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DUX Peninsula Edition

DATE: FEB10

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2010 ESSENTIAL EDUCATION GUIDE

PLUS DEVELOPING LITERACY THROUGH SONGS AND RHYMES

H A I L E Y B U R Y Award winning teachers. Small Classes. National Best Practice Outcomes.

Keysborough

Berwick

A C C L A I M E D

Brighton

www.haileybury.vic.edu.au

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LEARN HOW TO BANK ON YOUR MEMORY

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Mind matters


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St Leonard’s College

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St Leonard’s College is a coeducational, Uniting Church College, with almost equal numbers of boys and girls. The school has two campuses in Melbourne, one in Brighton and one at Patterson River. The Brighton Campus, which caters for students from ELC to year 12 has over 1400 students, and the Cornish Campus at Patterson River has approximately 320 students from ELC to year 10.

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The College enjoys an enviable academic record, offering both VCE and the International Baccalaureate Diploma at years 11 and 12. The Reggio Emilia philosophy of early years education underpins the Junior School curriculum and the College is accredited to offer the IB Primary Years Programme at both campuses. Cocurricular activities are viewed as an essential part of College life, rather than an option, and include academic, artistic, community and sporting opportunities. The College has been recognised for many of its programs, particularly its sustainable education program and recently the Cornish Campus was named the Sustainable School of the Year by the University of NSW.

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2011 Scholarships Each year the College offers academic, general excellence and performing arts scholarships to boys and girls presently at any school.

You can find us at…. Brighton Campus ELC – year 12, over 1,400 students 163 South Road, Brighton East VIC 3187 Phone 9909 9300 Facsimile 9592 3439 Cornish Campus at Patterson River ELC – year 10, over 320 students 65 Riverend Road, Bangholme VIC 3175 Phone 9773 1011 Facsimile 9773 1726 The best people to contact are… Enrolment inquiries Beryl McMillan, Director Community Relations ph 9909 9300 or email enrolment@stleonards.vic.edu.au

Applications close 21 February 2010 and are accepted on-line at www.stleonards.vic.edu.au

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Small school, big school, great school! Meet our new Principal, Mr Stuart Davis at our information sessions in February.

Cornish Campus Monday 8 February at 10.00am for a tour of the campus on a school day and a chance to talk with staff.

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St Leonard’s College provides an education and environment to suit all students. From our smaller campus at Patterson River to our larger Brighton Campus that caters to students up to year 12 and offers both the VCE and the International Baccalaureate.

Saturday 27 February at 10.00am for an information session and tour.

Cornish Campus Patterson River

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Brighton Campus Brighton East

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Brighton Campus Tuesday 23 February at 6.15pm tour and 7.00pm for an information session.

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4 CONTENTS advertisers’ index

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Haileybury ............................................p1 St Leonard’s College ........................ p2,3 Woodleigh School ............................... p4 John Paul College................................ p5 Mentone Girls’ Grammar School......... p6 Padua College ......................................p7 The Peninsula School.......................... p8 Mt Eliza Secondary College ................ p9 Kindergarten/Childcare Guide ..........p10 Mentone Grammar ............................. p11 Frankston High School .......................p12 Local Primary Schools .......................p13 Local Secondary Schools ...................p14 Penbank School .................................p16

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To advertise, contact Karen Chandler 9875 8346 or email dux@leadernewspapers.com.au

DATE: FEB10

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editor’s note

inside

Kindergarten is, of course, part of the vital early years in education. It seems there is always something we can do to help stimulate the developing brain. In this edition of Dux (page 5), we look at the value of an oldie but a goodie – the saying and singing of rhymes and songs. One of the benefits of saying traditional rhymes is the exposure children get to words and phrases they do not hear in everyday life, thus expanding their vocabularies. And (excuse me for jumping forward several years) research shows children with excellent vocabularies at age seven go on to do well in their final years of schooling. You’ll also find the most popular songs and rhymes among Australian children as part of our story. Enjoy the read,

It’s not too late to improve my memory? Phew! I was so pleased to read our story (page 8) about tips and tricks for making your memory work more efficiently. I was also relieved the adage that practice makes perfect even applies when you’re trying to train brain cells. Rest assured, however, that our expert is not an advocate of rote learning or learning without understanding or comprehension. Some of the suggestions even sound like fun. Speaking of fun – that’s probably the picture that’s conjured when you think about teenagers taking a gap year abroad. However, increasing numbers of school leavers are having more than fun; they are paying to do volunteer work in a developing country for at least part of their year. See page 15 to read about the experience of Melbourne’s Lily Colley when she was working in a kindergarten in rural Peru.

Kristin Owen Education editor owenk@leadernewspapers.com.au

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WORDS OF WONDER

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TEEN MENTAL HEALTH

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MIND GAMES

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How rhymes and songs form the basis of children’s literacy Parents need to read the signs to ensure their adolescents are OK Students, the young, the old, the in-between can all improve their memory

FILLING THE GAP A gap year can be more than a holiday. It can be soul-inspiring work

Dux editor: Kristin Owen Contributors: Fay Burstin, Shaunagh O’Connor Photographer: Tony Gough Designer: Josie Kilgour Sub-editor: Louise Browne Advertising: Karen Chandler Publisher: Sylvia Bradshaw Published by Leader Associated Newspapers PTY LTD, ABN 34 004 337 446. Leader Community Newspapers cannot be held liable for any errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission.

E OUGH T N EV ER TO DO FOR YOU NG PEOPL E W H AT T H E Y, with a struggle, COU L D

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BE E X PEC T ED TO BE DOI NG FOR T H E MSE LV E S.” Michael Norman (Principal of Woodleigh School 1974 – 1980)

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Junior Campus – Minimbah Court, Frankston South, Victoria 3199

t 03 9788 6488

f 03 9787 3931

e minimbah@woodleigh.vic.edu.au

Senior Campus – Golf Links Road, Baxter, Victoria 3911

t 03 5971 6100

f 03 5971 1010

e office@woodleigh.vic.edu.au

DUX 2010

woodleigh.vic.edu.au

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SOUNDING OUT 5

Words of wonder RHYMES ARE MORE THAN CHILD’S PLAY, WRITES FAY BURSTIN

● This Little Piggy ● Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star ● Humpty Dumpty

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● Round and Round the Garden ● Baa, Baa, Black Sheep ● Ring-a-Ring-a-Roses ● Rock-a-bye Baby ● Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree ● I’m a Little Teapot ● Bananas in Pyjamas ● Five Little Ducks ● Old MacDonald had a Farm ● This Old Man

Pictured from left: Emily, Tess and Millie, all 4.

to hear sounds that go together, known as phonemic awareness,’’ Prof Raban said. But there may be more than just science at work here. Renowned Australian children’s folklorist, academic and writer June Factor says familiarity is one of the keys to early learning. She believes popular nursery rhymes should form the basis of children’s first reading material.

“When children are familiar with the material, they are highly motivated and can make good guesses,’’ Dr Factor said. “Much of children’s early attempts at reading are guesses and if they make too many mistakes they lose heart. But if the first books are built on what they already know, they can’t go wrong and it gives them confidence to keep going.”

Source: Play and Folklore, edited by June Factor and Gwenda Beed Davey

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● Waltzing Matilda

Thursday 18 February 2010 4pm and 7pm Tuesday 19 October 2010 4pm and 7pm McMahons Road Frankston Victoria 3199 P (03) 9784 0200 / www.jpc.vic.edu.au

Enrolments for Year 7 2011 close 26 February 2010 - enrol today.

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OPEN DAYS

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DATE: FEB10

onsense rhymes about cows jumping over the moon, mice running up clocks and giant eggs falling off walls have enthralled children for centuries. But while they squeal with delight as this little piggy goes “wee wee wee” all the way home, something profound is happening in children’s rapidly developing brains. Education experts now agree that traditional nursery rhymes, chants and songs have a significant effect on helping develop children’s abilities to communicate, read and write. An early childhood specialist, Bridie Raban from the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education, said singing and reciting nursery rhymes to young children is now regarded as the first step towards developing literacy skills. Rhyming and alliteration encourage children to listen carefully to words.“All the research evidence points to the fact that rhymes and songs alert children to the patterns in language …and give them the opportunity

Australia’s most popular nursery rhymes, songs and chants


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YOUR TEENS 6 MIND TAG HERE 18

Head space SOMETIMES THE JOURNEY GETS TOUGH

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o the outsider, one of psychologist Michael Carr-Gregg’s patients looks, walks and talks like a 21-year-old. But she’s yet to blow out 15 candles on her birthday cake. The 14-year-old may look like she’s finished tertiary education when she’s actually just started to tackle years of adolescence. “Because these teens walk the walk and talk the talk, people assume they’ve got the life experience and the cognitive maturity to go with it and they clearly don’t,” Dr Carr-Gregg says. The Melbourne expert in adolescent mental health has released his new book, When to Really Worry, looking at the difference between the normal journey a child takes to adulthood, and a journey full of the symptoms of depression and mental disorder. Dr Carr-Gregg was inspired to write his book after the suicide of high-achieving Melbourne schoolgirl Hannah Modra, who suffered undiagnosed depression.

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While his book looks at a range of mental health problems such as psychosis, ADHD, obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders, Dr Carr-Gregg said depression is the most common form of mental disorder suffered by teens. The 2009 National Survey of Young Australians, involving 48,000 people aged 11-24, found drugs, body image and suicide were their top concerns. It was revealed last year that a cluster of teens at a Victorian school had taken their own lives. Schoolyard bullying and cyber bullying leave their teen victims depressed and in despair, and statistics show that one in five young people will suffer depression before they turn 18 for a range of reasons. For parents, the average adolescent journey can be annoying, tiresome and challenging, while for an adolescent with depression or other mental illness, it is heartbreaking and needs intervention. The key to tackling depression, Dr

A K–12 community that cares. Give yo your daughter the best start in a vibrant, caring commu community that challenges each student to aspire to excelle excellence and fulfil her potential; where students develop a love of learning and a genuine respect for each other.

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SCH SCHOLARSHIPS Years 5-11 in 2011: clo closing Friday 5 March 2010. S SCHOOL TOUR Saturday 13 March at 9.30am

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Phone 9581 1200 www.mentonegirls.vic.edu.au

Men

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tone G irls. Remarka

ble Women.

Mentone Girls’ Grammar School 11 Mentone Parade,VIC 3194 Peninsula Edition |

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MIND YOUR TEENS 7

● They remain tearful, sullen and out of sorts for

two weeks or more ● They appear to lose interest in life and don’t

enjoy things that once gave them pleasure ● They have trouble sleeping ● They are apathetic and excessively tired ● They have trouble thinking and concentrating ● They gain or lose a lot of weight ● They have unexplained headaches, stomach

aches or other pains ● They make comments such as, “I feel rotten

inside”, “I just want it all to end”, or “Soon, I won’t be a problem for everyone” Carr-Gregg said. They lack the emotional maturity to understand the normal changes they are going through. “One of the most important messages I’d like to give those parents is one that relates to optimistic thinking. “Prof Martin Seligman wrote The Optimistic Child and has created a branch of psychology called positive psychology. “One of his claims is that if we can teach young children the capacity for optimistic thinking and positive self-talk, we halve the

rate of depression and anxiety as they go through adolescence. “We have to help our children when they’re growing up to identify unhelpful thinking, black-and-white thinking, catastrophising. “If we can get them to look at their explanatory style, look out for the ‘shoulds’, the ‘oughts’, the ‘musts’ and the ‘can’ts’ – the rigid self-talk – it enables us to model for them a way to challenge those unhelpful ways of thinking.”

Dr Carr-Gregg says: DON’T FOCUS ON SUICIDE “It’s unhelpful. We need to focus on what leads up to suicide. If we can identify these mental health issues early then we stand a much better chance of helping young people who might be at risk of taking their own lives by getting them that early treatment. If we can address the depression issue we simultaneously address the issue of youth suicide.” EARLY TREATMENT “Mental health problems can stop your young person from tackling developmental tasks, but the good news is that early intervention, early treatment, is associated with a good outcome.” PREDISPOSITION “People are born with a certain disposition, a personality, a temperament that predisposes them to depression. Let’s say your mum and your dad were both born with depression. That gives you what we call a genetic loading. We know that adverse life events can happen – a separation, a divorce, a trauma, a chronic illness, sexual assault – and that seems to trigger the depression in people who are predisposed to it.” When to Really Worry,

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Worrying signs that a teen is clinically depressed may include :

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Carr-Gregg said, is reading changes in behaviour, outlook and attitude. He admits this is easier said than done during a time in a child’s life defined by massive changes as the norm. “The challenge for mums and dads is to become the world expert on their kids,” Dr Carr-Gregg said. “And if you get to know the way in which your kids operate usually, you’re in a much better position to look for the changes when they occur. “The difficulty with adolescence generally is that it’s a time of change and it’s very difficult to distinguish between what is normal teenage behaviour – mood swings, slamming doors, not paying attention, blurting stuff out – and what constitutes a clinical condition.” While acceptable sadness can last a day or two, depression is a sustained despair lasting more than two weeks. Dr Carr-Gregg reveals that the average delay between the onset of mental illness and its diagnosis is between five and 15 years. The first port of call if you are worried is your GP, the person at the gateway to the healthcare system and the one to direct you to specialist help if needed. The adolescent brain remains fragile and under-developed until its owner is well into their 20s. “What’s not understood enough is that the teenage brain is a work in progress,” Dr

rrp $19.95

Well done to the many students who achieved an ENTER score of over 90, putting them in the top 10% of the State, namely: Mitchell Bizon, Megan Christie, Matthew Dziegielewski, Dean Gazzola, Luke Gazzola, Nicholas Mackinnon, Georgia McDermott, Lucy Miceli, Benjamin Mililli, Jessica Mills, Ashley Murphy, Antonia Parry, Elliot Reid, Lesley Smith and Madeleine Westbrook.

Enrolment for Year 7 2012 at Padua College opens from 19 April and closes 11 June 2010.

To find out more, you are invited to attend an Information Night at Mornington Campus on Tuesday 4 May at 7:00 pm or at Rosebud Campus on Wednesday 12 May at 7:00 pm.

Rosebud Telephone 5982 9500 Junior Campus Year 7-10 Inglewood Crescent, Rosebud

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We also acknowledge the efforts of Elliott Reid and Alannah O’Brien-McDonald who each received a top score of 50 in Further Maths and Studio Arts respectively.

Parents of Year 5 children

Contact: enquiry@padua.catholic.edu.au www.padua.catholic.edu.au

We wish all our graduates well in their future studies and careers.

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We are proud to announce Nicholas Mackinnon as the Padua College Dux of 2009, achieving an ENTER ranking of 98.95.

Mornington Telephone 5976 0100 Junior Campus Year 7-10 Senior Campus Year 11-12 Oakbank Road, Mornington

Creative Sweat PAD 5281

Congratulations to the VCE Class of 2009

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www.padua.catholic.edu.au


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8 MEMORY BANK

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BRAIN EXERCISE BRINGS BENEFITS BEYOND EXAM RESULTS

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elbourne school groups and students are turning to memory training to improve exam scores and add value to study time – and they are getting results. Using your brain to learn everything from the names of the planets to spelling the word “accommodation” has always been part of a child’s educational development. However, in an age of spell-checking computers, educators have become wary of memory recollection standards slipping.

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BONUM TENE

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The Peninsula School

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Mind games I always tell students that you must understand something before you memorise it DANIEL DOBOS, MENTAL BLANK

So a drive has begun to encourage a fitness campaign for the brain. Just as health groups seek to get us all off the couch, memory experts recommend we take our minds out for a walk by engaging in memory training to improve

how we gain and retain knowledge. These types of brain games are finding enthusiasts at both ends of the age spectrum. Older people are using such exercises to keep their minds sharp and potentially reduce the risk of

dementia. For students and the young, the aims are to employ the brain and seek to improve their exam results and study techniques. Daniel Dobos, of Mental Blank, conducts popular clinics for schools about improving learning strategies by making better use of one’s memory banks. His business also extends to presentations for adults and professional groups. “At seminars I sometimes like to get everyone’s attention by memorising

OPEN DAY All welcome! Wednesday 9am -11am 17 February, 2010 Enter via Gate 3 and register at our Pavilion.

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MEMORY BANK 9

The V.A.L.U.E of clever thinking Memory specialist Daniel Dobos explains how he uses five elements to aid and improve his learning.

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VISUALISATION – Try to find a relationship with an image for each fact or word you want to retain. ASSOCIATION – Try to link two distinct elem ents together. It can be as simple as linking something old with something new. The aim is to establish in your mind a two-w ay connection between the elements. LOCATION – Location is a great sensory tool. When forming a visual memory cue, it can help if you create a unique location or perspective for it. UNUSUAL – The more quirky the image, the better you will remember it. Creating an unusual aspect to your visual cue can help to “jog” the memory. EMOTIONAL – Emotional experiences form some of the most significant and deep-set memories in our mind. Applying aspects of this emotional intellect can become an asset to learning. Think of it as a “shock” tactic.

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extend far beyond gaining better scores at school. Mental health workers and academics are increasingly interested in the important role memory has in a child’s general development. Sydney University conducts a Child Memory Clinic which helps children and teens with memory difficulties which impact negatively on their daily lives. Mr Dobos said the memory principles do serve many practical purposes. In an educational context, he said it is important to remember what the goal of study should be. “I always tell students that you must understand something before you memorise it,” he said. “There are times, with something like a list of facts, when just memorising it may be enough. But mostly what you need to have is a comprehension of just what you are trying to learn. Memory can be an amazing tool, but just like any other tool you have to know how to use it.” Researchers who study how the brain retains knowledge have found that visual memory can be more effective than auditory memory. Or, what we see is easier to recall than what we hear. To remember difficult facts, Mr Dobos suggests creating mental pictures. The concept is not new, but it is a skill that few apply. The example he provides is of a languages student trying to remember that the Spanish word for “table” is “mesa”. His method of doing so would be to associate “mesa” with something visual, for instance, making a mess. “So in my head what I do is associate ‘mesa’ with an image of a very messy table, with something strange like soft toys strewn over it. When I next hear ‘mesa’, my brain responds with this very quirky image, and there’s the table beneath all that mess. “We’ve had some really pleasing results with students through VCE Success,” Mr Dobos said. “And I don’t mean just in terms of getting better marks, but also by improving their confidence and their willingness to try different things.”  More: vcesuccess.com.au

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MOUNT ELIZA SECONDARY COLLEGE A school where students thrive in an environment of high expectations and are supported and nurtured to achieve a positive future. We offer a challenging and engaging curriculum that ensures your child reaches their full potential.

32QUVQ413856F/IM/10

Commitment to Individual Excellence on the Mornington Peninsula.

For further information and personalised tours please contact the College on 9787 6288. We look forward to meeting you and sharing our exceptional school. Peninsula Edition |

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all the names on the attendance roll,” Mr Dobos said. “The best I’ve done so far is recalling 114 names in 15 minutes.” Mr Dobos, 31, is quick to point out he’s not a freak – he’s a regular guy who finds keeping his mind and memory sharp to be not only useful but a fun hobby. He is also a person who has practised what he now preaches. Mr Dobos achieved high grades at VCE level and completed engineering and law degrees at Melbourne University before founding Mental Blank. His business now includes targeted assistance to VCE students through his program, VCE Success. The program covers not only memory and learning strategies, but more general aspects of study such as exam technique, note taking and, importantly, how to relax even during the demands of the VCE period. “One of the things I aim to do is take some of that stress away. If someone is spending a lot of time studying but they are not doing it effectively, then that is obviously not an intelligent use of their time,” Mr Dobos said. One senior school head in Melbourne, Jacqui Goldenberg, arranged for more than 80 students to participate in an intensive skills session presented by Mr Dobos late last year. The students, all in years 10 and 11, were intending to study towards their VCE this year. “It’s always good for our students to be exposed to different methods of learning,” said Ms Goldenberg, who was the school’s VCE co-ordinator last year. “I do see a real value in the learning methods that were demonstrated. Some of the memory techniques, while being simple, you can then apply to more elaborative techniques that are required in other subjects.” Ms Goldenberg said the existing format for VCE examinations still required a high element of memory-based knowledge to complement skills in comprehension and communication. This meant any improvement in memory could lead to a student being more confident about their studies and their potential to do well. The benefits of memory training


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Childcare & Kindergarten

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Peninsula Montessori Centre

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ADVERTISEMENT

Hope Early Learning Centre

Peninsula Montessori Centre is taking enrolments for playgroup (1-2 years), Small group (2-3years) and cycle 1 (3-6 years). Following Dr Maria Montessori’s philosophy each classroom is a mini society of mixed ages in which your child will be an independent and valued member. Call or email us to come and see for yourself the many benefits of this wonderful child oriented education.

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• • • •

9-11 Frank Street, Frankston Ph: 9783 2800 E: admin@pmc.vic.edu.au W: www.pmc.vic.edu.au

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• • •

Privately owned and operated Open Monday to Friday 6:30am till 6:30pm Fully Accredited 3 and 4 year old Kindergarten Program with Kindergarten Teacher All meals and nappies provided Kindergarten Sessions now available Extra Curricular programs offered

83 Dandenong Road, East Frankston. Phone 9781 3537 Peninsula Edition |

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OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR GIRLS AND BOYS F R O M

E L C

T O

Y E A R

1 2

 

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ELC - 4 10 - 12 5 - 9

Mentone Grammar is acknowledged as a dynamic learning environment with outstanding opportunities for boys and girls from ELC to Year 12. Our unique education model, where Middle School students in Years 5-9 learn in separate gender classes, with all other year levels coeducational, reflects modern thinking that boys and girls develop differently during various stages of adolescence.

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 Best of both worlds - all years learn together except Years 5-9 where girls and boys learn apart  Excellent teachers and outstanding results in a caring values-based community  Outstanding facilities including state-of-the-art Science Centre and a new junior school opening soon    Sat 27 Feb, Thu 11 Mar, Fri 14 May, Sat 7 Aug, Thu 28 Oct.         Online registrations close 22 February.

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63 Venice Street, Mentone | Phone 9584 4211 | www.mentonegrammar.net

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Do you have the future of Australian sport in your backyard?

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To nominate a sports star, call your local Leader editor or email contactus@leadernewspapers.com.au

* Nominee must be competing at or above state level to be eligible.

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Frankston High School

Year 12 Class 2009 – Best Always Congratulations to our Year 12 Class of 2009 who have upheld the school motto “Optima Semper – Best Always” by achieving sensational VCE results. These results are amongst the best in the state. MPR: QUV004 ED:

We are proud to announce the school Dux, Cathy Bi, with an ENTER of 99.5. Other outstanding results include: 7.3% (17) of our students achieved an ENTER above 95 - within the top 5% in Victoria. Over 33% (78) of our students received an ENTER of 80 or above- the top 20% in the state. Three students achieved a perfect subject score of 50, making them eligible for the prestigious Premier’s Award. These results reflect the unique opportunity the school provides to students on the Mornington Peninsula, by providing an exclusive Senior Campus with a focus on academic excellence. A continued strong tradition of students gaining tertiary first preferences, allows these students endless opportunities to pursue their dreams.

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Web: www.fhs.vic.edu.au

Phone: 61 3 9783 7955 32QUVQ456895F/IM/09

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Enrolments - 2011 For a solid learning foundation, consider

Together we learn

At Rowellyn Park Primary School in Carrum Downs, we educate the whole child. Widely acknowledged as a school of excellence we provide a welcoming atmosphere in which students, teachers and parents actively participate in a learning partnership. Our challenging and engaging curriculum is designed to stimulate creativity and to build strong foundations in Literacy, Numeracy, Science and Humanities.

Special features of our school • • • • • • • • • • •

Montessori Education

Its fundamental success is based on a deep respect for each individual child. Teaching guides or teachers are trained specifically to be able to monitor and design work plans for each child as they place the child at the centre of their teaching. Peninsula Edition |

2010 Vacancies for Grades 4, 5 and 6 available.

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PRIMARY SCHOOL - Ages 5-12 Karingal Primary Montessori Stream Mallum Avenue Frankston. Principal: Chris Gay 9789 0514

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The Montessori Method is centred around respect and encouragement, individual learning, unique equipment and is supported by classrooms designed to have a thoughtful balance of a variety of activities, allowing each child to progress at their own rate. Montessori education aims to create independent, confident, curious children who are eager to learn.

Mount Martha Primary School

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on the Peninsula

Small junior school classes Stimulating and child centred classrooms A library research centre Indoor gymnasium Visual Arts and Performing Arts program Physical Education classes / swimming classes Multi-media For a school tour or information Junior and Senior School Choir pack, ring the school on Instrumental Music & Dance classes 9782 0953 Aerobics Team or visit our website: Camping and Outdoor Education www.rowellynpark.vic.edu.au

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Rowellyn Park Primary School.

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y r a m Pri chool S ocus F

DATE: FEB10

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Limited places available for 2010. For enrolment enquiries contact 5974 2800 to arrange appointment with the Principal www.mtmarthaps.vic.edu.au Glenisla Drive, Mount Martha. DUX 2010

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Mount Erin College Where Students ASPIRE

OPEN

Mount Erin College

DAY

1PM, SATURDAY 13 FEBRUARY All Welcome. Visit Toorak College. Enquiries and School Tours.

SCHOLARSHIP EXAM MPR: QUV004

Scholarship applications are now available online for entry in 2011. Junior Boys and Girls into Years 5 & 6 and Senior Girls into Years 7 to 12.

Your child deserves the opportunity to reach their maximum potential. Toorak College is committed to improved Academic Performance for every student. www.toorakc.vic.edu.au

For more information and enquiries contact Ms Donna Galloway on 9788 7234 or visit our website.

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An Independent Day and Boarding School for Girls Years 7 to 12 and Co-educational Pre School to Year 6. ADPLACE 088TC

Learning

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Courage

I

Integrity

I

Excellence

I

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Leadership Through Service

offers: •Comprehensive Curriculum •VCAL, VET and VCE •Deaf Education Centre •Creative and Performing Arts •Multi-Level Music Program •Accelerated Learning Program •Student Leadership Team •Welfare and Transition Support •Active Anti-bullying Program •Supportive Friends Program •Student Support Services For more information please contact us Phone 5971 6000 Website www.mounterin.vic.edu.au 32QUVQ413870F/IM/10

DATE: FEB10

2010 Open Night Wednesday 28th April 5:30pm-8:00pm

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Information sessions and a Principal’s address will be held in the Arts Centre at 5:30 and 6:30pm. You’ll also hear about: • Our current 4.3 million dollar State Government building program, as well as the Federally funded projects. • The Year 7 Scholarship Program • The Footprints Program • The Active Learning Program • As well as many other fantastic learning opportunities for your children.

Tour groups will commence at the completion of each session. Come, see and experience: • A Taiko drumming performance • The HPV team • Our fantastic Arts and Technology facilities • The library and ICT facilities • Interactive subject driven activities on the night!

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For more information, regarding Open Night, please contact Tanya Blanch on 5979 1577. High Street, Hastings.

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FILLING THE GAP 15

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Lily Colley in Peru with her young charges.

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A world of opportunity KNOW WHY YOU’RE GOING If you only want an overseas holiday, then book an overseas holiday, don’t sign up for a volunteer position abroad. Gap-year volunteers will find they enter communities where people are relying on them to do jobs. UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCES Living standards will be far simpler than what you know. At times it is going to prove a tough adjustment. SEEK ANSWERS BEFORE YOU TRAVEL It’s vital to ask questions about where you will be going, the work and what is expected of you. Also, research any company or agent offering to find you a gap-year position. SET REALISTIC GOALS You have to accept you’re not going to change the world. However, you can make a real difference to people’s lives. LOOK BEYOND THE WORK While you are helping others, making new friends, expanding your life skills and having a fantastic adventure are all part of the experience of a gap year. Source: Projects Abroad

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“While it’s called a gap year, what you find is most people volunteer for between two and six months, and then do some independent travel before returning home,” Mr Pashley said. Projects Abroad provides volunteers to more than 100 independent projects around the world. These include locations in Africa, Asia, South America and Eastern Europe. Mr Pashley said it was important for a young person to find a gap-year position which suited their interests. “We find a lot of young people are willing to work in orphanages and schools supporting children, and others have a real interest in human rights and conservation projects, such as getting involved in animal refuges,” Mr Pashley said. Students considering a gap-year experience should be aware that there is a cost to working as a volunteer. As examples, Mr Pashley said a client with his company may pay $3000 for a three-month placement in India, or $5000 for a similar time in Peru. The fee would cover insurance, accommodation and administrative support while in the country, but excludes flight costs and pocket money. “You are paying your way but most of our clients will tell you it was well worth it.” Working abroad in your gap year does not have to be a solo experience. Groups of friends can arrange to work on a project together.  More: projects-abroad.com.au

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as a volunteer in a developing country. Lily, who completed her VCE in 2008, was based in the village of Urubamba in Peru’s Sacred Valley region. She spent two months in mid last year working as a kindergarten aide while living with a young family, experiencing a culture and lifestyle far removed from what she knew. “It really opened my eyes,” Lily said. “In Australia we are just so lucky and you don’t even realise it. It was my first trip overseas and it was a real challenge to adjust to the living conditions and do all I could to help the local people while I was there.” In recent years taking a gap year has become an accepted rite of passage in Western Europe, especially in Great Britain. Even Prince William and Prince Harry availed of the gap year to experience different cultures, try their hand at various volunteer roles and travel in a number of countries around the world. Prince Harry’s gap year included a stay in Australia, working as a jackaroo in the Queensland outback for two months. The growth of interest in gap-year placements has resulted in a number of companies and travel agencies providing support and services to students seeking volunteer roles. Will Pashley, Australian director of Projects Abroad, said his company receives about 1000 queries from young students each year. He said Projects Abroad had about 200 Australians working as volunteers last year.

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ily Colley knew she was a long way from home when on her second day of working at a kindergarten in rural Peru she suddenly found herself left in charge of a classroom of 25 children, none of whom spoke English. “The teacher just told me she was leaving for the day and I’d have to take over,” said Lily, 19, of Greensborough. “All the children spoke Spanish and I’d hardly even met them. I thought to myself ‘this isn’t something you’d experience every day back in Australia’.” Lily is one of the increasing number of Victorian students choosing to take a gap year between high school and starting tertiary studies to travel abroad and work

DATE: FEB10

SCHOOL LEAVERS ARE TURNING A GAP YEAR INTO A PAUSE FOR A CAUSE


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MPR: QUV004 ED: PUB: QUV DATE: FEB10 PAGE: 16 COLOUR: CMYK

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