazine in 1905-1906 led to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act, admitted that Duffy was partially justified in his claim of Federal recognition of his whiskey as medicine. Nevertheless, this famous “muckraker” took particular aim at Duffy’s product, because of its claims to “cure” and its inferiority even as whiskey. He also exposed as phony newspaper

Figure 15 - Dr. Harvey W. Wylie shut Duffy down. He ended frustrated with Washington bureaucratic footdragging: “I stated that Duffy's Malt Whisky was one of the most gigantic frauds of the age and a flagrant violation of the law, and that there was no necessity that we delay at all in the matter.” After his pleas for prosecution were ignored for two years, the doctor denounced the “determined efforts of my colleagues to protect Duffy’s Pure Malt Whisky from being molested either by seizure or bringing any criminal case against the maker.” Dr. Wylie left office in 1909 without ever having laid a glove on Duffy. The only official to win a case against the distiller was Duffy’s fellow Irishman, Patrick W. Cullinan. As the New York Commissioner of Excise, Cullinan in 1905 went to court claiming that Duffy’s was nothing more than sweetened whiskey and subject to state liquor taxes. The company countered with eleven physicians, four of them members of the Rochester Health Department, who swore their belief that the whiskey contained drugs that made it real continued on page 29

Figure 21

Figure 23 ized pitchers required small pouring areas (Fig. 21) so that the mixing ritual could be accomplished easily and were filled in the back (Fig. 22).

Figure 22

Fountains – Found in larger cafes or bistros, absinthe fountains were

dispensers of water for mixing drinks of the green faerie. Fountains had as few as one spigot or as many as six. In Fig. 23 there is pictured beautifully acid-etched a Rene' Lalique 4robinette fountain.


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Miscellaneous items of absinthe paraphernalia from “Belle Époque” (French for “Beautiful Era”) – the years between the Franco-Prussian War and World War I, are many and varied. In addition to those items already pictured and discussed there were, spoon holders, advertising mats for card or dice games, wormwood labels (Fig. 24), large and small advertising posters, postcards (Fig. 25), books, catalogues, journals, apothecary bottles (Fig. 26), brochures, menus, early photographs, tin advertising signs such as the one in (Fig. 27), Impressionistic paintings, porcelain match strikers (Fig. 28), and other items too numerous to mention. All such things are of great interest to collectors but as always, collectors need to adopt the attitude and caution recommended all the way back to Greek and Roman times – caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

Figure 24 ***** Fakes & Forgeries – advice from a French antiques dealer

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Bottles and Extras

markets, is faked or incorrectly described one way or the other. “Many of the rarest absinthe spoons (and other items such as fountains and spoonholders) have been reproduced as modern replicas. There is nothing at all wrong with this of course - we sell replicas, clearly marked as such, ourselves. However unscrupulous sellers occasionally try to pass them off as originals. Fortunately they are easy to recognize, and will only fool a beginner. “More dangerous are outright fakes, made with the intention to deceive. These can be hard to distinguish from originals, especially just on the basis of photographs. Since individual absinthe spoons can be worth several thousand dollars, the potential for profit on the faker’s side is obvious. There are several very active makers of faked absinthe spoons in France, who are continually refining their skills. It’s for this reason that I generally don’t post detailed guide- Figure 27 lines for distinguishing faked from genuine spoons on my website – I ers were improving their product and and a few French collectors did this in eliminating their mistakes in response the past, and then found that the fak- to the information we had so helpfully provided them!

“This fascinating field, is a minefield for the unwary collector. 80% of what’s sold on eBay, or in flea

Figure 25

Figure 26

Figure 28 “The danger with fakes of course is that once they get into circulation

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

cider business in 1842. The resulting entity was known as the Duffy-Mott Company, Inc., with its principal processing plant located at first in New York City. That company, in which Duffy had a major interest, increased its assets, product lines and markets nationwide. It eventually moved to Hamlin, New York. With a guaranteed supply of Kentucky whiskey from Frankfort for his

Figure 4 Tomley Rye shot glass

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Figure 6 - Hiram Cronk funeral scenes funeral in New York City (Fig. 6). Whether Walter Duffy attended is unknown. Duffy’s unsupported claim that “malt whiskey” really was medicine even convinced some Temperance advocates. Duffy backed up his fiction by concocting a story that his remedy was made from a formula worked out fifty years earlier by “one

hand mirror (Fig. 7), the old gent also appeared on Duffy’s trade cards (Fig. 8), blotters (Fig. 9), posters (Fig. 10), and a paper label that was applied to the base of each bottle (Fig. 11).

Figure 5 Seneca Chief shot glass

Rochester rectifying and blending facility, Duffy introduced a number of other liquor brands. They included Tromley Rye (Fig. 4), Seneca Chief (Fig. 5), Genesee, Kentucky Raider and Elite whiskeys. These were regional labels; the flagship brand remained Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey. Its owner energetically marketed it to a wide audience, placing his advertising in national magazines and major newspapers all over America. Hiram Cronk Testifies -- and Dies One of Duffy’s most celebrated ads featured Hiram Cronk of Ava, New York. At 105 years old Hiram was accounted the last surviving veteran of the War of 1812. Cronk was quoted saying: “For many years Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey has been my only medicine. I take a dessert spoonful of the tonic three times a day with my meals, and when I go to bed. I am thankful to Duffy’s for it gives me a good appetite and keeps me strong and well in my old age.” His daughter confirmed that Hiram was “keen in mind and rugged in strength” thanks to Duffy’s. Ironically, two weeks after the ad ran in the Washington Post of April 30, 1905, it was followed by a Post news story reporting Cronk’s death. Hiram got a hero’s

Figure 7 - Duffy oval hand mirror of the World’s Greatest Chemists.” The distiller featured a trade mark of the bearded scientist who apparently had discovered this wonder liquid. Shown here on the back of a giveaway

Figure 10 - 1904 Duffy poster Duffy insisted that his product was protected from infringement by “low grade impure whiskey” by “the Pat-

Figure 8 - Duffy trade card

Figure 11 - Duffy paper label

Figure 9 - Duffy ink blotter

ented Bottle--Round, Amber Colored, and with Duffy blown into the glass.” (Fig. 12). Bottle diggers all over the country regularly find them. A cache of five recently


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September-October 2008

Whiskey Rogues: Duffy and Gambrill By Jack Sullivan Special to Bottles and Extras

Distillers Walter B. Duffy of Rochester, New York, and George T. Gambrill of Baltimore, Maryland, probably never met during their lifetimes. But their stories bear striking similarities and they surely would

Figure 1 - Walter B. Duffy have recognized in one another the incontrovertible fact that each man was a “whiskey rogue.” Let’s begin with Duffy, seen here in maturity (Fig. 1). His story begins in Canada where he was born in 1840, about two years before his father Edmund emigrated to Rochester, New York, and opened a cider refining business. It was a successful enterprise. Edmund soon expanded into selling “wines, liquors, cordials and cigars.” In an 1861 ad he also claimed to be a “rectifier” -- that is, a refiner and blender of whiskey. The elder Duffy eventually brought young Walter into the business and left it to him when he died during the 1870s. Walter in the meantime had served as an officer in the Union Army during the Civil War and had married in 1868. Upon inheriting the company he promptly expanded the business into other products. In 1881 a Rochester business

directory lists Duffy as a distiller and rectifier of alcohol, “French spirits” (brandy), malt, wheat, rye and bourbon whiskeys. The 1880s were a time when patent medicines began their meteoric rise in popularity by aggressive advertising and other ploys. Many whiskey makers began to advertise their wares as being “for medicinal use” without being specific as to the ills they were meant to remedy. Duffy took a different approach. He decided to straddle the divide between selling the 15 cent saloon shot and hawking his booze as a cure for specific diseases. Thus, early in the 1880s was born the Celebrated Duffy’s Malt Whiskey, which Walter advertised as the “greatest known heart tonic.” He also claimed that his product could cure consumption (tuberculosis), bronchitis, dyspepsia (chronic indigestion), and even malaria. In and Out of Trouble In 1884 Duffy left Rochester for Baltimore, a brash young man “hoping to cash in on Baltimore’s prestige,” according to one author. He set up a large rectifying plant downtown and contracted for ad space across all 1,684 pages of Wood’s 1886 Baltimore City Directory to proclaim: “Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey!....Cures Malaria, Price One Dollar Per Bottle...Sold by Druggists, Grocers and Dealers.” He also launched Maryland Star Rye Whiskey in three grades. This onslaught, however, left the Baltimore drinking public considerably less than impressed. Sluggish sales soon landed the overextended entrepreneur in financial hot water. On November 16, 1886, the New York Times headlined: “The

Figure 2 - Rochester Distilling logo

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Duffy Failure: Creditors Looking for Mr. Duffy and Looking in Vain.” A complicated financial deal had failed, one of Duffy’s partners was headed for Honduras, and he himself was lying low. Duffy’s plant in Maryland went into receivership in 1887 and he fled back to Rochester, leaving behind a howling mob of creditors. Despite this setback he remained president of the Rochester Distilling Company (Fig. 2) and continued to produce his purported anti-malaria liquor. The success of Duffy’s Malt Whiskey as a cure almost certainly helped solve Walter’s bankruptcy

Figure 3 - 1898 Rochester Distilling letterhead woes. What Duffy had failed to sell in Baltimore began to attract a national clientele. Before long Duffy was looking once again to expand outside Rochester. This time he headed west to Kentucky. There, in 1887, George T. Stagg with other local whiskey men had incorporated the Stagg and O.F.C. (Old Fire Copper) distillery in a brand new facility at Frankfort. When Stagg retired because of ill health in 1890, Duffy purchased a majority interest. In 1892 he was elected president of the corporation. A 1898 letterhead depicts the Rochester rectifying plant and the Frankfort facility, now called the O.F.C. and Carlisle Distillery (Fig. 3). Reflecting these two properties, Duffy later would call his business holdings “The Kentucky and New York Company, Distillers.” In 1890 Duffy merged his cidermaking operation with that of Samuel R. Mott. a Bouckville, New York, businessman who also had started a

Bottles and Extras

they are sold and resold, and may eventually be offered in good faith by less knowledgeable sellers unaware that they are not the real thing. “The word “absinthe” is something of a magic bullet for a French antique dealer – it instantly increases the value of the associated antique ten or twenty fold. So unsurprisingly, items made for use with other liqueurs of the period – bitters, gentians [tonic liquor extracted from gentian root] – are often hopefully described as absinthe antiques. Even more commonly, items made after 1920 for the pastis [aniseed-flavored aperitif] market, are sold as absinthe period antiques. Almost all the so-called “absinthe fountains” on the market were in reality made for use with pastis in the 1930’s. “So in summary, as in all fields of antique collecting, caveat emptor. [Amen!] Buy only from someone you trust, with the requisite specialist expertise. As with all fields of antiques, new collectors in particular should exercise great caution in buying, particular if they are offered what appears to be a ‘bargain.’ Rare absinthe spoons are traded within a fairly small body of knowledgeable collectors and dealers, who are well aware of their value. A spoon from an unknown source offered at well below market value may well be faked.”

Selected Bibliography Books: Adams, Jad. Hideous Absinthe: A history of the Devil in a bottle, University of Wisconsin Press, 2004. Crowley, Aleister. The Green Goddess, International Publishing Co, New York, 1918. Lanier, Doris. Absinthe: The Cocaine of the Nineteenth Century, Jefferson, 1994. Munsey, Cecil. Illustrated Guide to Collecting Bottles, Hawthorn Book, Inc., New York, 1970.

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Periodicals: Glass, Erin. The ‘green fairy’ tale – Fabled absinthe, making a comeback, sparks new controversy, San Diego Union-Tribune, April 23, 2008. Heilig, Sterling. Absinthe Drinking, Atlanta Constitution, Aug. 19, 1894. Huffington, Ariana Stassinopoulos. Creator and Destroyer, The Atlantic, June, 1988. Marrus, Michael R. Social Drinking in the Belle Epoque, Journal of Social History. Vol. 7, No. 4, Winter, 1974. Internet: Arnold, Wilfred Niels. Absinthe – Scientific American http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id= absinthe-history& Viktor Oliva (April 24, 1861–April 5, 1928) – Czech painter and illustrator. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viktor_Ol iva Vincent Van Gogh – Medical Records. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_ Van_Gogh#Medical_records

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Fair use notice: Some material in this article was originally published by the sources above and is copyrighted. We, as a non-profit organization, offer it here as an educational tool to increase further understanding and discussion of bottle collecting and related history. We believe this constitutes “fair use” of the copyrighted material as provided for in Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. If you wish to use this material for purposes of your own that go beyond “fair use,” you must obtain permission from the copyright owner(s). Cecil Munsey 13541 Willow Run Road Poway, CA 92064-1733 phone: 858-487-7036 email: cecilmunsey@cox.net gmail: cecilmunsey@gmail.com website: CecilMunsey.com More than 1200 free-to-copy wellresearched articles and other materials of interest to bottle collectors


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September-October 2008

Table and Office Ware from Capstan By Barry Bernas

More Than A Glass Container Maker The officers and employees of the Capstan Glass Company prided themselves on being able to develop, manufacture, market and sell glass containers in large quantities. The fact that many labeled examples still exist today attest to the success this company had in convincing food packers to use Capstan Glass vessels as the outer wrapper for their various products. Based on this corporation strong point, I naturally expected only tumblers, jars and bottles to have been turned out in this firm’s factory located in South Connellsville, Pennsylvania. When asked on previous occasions if Capstan ever made items other than food containers, I always responded in the negative because none were ever advertised and, more importantly, I’d never run across a monogrammed specimen. However, after years of collecting examples from this company, I’ve recently discovered that trademarked pieces were also manufactured which didn’t exactly fit into the category of a glass food container. Although relative few in number so far, these oddities will be the subject of this article. Tableware? The first odd item is a two-piece set of matching shakers made by Capstan.

Figure 1

The specimens in Figure 1 are both 4 9/16th inches in height and weigh 7 3/4th-ounces each. The box quilted outer design on these roundedsquare shaped shakers was quite popular during the later years of the 1920s and throughout the 1930s. Besides Capstan Glass, I’ve seen editions with similar motifs from the well-known glass houses of Hazel Atlas and Owens-Illinois, just to name a few manufacturers. On the outer body of these two containers, there is a checker board pattern composed of 1/4th inch squares which are lined up in rows on three sides. This attractive motif starts just below the vessel’s curved shoulder and ends at a point above the bottom parting line. On the front of the jars in Figure 1, there is a smooth 2 x 2 inch label space positioned between two rows of squares each above and below this promotional area. In the center of the blank segment is a rectangular shaped raised area with rounded corners that is 1 9/16th inches wide and 11/16th inch in height. On the outside surface of this geometric form is either the embossed word SALT or PEPPER in 5/16th inch high capital letters. The four sided, cup bottom mold style of base on both models has a Capstan Glass nautical logo in the center with the mold number 5984 below it and the series numbers 5 (salt) and 2 (pepper) above the trademark. Due to the absence of Company ephemera, it isn’t known whether these embossed examples were made to market a specific brand for one or more commercial packers of food seasonings or were sold without contents in small general, grocery and/or department stores or supply outlets. Certainly, each scenario is believable on its own merits. I prefer the latter course but I’ll leave you to decide for yourself which one is most appealing.

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Office Ware? The next four pieces surely don’t fit into any glass food container category that I’ve encountered. Collectively, these models have a common theme. I’ve often wondered if they were manufactured for a specific Company purpose. Between 1919 and 1938, Capstan Glass opened and staffed district sales offices in major food packing centers around our nation. Starting with seven cities in 1921, the firm’s complement grew by 1934 to eighteen country wide and two in Canada.1 In these offices, part of the daily routine for the sales personnel involved meeting with customers to determine their packing needs and to demonstrate how Capstan could solve any of their problems. Undoubtedly, this corporate philosophy of personal contact necessitated many face to face meetings. Whether at corporate headquarters in the South Connellsville or in their many satellite places of business, the ash trays, ice bucket, ice crusher and monogrammed glass that I’ll describe in follow on subsections may well have played vital refreshment and relaxation support roles. As office accessories, this set probably served their Capstan masters nobly during the closing of deals between Company officials and packing industry counterparts and/or potential clients. Initially when I came across the four items, I was dumbfounded. Throughout my prior research into the history of the Capstan Glass Company, Corporation executives and marketers constantly emphasized that the output of their factory comprised tumblers, jars and bottles. At no time did they mention or even allude to ash trays, ice crushers, ice buckets and monogrammed glasses being in their line of wares. Coupling this factor with the color of the items and applied designs thereon, I had and now still have a major head scratching conundrum to resolve. If these entertainment accoutrements weren’t turned out specifically for Company executives in offices nationwide and in Canada, I’m at a loss for why they are

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and in a suitable way, overcoming the great difficulties of communication, inadequacy of personnel, and means of transport and succeeding in relieving at the critical moment the bareness and poverty of the needy population of the town." "His comrades around him were dying of typhus," his grandson noted, "but ironically, he never got sick until

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16 years later when he came down with typhoid fever. We later found his day-to-day diary from 1918 to 1919, medals and certificates documenting the extraordinary event." Adams operated the Boston drug store until retiring during the early 1950s. He died Jan. 18, 1974, at the age of 88. His grandson donated R.W. Adams’ artifacts to the Agrirama (a museum devoted to farm life and agriculture) in Tifton, Ga., where in 1975 the office of Dr. Vann was relocated. The Thomas County History Museum in Thomasville, Ga., also received some of the artifacts including many photos and negatives.

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R. W. Adams with Greek soldier

AUTHOR’S NOTE: I am indebted to Jim Mayo and his family; Ephraim J. Rotter, curator of collections, Thomas County Museum of History, Thomasville, Ga., and Neetika K. Gujral, Presidential Intern, Hazel Braugh Records Center & Archives, American National Red Cross.

Medal of Our Savior front (top) and back (below)

Bill Baab 2352 Devere Street Augusta, GA 30904 (706) 736-8097 riverswamper@comcast.net US Bronze insignia

Hung Over? Try this Even after retirement and late in life, Redden Whitaker Adams kept prescribing. "My husband, Jimmy, woke up one morning with a terrific hangover," recalled Mary Ann Mayo Brown of Valdosta, Ga. "Pop (Adams’ nickname) told him what to mix: In an iced tea glass filled halfway with water, add some creme de menthe, an aspirin, an Alka-Seltzer tablet and a couple of ice cubes. Mix it well and then drink it through a straw. "It worked!" Medal of Military Worth ribbon and box


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September-October 2008

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gie

Blood Life wrapper

Free Library to Boston. It opened in 1914. He also owned more than 1,400 acres of land and his wife spearheaded the founding of the Boston Red Cross, according to newspaper articles of that era. Boston, named in honor of Capt. Thomas M. Boston, dates to 1830 and was incorporated by an act of the Georgia Legislature on Oct. 24, 1870. A member of the Georgia Pharmaceutical Association, during World War I Adams volunteered his services to the American Red Cross. Compensated only for expenses, he was commissioned a lieutenant and assigned to the American Expeditionary Force (AEF). Red Cross archives noted in their "Co m mi s s io n to Greece Reports Red Cross insignias

printed by P.D. Sakellarios in Athens on July 1, 1919" that Lt. R.W. Adams established a refugee station in a mosque in Serres and that "he remained in charge throughout the period of active distribution.".

Lily & Mary Adams Blood Life broadside

The Adamses were prominent in Boston’s social life. He played first chair violin in the "Boston Symphony Orchestra" (11 players under the direction of H.C. Witt), and he and his wife, Lily, were largely responsible for bringing a Carne- R. W. Adams & wife (on left)

Calling card used while in Greece

While stationed there, he was promoted to captain and honored by having the "Decoration of the Silver Cross of Our Order of St. Sauveur" conferred upon him by the nation’s king. The monarch also pinned the Medal of Military Valor, Fourth Class, on Adams’ chest "for the principal part he took in the distribution of aid to the inhabitants of Serres, acting personally and exposing himself while doing so, to the danger of being attacked by the (typhus) epidemic raging in the town, exceeding in activity and self-denial, working methodically

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extant today. If you have a better explanation for their presence, other than what I’ve laid out in my supposition, I’d surely like to hear from you. Ash Trays Figure 2 contains a picture of two sizes of octagonal ash trays that carry the Capstan Glass trademark. On the left, the black glass

Figure 2 specimen is 5 7/8th inches wide, 5 7/8th inches long and weighs two pounds two and one-fourth ounces. At its summit, the side walls are 1 3/16th inches tall. Four semicircular shaped depressions are formed onto the outer top ledge. Due to their size, they most likely were meant as a resting place for lighted cigars. The circular indentation in the center of this ash tray is 9/16th of an inch in depth and has an outer diameter of 4 9/16th inches. Boldly embossed in the center of this region is an 11/16th inch tall capstan, proudly facing upward and announcing its presence for all to see. The underneath side of the lefthand model has a slightly raised, flat, 3/16th inch wide, octagonal bearing surface. At its innermost point, there is a 3/16th inch slanted inward segment which blends into a 4 1/8th inch wide and 4 1/8th inch long flat and unembossed octagonal surface. If the heavy left-hand example was for cigars, then its mate to the right could have been for cigarettes. This black glass specimen is 4 inches wide, 3 15/16th inches long and weighs ten and one-half ounces. The vertical outer side wall is 3/4th of an inch tall. Similar to its counterpart, there are also four semicircular shaped depressions along the top outer surface. Unlike its mate to the left, these half circle indentations are shallower in construction and probably intended as a place rest for lighted

September-October 2008

cigarettes. The center of this ash tray’s top has a 5/8th inch slanted depression that merges into a flat circular recession which has a 2 3/8th inches outer diameter. Directly in the center of this region is an upward facing, 7/16th inch tall Capstan Glass trademark. Turning this model over, we find a flat, 3/16th inch wide, octagonal bearing surface. At its innermost point, there is a 3/16th inch slanted inward segment which blends into a 3 1/8th inch wide by 3 1/8th inch long flat and unembossed octagonal surface.

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vertically oriented flutes. These identical panels have a convex shape throughout their length. Designed with rounded upward tops, curved downward bottoms and canted inward sides (1/4th inch wide at the top and 3/16th inch wide at the bottom), these curved outward features are connected side by side around the inner circumference of the tumbler. The circular base on this banded model has an outer diameter of 2 9/16th inches. Figure 4 has a picture of this part.

Ice Crusher The second specialty piece is composed of a tumbler from Capstan Glass and an ice crushing mechanism from the Schulte Brass Manufacturing Company of Norwood, Ohio. Figure 3 shows each section.

Figure 4

Figure 3 Regarding the container, this vessel is 5 5/8th inches tall and holds 13fluid ounces when filled to the overflow point.2 It has a smooth sealing area at the outer lip vice an Anchor finish which is usually comprised of a vertical surface and knurling. To properly seal this container, a 70 millimeter size of metal push-down cap would suffice. The exterior side wall on this specimen is smooth and slants ever so slightly inward from top to bottom. Around it are five applied color bands in a red-black-red-black-red sequence. The red lines are 1/8th inch in width and the black ones are twice that size or 1/4th inch wide. Internally, there are thirty-two

In the center, the trademark for the Capstan Glass Company is strongly embossed. Underneath it is the mold number 595 while over the same symbol is the series number 13. The ice crushing apparatus on the right in Figure 3 consists of a black wooden handle connected to a thin circular metal support bar. At the end of this rod is a round metallic plate carrying nine pointed downward prongs constructed of the same material. Around the support bar is a shinny metal top with the phrase – PAT.PEND. – stamped into its top surface. On the interior of the cap is stenciling in black letters. It spells out Schulte Brass Mfg Co. on one line with Norwood, Ohio below it. I presume this information is the manufacturer’s name and location of his business. Unfortunately, a quick search of the Internet website for the United States Patent and Trademark office failed to turn up a patent for this hand ice crushing mechanism.


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September-October 2008

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at the top provide the support for a shiny metal carrying handle. In my opinion, the decorations on the outer and inner body of this pail are extraordinary.

Figure 5 profiles the fully assembled ice crusher. Ironically, I’ve seen the same style of crushing tool atop a Hazel Atlas Glass Company marked applied color banded tumbler. On the HA trademarked example, the container was internally fluted and carried the identical red-black-red-black-red outer design as the Capstan 595 version. Which one came before the other? I can’t say one way or the other. If nothing else, my encounter with a twin from another glass maker indicated one of two things to me. Either there was an intense head to head competition on-going between both firms in the mid-1930s for a bigger piece of the glass container market or the assembler of the ice crusher got a better deal for the glass bottom from whomever made it second. Ice Bucket To complement the ash trays and hand operated ice crusher, the next Capstan oddity is a depression green colored ice bucket. It is pictured in Figure 6. This beautifully crafted model is 5 7/8th inches tall. Across the outer top lip, the distance measures 5 1/16th inches. Its circular side wall angles inward from top to bottom, drawing the exterior diameter of its base down to 4 inches. Two circular glass bosses

Figure 6 The slant exterior surface has a smooth backdrop for other objects and patterns that have been engraved thereon. Along the top just under the lip are twelve finger tip shaped forms cut into the exterior wall in a downward position. Two inches down from the mouth is a 1/8th inch wide line, running around the bucket. Two inches up for the base is a matching companion. On the front and back between both horizontal features is a flower motif. It is composed of six, 5/16th inch in diameter circles arranged in a circular pattern. To the right and left of this form are leaves in the shape of an arrowhead. Turning to the interior, twelve panels are pressed onto this surface. Rounded upward at the top and rounded downward at the bottom, these flutes have sides which angle slightly inward from top (1 1/4th inches) to bottom (1 inch). Convex shaped throughout their length, these decorative features are connected side by side around the inner circumference of the ice bucket. In the center of its circular base is an impressive and strongly embossed 5/8th of an inch tall capstan. Figure 7 refers.

September-October 2008

Got Tired Blood? Get Blood Life!

South Georgia pharmacist’s formula reportedly cured what ailed you By Bill Baab

Figure 7

Figure 5

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I’ve seen other examples of this ice bucket in the same color with a matching engraved outer pattern and an exactly molded inner motif. However, these models didn’t have any maker’s logo embossed on the base. I’m presuming Capstan Glass coopted this popular design for their purposes. If the engraving was done by their personnel in the South Connellsville, Pennsylvania factory, this craftsmanship represents an impressive step upward for their product line. Monogrammed Glass Adding to the prior trio, the glass in Figure 8 completes the presumed customer entertainment set.

Redden Whitaker Adams knew as a child what he wanted to be when he grew up, and it wasn’t a policeman or a fireman. His notion of becoming a druggist came to fruition perhaps sooner than he expected. Born October 23, 1885 in the tiny Thomas County town of Boston in southwest Georgia, Adams left an indelible mark on his birthplace by developing a formula that reportedly benefited people who lacked energy, a common complaint during that day as well as the present. Blood Life was guaranteed under the Pure Food and Drug Act of June 30, 1906 and was assigned No. 7692. It was produced in unique, dark amber, embossed flask-like bottles and labeled "The Great and General Tonic and Blood Purifier." One bottle sold for a dollar or a bargain six bottles for $5. Nearing his 17th birthday on Oct. 23, 1902, he became a pharmacist’s apprentice in Madison, Florida and with Bruce Pharmacy in Tifton, Georgia. He became a registered pharmacist in Florida on June 17, 1903, and earned his permanent druggist’s li-

Figure 8 I called this specimen a glass because it neither has the weight nor stouter construction qualities noted in the Capstan tumbler line. Additionally, it isn’t embossed with a Company trademark on its base. That logo appears on the front in the applied color red.

J. C. Adams and Sons Drugstore

cense No. 958 in Georgia on July 12, 1903 to become what is believed to be the youngest licensed pharmacist in that state’s history. Two years later, he joined his father, James C. Adams, and his brother, Denzil Roy Adams, in purchasing the City Drug Store in their hometown of Boston from Dr. Henry C. Vann (1850-1933). The drug store

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had been in business under various owners since 1882. Among other things, the Blood Life Company’s product, operating under the Adams Drug Company roof, claimed to be a remedy for scrofula (swellings of the lymph glands in the neck), rheumatism, syphilitic sores, old sores, boils and pimples and other skin eruptions, erysipelas (skin condition with a fever), cancerous humor (humor defined as a normal body fluid), salt rheum and other general diseases resulting in impure blood. Adams’ grandson, Jim Mayo of Weaverville, North Carolina, discovered a number of artifacts in the attic of the old drug store, including bot-

tles, broadsides, labels, colorful wrappers and wooden crates. Later, he found his grandfather’s "Private Formulae" book dated 1902. In it was the recipe for Blood Life and many other concoctions. Principal ingredient, according to the formula book, was potassium iodide. A medical reference book noted that "in regions where little iodine is obtained in the diet, iodides are completely effective in the prevention of goiter. . .widely employed in the treatment of bronchitis and asthma." It’s also been used in the treatment of diseases found in cattle, the reference book text reported.


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September-October 2008

Earl Swift’s Slate Cleaner Patented May 8th, 1877 By Dave Maryo

Sometimes you find a bottle is not what it first appears. This is one of those bottles. This little cobalt blue bottle looks like an ink, but it is a slate cleaner bottle. Slate cleaners were needed at a time when the old oneroom school houses used chalk on slate for their daily lessons. But some students used pencils to mark on the slate that could not be wiped off like chalk. The pencil marks were difficult to remove and required a good washing, leaving the slate wet and not suitable for chalk until it was dry. That’s when Earl Swift and other inventors created slate cleaners and tools to remove the pencil marks. The

bottle was originally fitted with a sponge over a cork held in place by wire. The cork had a central opening to allow the cleaning liquid to soak the sponge when the bottle was turned upside down. The bottom end of the bottle was threaded to attach a nut to hold piece of chamois skin over a pad to wipe the slate dry. After resting in the ground for more than a hundred years only the glass bottle remains. Dave Maryo (760) 617-5788 Dave@bottleauction.com

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This capstan monogrammed example is 4 3/4th inches tall and is capable of holding about 9-ounces of liquid when filled to the lip. Its outer diameter at the mouth is 2 3/8th inches or 60 millimeters. A slightly angled inward and smooth outer body terminates at a 2 1/8th inches wide base. The applied color Capstan Glass Company insignia on this outer surface is 1 9/16th inches in height. Internally, there are fourteen, very lightly pressed vertical flutes arranged side by side. These slightly visible features appear to have rounded upward tops and rounded downward bottoms. Convex to the touch throughout their length, these panels have sides which slant inward from top (1/2 inch) to bottom (7/16th inch). The underneath side of the base on this example carries no embossing whatsoever. Without an employee verbal history report, speculation is the only tool left to suggest why this specimen was ever pressed and decorated. I’ve lumped the ash trays, ice crusher and ice bucket in with it to support a possible story line which is, at the very least, believable. Is it the correct reason? Only time will tell. Paperweight The last piece of office ware is seen in Figure 9. Many glass companies had paperweights manufactured as advertisement mementos but none that I’ve seen have ever solely used the firm’s trademark in this role.

September-October 2008 th

53 office windows you will find the paper weight a handy desk accessory. We will gladly send paper weights to packing company executives on request.”3

th

x 2 5/8 inch square base that is 1/4 inch in height. On the obverse of each side panel is embossing which spells out – CAPSTAN – GLASS – COMPANY – CONNELLSVILLE. This paperweight was first advertised by itself in April 1923. A February 1937 sales pitch was the last time it was shown. The text, which accompanied the initial marketing ploy, follows: “In the Capstan glass paper weight we have visualized our Trade Mark, which has come to mean quality glass containers, fair dealing, and prompt service to the users of packers’ ware. With the coming of Spring and open

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Tumblers, Jars and Bottles; A Product Identification Guide for the Capstan Glass Company, South Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Barry L. Bernas, 239 Ridge Avenue, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 17325, 2007, pgs. 21-22 and 31-32 2 Ibid, pg. 68. The advertisement for this tumbler indicated it had a capacity of twelve and three-eighths ounces. 3 Ibid, pg. 132

Postscript I think you’ll agree with my comment that the pieces of glassware that I just introduced are anomalies, especially when discussing the glass container products turned out by factory hands from the Capstan Glass Company. If we only knew the purpose for which these decorative items were made, we could better understand why Capstan officials seemingly moved into another area of the glass industry and added these novelty pieces to their tumbler, jar and bottle lines. Maybe, it had something to do with the impending merger of its parent organization, the Anchor Cap Corporation, with the Hocking Glass Company in late 1937 or perhaps, another strategy played out altogether. Right now, the distance between that rationale and explanation continues to increase in time, causing the real reason to continually fade from crystal clarity into opaque obscurity. This trend doesn’t bode well for determining the reason any time soon. I can use your help. If you have other pieces of Capstan marked ware that are outside of the tumbler, jar and bottle categories, I would truly appreciate a direct contact. That way, we can discuss and record your find and then put forth your discovery for the benefit of all enthusiasts in our hobby. Barry L. Bernas 239 Ridge Avenue Gettysburg, PA 17325 (717) 338-9539 barryb6110@aol.com

Figure 9 Being 3 1/8th inches tall, this novel promotional device has a 2 5/8th

Ad for Capstan from the January, 1934 edition of The Glass Packer


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September-October 2008

Authentic Bottles as Part of Your “Plunder Chest” or Camp By Cecil Munsey

Copyright© 2004 - 2008 [This article was written originally for Muzzle Blasts magazine, the official publication of the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association (NMLRA). It deals with teaching “Mountain Men”, “Historical Re-enactors” and “Rendezvous” fans about collecting and including original period bottles in their activities. Photographs courtesy of W. Van den Bossche and F. Weegenaar.]

Black glass bottles, as pictured on the famous NMLRA target (Fig. 1), were among the first containers of liquids to come to America from Europe. While mountain men, like Jedediah Smith and Jim Bridger, carried some glass containers as they roamed and worked in frontier Amer-

The glass was so dark that at first glance it appeared to be black. Interestingly enough, black glass is a very durable glass, and therefore better, because it can withstand a great deal more exposure to the natural elements than can glass of other colors. Squat Wine Bottles Squat wine bottles (Fig. 2), made in the 1600s–1800s, are one of the types of early bottles most desired by

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The Dutch also made squat wine bottles during the seventeenth century. The Dutch version is usually found with a comparatively longer neck than the English model (Fig. 3). Another difference between the two types of free-blown squat wine bottles can be found by examining their bases. English bottles of this type have an almost nonexistent basal kickup (bottom of the container pushed up into the interior during construction) and a rather small pontil (rod) scar, while Dutch versions have a rather severe basal kick-up and a large pontil scar (Fig. 4). Still another difference can be found on the bottlenecks: The Dutch examples feature flat wraparound rims, whereas the English

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September-October 2008

“biggie” seems to have been the King-

ston, New Mexico trip. Looking at the full-page picture of the mountain area in the newsletter makes one feel like they are flying over the mountains under their own power. There are multiple pictures from the place they stayed to bottles galore and “smiling” Pete “hitting paydirt!!” We have to mention Zang Wood. He’s pictured with Pete after Pete handed him a “Black, Range, Soda Works New Mexico” soda. This may be a first, but folks actually thought that this is

the first time that they had seen Zang almost speechless. People who know Zang will appreciate and understand this comment A couple of terrific articles also appeared in this issue of the newsletter. Greg and Marcia Hoglin told of their Michigan bottle dig. They threw in a couple of pictures so that we could see that they were serious about this dig. Mike Dickman supplied “Poisonland.” Mike had an entire page of excellent quality pictures of two skull poisons. One is a cobalt and the

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other is clear. The detail in the pictures is outstanding. The schedule of four meetings a year appears to work well for the club. The meetings and digs end up being well attended. Jerry had told us some time ago that the club tries to have a club dig every time they have a meeting. The “combo” works for this club. Who said “digging” opportunities were best in the 1960s? These folks will have none of that, thank you!

Canning History Fun Facts 1795

Napoleon offers a 12,000 franc prize for a method of preserving food for his armies which had such long, vulnerable supply lines that hunger began to tax their fighting strength.

1810

Nicolas Appert, a French confectioner, wins the prize. He experimented in preserving food by sterilization by sealing food tightly inside a glass bottle or jar and then heating it.

Also in 1810 Figure 2

British merchant Peter Durand received a patent from King George III for a tin plated iron can to be used as a food container, allowing sterilized food to be preserved more effectively.

Now for the rest of the story: Canned rations provided to soldiers and explorers saved legions from sure starvation and the cans were useful for ocean voyages, during which glass bottles tended to break, and soon the British Navy was dining on canned vegetables and meat. So far, so good, but, what Durand (and everyone else for that matter) forgot to invent was a way to open the cans. For 50 years, getting into your pork ‘n’ beans required the use of a hammer and chisel. Figure 1 ica, few examples remain today. Those bottles that do exist mostly belong to private collectors and museums. The bottle category is generically called “black-glass” because iron slag was added to the basic glass mixture of sand, soda, and lime to produce a very dark glass. Until approximately the mid1800s it was believed that dark glass (“black glass”) was the best glass. This belief probably stemmed from the demand for dark glass containers by merchants of wine and spirits after they discovered their products would keep better in dark containers. Glassmakers catered to the demand by making a very cheap “’black glass.”

1858

Ezra Warner, an American, patented the can opener. An intimidating combination of bayonet and sickle and it was adopted by the US military during the Civil War. (Note the year – it should be very familiar to jar collectors)

Figure 3 black powder aficionados who are concerned with the authenticity of their equipment (gear). They come in a wide variety of sizes and because they were free-blown no two are alike in shape. Squat wine bottles have several names including “king’s,” “onion,” “squat,” “mallet,” “Dunmore,” and “Wistarburg” – take your choice. Squat wine bottles were made in England from about 1600 to 1830; it is not likely that any were made in America but if they were it would be difficult if not impossible to differentiate between the two types.

However, it was not particularly convenient. Early openers were stationed at grocery stores and clerks did the honor of opening the cans. 1870

Figure 4 specimens have an applied collar (laid-on ring).

William Lyman patented a very easy to use can opener with a wheel that rolls and cuts around the rim of the can, thus, cans could be opened at home!


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end. Mike said that Keith didn’t spend much time checking out his bottle. However, Keith learned at the meeting that he owns “the finest labeled example of this bottle.” Members had not seen such a fine example. Mike ends his article by saying “Oh, I almost forgot, Keith paid a $1 for it. Way to go, Keith!” Las Vegas Antique Bottles and Collectibles – The Punkin Seed The club’s board has approved club bus trips for the next 12 months. As a result a June bus trip to Prescott was chaired by Louise Colluci and Dennis Larson. Secretary Rebecca wrote a trip report. From reading about the serenading bus driver to the bingo-playing gigglers it is our assumption that everyone put their heart into this trip. They enjoyed good food and shopped well. The trip report reads like members of the group each bagged a bunch of miscellaneous treasures and dropped back into their seats on the bus feeling pretty darn satisfied. Rebecca said, “We got back into Las Vegas at dusk and went home excited that our next meeting was only three days away.” In the June issue of this club’s newsletter, Editors Dottie and Dick Daugherty placed a notice on the front page to alert club members that “we, the editors are trying out a new format for the Club Newsletter.” The editors have three main reasons for the new format. They shared those with the club, as well. One reason is that “The commercial Zerox machines that print the 100 copies of The Punkin Seed each month have not been satisfactory in the folding process of the masters we take to them.” It was stated that several machines have the same printer problem. The editors are trying to satisfy postal guidelines for mailing folded and tabbed newsletters. The second reason is a pretty hefty one. As many editors realize, there are laborintensive efforts involved in putting the newsletter together, getting it published and on the road to club members. These editors consistently issue a newsletter every month. The editors

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went on to explain their suggestion. They said that they have converted their guest bedroom into “The Punkin Seed Room.” This is how the editors closed in on their idea: “We have the room and the time and we’d like to attempt to by-pass the commercial printer and see if it is feasible time and money-wise to print the 100 newsletters in ‘The Punkin Seed Room’ each month.” Additionally, “To cut costs, we want to see if a shorter page newsletter could be ‘home made’ and put in envelopes for mailing and still contain enough of the education and information you members have been accustomed to receiving.” It is the intention of the editors to try the envelope mailing method at least one time. If favorable comments are received by the membership, the new method will continue. Reno Antique Bottle Club – Digger’s Dirt One of the club’s latest programs was presented by Alan Bruner. He showed slides that was evidence of his 750-mile backpack walk “from the most southern point of Nevada to the northern border of Oregon and Nevada.” He explained that he traveled across deserts, mountains and through the U.S. Government secret area “51” near Tonopah. His slides were of remote Nevada. What a treat club members had that evening. Most members would never have had any idea of what the remote area of Nevada looks like. Alan had put 750 miles on one pair of boots. Who knows how many miles he had on them prior to his “one-man” trek. Here is a new approach. This club “received a letter from Adrian S. Janit, Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. He asked if any of our club members would like to participate in a questionnaire about collecting. Most everyone raised their hand. Doctor Janit will pay the club $1.50 for each form returned.” It is estimated that the questionnaires would take about five minutes to complete. Six club members (Marty Hall, Bill Metscher, Helene Walker, Maryann Lawrence, Duane Warth and Russ

Bottles and Extras

Umbraco) decided to make one of their meetings more interesting by bringing in several items for display. Some of those items included ghost town signs, bicentennial signs and ranged all the way to “pictures of a collection of deer and elk, which had locked horns and were unable to free themselves.” At the same meeting some club members made donations. We read that “Dave Abel donated a Steinmetz medicine from Carson City. Marty furnished a beautiful fluted neck Lashes Bitters. Mary Warth donated a nice soda. Susan Pelt donated a book about Nevada and slot machines. Bill Metscher furnished some 2008 calendars from the Nellis Air Force Group.” Back in May we exchanged an email with Prez Marty. During that email exchange Marty commented on an experience he had survived. We think we remember that we encouraged him to write about it in a future newsletter. It would definitely make a “killer” story. Let’s see how many from the Reno club read the Bottles and Extras magazine and start asking Marty, “What experience?” New Mexico Historical Bottle Society On June 26th we received the club’s “2nd meaty newsletter of the 2008 season.” That is what President Jerry Simmons says in his “Notes from the President.” We tend to agree with Jerry after reviewing the newsletter and learning how busy club members have been during the first five months of this year. It seems that these folks have a couple of hobbies that compliment each other, digging and being invited over to someone’s home for chow! Jerry mentions club members digging in Albuquerque and Carthage. He also mentions the “chow” part in that Jim Garcia had club members over for a “fantastic pre-show meeting and barbeque.” We read that the Carthage trip gave folks a walking workout. Carthage has been noted as a “good future dig/get together site” for club members. The real

Bottles and Extras

Demijohns and Carboys While one doesn’t very often see them at a rendezvous, very large glass containers known as demijohns and carboys are worthy of a separate discussion. These bottles command attention mainly because of their size. They sometimes are large enough to contain ten or more gallons and weigh up to thirty or forty pounds empty, although both types are normally manufactured to hold from one to ten gallons. Demijohns were usually manufactured in a bulbous or bladder

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came popular when the use of molds became the most efficient method. Both were bulk containers that were reused until broken. Originally almost all of these large bottles were

Figure 7 covered with wicker baskets (Fig. 7) or wooden boxes to reduce the chance of breakage. The earliest of these bottles were made in dark green to black glass but an amber specimen is sometimes located. Nineteenth-century examples are found in aqua and clear glass in addition to the common dark green and black glass, and are of the blown-in-mold type.

Figure 5 shape (Fig. 5) and have rather long necks; carboys, on the other hand, were generally cylindrical in shape and had short necks. From all indications demijohns were more popular in the early days when free blowing was the most practical method of producing bottles (Fig. 6), and carboys be-

Figure 6

Seal Bottles The practice of attaching glass seals to the shoulders or sometimes the bodies of wine bottles began in England in the 1600s. Some of the earliest found bear dates from the 1650s. Seal bottles (Fig. 8) were not a new idea when adopted by the English; they go back to Roman times. On glass bottles, seals were applied after the bottles were completed but not annealed (cooled). A glob of glass was taken from the furnace and lightly fused to the hot bottle, then while the glob was still hot it was impressed with a stamp rather like a stamp used for impressing sealing wax. The stamp would, of course, have lettering and/or design cut in backwards on it. (Such a process should not be confused with the later

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practice of embossed lettering achieved by either carving into the bottle mold, or on plates that were inserted into the mold.)

Figure 8

On wine bottles, seals were first used as identifying marks for taverns and persons of the upper class (Figs. 9 & 10). Later the custom spread to

Figure 9

Figure 10 shipping agents, merchants, and distillers. Before the 1800s wine bottle seals were the exception rather than the rule. Not all bottles bearing seals were wine containers. Some seal-bearing bottles contained mineral water, rum,


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September-October 2008

olive oil, anisette, and so forth; the same holds true for unmarked bottles and the large demijohns or carboys. Of the liquids other than wine that were put in bottles generally thought of as wine containers, rum was, no doubt the most popular. Seals on wine bottles may also carry the date the bottle was manufactured or first used, and are especially helpful in dating the containers. Such dates, however, are not necessarily indicative of the period the bottle was used because glass bottles were relatively expensive in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and were often used and reused until broken. Utility and Other Black Glass Bottles Utility bottles and other black glass containers are also among the historic bottles that belonged in a

Figure 11 mountain man’s “Plunder Chest.” (Fig. 11) is an example of a freeblown utility (or snuff) jar that was made in New England between 18001830. It is cylindrical, black glass and has an applied collared mouth with a laid on ring. (Fig. 12) pictures an early freeblown utility bottle, from New England. It was made during the 17801840 period. It is eight inches tall and approximately five inches wide.

Format 12 (Fig. 13) is a typical black glass wine bottle of the early 1800s. This is probably one of the easiest to obtain free-blown bottles that may have graced the plunder chest of a typical frontiersman. These bottles were made by the thousands and were often used and reused because of their durability. (This particular bottle recently sold on eBay for $25.)

Bottles and Extras

American trappers and traders – especially at rendezvous of mountain men. Trade goods almost always contained a few bottles of “fire water” – (This term comes from the Indian practice of throwing a cup of whiskey into a fire to see if it would burn. If it would not flame up, it would not be accepted.) Bottles used to contain those three alcoholic beverages had to travel some rough sea voyages and land trips to reach the places where they were consumed. To keep such bottles from breaking during shipment, case bottles were designed to fit in boxes made especially for that purpose (Fig. 14). Containers for alcoholic beverages have been many and varied over the centuries. A variety of stoneware bottles were used as were many cylindrical glass bottles, but the most predominant of all gin containers has been square-bodied case bottles. The term “case bottle” originally referred to an octagonal bottle (Fig. 15). During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries case bottles were used extensively by chemists and apothecaries; since gin was originally dis-

Figure 14

Figure 13 Case Bottles Rum, gin and whiskey were favored “hard” beverages of pioneering

pensed as a medicine it is safe to assume that from its inception it was distributed in case bottles. Case bottles of the seventeenth century differ little from those of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but the earlier examples were almost straight-sided, whereas the later types were more tapered (Fig. 16). It can be supposed that it made no difference to traders and trappers but

Bottles and Extras

Wormer is going into a “research” mode with his purchase of a deed to a piece of property in Napa that is dated 1867. He’s working on checking out where the property is located. That was a good find. You never know what gems are in among items for sale. We have personally realized that folks should carefully look through every item displayed for sale. John Hemphill added a personal touch by bringing in bottles that belonged to his father. He let the members do a “hands on” as the bottles made their way around the meeting. The bottles consisted of a clear “Roth and Company whiskey and some amber rectangular quarts, Lea & Perrins Worcester, Old Campe Rye Whiskey and a Homer's California Ginger Brandy.” Chuck Ingram showed a clear Whitman & Greene San Francisco whiskey in two different sizes. “Bill Ham finished the evening with an overview of Rosenbaums Bitters. Bill does a really good job and is well informed.” Oregon Bottle Collectors Association – The Stumptown Report Additional information on new member Arlie Anderson appeared in the recent issue under “New Member – Update.” It is reported that Arlie has been attending OBCA shows for about seven years. He first started attending OBCA shows after picking up a show flyer while he and his wife were checking out some antique shops in Medford and Jacksonville. His interest in collecting bottles goes back in years to Rhode Island on the East Coast. He lived there for some years after being discharged from the Navy. The most important part of his background is that a friend back in the area lived in an old farm house and invited him to dig for bottles. “When he actually found one, he was hooked. His taste is for the unusual or uncommon colors and/or shapes.” There was no shortage of items brought to the June meeting. We feel that Secretary Bill captured the whole evening in great detail. He wrote that the theme for “Show and Tell” was food and drink bottles. Then his notes

September-October 2008

went on with what members brought in. Perhaps Mark had one of the more personal stories to tell in that he told folks that his grandfather ran a saloon in Sandy. The next comment was that his grandfather somehow got himself kicked out of the Christian Church. The kicker is that his grandfather then became mayor! This next item sounds like another family story should accompany it. Mark showed a Junker’s Confectionery and Restaurant framed 1925 calendar. In addition to the intriguing information above, he showed a green blob top bottle embossed Mineral Water with Honesdale Soda Works in weak lettering on the back. He mentioned that Kim dug it in New York! He also brought in many other great items of interest such as his pontiled mustard with a rolled lip that caught our interest. Jeremy brought in a couple of items, one of which was an amethyst The Owl Pharmacy Co., Seven Troughs, Nev., drug bottle. Bill mentioned that “It is one of Nevada’s top bottles and is really a killer.” Many members brought in great finds. It is always amazing to see how much variety there is in any given “Show and Tell” segment of a meeting. We read where Mark and Scott are not going to dig back East this spring. There is always next year. Maybe the gas prices will be better. Surely we jest! We know your club is shutting down for the summer, as are some others. However, we look forward to your resuming your meetings in September and we will be watching for your newsletters. San Diego Antique Bottle and Collectibles Club – The Bottleneck This club has joined the ranks of being among some other clubs who will be in “summer shut-down” mode for newsletters and meetings. No doubt that some of this club’s members will be vacationing and milling about in antique stores hopefully “helping the economy. Perhaps some of the treasures found and acquired during the summer will pay off in being used for future “Show and Tell”

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segments. In spite of the intense heat, we hope to learn of some serious digging that took place during the summer months. During the May meeting club members welcomed “new member” John Crihfield. New members will probably see more of their names in print when they bring in their finds into meetings and share information about them during the “Show and Tell” part of meetings. Welcome aboard! The club’s May meeting sounded too good to be true! However, it turns out that it was more than good. In fact Secretary Jim reported that the “evening’s program consisted of a fascinating slide show.” We read that the program was a slide show by Matt Lawson and Kevin Westfall. They explained the art and science of bottle digging. Jim further stated in his notes, “Great job, guys! If not for the late hour, I think most of us were ready to grab our probes and shovels and head for the Gaslamp!” We don’t think Mike Bryant will mind us mentioning some of the highlights from his “Two Great Finds in One Month” article that appeared in the June 2008 issue. It starts out that Mike and Frank Pekerak (club “Prez Sez” guy) went “San Diego milk bottle” hunting one morning. They went to a house to look at some milk bottles. They ended up in the garage and this is when the story gets really good. Mike says, “Frank came up to me and asked if I had seen the metal plaque hanging on the wall. I had not, and he said you better get over there and look. I was dumbfounded when I saw what it was. This was the metal (copper) name plate for the San Diego Brewing Co. that was attached to the wall outside the brewery. The building stood at 32nd & Bay Front from 1908 until it was torn down in 1945.” Guess where that copper name plate is now? Mike further explains another person’s good buy that was brought to the May meeting for show and tell. Keith Baumgartner purchased a nice looking whiskey bottle with a complete label at the swap meet one week-


16

tributions, tentative scheduling of a picnic and changing the club’s “show name.” One issue of changing the club’s meeting place is still in the discussion stage. It was left that this issue is recognized as an “action motion with more information to come.” Here are Jerry Rickner’s comments regarding a program he presented at their April meeting: “It was my turn to present the program for the evening. I had recently bought a collection that had several old labeled medicines in it. I showed about 40 of them from opium for babies to furniture polish. I think the program was a success because there was a standing ovation at the end. I’m not sure if they were applauding the program or were glad it was over.” We think that the readers will choose to opt for Jerry having done a great job. Los Angles Historical Bottle Club – The Whittlemark Vice President Randy Selenak had an interesting paragraph in his June Announcements portion of the club’s newsletter. Randy wrote about a new event that the club got invol ved in. Here is what he says is coming up in the club’s future: “Internet Bottle Auction." There will be a 10% seller’s premium that will totally benefit the LAHBC. That means the bottles offered to the auction will not be a donation. The consignors receive 90% of the hammer price and the remaining 10% goes into club coffers. This will be the first time that the club has been able to offer this kind of opportunity to their members. On the third Thursday evening in May club members found themselves totally absorbed in the club’s annual auction, in lieu of a regular meeting. Ken Lawler wrote an article calling out the fact that the club’s two Randys “graciously volunteered to act as auctioneers.” Randy Driskill was definitely in his comfort zone with conducting the auction with humor. Randy Selenak was keeping an eye on things and got into the action, too. Dwayne Anthony volunteered to be the runner delivering the items from the auctioneer to the winner. He spent

September-October 2008

a lot of time on his feet as did the two auctioneers. One outstanding action of the evening was the bidding on the Stoll Beer. Dave Garcia and Bob Manthorne did some competitive bidding for that Stoll beauty. Dave’s picture of Dwayne handing Dave the Stoll made it into the June issue of the The Whittlemark. The club treasury has an additional $1,500 or more, thanks to the bunch of bottle huggers who were definitely in the bidding mood. Club hero Tom Hanna was the official site manager saving tables for the picnic again this year. On June 8th, he hit the Arroyo Seco Park in Pasadena at 5:30 a.m. The temperature stayed a pretty consistent 70. Ken Lawler wrote an article on the annual club picnic in which he tells that twenty-two folks showed up. As promised Pam and Randy set up three grills. Pam did her famous tri-tip roast, and sausages and hamburgers were added this year as promised. Ken states in his article that “there were baked beans, green salads, deviled eggs, breads and spreads, cakes, cookies, pies and ice cream.” A raffle was held and four good bottles went to the winners. A drawing was held for a member’s only item. Dave Garcia won that item which was a fivegallon, wide-mouth ceramic jug embossed with Douglass Clay Products Co. Los Angeles, Cal. That jug was a beauty and caught the attention of many of the members. Ken wrote that “Dave Garcia challenged Don Wippert to a game of ‘shoes’ while Dave’s young son and his mother were flying a kite.” Ken ended his article like this: “A lot of bottle tales and talk were exchanged over plates of good food. I think it was a really nice picnic. The food was wonderful, the weather was nice, the people only the best!” Antique Bottle Collectors of Colorado – Dump Digger’s Gazette The first item of interest under “Club News” that got our attention is that there was a club dig held in August. We hope that we will be able to give this dig some coverage in a future column.

Bottles and Extras

Also announced is that “Future Programs for the Club meetings include ‘Colorado Ghost Towns’ by Ron Ruhoff in September and in October we will hear Dave Cheadle give a program about ‘Fall Theme’ Trade Cards.” Here is something to check on if you haven’t already seen it. President Rick advises in his May President’s Message that Zang Wood has a great article in the May issue of the Antique Bottle and Glass Collector. He noted that Zang is the author of a book entitled, “New Mexico Blobs – Hutches – Mineral Waters.” President Rick definitely has an open mind when it comes to what the members of his club collect. He says that club members have vast interests in collecting. He encourages people to collect “all types of antiques and collectibles.” He feels that variety is what creates a more interesting collection. Rick realizes that some club members are getting restless. He knows that when the snow melts and the weather warms that people are out on the road. He says that club members “are getting the itch to dig, go to garage sales, antique shops, estate sales, auctions, etc.” With that in mind we are betting that some members will be having some pretty exciting “Show and Tell” items to share when club meetings resume in the fall. Northwestern Bottle Collectors Association – The Outhouse Scoop During the club’s April meeting President Leisa asked club members a much-asked question. She asked what she could do to generate more interest in club meetings. Hubby Lou suggested a guest speaker. That idea was well received by club member Richard Siri. He readily volunteered to be the first guest speaker. The “Show and Tell” portion of the meeting brought forth many good items of interest. Leisa brought a late 1800s French fashion doll. She told of purchasing her doll at a yard sale while in Morro Bay. The doll is in good shape and is valued at $2,500. Nice selection, Leisa. Mike Van

Bottles and Extras

Figure 15 it is often difficult to differentiate between Dutch, English and American types because glasshouses made use of Dutch craftsmen, and vice versa. There are si milar problems when dating is att e m p t e d . Unlike wine and other early Figure 16 glass bottles, the glass seals occasionally found on case bottles are seldom dated, since gin does not need aging. Case bottles blown before the mid-1800s, approximately, have scars on their base left by the breaking off of the pontil rod, while later types (eighteenth and nineteenth century) were blown in dip molds. Beyond the mountain man period (1840s–plus) plate molds were used in the manufacturing of case bottles. This improvement made possible a variety of embossments. They are numerous on the late nineteenth-century bottles. That innovation can be used, by those looking for authentic bottles to include in their rendezvous equipment camp. In addition to a range of lettering usually identifying the company whose product the bottle contained there were many figures and designs such as people, animals, birds, stars and crests – none of these embossed containers from the post 1840-period would have been available to frontiersmen.

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COLLECTING NOTE:

Periodicals: Shafer, James F., II “Sealed in Glass,” Western Collector, Vol VII, March, 1969.

Obtaining examples of the bottles discussed in this article is not particularly difficult or unreasonably expensive – that statement is not true when one is looking to obtain specifically historic or museum-quality pieces. To shop for authentic bottles to include as part of your camp, a good place to start is the Internet auction site http://www.ebay.com/ using one of the following categories: “king’s bottle;” “onion bottle;” “squat bottle;” “mallet bottle;” “Dunmore bottle;” “Wistarburg bottle;” “demijohn bottle;” “carboy bottle;” “seal bottle;” “utility bottle;” “utility jar.” Any and all of the above types may be found more easily in the large general category, “black glass container.” Then there are, of course, the usual places such as flea markets, garage sales, estate sales, auctions or antiques stores. Bibliography Books: Beare, Nikki. Bottle Bonanza. Florida: Hurricane House Publishers, Inc., 1965. Davis, Derek C. English Bottles & Decanters – 1650-1900. New York: The World Publishing Company, 1972. McKearin, George and Helen. American Glass. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc. 1941 and 1968. Munsey, Cecil. The Illustrated Guide to COLLECTING BOTTLES. New York: Hawthorn Books, Inc. 1970. Munsey, Cecil. Would You Believe. San Diego, California: Neyenesch, Inc., 1968. Monroe, Loretta. Old Bottles Found Along the Florida Keys. Coral Gables, Florida: Wake-Brook House, 1967. Van den Bossche, Willy. Antique Glass Bottles. Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: Antique Collectors’ Club, 2001.

“Bottle Seal Cannot be Counterfeited,” Scientific American, Vol. CLI, October, 1934. Hudson, J. P. “17th-Century Glass Wine Bottles and Seals Excavated at Jamestown,” Journal of Glass Studies, 1967. Hume, Ivor Noel. “17thCenturyVirginians Seal; Detective Story in Glass; Sealed Wine Bottles,” Antiques, Vol LXXII, September, 1957. Correspondence: Robert J. Merada, of the Florida Frontiersmen, to author, March 2004. Internet: “An Estate of a Mountain Man” by M i k e M o o r e – http://klesinger.com/jbp/estate.html James Baird died on November 4, 1826 in El Paso. An inventory was made of his belongings at that time, with witnesses to approve the writing to be correct. “Language of the Rendezvous” by Coon ‘n Crockett Muzzloaders, Grand Forks, North Dakota http://www.cooncrockett.org/cnc~glos .htm “A Glossary of American Mountain Men Terms, Words & Expressions” compiled by Walt Hayward & Brad McDade of The American Mountain Men http://xmission.com.~drudy/amm/glas s.hetm Cecil Munsey 13541 Willow Run Road Poway, CA 92064-1733 phone: 858-487-7036 email: cecilmunsey@cox.net gmail: cecilmunsey@gmail.com website: CecilMunsey.com More than 1200 free-to-copy wellresearched articles and other materials of interest to bottle collectors


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The Jar

Stealing Artifacts from Cemetery Plots Can be Fatal By Charles David Head Everything that Benny Height got involved in turned to gold and, if not for King Midas, he would have had no equal to this day. If it did not benefit Benny in some way, he would not have anything to do with it. Had it not been for one very bad mistake, ol’ Benny would still be alive today and I wouldn’t be writing this story. Actually, this has more of a resemblance to an obituary than a story, but I assure you that it’s quite an interesting one, especially if you stick around long enough to hear about THE JAR! On the surface, Benny seemed to be an ordinary, happy-go-lucky, hardworking, likeable kind of fellow. But beneath all that charm and radiant smile, he was as crooked as a box of fish hooks. He was such a good scam artist that he could have sold a hairbrush to Kojak! I first met Benny while hunting antique bottles in Orme, Tennessee, a quaint little community set at the foot of the Cumberland Plateau, mostly forgotten about nowadays. It was once a thriving coal mining town at the turn of the 20th century. Benny was in the midst of a trip to the Marion County Jail when I happened by chance to drive by and spot Deputy Lancaster putting him into the back seat of the patrol car. Crime being virtually nonexistent in Orme, I rolled to a stop beside the deputy to see what the handcuffed miscreant had done to bring out the long arm of the law. Having gone to school with Deputy Lancaster, I had no qualms about inquiring about what Benny had done. Congratulating the deputy for having the good fortune to be close by when the call came in, he could not help but chuckle as he recounted Mr. Height’s crime to me. Benny had been caught redhanded digging up Mr. Hunter Steele’s back yard in search for antique bottles. Mr. Steele operated a

very successful landscaping company in the county and his nicely manicured lawn was a shrine that clearly showcased his talent as one of the best landscapers in the business. Arriving home from an early Sunday morning fishing trip, Mr. Steele was not at all happy to find someone digging up his back yard. Even though Benny had assured Mr. Steele that he only meant to dig for old bottles on the property next door to his (where the old city dump had recently been rediscovered after a 100-year hiatus), the irate landscaper would listen to no such bunk. He called the law and demanded someone come and remove the human backhoe off his property immediately or else he’d be inclined to take the fellow fishing with him that afternoon and use him for bait! Not wanting to see someone go to jail for "accidentally" straying across someone’s property line while searching for antique bottles (since I’d come close to doing just that), I asked Deputy Lancaster if the matter could be resolved. He said it was up to Mr. Steele as he was the complainant and, since he had not yet signed the arrest warrant, it would be easy to drop the whole affair. Having once worked for Mr. Steele and still being in his good graces, it was relatively easy for me to talk him into letting Mr. Height go. After all, Mr. Steele had a business to run and he’d have to spend a number of days in court should he care to pursue the matter. I had to reassure Mr. Steele that his damaged yard would be restored before the week was out and that Benny would never step foot onto the property once the yard work was done. A handshake sealed the deal and Benny was set free. He was delirious with joy after I had saved him from a trip to the county lockup and more or less adopted me as his best friend then and

Bottles and Extras

there. He accompanied me on several bottle digs and always seemed to find something worthwhile. During one of my visits to his home in Scottsboro, Ala., Benny astonished me by showing several boxes of Hutchinsons and straight-sided sodas that he had irradiated . What once were clear bottles were now dark purple! Benny said that he used to just irradiate unembossed milk bottles to peddle as flower vases at bottle shows, but had noticed that often the color appeared more of a cobalt blue color rather than a dark purple. Thus inspired, he began to irradiate common embossed clear sodas that he than sold on eBay and at antique bottle shows as very rare cobalt blue variations. He said most people didn’t know the difference, but when hit by negative feedback on eBay, he always refunded the money so as to retain his 100 percent favorable rating. Of course, he rarely got any negative feedback because he intentionally hid the bidders’ IDs to make it difficult for others to contact them and warn them that they were buying altered products! Benny said he raked in most of his money selling irradiated bottles as the real thing, since few people knew the difference. He gleefully quoted P.T. Barnum: "There’s a sucker born every minute!" He had only just begun and seeing that he had my undivided attention, he really got fired up. He showed me a five-inch-high stack of patent medicine labels along with three shelves of plain cork-top, recessed paneled medicine and extract bottles. The bottles were worth very little, he said, until he pasted on the labels. He said he was getting $20 for the labeled ones. He said he often felt like a Baptist preacher when he "married" a paper label to a plain bottle. The plain bottles many collectors call "Plain Janes" he obtained from antique stores or from one of his ads in bottle collector magazines for a dollar or so. That saved him time and trouble of having to wash the plain bottles he’d been digging, plus he had

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terest in antique bottles and pottery and showed a pontiled Sands Sarsaparilla to his guests. "I just love pontiled bottles," he said. The club did not meet in July. My wife, Bea, and I enjoy sharing our collection of bottles with John Q. Public. Bob Riddick of Lexington, S.C., who is a member of our club as well as the South Carolina Bottle Club, joined me in an exhibit at the Aiken County (S.C.) Public Library for the month of June. Bob has an outstanding collection of Aiken bottles, while our collection of Augusta bottles on display included the small size River Swamp Chill & Fever Cure whose embossed alligator wowed visitors. Then Bea and I took nearly 100 bottles to the Washington (Ga.) History Museum for a three-month-long exhibit that ended Sept. 30. Included in the display was a Dead Stuck for Bugs (see above), a cobalt eightsided, iron-pontiled S.P. Knickerbocker Soda Water from New York, several Saratoga Springs mineral waters, a 1730s English mallet bottle found in Beech Island, S.C., near Augusta, a 1790s English onion bottle, a Bumstead’s Worm Syrup from Philadelphia ("This Bottle Has Killed 100 Worms"), a Mrs. Winslow’s Sooth-

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ing Syrup and Mrs. Winslow’s Toothing Syrup, a cobalt Casper’s Whiskey ("Made by Honest North Carolina People"), a J.J.W. Peters, Hamburg gin (with embossed German shorthaired pointer), a HunterFisherman calabash, several applied color label bottles and many other Augusta bottles. Appropriate labels accompanied all. The South Carolina Bottle Club’s Jim Edenfield displayed South Carolina Dispensary bottles and jugs at the Sumter (S.C.) Museum in June. The Raleigh Bottle Club’s Marshall Clements was singing the "Computer Blues" during June and July because his PC collapsed and he was forced to utilize one at the public library to work on issues of his Bottle Talk newsletter. His May issue’s cover featured a photo of the rare aqua blobtop S.R. Carrington Bottling Works from Durham, N.C. Club member Robert Creech entertained his fellow members with a video presentation during the April meeting. Included was a collection of photos from the club’s early years as well as collections of current members. The Pepsi-Cola Company each year sent out quality control representatives to test the water and sugar

content at its bottlers. Member Bart Weeks showed a Pepsi sugar tester in its box – a very unusual "go-with." Finally, club member Dean Haley needs help in identifying a Marine Hospital Service bottle. The clear, drug store-like bottle is embossed Marine Hospital Service 1798 – U S – 1871 in a circular slug plate with two crossed anchors in the center. He would like to know its age and origin. Dean can be reached at connerhaley@aol.com. Editor Melissa Milner featured pre-Prohibition shot glasses in the June issue of The Groundhog Gazette, newsletter of The State of Franklin (Tenn.) Antique Bottle & Collectors Association. She noted that such glasses are typically two inches in height, made of thin glass and have acid-etched messages or names. While the Volstead Act enacted by Congress in 1919 went into effect nationwide in 1920, Maine went dry in 1851 and Kansas in 1880, probably the reason no shot glasses or liquor advertising are known from those states. Melissa downloaded 13 shot glass photos to complement the article.

his email is: Nu ggetup@yahoo.com. We’ve had contact with our club in Hawaii and the president will keep in touch if something newsworthy catches his attention. We know that we will be receiving newsletters from clubs not mentioned in this issue when the summer heat leaves and fall settles in.

Jill is focused on salts. Mike Henness seems to be out to break his own record in bringing in some “killer” raffle bottles. You won’t believe this, or maybe you will, Mike got to take one of his own raffle donations back home with him. As a raffle winner he chose his aqua G138 Washington-Taylor Flask. There were four other winners. Wyatt Lake won the yellow amber Doyles Hop Bitters. Mike Lake got to take an open pontil, Keene, New Hampshire aqua pickle bottle. An amber 6-log Drake's Plantation Bitters ended up with Mike McKillop. One of the raffle bottles was donated by Jerry and went home with Jim Kuykendall. Five important issues were discussed and passed at the club’s executive board meeting. For example some of the issues involved charitable con-

Western Regional News Ken Lawler & “Dar” 6677 Oak Forest Drive Oak Park, CA 91377 (818) 889-5451 kenlawler@roadrunner.com We have a new club out here on the West Coast. Even though we are not writing about them in this issue we would like to introduce them. The club is named the “Hemet Historical Bottle Seekers.” When they get fully set up we expect to receive word from them as to their progress. At that time we will include them in our column. In the meanwhile if any of you out there would like to contact the club the president is Austin Jones and

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Forty-Niner Historical Bottle Association – Bottle Bug Briefs There is nothing like starting out with news that the club has two new members. President Jerry introduced two guests at the club’s April meeting. They signed on at that very meeting and the club learned what they collect. Roger is into Western sodas, plus a variety of other items. It seems that


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September-October 2008

shelter at Deming Park. "The date for our show weekend is as follows --- Friday evening, November 21st, for the auction and Saturday the 22nd is our show. This would be a good time to be thinking of some better items for the auction. "This meeting we had a lot of good show and tell. Ned Pennington brought a nice group of early German half-post bottles with some crude looking paint, a beautiful teal wax

sealer jar in mint shape and a reproduction he bought on Ebay. Martin Van Zant, Bill Granger and Doug Smith have been digging some great stuff. Martin and Bill brought in a really cool ice blue blob top soda, a really good-looking ladies leg in black glass, early almost pontiled blob top soda from (guess you had to be there), a crock wax sealer and a handled jug. Martin had a pontiled Indian medicine, pontiled balsam, pontiled scroll and

other nice things. I asked them where they had been digging and they said in the small town of 'None of Your Business.' Huh, I never heard of that town.” The WVABPC holds monthly meetings at Shadows Auction Barn, 1517 Maple Ave., Terre Haute, Ind. Club dues are $10/yr. For more information, please contact Gary Zimmer (treasurer), 10655 Atherton Rd., Rosedale, IN 47874.

pesticides used to get rid of them. Did you know that there are at least 92 different species of bed bugs? I didn’t think so! There were two great digging stories, one by Fletcher and the other by Ed Stewart, in the July issue. The first involved Fletcher, longtime digging buddy Ed Tardy, and Randy Yarberry, all meeting in St. Joseph, Mo. Tardy provided an Extend-A-Probe, which allows sections to be added to lengthen the probe. Yarberry had a device called a Quad Pod, similar to a tripod, but with four legs. Made from heavy duty conduit, it came in five-foot sections and provided a stable base for a pulley. A rope ran through the pulley, allowing buckets of dirt and debris to be pulled from the center of the privy pits. These guys are serious diggers. Among the prizes dug from five pits were a cobalt Sanford’s Radical Cure and a small mini jug with Buffalo Saloon and picture of a buffalo / F.L. Bauer on one side and L.B. & Co. / Handmade / Paducah Club / Kentucky / Finest Whiskey on the other. This is an extremely rare mini jug produced at the Bauer Pottery in Paducah, Ky. St. Joseph drug store bottles include The Elfred Drug Co. / Frederick Ave. / Cor. 9th and Francis Sts.; William Loving / Pharmacist; J.T. Meadows / Pharmacist, and Geo. W. Lormor / Opera House Drug Store.. Stewart’s story was titled "The Drugstore Hole" and took place be-

tween he and Kenny Burbrink on a Wichita, Kan., construction site. Among bottles found were a very rare Joe. Gerteis / Wichita Kas., Hutchinson, and Wichita drug bottles embossed G. Gehring <scales> / Druggist; Established / 1870 / Aldrich & Brown (in ribbon) <mortar & pestle> / 36 Main St.; M.P. Barnes & Sin / The Druggist <mortar & pestle> / 100 Douglas Ave.; <Star> Israel Bros. / Drug & Grocery Store; Dr. L. Saur & Son / Druggists; Chas. Lawrence / Druggist / <CL monogram>. The drug store bottles dated from the late 1870s to the mid 1880s and included some previously unknown examples. Fletcher included no fewer than 21 color photos with his Missouri story, while Stewart included five color photos and one black-and-white vintage photo with his. Those didn’t include photos of a previously unknown Wynnewood / Bottling / Works / Wynnewood, I.T. (Indian Territory) Hutchinson and a Maurice / Well Water / Mangum, Tex. bottle on the front page, as well as color photos (10) of Oklahoma items sold on eBay. The Horse Creek Bottle Club’s June meeting was held at the private museum of Kenny Jarrett in Jackson, S.C. Kenny is owner of Jarrett Rifles, manufacturer of custom sporting rifles, and a super collector of all things South Carolina. His collections range from the prehistoric to the American Revolution to the Civil War and beyond. He also is a worldwide hunter of big game and mounts of his trophies are everywhere. He has a developing in-

Southern Regional News Bill Baab 2352 Devere Street Augusta, GA 30904 (706) 736-8097 riverswamper@comcast.net Mark Wiseman, a member of the Iowa Antique Bottleers, enjoys writing about his digging finds and that’s OK by Johnnie Fletcher, president of the Oklahoma Territory Bottle & Relic Club. Wiseman pens "Iowa Digging" (with Elsie the Pup) and Fletcher used the Mother’s Day 2007 story to fill eight of the Oklahoma Territory News’ 14-page June issue. Another digger, Ed Stewart, filled the final two of the newsy pages. Still other pages were taken up by the two covers and a want ad and Oklahoma Bottles Sold on eBay section. Among the bottles found were many Des Moines, Iowa drug store bottles, including Webb Souers, L.H. Bush, Hufford Bros., J.P. Kelly and Opera House Pharmacy. The best of the lot was a teal green Harlan Bros. / Kirkwood House Drug Store / Des Moines. Stewart, Kenny Burbrink and the latter’s son, Casey, did some digging in St. Joseph, Mo., and one of the neatest bottles found was Dead Stuck for Bugs. It features an embossed bed bug with a pin stuck through it. Bed bugs were a problem in many homes during the 19th and early 20th centuries and "Dead Stuck" was one of several

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

a reliable supply. To show me the simple process of making something out of nothing, Benny took one of the labels: "Stories Flux Mixture, A Safe, Sure and Effectual Cure, Dr. J.H. Stories, Dayton, Tenn." He glued it onto the front panel of an aqua cork stopper medicine bottle. "There," he exclaimed, "I just made thirty bucks!" Then he took me out to his storage barn and I must admit that I was impressed by his setup. On the floor and on a long work bench were every types and sizes of plain stoneware jugs. He took one off the bench and showed me what was stenciled on it: "Coca-Cola Bottling Works, Pikeville, Tenn." I was dumfounded and asked him why in the world didn’t he have this rare jug in a safer place. He let out a loud guffaw! "You nitwit, the stenciling on the jug is fake. I personally etched that wording onto it less than a week ago!" He switched on his computer and showed me a mate to that jug listed on eBay. With two days left, bids were already up to $587.25. "But how do you get away with such fraud?" I asked. He said the jug’s photo wasn’t sharp, but "people will buy absolutely anything marked CocaCola and rarely check to see if an item is authentic. Should a buyer deem the stenciling on the jug has been faked, I always give a refund under the condition that they withdraw their negative feedback. This has only happened twice since I started doing this and twice out of 63 jug sales is not a bad average at all, don’t you think?" He took me out to his garage where he showed me something else. He took an unembossed, coffinshaped flask and right before my eyes etched 18th Ala. Rangers (large horseshoe in the center). C.S.A. "This will bring at least $40 on eBay before the week is out," he declared. I asked him if wasn’t he afraid of being caught and sent to jail. "The folks at eBay have never taken any action in any of the fraud claims filed against him and anybody else that I know of. I think the higher-ups at eBay are more concerned about mak-

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ing a buck than protecting their customers from scam artists like me! "If you think my Civil War flask is something, you need to check out my nice assortment of name brand siphons. I buy them for three bucks each from a foreign country, etch them with some bottler’s name along with a well-known brand name, list them on Bay and watch the bids go out of sight! Surely you don’t think I can afford this nice house, a new pickup truck and two ATVs on just my salary as assistant manager at the hardware store?" I just shook my head in disbelief. Two weeks later, Benny asked if I wanted to ride with him to check out the new antique mall in Madison, Ala., as he heard it had a nice assortment of bottles. Despite reservations, I agreed. Once there, I was surprised to find an old friend behind the store’s counter. Barry Lewis and his wife had been in the antiques business for at least 20 years and I’d stopped by one of their earlier stores in Huntsville, Ala. I used to shop at their store, but more often than not stop by to sell the Lewises something I’d found and had no desire to keep. After chatting with Barry for a few minutes, Benny and I went to the area of the store where antique bottles were lined up along a wall shelf. I showed Benny a number of nice poison bottles, including an embossed amber skull in triangular shape. I couldn’t afford it. We browsed around the store and I bought a 1908 vintage post card showing the Portland Dixie Cement Plant in Richard City, Tenn. You can imagine my astonishment and dismay when Benny pulled onto the highway and then began pulling poison bottles from his pockets, including the amber skull I’d admired so much! "These are yours," Benny said. "I saw that you liked them and thought I’d save you a few bucks by getting them the five-finger discount way!" "My lord, Benny! What have you done? Stolen bottles from my good friends! "Awww shucks," he replied. "They won’t miss a few bottles and if they do, we both know they have insurance and they can always claim

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double the value of what I actually took." "Yes, and then their insurance rates will go out of sight!" I accepted the bottles and later returned them with an explanation on how they ended in my possession. I assured the Lewises that Benny would not be back in their store again, at least, not with me. That little incident didn’t dampen Benny’s friendship for me. I saw him three weeks after he’d attended the Jackson (Miss.) Antique Bottle Show, gloating over some of the "bargains" he got there. The "bargains" he obtained by catching some dealers away from their sales tables, swapping price stickers and purchasing the bottles from whoever was minding the tables. Benny showed me his best "bargain," a bottle that had been marked $200 that he was able to buy for just $20 after swapping price stickers. He also got a WW LAKE’S / C E LERY T ON IC B OT T L IN G WORKS / JACKSON, MISS.. He said the celery tonic was actually his second choice at M. Robert Wagner’s table, but seeing as how the young fellow at the table didn’t have a key to a locked display case which held a mint BIEDENHARN / CANDY CO. / VICKSBURG, MISS. embossed Hutchinson soda bottle, he had to settle for it. It was at this point that I decided it was high time for me to part company with Benny and make it a permanent separation. After all, I had many friends in the antique bottle collecting hobby and here I was associated with a fellow with absolutely no morals. It also was slowly dawning on me that Benny was using me to get close to others in the hobby in order to steal from them later. I managed to avoid Benny for the better part of six months. Then by chance I happened to run into him at the First Monday Flea Market on the Scottsboro, Ala., courthouse square. He was glad to see me and I sort of felt kinda bad when he asked why I had not dropped by or answered messages he’d left on my telephone answering machine. I told him I’d been


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busy as heck and that my phone’s been on the blink for a while. Benny said he knew of a very old cemetery in South Pittsburg, Tenn., that he’d like to go look over and if I wanted to, I could go with him. It dated all the way back to the Civil War and while we may not find any old bottles to speak of, it would be an interesting way to spend a day in which to catch up on what’s been happening with one another these past few months. I couldn’t think of any kind of excuse to avoid going with him and, anyway, I love history and always enjoyed checking out old cemeteries. I couldn’t think of any mischief he could get into so I agreed to go with him. We stopped off for breakfast at The Pirate restaurant (Benny’s treat) and then headed to the old city cemetery perched on a knoll behind the old McReynolds High School now being used as a city maintenance shop. The cemetery exceeded all my expectations as it covered some 30 acres and nearly all the tombstones and grave markers dated to the early to late1800s. Some of the graves were marked by just a small creek rock, while others had gargantuan monoliths that would have made a pharaoh envious. Many graves had no markers at all. In one section, Benny and I found a number of Union soldier’s graves, results of a Civil War battle at Fort McCook at the mouth of Battlecreek on the Tennessee River in 1862-64. Large oaks, hickory and pines shaded the graves of the rich and the very poor, those long forgotten and the ones found in history books, such as James Bowron, one of the town’s founding fathers. There were few flowers, flags or accouterments on the majority of the graves, but the cemetery was adorned with pretty spring flowers, budding dogwood trees, a recent growth of grass and sweetsmelling honeysuckle. Here and there scattered among the adults’ graves were those of small children and babies, a heart-breaking sight indeed. Most had markers of some kind, usually a little lamb

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perched on the top of the stone, or an angel with outstretched wings. Cast iron rabbits or puppy dogs were in graves of infants whose parents could not afford the more ornate markers. The cast iron figurines were probably made at either the Blacklock or the Lodge foundries in South Pittsburg. Other graves were decorated by vases and fruit jars full of flowers, but few of the vessels had survived many years of neglect. All were empty, stained and cracked or broken, probably by rain water being frozen during the winter.

Toward the close of our visit, Benny and I found one of the tiniest graves in the cemetery. It was all by itself beneath a splendid holly tree. The little lamb stop the stone was a tribute to the fallen angel underneath. The stone was carved with HELEN MARIE SIMS / TWIN OF / LEONA CHRISTINE SIMS / B MAY 11, 1906 / D AUG 31, 1909. We wondered what misfortune had fallen upon the child to cause her to die at such a tender age. Perhaps the dreaded typhoid fever, cholera or another disease had snuffed out the child’s life. In the center of the child’s grave was the smallest bell-shaped, half-pint U-SAV-IT jar that I’d ever seen. The little jar sparkled and glittered in the late afternoon sun as if had been manufactured that very day, The onslaught of more than 80 years of weather had not dimmed its shine. Benny spotted the jar and loudly proclaimed, "That’s Mine!" Before I could utter a word of protest, he

Bottles and Extras

snatched up the jar, turned on his heels and ran out of the cemetery. Horrified by such an outrage, I ran after and soon caught up with him. I told him that stealing from a cemetery, especially off a child’s grave, was about as low as anyone could stoop and I’d not stand for it. I demanded he return the jar immediately. Benny said the jar was extremely rare and that he’d been looking for one of that size for a decade. If he left it on the grave, it would eventually get broken by the elements and he intended to keep it. "But placing that jar on the grave of their child was one of the last acts of love that her parents could have performed for her," I remonstrated. "It’s a sacrilege for you to remove it!" We had by now reached the fourlane highway that we had to cross to reach our trucks parked in front of the restaurant. Smirking, he turned to me and replied, "I’ll worry about that sacrilege business when I meet my maker," and stepped off the curb into the busy highway. Big Mistake! He stepped right into the path of Mr. Robert William Coffman’s fully loaded pulpwood truck and into the arms of his maker as well. Droplets of Benny’s blood rained down upon me, but that didn’t numb my mind nearly as much as did the sound of little Helen Marie’s jar breaking. I knew that the love and affection that her parents had memorialized in the jar was now shattered into a thousand pieces. After a lengthy interview with the police and a night of fitful sleep, I awoke the following morning hoping it was all a bad dream. But once I turned on my radio, I heard the announcer making much ado about the previous day’s tragic accident. I’d misplaced my wristwatch and, thinking I’d lost it when I made a grab for Benny to keep him from being hit by the truck, I returned to the accident scene. There on the edge of the highway, beside a remnant of yellow police tape, was not my wristwatch, but the tiny U-SAV-IT jar. It sparkled and glittered in the early morning sun-

Bottles and Extras

him. He was very concerned with the cancer operations on his head, and not feeling well, like the ‘ol’ John that I knew. The only time he could not make it in to one of the last meetings was foretold by the onset of his cancer. Sat in his truck with Ginger by his side. I could tell you many more stories that John and I shared, but! Yup, all of us will miss the Big Lug! Just another great bottle collector, gone! See ya later, John! For more information on joining the NSHBA, please contact Doug Shilson: 3308 32 Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55406-2015. The club does not meet in the months of June, July and August. Ohio Bottle Club Phyllis Koch (editor) and Donna Gray (secretary) always do a very nice job with The Ohio Swirl, the OBC’s newsletter. John Fifer is the club president. The program for the OBC’s April 24th meeting was “Dyke Toy and Marble Company of Akron, Ohio.” The program was introduced by Bill Koster, and presented by David Rotilie, Bill Elders, Bill Cody and Bill Koster. Donna captured these details: “In 1884, Samuel Dyke opened Dyke Toy and Marble in downtown Akron on the site that had once been Lock 3 of the Ohio Canal. The factory originally produced toy clay marbles for sale to the neighboring Merrill Pottery Company. Sam Dyke revolutionized the marble business when he invented machinery to mass-produce toy marbles out of clay. By 1890, the factory was producing over one million clay toy marbles each day. By 1891, Sam founded The American Marble and Toy Manufacturing Company, the largest 19th century toy company in the United States. Besides marbles, it also produced miniature jugs, pots, shoes, animals and many other items. The factory burned to the ground in 1904. Bill Cody researched the disaster. After midnight on September 6, 1904, the factory burned down. Word quickly spread and soon children came to the site to take pocketsful of mar-

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bles. Police tried to keep the children from the charred remains. The city then ordered everything to be buried at the site, including the thousands of toys and marbles. Currently, Bill is looking for a catalog of company items – something that documents all toys the company produced. Starting in the mid-1990s, the City of Akron began to tear down and remodel the vacant O’Neil's Department Store and tear up the adjacent parking deck. Part of the land was to be a park – Lock 3 Park – which is on the site of the historic American Marble and Toy Manufacturing Company. This was an opportunity not to be missed by some Ohio Bottle Club members. David Rotilie said he started digging when the O’Neil's store was being torn down. Using Sanborn maps, he said he went down ten feet. In the early days, ‘they didn’t bother me;’ they thought I was nuts!’ He found many little jugs (some had political labels), little boots (which had contained snuff), little banks, flower pots and much more. Dave said he spent a good part of a couple years in the ground! Many digging days were from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. He shared much of what he found with the historical society and kept some for himself. Bill Elders also was at the scene. He told the club interesting – and sometimes funny – personal stories about the digging. When the city closed down the digging, Bill was given another week to dig. He accepted the offer, including responsibility for insurance, and invited others to dig with him. Bill Koster and Tom Haas dug at the O’Neil's site. On one occasion after hearing about the building teardown, he and Tom went to the back area where Merrill Pottery was located. Going down the steps, they met Dave Rotilie and Bill Cody, who were leaving – tired from digging all night. Bill and Tom just started raking – and pulled out 29 beer bottles! They also kept good pieces with names – to get an idea of all the companies and places where the company shipped the bottles.

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Bill recommended that the club take a trip to the American Toy Marble Museum in downtown Akron. The museum opened in 2002, and features large collections of Akron marbles, toys, and artifacts. The June newsletter also contained an article by Jack Sullivan, “The Short but Happy Life of the Match Safe,” and an article by Bill Elder, “Picker and Digger.” The July newsletter contained another one of Jack’s articles titled “The Great Lakes Expo: From Hist’ry to Glitzy.” The program for the OBC’s May 29th meeting was “Milk Bottles of Wayne, Medina and Summit counties.” The program was introduced by Bill Koster, and presented by Jim Cady, Ralph Bowman, David Lehman, Wilbur Bowers, Adam Koch and Bill Koster. Bill said that our club has many milk bottle collectors. Some years back, diggers hated milk bottles. Everybody wanted bottles such as inks, flasks, and bitters. Now, however, some milk bottles sell for $500 or more. Still, even some one-of-a-kind milk bottles don’t bring in the money they should. This club has sold over 250 milk bottle books. The OBC recently lost long-time members George Tomko and Hiram Wilkinson. For more information on joining the OBC, please contact Berny Baldwin (treasurer), 1931 Thorpe Circle, Brunswick, OH 44212. The club also has a new website which can be found at: http://www.ohiobottleclub.com. Details about its milk bottle book can be found there also. Wabash Valley Antique Bottle & Pottery Club Martin Van Zant is newsletter editor for The Wabash Cannonball, the WVABPC’s monthly newsletter. Peggy Zimmer is the club president. Ed Newman tells us the following in the secretary’s report in the June issue: “Hi, everyone, we only had 6 members at the June meeting. This was a nice laid-back summer meeting with lots of stories and gossip. The club picnic was held at the railroad


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tain of a man was lurking nearby. You see, John had a sign that said, this is HIS diggings, stay away. No claim jumping on my findings. I thought about this guy who would have said such a thing. Until I met him. Yes, he was big, and yes he was always lurking nearby. You couldn’t miss him. The friendship began when we would share our digging finds. No bottle exchanged hands. At least with Big John. It was his space, and I mean lots of space. I was digging in the many trash pits that dotted the area. Some outhouse outlines we did find, and hundreds of bottles etc. would be for our taking, and we did get to know one another. And it was on a daily basis of conversing with John that we became friends. Talking about the history of where we were digging and all those beautiful Victorian homes that were being razed. What a shame, but at that time, we were interested in those unusual shaped and odd-colored glass bottles of all sizes. It would be no problem to find several hundred bottles for our taking. We had it all to ourselves, that is until more interested bottle hounds found the same area. It got to a point, that if we didn’t dig out our area entirely, those ‘Claim Jumpers’ (as John would call them) would dig the rest. Sometimes in the middle of the night! And here is where John got quite irate! To the point, if anyone of those ‘youngsters’ got in his way, be rest assured you would have a shovel laid upon your head! Talk about the banter that went back and forth! (Priceless) On one of those diggings with John, he told me he was going to work for the City of Minneapolis. Since, I had been working for the city as an equipment driver for a couple of years, I asked him what department? He started out as laborer, meaning any place the construction crews would dig up many more bottles, and John liked that job very much. We would get together on digging sites and swap stories about the ‘goofy’ foremen we had to work for. And then John became a lead man. Had his own city truck and was in charge of certain ar-

September-October 2008

eas to maintain the sewers (always on the lookout for dump sites). John had several digging partners, including Vern Dotseth, Charlie Farley, Al Lagan and dug alongside of others. Later on after retiring, I had dug with John on several other occasions. He had the darndest luck. I was digging on one side of a yard, John on the other. I dug up several medicines, John dug up a small Geo Benz Bitters. Such luck John had! Vern Dotseth (close friend and main digging partner) and John were seen on TV and also were mentioned in the Minneapolis papers in an area of western downtown Minneapolis, holding old fruit jars! One time after I had retired, John called me, asking to come over to the sewer dept. It seems John had too many lockers! (Lockers were meant for clothes, as his boss said). It seems that John not only had very few of his clothes, but lots of cat food and many dug bottles he was storing in three large lockers. (John took care of feeding the cat. It was a gray gnarly looking cat with green eyes and a bit of one ear gone!) But he loved animals. And besides, the cat was a good mouser, John said! We both retired from the city after 30 plus years. After asking John to join our newly formed bottle club time and time again and told him what he was missing, he relented a few years later. John & Brenda Larson became members #118, April 1974. John liked our monthly meetings, especially the treats. He sure had a sweet tooth. John had a favorite chair he would like to sit on. The rest of us used those foldup metal chairs, and he had a spot near the door. His favorite companion at all times was a glden Lab named Ginger. If this dog barked, I never heard a noise! Many times during the summer months John would come by early in the morning to have a can of cold pop. And we would talk of the days digging together plus the days' events and digging partners and the bottles he would find along with them. Some of the finds he would bring were stoneware beers from Mankato, St. Paul, and

Bottles and Extras

Wisconsin that were debossed on the side. Twice he showed some nice bitters in amber plus local druggists bottles. It was a rare event that John would give away anything. But two bottles are in my collection --- a druggist bottle, T.K. Gray / Minneapolis and the other, a Spa Bottling Co., St. Paul. Not the rarest of bottles, but when I look at these two, I will always remember John and what he meant to me! John was a special person at our yearly bottle shows. Sometimes he would get into town after traveling from his place in Arizona and couldn’t wait to wake me up at the Days Inn. He needed his coffee and those rolls we had for the dealers and members. You see, John was the enforcer, the ‘Cop,’ the security for our bottle show and sale each year. He would get dressed in different types of historical clothes. One time he came in a Civil War dress ‘Blues.’ Boy, did he look sharp and was the talk of the show. At our last show, John was not feeling well and couldn’t make it. We sure missed him. Just his presence would deter anyone from making a mistake by doing something foolish. His partner at the door was Gwen Seeley. John was four-times larger than Gwen. I depended on Gwen, as I would call her my little sergeant at the door. Actually, it got so I depended on both of them. What a combination to have. Big John and the little Seargeant. No one would get past these two, not unless you paid your 3 bucks, that is. Wear Your Name Tag" was one of John’s favorite sayings at our bottle shows. Or you would feel the wrath of ‘Big’ John. What could be better? ‘Big’ John, Vern Dotseth, Charley Farley and Dave Vollmar guarding our precious bottles at our shows each year. John did have his soft side. ‘The other John.’ His nickname could have been ‘Teddy Bear,’ and he expressed it at our meetings at my home. His love and compassion of digging for ‘ol’ bottles with his favorite partner, Vern, were second to none! Couldn’t wait for the times he would dig with

Bottles and Extras

shine, not because it was shattered into a thousand pieces like I’d assumed the day before. It looked exactly like it did when it was placed on the little girl’s grave. With trembling hands, I reached down and retrieved "The Jar" and within a few minutes had returned it to its rightful place – the center of little Helen Marie Sims’ grave.

September-October 2008

409/W.H. Bard/Portland, Ore. An Unlisted Oregon Flask By Garth Ziegenhagen

As I was rounding the corner at an earlier Chico Bottle Show, I was very surprised to find an Oregon flask AUTHOR’S NOTE: This is a ficthat I nor anytional store and its sole purpose is to body else I could bring into focus many of the problems find had ever plaguing our beloved hobby. However, heard of before. the old city cemetery does in exist in A t P e t e South Pittsburg and I have visited it Hendrick’s table many times. I got the idea for the story was this flask, while reminiscing about one of my “409/W.H. visits there with "Cousin Billy" where B a r d / P o rt l a n d , I remembered seeing an intact UOre.” that Pete had received from a SAV-IT jar. Since that time, efforts friend in Longview, Washington. I have been made to restore the cemewas even more excited when I found tery. Pete and he was willing to let it go at Charles D. Head a very reasonable price - you know 23549-001 how some sellers are often off lookPO Box 150160 ing for bottles at a bottle show! Atlanta, GA 30315 We, in Oregon are fortunate to have had John Thomas and Bob Barnett to catalog bottles and publish some excellent Oregon resource books on the history of these bottles. We also owe a great deal of gratitude to the bottle collectors of Oregon who have shared their knowledge and bottles with the authors of these books. I doubt if anyone else will be able to 1 year Air Mail publish specific bottle books like John and Bob. It is very rare to find subscription an embossed whiskey not already re$60 searched and the history uncovered. Unfortunately, none of the books listed this flask, therefore, it was up to Established 1979 me to find out who this person was, The world’s first full color bottle magazine when he was in Portland, and where the saloon was located. simply got Better and Bigger. I do have some research books, Packed Full of the information you need on the UK & world wide bottle scene. but soon discovered that W.H. Bard Well-researched articles & all the latest finds. was not listed in any Portland census Upcoming sales and full show calendar. or directory up until 1910. In the 1910 census, he was boarding in SeatPersonal check, Mastercard/Visa, even cash! tle and in 1911, he was the President BBR, Elsecar Heritage Center, Barnsley, and manager of the Mt. Hood Commercial Co, while boarding at 744 2, Yorkshire, S74 8HJ, England Kearny. In the same 1911 directory, Ph: 011-44-1226-745156 Fax: 011-44-1226-321561 he was listed as owner of a saloon at

Full Colour

BBR

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409 Washington, thus, the 409 on the first line of the dandy flask he had made. An advertisement on page 1627 of the directory listed: Family Liquor Department Mt. Hood Commercial Co. Merchant’s Lunch & Buffet Imported Lunch Delicacies 409 Washington Street The saloon was also listed in the 1912 directory, but, that was the end of the listings and probably why there were not many bottles made for this saloon. In 1913, at the age of 60, W.H. Bard was listed as a lawyer at 224225 Abington Bldg. and owned a house at 1125 Francis Avenue and still operated a Mt. Hood Commercial Co., but was no longer the owner of a saloon. How quickly he seemed to have become a lawyer - probably realizing that prohibition was coming, and, thus, being a lawyer was more lucrative than a saloon owner. Still it seems, he would be a person dealing with other people’s problems, but, could charge more. He remained a lawyer until his death in 1921 at the age of 68. AUTHOR’S NOTE: If anyone else out there owns one of these flasks, or comes across it, at least now you know some of it’s history. History is the reason I collect bottles and I think we, as bottle collectors, have contributed to the preservation of history more then non-bottle collectors will ever realize. As for unlisted Oregon bottles, and “go-withs”, it might be wise to save past issues of The Stumptown Report edited by Bill Bogynska and published by the Oregon Bottle Collectors Association. Garth Ziegenhagen 2596 SW Pumich Ave Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-4776 zigs@bendcable.com


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Classified Ads FOR SALE FOR SALE: Hutchinson list #1: Alabama (1), Colorado (2), Hawaii (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Mississippi (1), New Jersey (5), New York (5), West Virginia (1), Wisconsin (3), and Mavericks (1). Hutchinson list #2: Alabama (1), Arizona (1), Colorado (2), Hawaii (1), Kansas (1), Louisiana (1), Missouri (1), New York (1), North Carolina (1), Oregon (1), Texas (1), Utah Territory (1), Chattanooga Glass Co. (1), Virginia (1), Medicated Root Beer (1), Hawthorn Spring Saratoga (2), Highrock Congress Springs Saratoga (1), Guilford, Bt Mineral Spring Water (1), Pennsylvania (20). Contact: Zang Wood, 1612 Camino Rio, Farmington, NM 87401. Ph: (5050 327-1316. FOR SALE: Beautiful mediumamber Reno Brewing Co., Reno, Nev. blob beer, pint, $50. Aqua, tooled, crown, slug plate, L. Rosenfeld Co., Council Bluffs, Iowa, $45. Tooled, four-mold, crown, San Jose Soda Works, A.J. Henry, Prop., San Jose, Cal., $45. Pint, applied top Udolpho Wolfe's Aromatic Schnapps, beautiful citron-green, $35. Deco soda, clear, crown, Silver State Soda, embossed with pack mule and miner, scalloped, $50. Half-pint fruit jar, clear, lid and bail, embossed Quong Hop & Co., 12oz Net with the same Chinese writing, $30. Dr. Ordways Celebrated Pain Destroyer, pontiled, 12-sided, aqua, rolled-lip, original label, cork, inside residue, $65. Amber square quart, tooled top, Veronica Mineral Water, $65. Contact: Jean M Pouliot, Box 205, West Glacier, MT 59936, Ph: (406) 888-9092. FOR SALE: Bitters bottle, Old Sachem Bitters and Wigwam Tonic, mint condition, black glass. This sexy barrel I have never read or heard about in black glass. If you collect any of the barrels, you might want to add this sweetheart to your collection. Contact:

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

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*****50% DISCOUNT***** For FOHBC member clubs All ads must be paid for in advance Make checks payable to FOHBC (Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors) Send payment to: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 Send ad copy and/or questions to: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 (816) 318-0160, fax: (816) 318-0162 AD DEADLINES Issue Date

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Bottles and Extras

In the July IAB newsletter, it was reported that the “State Historical Society of Iowa will have an exhibit of Iowa pottery beginning in September. Mike Magee proposed that the Fall IAB meeting be held at the Iowa Genealogical Society building which is across the street from SHSI. That would make it convenient for those attending to visit the exhibit.” The IAB is seriously pursuing rubbings (and photographs are helpful) of Iowa bottles that are unlisted in the book, “The Antique Bottles of Iowa, 1846 – 1915”. Please contact Mike Burggraaf at 641-469-6018 or QRSGLASS@iowatelecom.net. The IAB newsletters always contain wonderful digging stories by Mark Wiseman. He has a regular column, “The Digger’s Scoop,” that tells of his local digging adventures with his dog, the old truck, and various digging friends that join him. You can find out more about IAB membership ($15/yr.) from Tom Southard, 2815 Druid Hill, Des Moines, IA 50315. Midwest Antique Fruit Jar & Bottle Club The MAFJBC has members nationwide and is heavily fruit jar focused. Their meetings are held the first Monday of the month at 1:30 p.m. in the Cantina at Minnetrista, which is located in Muncie, Ind. Dave Rittenhouse is the club president. At the May meeting, club members were asked to bring amber jars or bottles. The Midwest Glass Chatter (their newsletter) is always loaded with pictures of the many items that are brought to the meeting. Jean Harbron brought an amber half-gallon Globe fruit jar that had once belonged to her “Dad’s first cousin’s wife.” A family member had said, “What are you doing, giving her that old ugly jar?!” (not realizing that people love to collect them). Lou Ebert displayed a very large amber advertising beer bottle (no label) (base: Phelps Mfg. Co. / Terre Haute, Ind.). The bottle was a whopping 20 inches tall and 5 7/16” in diameter. The bottle had a ground lip and would have held approximately 4 ¼ quarts! Charles Wil-

September-October 2008

liams brought many examples of irradiated (“nuked”) jars which had turned an easily identifiable brown amber color. Buyers need to beware when they are purchasing amber jars. Dave Rittenhouse shared an amber pint bottle of Rittenhouse Straight Rye Whiskey (with original label; no immediate relation to his family!). Dick Cole brought a variety of amber Anchor Hocking commemorative bottles (one was shaped like a book and another was shaped like a baseball). Joe Coulson shared some Anchor Hocking special run bottles, too. All of these would have been produced in limited numbers. The MAFJBC has a website: http://www.fruitjar.org. Meeting details as well as lots of pictures from its semi-annual shows can be found there. Pictures from the July show and sale were just posted. The next show and sale will be January 11th, 2009 at the Horizon Convention Center in Muncie. Minnesota’s First Antique Bottle Club Gwen Seeley forwarded us copies of their January and February newsletters, “The Bottle Digger’s Dope.” Gwen reports that due to her health she finds it necessary to resign her role as editor. She continues as coeditor, and Barb Robertus has assumed her editor duties. The newsletter's May issue reports that Gary Essig has passed away. Gary and Dianne were among of the first couples to join the club. “Gary is the brother of members Denny and Mary Essig. Gary had been battling cancer for more than five years. We remember all the great times we had with the both of hem. Dianne was our 3rd show chairman and what a great job she did. We looked over our albums from our early days, and found this of Gary. [picture of Gary in a night gown and night cap and carrying a candle]. Photo shows Gary in costume! When we were much ‘younger,’ our bottle club had many costume parties, where you would come dressed as a bottle. In this case Gary was the NIGHT CAP BITTERS.

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Note cap and candle! We have missed Gary and Dianne very much as friends and bottle collectors. They have lived in Eugene, Oregon, leaving Minneapolis in the early 1970s.” The club does not print newsletters in June, July and August. It will not be until the September issue that we hear back from them. Membership in the MFABC is $10/yr. For more information, please contact Linda Sandell, 7735 Silver Lake Road #208, Moundsview, MN 55112. North Star Historical Bottle Association Doug Shilson is editor of the North Star Historical Bottle News. Doug does a great job each month reporting the club’s latest happenings. He puts a lot of effort into recording all the details that take place. Steve Ketcham is club president. Doug tells us in the club’s June newsletter about the recent passing of one of a long-time club member, John Larson. “Well, here we go again. I’m very sorry to report, but want to, because this was one individual who not only had been a part of my life, but part of our organization almost from the beginning! John, Jack, Big John, whatever you called him, had better be either of these three names or else you ‘might’ get a shovel over your head. Or, don’t want to be in the same area while digging for bottles. As you can guess by the name of Big John, he was big. Over 300 pounds big. John Larson was born John Raymond Larson, July 26, 1938. I remember the time we had met, it was at the time I-94 was being thought of. The area was on the west side of I-94 on a steep hill in an area where the homes were being torn down but in an area just above the diggings of the future of I-94. Not quite as deep (as it is today). Plenty of room to just let the dirt and sand and those millions of broken glass shards slither down the banks to be picked up by those giant Caterpillar scrapers (one scoop and 10 yards of dirt are gone in a second). In those wild days, digging was free to anyone that ventured to dig and scoop up their finds. But, watch it! This huge moun-


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Munsey. Tom also keeps club members up-to-date with highlights from “The Milk Route”. The FABC has a good website with pictures from its annual shows. You should check it out: http://fabclub.freeyellow.com/home.ht ml. Richard Elwood is the club president. Monthly club meetings are held at the University of Findlay. To find out more about its monthly newsletter, “Whittle Marks,” send a note to: Findlay Antique Bottle Club, P.O. Box 1329, Findlay, OH 45839. The club’s 32nd Annual Bottle Show and Sale will be October 19th, 2008. Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club Michele and Shaun Kotlarsky are newsletter editors for “The Embossing,” the monthly newsletter of the Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club. Bob Powell is the club president. For the May meeting, the club had a slide show, “and a special thank you goes out to Rod Krupka for not only loaning us his projector but organizing the slides so they would work in it, and reorganize them into the one that was returned to the Bottle Federation! The slide show this month was on Fire Extinguisher Grenades by Byron and Vicky Martin.” [EDITOR'S NOTE: for all of the clubs reading this, you might also want to take advantage of the Federation’s slide show loan program for your own club]. “We had a show and tell while Rod helped get the slides into another device to be used with his projector. Bill had the club’s 3rd show ribbon from 1979. Les & Judy had some items they purchased at the Wheaton show. A Diamond insulator, a Brookfield with amber swirls, a Chicago and a WFG Co. cornflower blue crackled. Of course, Judy had some fairy lights. There was a ‘thumbprint’ Wes Morland red and white one she bought at a garage sale which was made prior to 1984, an amber one marked with W ‘Irish Waterford.’ She also had a 7-up green 4-pieced one that was older than Fenton. Earnie had a cider bottle that was amber and from Muskegon. It

September-October 2008

said Chumard’s on it. Michele had some flyers and brochures from the Ephinany Glass Co. open house in Pontiac and will bring a slide show of same to a meeting soon. Her paperweight she purchased from there was a pink one. Rod had a sign from Ypsi, Ypsilanti Mellencamp’s for Clothing – it was metal. He also brought a ‘Sutton’s Hardware’ pail from Howell, which was below the Opera House.” The HVBIC meetings are held the 2nd Monday of the month at 7:30pm at the First National Bank, 8080 Challis Rd., Brighton, Mich. You can find out more about the HVBIC online at their website: http://hvbic.org. The monthly newsletter can be viewed there also. Iowa Antique Bottleers Mark Wiseman (newsletter editor) does a wonderful job each month reporting the IAB happenings. Mark submitted the IAB newsletters for May through July. The IAB’s April meeting theme was “Black and Blue” glass bottles, “and there were plenty of these brought along with many other great show and tell items. The Morrison Grundy County Museum space we use was even more open on the north side, and there was a fine potluck lunch enjoyed by all.” “Jack La Baume brought his very fine collection of black glass bottles. Chuck Erb brought cobalt bottles including one embossed ‘Rheumagon’ he found in the basement of a burned out Garden Grove, Iowa drugstore, and seven different sizes of triangular one wing Owl Drug bottles. Reid Palmer brought more Mary Gregory type items. Jim Weeks brought a cobalt ‘H.K. Mulford Co. Philadelphia,’ a cobalt insulator, as well as a salt cellar in blue and white Akron Agate. Percy Poulin brought cobalt bottles, a cobalt cone ink, umbrella ink, a squat and funnel ink, and a black glass seal bottle ‘LM & C’ found with four others in a wall in Dubuque, Iowa. Kevin Williams brought a lamp that he bought at Goodwill and then removed the paint so it was clear (an idea he got from Steve Showers) and put

Bottles and Extras

shards from Colfax pottery/Red wing jugs from Colfax inside and it really looked great. Jeff Krapfl brought a grouping of very rare bottles and stoneware items. Among them was an unknown drugstore bottle --- City Drug Store, Chas. J. Brayton (monogram) Dubuque, Iowa --- and three unknown crock bottles, all stamped ‘Krueger Bro. Ossian, Iowa,’ all a little different in glaze but the same shape, (one with brown or no glaze) that Jeff thinks were likely made at the Fayette Pottery in the 1860s.” Mike Magee submitted a copy of an old newspaper article that was shown in the June IAB newsletter. From the May 26, 1911 Waterloo Courier, “Bitters Proved Too Lively Tonic. Muscatine druggist arrested as bootlegger. Proprietor, Leading Church Man, Pleaded Ignorance of Charge. Muscatine, Ia., May 26, ‘Centennial bitters,’ a tonic guaranteed to liven one up and containing 30 percent alcohol, is the latest ‘booze’ which has been given local citizens a touch of high life. As a result of selling the same, Theodore Keutchman, a prominent druggist of this city, was placed under arrest yesterday and it is now up to him to explain to the court why he should not stand trial for bootlegging. "Keutchman’s sales increased rapidly of late, according to the police; in fact, he had quite a run on this particular bitters which was not as bitter as it might seem, but which had a greasy taste after swallowing. Several with beautiful buns and a bottle of the tonic were picked up recently and brought to jail. As a result, a police investigation was ordered and Keutchman was taken into custody. "Keutchman is prominent in church circles here and his arrest has caused a mild sensation. He is assistant superintendent at the United Brethren Sunday school. He pleaded ignorance.” Mike Magee provided more research details about “Theodore Keuchmann” that were printed in the IAB newsletter.

Bottles and Extras

Mark Weber, 99 Churchhill Rd., Ledyard, CT 06339, Ph: (860) 464-8046 or E-mail: MarkCWeber@aol.com. FOR SALE: BENNINGTON POTTERY: (1) Bennington Coachman, 1849 mark, Rockingham glaze, 10" tall, similar to Barrett color plate G, 1st row, center, perfect, $875. (2) Toby snuff jar, 1849 mark, removable hat, 4 1/2" tall, looks like Barrett, plate 418, #2, except Rockingham glaze, perfect, $1495. (3) Ben Franklin toby pitcher, 5 7/8" tall, Rockingham glaze, similar to Barrett plate 416, #3, dime-size pressure ding in center of base, otherwise perfect, $225. Postage & insurance extra. Have other Benningtons. Contact: Don Fritschel, Ph: (303) 499-2437 or E-mail: donfrits@aol.com.

September-October 2008

FOR SALE: Bottle Collector Jimmie Brown of Bloomfield, NM passed away in February, 2008. His widow, Faye, has asked me to sell hi Hutchinson’s. Faye has a number of blobs, a large number of painted Label sodas. Also Coke, Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Big Chief, and numerous other sodas. If interested, contact Faye, ph: (505) 632-2460. Hutchinson’s with number from each state: Florida (1), Iowa (1), Illinois (1), Kansas (1), Minnesota (1), New Jersey (22) and 2 gravitators, New York (30) & 1 gravitator & 1 floating ball (no ball), Ohio (1), Pennsylvania (8), slick (1), Utah (2). $10 each plus shipping. Send long SASE (2 stamps) for a list to Zang Wood, 1612 Camino Rio, Farmington, NM 87401, ph: (505) 327-1316. Checks or money orders made payable to Faye Brown.

FOR SALE: The time has come that we must sell ALL the Bottles and Collectibles we have dug and purchased during the past 40 years! Failing health as put us on the NO SHOW LIST for some time now. If interested or know anyone who might be interested, please contact Richard L. Wilcox, 7422 Park Dr., Mechanicsville, VA 23111, Ph: (804) 746-9854; E-mail: ilcox7422@aol.com.

KETCHUP, PICKLES, SAUCES 19th Century Food in Glass Betty Zumwalt, author 498 pages of pictures & research of glass containers the early food Industry utilized Smyth Bound - $25

FOR SALE: Houghton & Dalton Pottery, authored by Jim Houdeshell, 1610 S Main St.; Findlay, OH 45840. $6 per copy. Call Ph: (419) 423-2895 or E-mail: Jdmmh@woh.rr.com.

The Glass Artisan’s Bottle/Glass Cleaning Service

FOR SALE: Many different type fruit jars - over 600 of them. Also painted label and embossed soda bottles for sale. Call (970) 434-5697 Art or Cheryl Pickrell. FOR SALE OR TRADE: Quart black-amber Magic Star; dark-green Mason's Patent Nov. 30th 1856 halfgallon (smooth-lip version); quart Fink and Nasse embossed in slugplate circle (Cohansey-style); pint whittled amber jar base embossed Putnam; quart yellow-amber trademark Lightning; pint Ball Perfection (no lid or band). Contact: Ph: (618) 520-7111 or E-mail: pmurfe@sbcglobal.net.

Mark West Publishers PO Box 1914 Sandpoint, ID 86864

Many years of cleaning service with dealer and collector satisfaction. Your items are treated as if they were my own and with close attention to detail .

Prices start at $15 Contact: STEVE (414) 281-5885 glassartisan@yahoo.com

IT ALWAYS PAYS TO ADVERTISE!!!!! Send in your for sale items!

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WANTED WANTED Southern Illinois blob top and Hutchinson-style soda bottles. No painted labels Steve Kehrer (618) 410-4121 Kehrer00@charter.net Wanted: Tampa alligator Hutch. Highest price paid for FLA BREWING CO, TAMPA, FLA with embossed alligator. Must be Hutch finish, not Baltimore loop. Contact: R.J. Brown, 4114 W Mullen Ave, Tampa, FL 33609, (813) 286-9686, email: RBrown4134@aol.com. Wanted: Fruit Jar Newsletter issues: April 1981, June 1981 through March 1982, July 1982, September 1982, December 1982 through June 1983, August 1983, October 1983 through January 1984, March 1984, July 1984 through November 1984, January 1985, February 1985, April 1985 through September, 1985. Contact: June Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0160, email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Wanted: Sealfast Sold By jars, unusual Hirsch Bros items, unusual Flaccus items, and/or unusual pint jars. Contact: R Wayne Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0161, email: JarDoctor@aol.com. WANTED Levitan and Bagan, Chicago, IL bottles of any/all kinds. Seltzer and soda bottles are known. Company belonged to my greatgrandfather during the early 1900s. Known to have been delivered at some time by Seipp’s Brewery wagons. Tony Hofeld 8724 Ferris Avenue Morton Grove, IL 60053 Ph: (847) 966-0909 Email: ahofeld@aol.com

Wanted: ATTENTION - PLEASE HELP! I am looking for a fruit jar marked PATENT APPL’D FOR on the side of the jar. No other markings. Red Book #9 listed as #2293. I will


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pay a good price for I need it to complete this part of my collection. Contact: Bill Dudley, 1947 Tahoe Dr., Xenia, OH 45385 or call (937) 3728567. Wanted: Need a Crystal Spring Saratoga Mineral Water bottle in ANY condition! Contact: Howard Dean P.O. Box 115, Westernville, NY 13486, Ph: (315) 827-4606. Wanted: Central New York bottles, especially from Auburn. Free background check information and appraisals of these bottles and go-withs. Contact: Tom Kanalley, Ph: (607) 7537250. Wanted: Quality U.S. poison bottles and Marinette, Wis. and Menominee, Mich. bottles and brewery items. Contact: Henry & Toni Johnston, N4123 W. Townline Rd., Marinette, WI 54146, Ph: (715) 923-9351 or E-mail: poisonman@cybrzn.com. Wanted: New old stock bails for blob top beers. Contact: Doug Farmer, Ph: (260) 672-1186 or E-mail: ftwynbrew@aol.com. Wanted: S.T. Suit, Distiller, Suitland and Maryland stoneware jugs and other items relating to this company. I also want trade tokens of all kinids from saloons, mines, general merchandise stores, glass manufacturers, etc. Good prices paid for anything I can use. Contact: David E Schenkman, P.O. Box 366, Bryantown, MD 20617, Ph: (301) 274-3441 or E-mail: dave@turtlehillbanjo.com. Wanted: Philadelphia strap-sided or seamed whiskey flasks. I collect and catalog these and also have an interest in Thomas H. Dillon (THD), Philadelphia mineral water bottles. Please contact me if you have any in your collection or any you wish to sell. Contact: Art Miron, Ph: (215) 248-4612 or Email: jestar484@verizon.net. Wanted: Geogia pottery, milk bottles, antiques. Have some items to trade. Always looking for Georgia items!

September-October 2008

Contact: Paul Irby, 5981 River Oaks Dr., Flowers Branch, GA 30542, Ph: (770) 967-3946 or E-mail: Irbybottles@juno.com. Wanted: Target balls - any common colorful target ball will do. I am looking for a true turtles ink. Contact: Mark Weber, 99 Churchhill Rd., Ledyard, CT 06339, Ph: (860) 4648046 or E-mail: MarkCWeber@aol.com. Wanted: Lighthouses. Want Sol Frank’s large Seaworth’s Globe and Castillian. Mint only. Yes, still buying other "top end" bitters! Thank you. Contact: Jeff Burkhardt, Ph: (262) 573-6468 or E-mail: froglegs13@msn.com. Wanted: Pre-1915 (especially 19th century) bottles in most categories. Still need a couple of J.J. Butler inks and female medicines. If in North Georgia, check out my booth in REMEMBER WHEN ANTIQUES, Hwy 53, 10 miles west of Gainesville, Ph: (770) 888-2991, for a variety of antique bottles, pottery, insulators and small antiques. Contact: Jim Scharnagel, 3601 Laura Ln., Gainesville, GA 30506, Ph: (770) 536-5690. Wanted: Souvenir china and souvenir scenic custard glasses in excellent condition depicting views from American towns & villages, resorts, World’s Fairs, etc. Avidly sought. Preference is for scenes from New York state, New England and most states west of Mississippi River. Many thanks! Contact: Burton Spiller, 22 Tobey Brook, Pittsford, NY 14534, Ph: (585) 264-8968 or E-mail: bottlebug@aol.com. Wanted: Wm. W. Well’s Liniment, Freehold, N.J., pontiled or BIMAL, smooth-base version. Contact: Bob Randolph, 1564 Horseshoe Dr., Manasquan, NJ 08736-2704, Ph: (732) 223-6938 or E-mail: randgal@aol.com. Wanted: Hotchkiss and other Essential Oils bottles. Pepper-

Bottles and Extras

mint/Spearming/Wintergreen. H.G. Hotchkiss (Lyons, N.Y.); L.B. Hotchkiss (Phelps, N.Y.); Hale & Parshall (Lyons, N.Y.); Peirson & Perkins (Newark, N.Y.); M.H. Dillenbeck (Lyons, N.Y.); Peppermint Producers (Lyons, N.Y.); A.M. Todd (Kalamazoo, Mich.) and others. Contact: Richard Kelley, Ph: (315) 9466 3 1 6 o r E - m a i l : Kelleye@redsuspenders.com. Wanted: Baby nursing bottles, colognes, bottles (nipples, bottle covers, brushes, utensils, etc.). Eye wash cups, insulators, glass candy containers. Send list with descriptions, condition & price to: Marliman@juno.com or mail to: Joan B Roth, 405 Camelia Trail, St. Augustine, FL 32086. Wanted: Past issues of Bottles and Extras. If you have issues you would like to dispose of, please consider donating them to the FOHBC. We have new members regularly request old issues. Contact: June Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0160, email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com. Wanted: Glass Chatter newsletters from the Midwest Antique Fruit Jar & Bottle Club, especially ones from the 70s and 80s. (I have none prior to April, 1977) Also looking for any old bottle magazines. Send list of what you might have. Contact: June Lowry, ph: (816) 318-0160, email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com. Wanted: Embossed whiskey - C.J. Stublin - The Dalles, Oregon WITHOUT inside screw. Contact: James O. Dennis, Ph: (541) 298-1979. Wanted: Looking for Oklahoma IT Hutches. Contact: John Witney, Ph: (918)835-8823. Wanted: Femail cures and trade cards or advertisements for same Email: Jmshier@aol.com. Wanted: Harley's Peruvian Bank Bitters / W D Souders & Co Muncie Ind. I have two from Cincinnati, but, need one from Muncie. Also wanted Cabin

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

of hospitality each month. The winner of the raffle drawing the month before gets the honors!

monthly raffles. The newsletter also included some information on "flint glass."

The WHITTLE MARK EAST is the newsletter of the Merrimack Valley Antique Bottle Club, of North Chelmsford, Mass. The July meeting was the annual pizza social. The bottle themes included Independence Day, fire grenades, or your best recent find. Twenty members attended the June meeting, bringing over 60 bottles! The show and tell was extremely well-received and called "spectacular." Way to go! The club owns a display cabinet, which was available for the upcoming show on Sept. 28th in Lowell, Mass., at the Lowell Elks Club. It was requested that those doing shows and flea markets please take flyers and be sure and talk up the show. These are among the two best ways of advertising! Members donate bottles for the

The MOHAWK VALLEY ANTIQUE BOTTLE CLUB's newsletter, Bottles Along the Mohawk, featured information on the July speakers right on the front page. "Glass Insulators" was a power point presentation by Ron Weir and Todd Zinkovitch. It was the club's first-ever power point program. The club meets in a library, which has a power point projector mounted on the ceiling of the meeting room. Members were urged to attend! Club president Fred Capozzella was highly complimented for his June program on Utica Breweries. This was held at the Oneida County Historical Society for their Utica Monday Night lecture series. Fred's program was the best attended to date! The club held their picnic in June, which was very well attended. Tailgating at this meeting was some of the colors and shapes. John Panek displayed his collection of advertising shoe brushes (all Chicago, of course), which included wooden, celluloid and metal tops. Dorothy Furman displayed a collection of pewter thimbles. Dan Puzzo displayed his instant collection of sterling silver souvenir spoons from Woodstock garnered in one purchase on Ebay. Ron Neumann Sr., had a collection of inks in very nice colors. Jeff Dahlberg displayed a collection of outhouses from his extensive collection. The June ABCNI newsletter also had pictures from the club’s recent show and sale. The program for the July meeting was given by Ron Neumann Sr. He never fails to come up with something new from his vast collection. And I don’t think he has even tapped his sheds. He showed us some of his pictorals, which he said he likes to collect. They say one pictoral is worth a hundred plain bottles. Among the sodas that Ron showed were Standard Bottling Co., Flag

Midwest Regional News Joe Coulson 10515 Colingswood Lane Fishers, IN 46038 (317) 915-0665 jcoulson@leader.com The hot summer months are upon us. Everyone is getting ready to head to the Expo! Let’s see what the Midwest clubs were up to in May and June (please don’t forget to send in those newsletters and notes, because we LOVE to hear from you and would like to share that info with others). Antique Bottle Club of Northern Illinois Dorothy Furman is the newsletter editor of the ABCNI, and Jeff Dahlberg is president. The club has been holding its meetings at the Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbeck. The program for the ABCNI June meeting was “Mini-Collection Night.” Dennis Klinkhammer showed a nice collection of salt shakers in various

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best they've had, with many unusal items offered. September featured a mini-show, or an auction. Here's something - the Club BBQ and Dive was held July 27th. Host members Bob and Linda Kennerknecht live on Okara Lake are hosts. Members Frank >> Starczek and Dan Weeden scubadived for bottles and other treasures! I'm anxious to hear the results! The EMPIRE STATE BOTTLE COLLECTORS of Syracuse don't meet in the summer, but preparations are being made for the 10th Annual Fall Antiques, Bottles & More Show & Sale. This will be held on Sunday, October 19th (9-3), at the Scriba Fire Hall, Rt. 104-E, Scriba, N.Y. (just east of Oswego). Show chair is Barry Haynes, who does a great job. Look for 60 tables, appraisals, educational displays, very good food, and more!

Bros., Massachusetts; Thomas F. Donahue, New York; Rayner’s Specialties, New York; Aquos Beverages, Indianapolis, Ind.; Hutchinsons from Engles’s Bottling Works Cincinnati, Ohio; Poles & Rosen Newark, N.J. Figural embossed beers from Ind. Brg. Assn. Marion Indiana (Lion); George Bechtel Brewing Co. (Knight); E.J. O’Connor, S. Amboy N.J. (Anchor); E. S. Pierce Co, Mass. (Eagle); Beadlestone & Woerz Empire Brewery (Woman & Eagle); D.J. Whelan, Troy N.Y.; Schweppes (standing Lion); P.J. Whelan, Troy N.Y. (Star). He also showed many more beers plus milks and whiskeys. Findlay Antique Bottle Club Tom Brown (newsletter editor) of the FABC submitted the June and July newsletters (Whittle Marks). Tom typically reprints several Bottles & Extras articles for club members in their newsletter. Recently this included “Step Aboard Arabia” by Steve Ketcham; “The People’s Favorite Bitters” by Jeff Wichmann; and “Jimmy Carter & Billy Carter: Bottle Collector & Can Collector” by Cecil


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September-October 2008

appraisals, and early bird admission are advertised! Some recent programs included Kanalley, who showed slides of the 2002 FOHBC National Show in Syracuse. Tom was on the committee and is a well-known New York State collector. In April, Kurt Kabalac presented "Glidden Pottery," made at Alfred (N.Y.) University for 17 years, closing in 1951. Kanalley was the speaker once again in May, speaking on "Black Glass." The club recently voted to donate $150 to the National Bottle Museum.

Northeast Regional News Chris Davis 522 Woodhill Newark, NY 14513 (315) 331-4078 cdavis016@rochester.rr.com THE POTOMAC PONTIL, the newsletter of the Potomac Bottle Collectors, serving the national capital, includes a very informative and nicely illustrated article on "The Top Ten Baltimore Shot Glasses," by Jack Sullivan, in the July-August issue. The club doesn't meet in the summer, but some recent May meeting news included a visitor who brought a large crate of bottles to the meeting. Most were Samuel Palmer sodas, some being amber. A photograph showed the bottles as being dug, with dirt still intact. A few club members were able to buy some. Club member Roland Longerbeam was shown with a large display of fruit jars he brought for show and tell. This is one of the highlights of the Potomac club's meetings. The FINGER LAKES BOTTLE COLLECTORS, headquartered in Ithaca, NY, in the heart of the beautiful Finger Lakes Region, publish a newsletter, The Applied Lip. Editor is Abby Nash, former professor of wine at Cornell. The program for May was a different one - club vice president Jay Travis >>> presented "The Bottles of Deadwood, South Dakota." I would have liked to >>> attend that one, having in interest in the history of the American West! The club holds two flea markets each year, in the spring and fall, in addition to their annual bottle show in early October. These are all held at the same location at the Dryden Fire Hall, midway between Ithaca and Cortland on busy Rt. 13. The 39th Annual Antique Bottle, Jar & Collectible Show & Sale will be Sunday, October 5th. Show chairs are George Blassch and Tom Kanalley. 40 sales tables, free bottle

The PITTSBURGH ANTIQUE BOTTLE CLUB's newsletter is titled The Probe. The logo is very appropriately a rustic outhouse, complete with a half-moon in the door. The July meeting minutes, very complete with a good amount of light-hearted humor, included information on who from the club was attending the York Expo. Bob DeCroo and Eng Johnson will be setting up as dealers. It was hoped that one member would make it across Pennsylvania on the Turnpike without stopping to dig! The temporary librarian, Chris Oskin, indicated the late fee for books not returned in time would be a pontilled Pittsburgh soda! The club brainsormed about ways to increase membership at meetings, including promoting the club through word of mouth at flea markets, shows, and antique shops, print business cards with the club mission statement as well as meeting and contact information, publish directions to the meetings, and survey members to find out their likes and dislikes. A number of very interesting digging and auction stories were described. A recent program was scheduled on dolls, but the speaker couldn't make it. The club filled in with quite a display of assorted china doll heads and various other body parts, as dug. August's speaker was Mike Woshner, an expert on gutta-percha. He's the author of "India-Rubber and GuttaPercha in the Civil War Era." Quite

Bottles and Extras

renowned, Mike's expertise involves the history, patents and novel applications of rubber, hard rubber and guttapercha. I always think of fruit jar closures when I think of gutta-percha. The GREATER BUFFALO BOTTLE COLLECTORS' newsletter, The Travelers' Companion, brings the news that the July meeting held at the Flying Bison Brewing Co., was a big success. It's the only brewery in town that bottles beer (also on draft). Specialties include Boch, Gold and Aviator Red, its signature brand. The logo? An American bison head, of course! The newsletter goes on to say, "Suitably impressed with Flying Bison's fine beers, we were treated to a tour of the brewery's facilities with Tim (Herzog) expertly explaining the brewing process and answering any questions thrown at him by the tourists. Tim, in addition to being a master brewer, is a walking encyclopedia on beer, the brewing industry and anything else beer." The club offers a long distance membership at 50% the price of regular membership for those who can't make many meetings. Newsletters are received by mail or email. The club is really trying to promote newsletters sent by email. One of the advantages, besides savings on postage, is color pictures. Each newsletter also features a full page of members' display ads. Auction news included an outstanding stoneware water cooler from St. Johnsbury, Vt., with a Civil War soldier and his wife, in cobalt. The soldier was identified as General Asa Peabody Blunt, and his wife, Mary. The complete record of his service was detailed. With rim chips, this fine piece brought $88,000! Secretary Joe Guerra was elated to acquire a rare beer glass, acidetched "Superior Ale, Buffalo CoOperative Brewing Co." The glass itself is very thin, making Joe wonder if it was to be used for drinking, or merely advertising? Where did he find it? On Ebay, where else?! The club has an interesting way to decide who will do the task

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

Brand Deepwell Beverage / Cabin Creek Land Company, Decota, WV. Also any obscure West Virginia sodas or medicines - Hutch or slug plate - no ACL Also Crawford Bottling Works, Leewod, WV Hutch. Contact: John Akers, Ph: (304) 343-8716, E-mail: Mulecreekjohn@aol.com Wanted: Help! Help me to acquire Washington pumpkinseeds or flat flasks or dandys, rare medicines and Washington Territory. Also western pumpkinseeds. Looking for MK Gottsteins (Washington Territory). MK Gottsteins has picture of Indian in a canoe WT. Contact: Steve Hinsch, 8609 236th SW, Edmonds, WA 98026, Ph: (425) 2258810. Wanted: Buying Pre-pro Missouri whiskey shorts, advertising, go-withs, jugs, and back-bar bottles. Will buy individual items or complete collections. Price and describe. Send to: Fred Sweeney: P.O. Box 936: Shawnee Mission, KS 66201; E-mail: Fred@creekspeak.com. Wanted: Blob top sodas - cobalt, green, amber and Louisville, KY any color. Also want Louisville medicines. Call 502-863-0689. No calls after 7 pm Eastern Time please. Wanted: Miami, Florida milk bottles, hutches, sodas. Also Miami, FL souvenir china. Email: JSmiafl@juno.com.

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Rosenbaum’s, etc. Also looking for photograph of San Francisco Glass Works display of wares during the 1865 to 1868 time period. Contact: Warren Friedrich, 11422 Ridge Rd. Nevada City, CA 95959, ph: (530) 265-5204. Wanted: Mississippi & Louisiana jugs., postcards, Confederate items and early postmarked envelopes - I also trade and sell. Contact: HL Hill Jr, 1036 Briarwood Dr, Jackson, MS 39211, ph: (601) 957-0354 (home) or (601) 955-0288 (cell), email: sonnyhill@bellsouth.net. Wanted: Highest price paid for San Diego, California bottles. All types wanted, ACL’s, embossed, etc. If it has San Diego on it, I’m interested. Contact: Mike Bryant, ph: (858) 581-2787, email: sdmike@san.rr.com Wanted: Blobtop, Hutchinson, or bitters bottles from Missouri and Kansas towns especially Kansas City, Missouri. No hutch or blobtops from St. Louis unless pontiled. Also wanted - Sweet Springs Mineral Waters from Saline County, Missouri. Any pontiled medicine from Missouri except St. Louis. Any Block, Brandon, or Kirrmeyer bottles from Leavenworth, Kansas. Contact: Sam Lawson, ph: (816) 746-6136, email: SDLLL6508@aol.com. Wanted: Pre-1940s original oil and watercolor paintings with California and Nevada landscapes as the subject matter. Contact: John Shuler, 1167 Chaparral Ct., Minden, NV 89423, ph: (775) 720-4723.

Wanted: sample bitters - Sarasina, Dr. Lawrence, Morning Star, etc. Contact: David Mott, Ph: (315) 668-6958; Email: dmott8@twcny.rr.com. Wanted: Bottles and related items of southeast Michigan (Detroit area) - conducting research and assembling informational data base on bottles of this area - interested to learn of any unusual or rare bottles to document their existence. Specifically looking for these bottles: Dr. Ferris's India Tonic, Simoneau's Hall of Pharmacy, McGraw's Gargling Oil and any early Detroit stoneware items. Contact: Mike Brodzik, Ph: (586) 219-9980 or E-mail: bottlemike@wowway.com.

12th Annual Capital District Antique Bottle, Insulator, & Table-top Collectibles Show Saturday September 20th, 2008

Wanted: Better fruit jars for my collections. Particularly interested in pint automatic sealer, The Champion or Van Vliet. I am also looking for good colored Mason Improved type jars. Call (618) 520-7111 or E-mail: pmurfe@sbcglobal.net.

70 plus sales tables available Hot food & beverages will be available Displays General admission - $3 (no early admission)

9am to 2:30 pm St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church 440 Whitehall Road, Albany, NY

Wanted: Rare San Diego milk bottles and associated trivia. Please call (619) 470-0680. Wanted: Evansville, Indiana blobs, hutch, sodas, beer, and items marked Graham Glass. Contact: Tim Pillow, Ph: (812) 477-2148 or E-mail: Hoosierhiker@aol.com. Wanted: Early Western bitters such as Cassin’s Lacour’s

Featuring 70+ tables

For Dealer contracts & general show information contact: Fran Hughes at (518) 377-7134 or email: fhughes3@nycap.rr.com


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

FOHBC Sho-Biz

Calendar of bottle shows and bottle related events FOHBC Sho-Biz is published in the interest of the hobby. Federation affiliated clubs are noted. Information on up-coming collecting events is welcome, but space is limited. Please send at least three months in advance, including telephone number to: FOHBC Sho-Biz, C/O June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 or E-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com. Show schedules are subject to change. Please call before traveling long distances. All listings published here will also be published on the website: http://www.FOHBC.com.

October 4 Point Pleasant, West Virginia West Virginia State Farm Museum Antique Bottle Show at the WV State Farm Museum, Point Pleasant, WV (9am - 3pm). Held during the Fall Festival. Info: Charlie Perry, 39304 Bradbury Rd, Middleport, OH 45760, (740) 992-5088, email: Perrycola@ suddenlink.net October 4 Richmond, Virginia The Richmond Area Bottle Collectors Association, 37th Annual Show & Sale, 9am - 3pm; early buyers 7:30am) at the Showplace Annex, 3002 Mechanicsville Tpk, Richmond, VA. Info: Marvin Croker, (804) 275-1101 or Ed Faulkner (804) 739-2951, email: Faulkner@antiquebottles.com October 5 Dryden, New York The Fingerlake Bottle Collectors Association’s 39th Annual Antique Bottle, Jar & Collectibles Show & Sale (Sun. 9am - 3pm, admission $2; early bird 8am, admission $10; set-up Sun. 5:30am) at the Dryden Fire Hall, Neptune Hose CO., Rt. 13, Dryden, NY (located between Cortland and Ithaca on Rt. 13 - weekend before the Keene show). Info: Tom Kanalley, show Co-Chair, Cortland, NY, ph: (607) 7 5 3 - 7 2 5 0 , e m a i l : tkanalle@twcny.com; or George Blaasch, show Co-Chair, ph: (607) 589-6436, email: gblaasch@aol.com or Toby Dean, President, email: toby@tobiasdean.com. October 5 Chelsea, Michigan The Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club’s 33rd Annual Show (Sun. 9am 2pm, admission $2 with children under 12 free, set-up Sun. 6am) at the

Chelsea Conference Center, 164 Commerce Park Dr., Chelsea, MI. Free appraisals, free items for kids, free parking, food available on site, variety of glass. Info: Michele Kotlarsky, President, Box 210145, Auburn Hills, MI 48321, ph: (248) 673-1650, email: M i c h e l e K@ ma c . c o m o r Mi k e Bruner, show Host, 6576 Balmoral Ter., Clarkston, MI 48346, ph: (248) 425-3223, email: abbott4girl@sbcglobal.net. Website: http:// hvbic.org. October 10 - 11 Phoenix, Arizona The Phoenix Antiques, Bottle, & Collectibles Club’s Annual Show & Sale, (Fri. 10am - 5pm & Sat. 8am - 4pm, early buyers: Fri. 10am), at the North Phoenix Baptist Church, 5757 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ. Info: Betty Harnett, ph: (602) 317-4438, email: bettchem@cox.net. October 10 - 11 Moncks Corner, South Carolina The Berkeley Antique Bottle & Collectibles show at Berkeley Industries, Moncks Corner, SC. Info: Libby Kilgallen, ph: (843) 761-0316, email: lkilgallen@bciservices.org. October 11 Santa Rosa, California The Northwestern Bottle Collectors Association’s Annual Show & Sale, (10am - 4pm, early buyers 8am) at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, Finley Hall Bldg., Santa Rosa, CA, Info: Bev Siri, ph: (707) 542-6438. October 12 Keene, New Hampshire The Yankee Bottle Club’s 41st Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2:30pm, early buyers 8am) at the Keene High School, Arch Street, Keene, NH, Info:

Creighton Hall, 382 Court St., Keen, NH 03431, ph: (603) 352-2959. October 18 Louisburg, North Carolina The Raleigh Bottle Club Annual Show & Sale, (8:30am - 2pm, admission $3; early admission 7am, admission $10) at 111 South Church Street, Louisburg, NC. Info: Barton Weeks, show Chairman, ph: (336) 508-2759, email: bweeks6@triad.rr.com or Donnie Medlin, Co-chair, ph: (919) 496-1367, email: donniepepsinut@msn.com. All s h o w i n fo a l so a v a i l a bl e at www.raleighbottleclub.org. Club email: raleighbottleclub@gmail.com. October 18 Canyonville, Oregon Jefferson State Antique Bottle & Collectible Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm, early buyers: Fri., October 17, 12 noon - 7pm), at the Seven Feathers Hotel & Casino Resort, 146 Chief Miwaleta Lane (I-5 - exit 99), Canyonville, OR 97417. Info: Bruce Silva, PO Box 1565, Jacksonville, OR 97530, ph: (541) 899-8411, email: jsglass@q.com. Show website: www.ecandm.com/canyonville/. October 19 Findlay, Ohio The Findlay Antique Bottle Club’s 32nd Annual Show & Sale, (9am 3pm), at “The Old Barn Auction House”, one mile west of I-75 on Rt. 224, Findlay, OH. Info: Fred Curtis, 1635 Washington Ave., Findlay, OH 45840, ph: (419) 424-0486, email: fabc@wcoil.com. October 19 Scriba, New York Empire State Bottle Collectors Association’s 10th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm) at the Scriba Volunteer

Bottles and Extras

Notice” at the conclusion of my article. [It’s worthy to note, none of the material questioned was published as copyrighted material and that “Fair use” indicates the public (including non-profit organizations such as FOHBC) is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for educational purposes as stated in our bylaws, “…to increase further understanding and discussion of bottle collecting and related history.”] Regarding the questioning of my references, I offer the facts that the article cited six books from 1941 to 1994; two periodicals 1905 and 1938; six Internet references (only three of which the editor chose to publish?). Addendum: I think readers of Bottles & Extras would appreciate knowing, according to Mr. Sheaf, he designed the 1998 commemorative 32¢ U.S. postage stamp honoring the 1906 Pure Food and Drugs Act that was featured in the article as Figure 20. Editors note: missing internet references: http://littlerhodybottleclub.org/researc h/clarkewme.html http://littlerhodybottleclub.org/bottleb ook/newfinds11.html http://littlerhodybottleclub.org/bottleb ook/newfinds9.html

——————— Dear Ms Sathe, My company recently launched a new message board/bulletin board website called HobbyNotes.com. We think our site could be a great place for your group's membership to safely exchange messages and information about the group's activities. Membership is free. Our site was designed from the bottom up to be very user-friendly. It's not like what you may have seen before...it is simple and easy to use for anyone, even people new to the Internet. The site is monitored by a Site Administrator. You can easily see all the unique features and how the site works (without joining) by selecting the "How the Site Works" link on our home page. You can easily link your HobbyNotes profile to your own website. If you like our site, we would like to

September-October 2008

encourage you and the membership of your group to take advantage of HobbyNotes.com, and I would like to personally invite you to give me any comments or feedback about our new site. Sincerely, Peter Fitzgerald ——————— As you know, collectors are driven by a passion unlike any other hobby. Traditionally, collectors would record and keep track of their collectibles using paper notebooks and simple computer programs. With this approach, however, collections could only be shared within the collector’s own real-life social circles. All that is about to change with today’s launch of Collectionbuddy. C o l l e c t i o n b u d d y (www.collectionbuddy.com) is a new online resource and social network aimed at the huge community of collectors around the world that want an easy way to capture, catalog and share their collectibles; interact with other enthusiasts; and discover new collectibles to acquire. I thought it might be of interest to your community of bottle collectors. We also invite you to either register for your own account or use the following demo account to see what Collectionbuddy has to offer: http://www.collectionbuddy.com/login username: demo@collectionbuddy.com password: demo ——————— Pioneer antiquer Ralph Kovel dies Ralph M. Kovel, who with wife Terry made the collecting of antiques including bottles and pottery popular, died Aug. 28 from complications of hip surgery. He was 88. Their "Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide," as well as other books on silver and American art pottery, were written for average collectors and history buffs. Their intensive research, aided and abetted by a staff of 14 from their home in Shaker Heights, Ohio near Cleveland, was spread far and wide through syndicated newspaper columns, newsletters and television. "The Kovels were the first to get

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information to people about antiques, a once secretive business," said S. Clayton Pennington, editor of Maine Antique Digest. They were on top of all kinds of collecting, chronicling the highs and lows of hot collectibles, whether Tiffany glass, McDonald’s Happy Meal toys, vintage egg beaters or Roseville Pottery. "Our one big joke is that we finally got everything in the house to be old — including us," said Terry, his wife of 58 years. Other survivors include a daughter, Karen "Kim" Kovel of Miami Beach, Fla., who is a part of the family business, and a son, Lee Kovel, a non-collector according to his mother and who believes in clutter-free living.


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

Bottle Buzz Send Buzz notes to : June Lowry 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 Or e-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com

This is to inform you that due to health issues, Kathy Sathe has stepped down as Editor at least for the immediate future. My sincere apologies for the lateness of this issue and, unfortunately, the November/December issue will also be somewhat late. Myself along with Martin Van Zant and others are trying to continue the quality that Kathy established, however, due to my lack of experience, I am somewhat slower, but, it will improve with time. Along those lines, if you have any articles or items of interest, regardless of size, please submit to me at the address or email above. Thank you for your support and understanding. If you have any questions or concerns about the FOHBC or the publication, please never hesitate to contact me. Again, thank you for your support in this great hobby we all enjoy. June Lowry, FOHBC Business Manager and acting Editor ——————— What is it?

Leigh Bishop, a famous UK wreck diver discovered this in a shipwreck he discovered in 2007. It sank in the English Channel in 1874 and was built in 1869. Picture attached was taken when it was full of mud recovered from 90m depth. Assistance in identification was sent through many emails from the diver to Ernie Tapanes to Ellen Gerth

to Bill Baab to Cecil Munsey and finally to Alan Blakeman who did definitely identify the article. It looked familiar to Bill Baab, but he couldn’t place it. Cecil Munsey had never seen a “bottle” like this one, but, thought it could be a nursing bottle assuming the small end has an opening with the nipple fitting on that small end and the opening in the middle, the hole through which it was filled. Alan Blakeman said, “Definitely a baby feeder - c. 1860-80, end is maybe a ground down pontil.” Thus, the mystery was solved. You can view more items recovered from this ship wreck at: http:// www.shipwreckfilms.co.uk/ page48.html ——————— Greetings Cecil, I’ve just finished your GREAT article on Absinthe, and I wanted to congratulate you on such a wonderful job that you did. Your research and presentation are impeccable. Back in the 50’s I traveled around on big bands with Larry Muhoburac, a trombone/piano player from New Orleans whose parents owned the Old Absinthe House at that time, and we jokingly called it “The Old Abthe Sin House” since we imbibed there on many visits to New Orleans. Larry has been living in Sydney, Australia for the last 48 years, and I plan to forward your article to him. I’m sure it will mean an awful lot to him, so thanks again for your wonderful writing talents. Sonny Hill ——————— Cecil, I must tell you how much I enjoyed your article, Hunt’s Remedy - that appeared in Bottles and Extras - July/

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(More) Sho-Biz

News, Notes, Letters, etc.

Message to the Membership

September-October 2008

August. It was a beautifully illustrated and well written article. Well Done!! Dewey Heetderks Thanks, Dewey. I enjoyed doing it as I do all of my articles. It is especially nice to get a bit of mail indicating my work was read. Cecil ——————— HUNT’S REMEDY article questioned! (Bottles & Extras, July–August 2008, pp. 28-31) by Cecil Munsey I recently received an email from Richard Sheaff of Scottsdale, AZ who indicated he was “shocked and disappointed” with my recent article about Hunt’s Remedy. He indicated that, in his opinion, a portion of the article was “…plagerized [sic], simply lifted word-for-word from material I wrote years ago for the Little Rhody bottle club, and is posted on their web pages.” He continued, “Much of the other material in your story was lifted from sources which you do list under ‘References’ but do not properly credit, nor put within quotation marks all the material lifted word-for-word.” He also writes, “All and all [sic], a shameful and glaring unprofessional act of intellectual dishonesty.” He requested that Bottles & Extras “…publish some sort of correction notice in the next issue of the magazine.” I offer, here, an explanation instead of the requested “correction.” My understanding of plagiarism, regarding research and writing, is that I am being accused (according to the dictionary) of infringement of copyright, piracy, theft, stealing. To avoid any kind of research misunderstanding, I included the standard “Fair Use

Fire Department, US Route 104, Scriba, NY. Info: Barry L Haynes, PO Box 900, Mexico, NY 13114, ph: (315) 963-0922 or John Golly, 4 Vinette Rd., Central Square, NY 13036, ph: (315) 668-8350, email: bygolley@msn.com. October 26 Glendale Heights, Illinois 1st Chicago Bottle Club’s 39th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm) at the Ramada Inn, 780 E. North Ave (1/2 block west of I-355), Glendale Heights, IL. Info: John & Claudia Panek, 1790 Hickory Knoll, Deerfield, IL 60015, ph: (847) 945-5493, email: paperbottle1@aol.com. November 2 Elkton, Maryland Tri-State Collectors and Diggers Club’s 36th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm) at the Singerly Fire Hall, Routes 279 & 213, Elkton, MD. Info: Dave Brown, ph: (302) 738-9960. November 7 & 8 Tulare, California Golden Gate Insulator Club’s 40th Annual Tulare Collectible Show will be held at the Tulare Veteran’s Memorial Building, 1771 East Tulare Ave., Tulare, CA 93274. Info: Dave Brown, ph: (559) 936-7790, email: 1skychair@msn.com or Bob Merzoian, ph: (559) 781-6319, email: bobmerzoian@mac.com November 8 Belleville, Illinois The Eastside Antique Bottle & Jar Show and Collinsville Beer Can & Breweriana Show have been merged to create a Super show! (9am - 3pm, early buyers 7:30am) at the Belle Clair Fairgrounds, Routes 13 & 159, Belleville, IL. Info: Bill Cress, ph: (618) 466-3513 or Kevin Kious, ph: (618) 346-2634 or Curt Faulkenberry, ph: (636) 797-5220.

November 8 De Funiak Springs, Florida Emerald Coast Bottle Club’s Annual Bottle & Collectibles Show & Sale, (9am - 4pm) at the De Funiak Springs Community Complex (just north of I10), De Funiak Springs, FL. Info: Bobby Vaughn, ph: (850) 415-5521, email: bd2hg75@gmail.com or Alan McCarthy, ph: (850) 769-3984. November 9 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania The Pittsburgh Antique Bottle Club’s Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 7am), at the The Ice Garden, Rostraver Township, Exit 46B of I-70, 4.1 miles north. Info: Bob DeCroo, 694 Fayette City Rd., Fayette City, PA 15438, ph: (724) 326-8741 or Jay Hawkins, 1280 Mt. Pleasant Rd., West Newton, PA 15089, ph: (724) 872-6013. November 9 Oakland New Jersey North Jersey Antique Bottle Collectors Association’s 39th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 8am), at the Oakland Elks Club, 33 Ramapo Valley Rd., Oakland, NJ. Info: Ken, ph: (973) 907-7351 or Jim, ph: (515) 454-8993. November 15 Chehalis, Washington The Washington Bottle Collectors Association Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm with set-up Friday, November 14 1pm - 7pm), at the Southwest Washington Fairgrounds, Chehalis, WA. Info: Pete Hendricks, ph: (253) 335-1732 or Warren Lhotka, ph: (206) 3298412, email: wlbottleguy@yahoo.com, website: http:// www.wbcaweb.org. November 22 Terre Haute, Indiana The Wabash Valley Antique Bottle & Pottery Club’s 11th Annual Show &

Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 7am), at the Shadow Barn Auction Barn, 1517 Maple Ave., Terre Haute, IN. Bottle auction Friday, November 21st at 7pm. Info: Ned Pennington, 367 S 22nd St., Terre Haute, IN 47803, ph: (812) 234-2214, email: squarenail@verizon.net. November 23 Greensboro, North Carolina Southeast Bottle Club’s 7th Annual Bottle & Collectibles Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm with dealer set-up from 7am - 9am, no early buyers), at the Greensboro Farmer’s Curb Market, Greensboro, NC. Info: Reggie Lynch. Ph: (704) 221-6489, website: h tt p:/ / www. a nt iqu e bo tt le s/ co m/ greensboro. November 30 Bethlehem, Pennsylvania The Forks of the Delaware Bottle Collectors Association’s 35th Annual Show & Sal, (9am - 3 pm, early buyers 7:30am), at the Bethlehem Catholic High School, Madison & Dewberry Avenues, Bethlehem, PA. Info: Bill Hegedus, 20 Cambridge Place, Catasauqua, PA 18032, ph: (610) 2645945. December 6 Auburn, California 49er Historical Bottle Association’s 31st Annual Show & Sale, (9am 3pm, early buyers Friday, December 5 2pm - 8pm), at the Gold County Fairgrounds, Auburn, CA. Info; Steve Abbott, ph: (916) 631-8019, email: foabbott@comcast.net. January 11 Muncie, Indiana Midwest Antique Fruit Jar & Bottle Club’s Winter Show & Sale (9am 2pm), at the Horizon Convention Center, 401 S High St., Muncie, IN 47305. Info: Dave Rittenhouse, 1008 S 900 W, Farmland, IN 47340, ph: (765) 4 6 8 - 8 0 9 1, e m a i l:


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

(More) Sho-Biz rittjman@aol.com or Jean Harbron, ph: (765) 644-4333. January 17 Jackson, Mississippi Mississippi Antique Bottle Show, (9am - 4pm), at the Mississippi Fairgrounds, Jackson, MS. Info: John Sharp, PO Box 601, Carthage, MS 38051, ph: (601) 506-0105, email: Johnsharp49@aol.com. February 6 & 7 Rome, Georgia The Rome Antique Bottle Club’s Annual Show & Sale at the Rome Civic Center, Turner McCall Blvd., Rome, GA. Info Jerry Mitchell. PO Box 475, Bremen, GA 30110, ph: (770) 537-3725, email: mitjt@aol.com or Bob Jenkins, 285 Oak Grove Rd., Carrolton, GA 30117, ph: (770) 8340736. January 24 Anderson, California The Superior California Antique Bottle Club’s 33rd Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 4pm), at the Shasta County Fairgrounds, Anderson, CA. Info: Mel Hammer, ph: (530) 241-4878 or Phil McDonald, ph: (530) 243-6903. February 1 South River, New Jersey The New Jersey Antique Bottle Club’s 13th Annual Show & Sale, (9am 2pm, admission $3, under 12 free), at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 88 Jackson St., South River, NJ. Sales table $30 each. Free parking & appraisals. Food available. Info: NJABC, 24 Charles St., South Jersey, NJ 08882-1603 or Joe Butewicz, ph: (732) 236-9945, email: botlman@msn.com. February 13 & 14 Las Vegas, Nevada The Las Vegas Antique Bottles & Collectibles Club’s 44th Annual Show & Sale, (early buyers: Friday, Febru-

ary 13, 11am - 5pm, general admission: Saturday, February 14, 9am 4pm), at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino, 2411 W Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV. Info: Stan Pullen, 5830 E Owens Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89110, ph: (702) 452-7218. February 20 - 21 Columbia, South Carolina The South Carolina Antique Bottle Club’s 36th Annual Antique Bottle Show & Sale, (Friday, February 20, 12 noon - 6pm, Saturday, February 21, 9am - 1pm, admission donation to Boys & Girls Club, set-up Friday, February 20, 10:30am - 12 noon), at the Meadowlake Park Center, 600 Beckman Rd., Columbia, SC. Free parking, food available, 150+ tables— always a sell-out. Info: Marty Vollmer, 1091 Daralynn Dr., Lexington, SC 29073, ph: (803) 755-9410, email: martyvollmer@aol.com or Eric Warren, ph: (803) 951-8860, email: scbottles@aol.com. Club website: www.southcarolinabottleclub.com. February 22 Enfield, Connecticut Somers Antique Bottle Club’s 39th Annual Show & Sale, (9am - 2pm, early buyers 8am), at the St. Bernard’s School West Campus, 232 Pearl St., Exit 47W, 191 Enfield, CT. Info: Rose Sokol, 164 Elm St., Enfield, CT 06082, ph: (806) 745-7688, email: enfieldrose@aol.com. March 7 Saint Joseph, Missouri Missouri Valley Insulator Club’s 7th Annual St. Joseph Insulator/Bottle Show & Sale, (9am - 3pm), at the American Legion Pony Express Post #359, 4826 Frederick Ave., St. Joseph, MO. Insulators, bottles, lightning rod equipment, telephones, and advertising filled 63 tables in 2008 and we have 70 tables available for 2009. Info: Dennis R Weber, 3609 Jack St., St. Joseph, MO 64507, ph: (816) 364-

September-October 2008

At Auction 1312, email: show2009@aol.com.

stjoe-

March 14 Badin, North Carolina The Uwharrie Bottle Club’s 2nd Annual Antique Bottle & Collectible Show & Sale, (8am - 3pm, set-up 6am - 8am), at the Badin Fire Department, Highway 740, Badin, NC. Free parking and appraisals. Food available. $20 for eight-foot table - 48 available. Info: Todd McSwain, 8649 EddinsPoplin Rd., Norwood, NC 28128, ph: (704) 474-0552, email: mcswain8649@alltel.net.

SUPPORT THE SHOWS

ld So

a rarity, but to find one in this unusual green coloration is a real treat. Alex was always on the prowl for the rare and unusual, and he certainly found it in this Pittsburgh ball. This one grades a 10 with some nice unevenness to the glass. Selling price $4600. Submarine Poison Cobalt blue. Embossed POISON / REGISTERED No. 336907. middle of three known sizes, three inches X 1 5/16” tall. Perfect condition. Sold on ebay 9/28/2008 for $1555.00.

March 27 - 28 Morro Bay, California The San Luis Obispo Bottle Society’s 4th Annual Show & Sale, (Friday, March 27, 3pm - 7pm and Saturday, March 28, 9am - 3pm), at the Morro Bay Veterans Hall, 209 Surf St., Morro Bay, CA. Free admission and no charge for early buyers. Info: Richard Tartaglia, ph: (805) 5437484. April 26 Rochester, New York The Genesee Valley Bottle Collectors Association’s Show & Sale (9am 3pm), at the Minett Hall, Monroe County Fairgrounds, Rochester, NY. Over 200 tables, exceptional educational displays, over 100 dealers from 14 states and Canada. Bottles, insulators, whimsies, fruit jars, poisons, inks, apothecary, stoneware, ephemera, art glass and more! Info: Show Chairmen, Aaron Weber, ph: (585) 226-6345 or Larry Fox, ph: (585) 354-8072; Dealer Chairman, Pamela Weber, ph: (585) 226-6345, email: GVBCA@frontiernet.net; Exhibit Chairman, Chris Davis, ph: (315) 331-4078, email: cdavis016@rochester.rr.com. Club website: www.gvbca.org.

5

Alex Kerr in his skeet shooting heyday

GI-94 Benjamin Franklin/Where Liberty Dwells There is my Country/ T.W. Dyott, MD/Kensington Glassworks Philadelphia. Beautiful rare copper amber color, open pontil, sheared lip seven inches tall. Brilliantly clean in a stunning copper color. Has one after manufacture flaw—flash line located on the Franklin side on the medial rib above the I in Benjamin. Sold for $1530.

Alex Kerr is well-known for his fruit jar connection, however, he is “Said to be the greatest Skeet Shooter of All Time and winner of 18 National Championships.” Here are just a few examples of his target balls and go-withs that recently sold at auction.

EE EATON GUNS & C. 53 STATE ST. CHICAGO. 1.6 ounces, 3” diam. Medium cobalt blue. This is possibly one of only two blue Eaton balls known. This is a very pretty ball in a three-piece mold. There is an interesting grouping of bubbles on the base that almost resembles a constellation in the night sky. The only flaw on this one is a partially open bubble the size of a cantaloupe seed on the side opposite the name. Otherwise a mint 9 grade with a partially open bubble. F R O M J . P A L M E R O’NEIL & CO. 1.8 ounces, 3” diameter from Pittsburgh, Pa., home of the iron curtain. A wonderful yellow green (more green than yellow) ball with a wonderful coloration deeper at the top and the bottom. It is a three-piece mold and the strike is exceptional. A grade 10 target ball. The Palmer balls in straight amber are

BOGARDUS TARGET BALL THROWER. 32 3/8” long, 11 ½” high. Here we have a rather primitive Bogardus trap. It is known that Alex Kerr collected go-withs or various target ball memorabilia in addition to his spectacular collection of balls. Although this is a relatively ordinary and standard Bogardus trap, you cannot argue its early heritage. Condition on this trap is excellent with the original felt cup liner, and the trap itself in working condition. Sold for $2600. EMBOSSED PIGEON ON TWO SIDES. 2.8 ounces, 3” diameter. An unusual piece, in the form of a clay target ball with two embossed sides, what appear to be, pigeons. It is known these are quite rare with possibly only a few known examples. It looks like they simply took a mold and pressed clay into it, joining the two pieces in the middle with a design not unlike the edge of a crimped pie. The hole or mouth protrudes directly through one of the birds. Condition is perfect as made with just a little dirt and slight stain, typical of a piece such as this. Final price $2200.


4

September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

RECENT FINDS

Figure 1 tom and the other has a slick bottom. The biggest find so far this year goes to a previously unknown W yn n e wo o d , I. T. Hutch (Fig. 3 & 4). This bottle caused quite a stir with Oklahoma soda collectors when it was brought to light because no records exist that Wynnewood ever had a bottling works. Plus, no one has ever uncovered a Figure 2 single shard of glass in the form of a soda bottle with Wynnewood embossed on it. The story goes that two bottle diggers were digging the

old Ardmore Bottling Works location in downtown Ardmore. One of the diggers was informed that several patent medicine bottles and a bottle with Wynnewood embossed on it were uncovered across the street in another building that same week. He, in turned called his partner, and the partner quickly traded the owner out of the bottle. A background check of the building revealed that the original building was built around 1895 as a single story building with a brick basement. Between 1905 and 1915, the building served as a local pawn shop. In 1915, the building caught fire, exploded, and collapsed on itself. The building was rebuilt with all the debris pushed into the basement and covered with dirt. The owners today are in the wine business and wanted the basement re-

New Members Henet Historical Bottle Seekers Attn: Austin Jones, President 25059 Roseburgh Ln Hemet, CA 92544 951-927-9194 Nuggetup@yahoo.com Huron Valley Bottle & Insulator Club Attn: Michele Kotlarsky, President 2475 W Walton Blvd Waterford, MI 48329 248-673-1650 Michelek@mac.com Carl Alimonti 149 Starheim Rd Stamford, NY 12167 607-435-1654 General

Figure 3 opened to be used as a wine vault. They had the floor removed and all the dirt and debris hauled off. This only example of a Wynnewood soda bottle, several patent medicine bottles and an old safe were uncovered during the process. Thanks to the new ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remodeling efforts, another piece of Oklahoma's past has come to light.

Figure 4

September-October 2008

69

FOHBC MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY ADDITIONS & CHANGES

Two Pieces of Oklahoma History Surface So far this year, two important artifacts of Oklahoma's past have been uncovered by bottle diggers. Earlier this year, a previously unknown Poteau, I.T. (Indian Territory) Hutchinson (Fig. 1 & 2) was dug up in the bordering state of Arkansas near Fort Smith. Oklahoma's legendary bottle digger and author, Johnnie Fletcher and I, believe this bottle to be the earliest known variant of the four previously known Poteau, I.T. Hutches. This aqua, four-line tombstone slug plate bottle has a shorter than normal Hutchinson top on it and has the letter ''P'' in raised bumps or dots on the bottom. Normally, if a bottle has anything embossed on the bottom, it has a raised, solid letter. Of the four previously reported I.T. Hutches from this town, three have an embossed ''S'' on the bot-

Bottles and Extras

David Baumann (405) 816-1340 firstgencoltman1@cox.net

James Ayers 5186 Claudville Hwy Claudville, VA 24076 276-251-8015 rjment@swva.net Bottles, jugs, antique labels Mark Benbow 7214 Roosevelt Ave Falls Church, VA 22042 703-698-5714 mark@rustycans.com Beer cans and patent medicine bottles Ted Briley 5001 S Hickory Ave # 116 Broken Arrow, OK 74011 918-760-8274 Coca-cola bottles

Terry Burdette 3588 Riverfork Rd Waterloo, SC 29384 864-677-2122 Burdetts@prtcnet.com Fruit jars and pottery

Phil Glass 1006 Old Greensboro Rd. Thomasville, NC 27360 249-8054 Bottles@triad.rr.com Sodas, bitters, Pepsi

Harold Carlton 205 Locust St Johnson City, TN 37604 423-928-7649 Hutches, Pepsi, and local bottles

James Gray 12 Arrow St Cambridge, MA 02138 617-868-0752 Jamesgray2@mac.com Pontiled New England bottles

Kirk Humbrecht 19010 Ruth Dr Mokena, IL 60448 708-878-8392 Khumbrecht @phoenixfire.com Fire grenades and fire alarm insulators

David A. Hall 1224 McDonald Ave. Wilmington, CA 90744 310-834-6368 dcorridor@sbcglobal.net Local bottles from Long Beach, San Pedro, Wilmington (California)

Steve Kehrer Strano & Associates 705 E Hanaover St New Baden, IL 62265 618-410-4121 Kehrer00@charter.net Southern Illinois blob top and hutch type sodas

Michael Hester 2113 Washington Ave Harrisburg, PA 17109 717-232-0624 Hestermi@etown.edu Harrisburg bottles

Ray Klingensmith 1228 Highland Ave Cambridge, OH 43725 740-432-4466 Ray@poletop.com

Art Church 411 Hillside Lake Rd Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 845-705-5077 Art3672@aol.com Carter Davis 27531 Mt Nebo Rd Onancock, VA 23417 757-787-3690 IDavis@verizon.net Joseph Garlena 55 Long Ln York Haven, PA 17370 717-938-4863 joseph_garlena @us.crawco.com Inherited thousands of bottles from father Bill Geisz 4 Clive Hills Rd Edison, NJ 08818 732-549-2366 Colored pontiled medicines and sodas Justin Gilbert 56730 Blue Sky Ln Dublin, VA 24084 540-616-6517 JustinG1971@yahoo.com

Ryan Howard 260 Country By Way York, PA 17402 717-586-6347 RHoward182@hotmail.com

Ron Higgins 5127 Larchmont Dr Chesapeake Beach, MD 20732 301-855-4823

John Lee 885 E Ritchie Rd Salisbury, NC 28146 704-637-7572 leejohnh@bellsouth.net Fruit jars and related items

Roger Hill 522 Palmer Ln Menlo Park, CA 94025 650-324-4245 rogerhillusa@yahoo.com 1920s sodas

Richard Luey 600 W Avenida De La Merced Montebello, CA 90640 626-428-6011 General

Ralph Hollibaugh 2087 Glenrose Dr Redding, CA 96001 530-243-4672 California shot glasses, California back bar bottles, California liquor paper & cards

William & Peggy Mathias RR 1, Box 174 C 4 Flatrock Rd Independence, WV 26374 304-864-4392 mathiasbildo@hotmail.com Bottles and framed art prints


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Ron McCormick 1503 NW 11th Rd Gainesville, FL 32605 352-262-8672 oldflabottles@aol.com Florida flasks, Florida Bottliing Works, and Florida drug stores and pharmacies Keith McIntyre 1611 Stanford Dr Statesboro, GA 30461 912-587-9331 ogeechee_mac@yahoo.com Tommy & Sherry Mitchiner PO Box 54 Gordon, GA 31031 478-628-2373 Sherry_mitchiner @yahoo.com Georgeia blob tops and John Ryan bottles, etc Doug Nicot PO Box 121 Shortsville, NY 14548 585-289-8654 razorman@rochester.rr.com Barber bottles Eric Peirce 33092 Seawatch Dana Point, CA 92629

September-October 2008

Randy Salmons 31541 Highway 20 Fort Bragg, CA 95437 707-964-4301 Pepper sauces and Honeywell Charna Sansbury 11644 SW Ergret Cir # 1805 Lake Suzy, FL 34269 410-867-1945 Bottlemiss@aol.com Infant feeders Jason Townsend 720 N Dekalb St Sandwich, IL 60548 630-667-3357 JTins76@gmail.com Insulators

Bottles and Extras

Ralph Yoders 9767 Outville Rd SW Kirkersville, OH 43033 740-927-1029 sirpeanut@embarqmail.com Fruit jars and bottles

Changes

Jar Doctor™ YOUR COMPLETE SOURCE FOR GLASS

CLEANING EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

Larry Veneziano 27 W 115 Vale Rd West Chicago, IL 60185 630-293-1435 LarryHH@comcast.net Insulators

Designed to safely and professionally clean inside, Outside and base - all at one time. Available in white and clear PVC (3” through 7” ID) Prices ranging from $85 to $225

CLEANING MACHINES Units available, starting at $180 for small one-canister

OXIDES Polishing Aluminum, Cerium, and Tin $8, $11, and $20 per pound Cutting

September-October 2008

3

Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

Lynn Koehler PO Box 265 Niobrara, NE 68760 402-873-7147 botone@alltel.net Inks

CLEANING CANISTERS

Daniel Turner 1846 Gorham Rd Geneva, NY 14456 585-526-5352 Dturner922@hotmail.com Bitters

Bottles and Extras

President’s Message For those who don’t know me, I started collecting bottles back in the 60s and have been at it ever since. Digging, trading, buying and selling. I tell a lot of folks I collect home town bottles - I was born in San Francisco. I go after western bitters, whiskies, U.S.A. Hospital Department bottles, Lash’s and Hostetter’s bitters and the advertising that goes with them. Enough about me. As president of the FOHBC, I will do my best to grow the membership, insure that our magazine maintains the quality it has achieved, and is put out in a timely and consistent manner and promote the hobby whenever and wherever I can. The economy is tough and a lot of people are having a hard time making

ends meet, let alone spending money on hobby items. Travel is costly, with fuel at record prices, motel and food costs on a trip is also way up there. Still, bottle auction prices are holding, if not going up. Ebay sales are a little off, probably due to the quality of the items not being as stated. The sellers who give return privileges for a full refund do well and every once in awhile you can get a real deal. I’m always adding to my Hostetters collection from Ebay. Show attendance is off some because of the economy, but show sales here in the west have been pretty good. Maybe the dealers are taking less of a profit to move their stock and the customer base is down so you have to deal. The economy will get

President: Richard Siri PO Box 3818 Santa Rosa, CA 95402 (707) 542-6438 rtsiri@sbcglobal.net

better and things will get back to normal, whatever that is, and the hobby will survive. In the meantime, keep connected, check out the web site, keep your membership up so you can continue to get the magazine which will prove to be the glue that keeps the hobby together and moving forward. Maybe this is a good time to research that find you dug or bought, do an article and have it published in Bottles and Extras. Digging stories are fun, too. Be safe and stay well. Richard T. Siri, President FOHBC

Various grits of silicon carbide ranging from $6 to $12 per pound

TUMBLING COPPER

Gerry & Kathy Phifer 5201 SW - 32nd Terr. Topeka, KS 66614 785-271-6170 Jarman1@cox.net Fruit jars Kathryn Piersma 3912 Piute Dr Grandville, MI 49418 616-530-0222 BusyBeadz@att.net Glasshouse whimseys Ed Potter 82 Gabrielle St West Seneca, NY 14227 716-674-8890 Buffalo, New York bottles and Pan American items

Tod VonMechow 247 Washington Ave Phoenixville, PA 19460 610-935-0619 Tedvon@verizon.net Nancy & Ron Whisker 208 Tapeworm Rd New Bloomfield, PA 17068 717-203-4132 craftywhiskers@nmax.net Francis G Wiltz 715 S St Atchison, KS 66002 913-367-5486 Bottles

New 12 and 14 gauge chisel point in 3 sizes $8.50 per pound

We accept:

FOHBC Outgoing and Incoming Presidents

Paypal & ©

For further information, contact: R Wayne Lowry 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 JarDoctor@aol.com www.JarDoctor.com

(816) 318-0161 (816) 318-0162 (fax)

Carl Sturm, outgoing on left 2006-2008 Richard Siri, incoming on right 2008-2010


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September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

September-October 2008

71

Bottle and Extras Individual and Affiliated Club Membership Information Bottles and Extras

Membership in the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors includes:

Bottles and Extras

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Single issues and back issues: $5.00 each Membership information, forms, and an online payment option are also available on the website (www.FOHBC.com) Enclose the appropriate amount payable to FOHBC and mail to: FOHBC June Lowry, Business Manager 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083 Please allow 6 - 8 weeks from the time you send in your payment for the arrival of your first issue of Bottles and Extras

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors is a non-profit organization for collectors of historical bottles and related collectible items. Our primary goal is educational as it relates to the history and manufacture of historical bottles and related artifacts.

FOHBC Officers 2008-2010 President: Richard Siri, PO Box 3818, Santa Rosa, CA 95402; phone: (707) 542-6438; e-mail: rtsiri@sbcglobal.net First Vice-President: Bob Ferraro, 515 Northridge Dr, Boulder City, NV 89005; phone: (701) 293-3114; e-mail: mayorferraro@aol.com Second Vice-President: John Pastor, 5716 Versailles Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48103; phone: (734) 827-2070; e-mail: jpastor2000@sbcglobal.net Secretary: Ed Herrold, 65 Laurel Loop, Maggie Valley, NC 28571; phone: (828) 926-2513; e-mail: drbitters@mindspring.com Treasurer: Alan DeMaison, 4605 Clipper Cove, Painesville, OH 44077; phone: (440) 358-1223; e-mail: a.demaison@sbcglobal.net Historian: Richard Watson, 10 S Wendover Rd, Medford, NJ 08055; phone: (856) 983-1364; e-mail: crwatsonnj@verizon.net Editor (acting): June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083; phone: (816) 318-0161; e-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Merchandising Director: Kent Williams, 1835 Oak Ter, Newcastle, CA 95658; phone: (916) 663-1265; e-mail: KentW@ppoa.org Membership Director: Gene Bradberry, PO Box 341062, Memphis, TN 38184; phone: (901) 372-8428; e-mail: Genebsa@comcast.net Convention Director: R Wayne Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083; phone: (816) 318-0161; e-mail: JarDoctor@aol.com

Business Manager: June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083; phone: (816) 318-0160; e-mail: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com Director-at-Large: Carl Sturm, 88 Sweetbriar Branch, Longwood, FL 32750; phone: (407) 332-7689; e-mail: glassmancarl@sprintmail.com Director-at-Large: Sheldon Baugh, 252 W Valley Dr, Russelville, KY 42276; phone: (270) 726-2712; e-mail: shel6943@bellsouth.net Director-at-Large: Cecil Munsey, 13541 Willow Run Rd, Poway, CA 92064; phone: (858) 487-7036; e-mail: cecilmunsey@cox.net Midwest Region Director: Jamie Houdeshell, PO Box 57, Haskins, OH 43525; phone: (419) 823-8452; e-mail: JHBottle@hotmail.com Northeast Region Director: James Bender, PO Box 162, Sprakers, NY 12166; phone: (518) 673-8833; e-mail: Jim1@frontiernet.net Southern Region Director: Ron Hands, 913 Parkside Dr, Wilson, NC 27896; phone: (252) 265-6644; e-mail: rshands225@yahoo.com Western Region Director: Bill Ham, 4237 Hendricks Rd, Lakeport, CA 95433; phone: (707) 263-6563; e-mail: Billham@sbcglobal.net Public Relations Director: James Berry, 200 Ft Watershed Rd, St. Johnsville, NY 13452; phone: (518) 568-5683; e-mail: jhberry10@yahoo.com

Bottles and Extras Affiliated club membership rates for one year $75.00 (inside US) $95.00 (Canada) $110.00 (Other foreign) Club name Mailing address City State Zip Club President Address City State Zip E-mail address Meeting location Day Club website Club newsletter name Newsletter editor Club’s show date Club’s show location

(Use extra paper if necessary) Clearly PRINT or TYPE all ad copy

Telephone (

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Telephone (

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Time

Enclose the appropriate amount payable to FOHBC and mail to: FOHBC June Lowry, Business Manager 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083


72

September-October 2008

Bottles and Extras

Bottles and Extras

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

Membership Benefits

Bottles and Extras

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors cordially invites you to join a dedicated group of individuals and clubs who collect, study and display the treasured glass and ceramic gems of yesteryear. The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors (FOHBC) is a non-profit organization supporting collectors of historical bottles, flasks, jars, and related items. The goal of the FOHBC is to promote the collection, study, preservation and display of historical bottles and related artifacts and to share this information with other collectors. Federation membership is open to any individual or club interested in the enjoyment and study of antique bottles. The Federation publication, Bottles & Extras, is well known throughout the hobby world as the leading publication for those interested in bottles and “go-withs”. The magazeine includes articles of historical interest, stories chronicling the hobby and the history of bottle collecting, digging stories, regional news, show reports, advertisements, show listings, and an auction directory. Bottles & Extras is truly the place to go when information is needed about this popular and growing hobby. In addition to providing strength to a national international organization devoted to the welfare of the hobby, your FOHBC membership benefits include: • A full year subscription the Federation’s official publication, Bottles & Extras (now published Bi-Monthly) • One free ad per yearly membership of 60 words for use for “wanted” items, trade offers, etc. • Eligibility for a discount at FOHBC sponsored shows (National or EXPOs) towards “early admission” or dealer table rent • Access to a knowledge of the world of antique bottle collecting unavailable elsewhere • Contact information for clubs devoted to the study of historical bottles • A forum for your writings, articles, and editorials regarding the hobby • Participation in the nomination and selection of Federation members for the Honor Roll and Hall of Fame • Federation-sponsored writing, show poster, and newsletter-design contests • Free publication assistance for your book or manuscript • And more... We encourage Affiliated Bottle Club memberships by offering these additional benefits to your group: • Display advertising in Bottles & Extras at an increased discount of 50% • Insertion of your bottle club show ad on the Federation website to increase your show’s exposure • Links to your club website free of charge, as well as assistance with the creation of your website • Free Federation ribbon for Most Educational Display at your show • Slide programs for use at your club meetings • Participation in Federation sponsored insurance program for your club show and any other club sponsored activities Finally… We need your support! Our continued existence is dependent upon your participation as well as expanding our membership. The Federation is the only national organization devoted to the enjoyment, study, preservation, collection, and display of historical bottles. The FOHBC welcomes individuals who would like to contribute by running for Board positions or by sharing their expertise and volunteering their talents in other areas of interest such as contributions to our publications, assistance with the Federation’s National and EXPO shows, or through membership promotion. If you haven’t yet joined our organization, please do so and begin reaping the benefits. If you are already a member, please encourage your friends and fellow collectors to JOIN US!! For more information, questions, or to join the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, please contact: June Lowry FOHBC Business Manager 401 Johnston Ct. Raymore, MO 64083 816-318-0160 OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com or visit our home page on the web at www.FOHBC.com

September-October 2008

Vol. 19 No 4

September-October 2008

No. 179

Table of Contents FOHBC Officer Listing 2008 - 2010 ........ 2 Whiskey Rogues Jack Sullivan...................................24 President’s Message ................................. 3 Barton Balls Recent Finds ............................................. 4 Mike O’Malley................................28

Plunder Chest Cecil Munsey ..................................54

At Auction ................................................ 5 Ownership Statement...............................32

401/W.H. Bard/Portland Ore Garth Ziegenhagen.........................61

Bottle Buzz............................................... 6 The Dating Game: Berney-Bond Russ Hoenig, Bill Lockhart, Pete Regional Reports ...................................... 8 Schulz, Carol Serr, Les Jordan, Bill Lindsay & Phil Perry, ..............33 Canning Fun Facts.................................. 19 Absinthe II Earl Swift Slate Cleaner Cecil Munsey ..................................43 Dave Maryo ................................... 20 Table and Office Ware from Capstan Tired Blood Barry Bernas...................................50 Bill Baab ........................................ 21

The Jar Charles Head..................................58

Classified Ads & Ad Rate Information....62 Show Biz Show Calendar................................66 Membership Additions and Changes .......69 Membership Application .........................71 Membership Benefits ..............................72

Don’t miss an issue - Please check your label for expiration information. Fair use notice: Some material above has been submitted for publication in this magazine and/or was originally published by the authors and is copyrighted. We, as a non-profit organization, offer it here as an educational tool to increase further understanding and discussion of bottle collecting and related history. We believe this constitutes “fair use” of the copyrighted material as provided for in Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. If you wish to use this material for purposes of your own that go beyond “fair use”, you must obtain permission from the copyrighted owner(s).

WHO DO I CONTACT ABOUT THE MAGAZINE? CHANGE OF ADDRESS, MISSING ISSUES, etc., contact the Business Manager June Lowry, 401 Johnston Ct., Raymore, MO 64083; Phone: (816) 318-0160 or email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com To ADVERTISE, SUBSCRIBE or RENEW a subscription, see pages 64-65 for details. To SUBMIT A STORY, send a LETTER TO THE EDITOR, or have COMMENTS and concerns, Contact: June Lowry, Bottles and Extras, 401 Johnston Ct, Raymore, MO 64083 Phone: (816) 318-0160 or email: OSUBuckeyes71@aol.com BOTTLES AND EXTRAS © (ISSN 1050-5598) is published bi-monthly (6 issues per year) by the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc. (a non-profit IRS C3 educational organization) at 401 Johnston Court, Raymore, MO 64083; Ph: (816) 318-0160; Website: http://www.fohbc.com. Non-profit periodicals postage paid at Raymore, MO 64083 and additional mailing office, Pub. #005062. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Bottles and Extras, FOHBC, 401 Johnston Court, Raymore, MO 64083; ph: (816) 318-0160. Annual subscription rate is $30 or $45 for First Class, $50 Canada and $65 other foreign in U.S. funds. The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc. assumes no responsibility for products and services advertised in this publication. The names: Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc., and Bottles and Extras©, are registered ® names of the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc., and no use of either, other than as references, may be used without expressed written consent from the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors., Inc. Certain material contained in this publication is copyrighted by, and remains the sole property of, the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, Inc., while others remain property of the submitting authors. Detailed information concerning a particular article may be obtained from the Editor. Printed by J-2 Printing, North Kansas City, MO 64116


WANTED Penn Colored Hutchinsons TURCHI BROS. PHILA (CITRON) T.D. CUMMINGS, PHILA (OLIVE GREEN) P.J. SERWAZI, MANAYUNK (DEEP OLIVE) JOS. SMITH RENOVA, PA (OLIVE GREEN) GOUDIE MOL & CO. ALLENTOWN (GREEN) P.H. REASBECK BRADDOCK (E. GREEN) UNION BOTTLING WORKS, PITTSBURG (CITRON) SOUTHSIDE BOTTLING HOUSE, A.M. SCHADEMAN (AMBER & CITRON) SOUTHSIDE BOTTLING HOUSE (COBALT) LAFFEY & HARRIGAN, JOHNSTOWN (COBALT) RIDGEWAY BOTTLING WORKS, R. POWER (COBALT)

KEYSTONE BOTTLING HOUSE, PITTSBURG (LT. COBALT) J.C. BUFFUM & CO., PITTSBURG (ALL COLORS) ROYAL BOTTLING HOUSE, J. UNGLER, PITTSBURG (AMBER) F.J. BRENNAN, SHENANDOAH (YELLOW) ASHLAND BOTTLING WORKS, ASHLAND (AMBER) PHIL FISHER, PITTSBURGH (CITRON) T.I. (AMBER & COBALT) PITTSBURGH BOTTLE EAGLE BOTTLING WORKS, YORK (AMBER) A.K. CLARK, 41 CRAIG ST., ALLEGHENY (CITRON & AMBER) EXCELSIOR BOTTLING WORKS, ALLEGHENY CITY, PA (COBALT, AMBER, CITRON)

I WILL PURCHASE OUTRIGHT OR TRADE FOR OTHER PENN COLORED HUTCHINSONS. PLEASE CONTACT ME AT (813) 286-9686 OR EMAIL AT RBROWN 4134@AOL.COM FOR LIST OF AVAILABLE COLORED HUTCHS. R.J. BROWN, 4114 W. MULLEN AVENUE, TAMPA, FL 33609


FOHBC C/O June Lowry 401 Johnston Ct Raymore, MO 64083

Bottles and Extras

Absinthe Part II Page 43

Table & Office Wares Page 50

Periodicals

September-October 2008

The official publication of the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors

What is it? Page 6

Whiskey Rogues Page 29

Vol. 19 No. 3

US Postage Paid

Kansas City, MO 64108

www.FOHBC.com

B&e sepoct 2008r  

Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors (FOHBC) September October 2008 Issue of Bottles and Extras

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