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La Costa Canyon High School

MavLife

March 2014

One Maverick Way, Carlsbad, CA 92009

Volume 8 Issue 4

Ron Lenc HonoredS as ‘Teacher of the Year’ enior tiles, the “recycla bull,” and the spring art show are just three of the many contributions Ron Lenc has made during his more than 17 years as a teacher at La Costa Canyon High School. As the Sculpture, AP Studio Art 3D and Video Film teacher, his dedication to the campus and to the arts has manifested itself through his

participation in The Credentialed faculty band, which fundraises for student scholarships; his creation of the Emerging Artist Senior award to support students planning to study the arts in college; and his organization of the lunchtime Clay Olympics, in which students throw clay blind-folded or in tandem. Lenc was recently honored

Cassandra Cyphers

Left: In addition to being the Sculpture, AP Studio Art 3D and a Video Film teacher, Lenc is also a member of The Credentialed, an all-educator district band and is a leader in the movement to increase recycling on campus. Right: Freshman Elizabeth Schroeder crafts a piece using the pottery wheel during class on March 12.

with the award of La Costa Canyon Teacher of the Year on March 7 for his “mentoring and guidance that brings students to a high level of appreciation and understanding of the arts,” according to Principal Kyle Ruggles. “I am very humbled by it, and it is an honor to be recognized by my peers,” Lenc said. “But it’s an award I accept to recognize all the teachers that work hard without recognition. It’s in their name that I accept that award.” The award recognizes and validates the hard work that teachers demonstrate on a daily basis. Since the school opened in 1996, teachers have been nominated annually by their colleagues, based on a comprehensive list of factors. “The criteria the teachers look for is instructional excellence, pride in our school, campus, or district, or community service and developing school culture,” assistant to Principal Ruggles Sara Smith said. “Most of our teachers have all of these qualities, but only one wins.” Lenc’s interaction with his students was influential in his nomination as the Teacher of theYear. “In the classroom, he has inspired many students by bringing ceramics to life,” Dr. Ruggles said.

Michael Casinelli Staff Writer

Three Lady Mavs Reach Beyond the Green Gates to Make a Difference Students raise funds for autism research, musical instruments for underprivileged kids, and Turner Syndrome research

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hile some students feel compelled to get involved in nonprofit organizations only to appease their dream colleges, there are three girls in particular who choose to volunteer their time to important issues that affected each of their lives. After senior Amanda Lowery’s brother was diagnosed with autism four years ago, her family underwent serious changes to cope with the news. “We went from this loving environment to, really, one that’s serious and full of treatment and therapy,” Lowery said. “But we’ve learned to be resilient. We’ve learned to support him, and love him unconditionally. It’s tough, but it’s only allowed us to grow as a family.” For the past three years, Lowery has organized a team to participate in the 5K race held annually by the National Foundation for Autism Research (NFAR) in Balboa Park. According to the NFAR website, “100 percent of the funds raised at the Race for Autism stays in San Diego to support local autism programs, services,

IN THIS ISSUE

Youth Jamz shows how every teen has the potential to change the world.”

Jenna Lizerbram

Molly Naudi

Left: Senior Amanda Lowery coordinates a team annually to run in the National Foundation for Autism Research 5K race to raise money for support programs for children and young adults with autism. Middle: Senior Jenna Lizerbram and her brother Noah founded YouthJamz, a nonprofit which hosts fundraising benefit concerts to develop music programs for underprivileged children. Right: Sophomore Makaila Eddington organized a fundraising walk/run for the Turner Syndrome Society of the United States.

treatments, outreach efforts and educational initiatives to hundreds of classrooms.” “It’s just inspiring to see all these families come out to support

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OPINION 4

It’s Good to Be Me Student clubs combine with transitional and functional life skills classes to promote inclusion. PAGE 7

others,” Lowery said. “It allows people to do the same, to support other people in the community regardless of if they’re related or not. I think it inspires change because it

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fosters a growth or acceptance or love and compassion for people. “ Lowery has managed to raise

Interested in attending this spring’s Youth Jamz concert? Visit

www.youthjamz.org

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THE EXPLAINER 11

SPORTS 12

The Hungry Catching Up With the Herd Maverick Guest taste-testers MavLife catches up with search for the most three alumni who are still satisfying chips and achieving athletic success guacamole. in college. PAGE 13 PAGE 15

for more information and coverage of past events.

ENTERTAINMENT 14


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News

NEW CALIFORNIA LAWS When asked an open-ended question about what it is like to be LGBT in their community,

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Schools Must Provide Equal Access to Transgender Students

ccording to a 2012 Human Rights Campaign (HRC) survey of teens aged 13 to 17, 40 percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) teens in Caliof the LGBT fornia believe that their state governyouth described ment is accepting of them, compared to negative 29 percent nationally. experiences, The California state assembly, in part as a move to help all students feel the top three being: safe at school, recently enacted the “School Intolerance in the community Success and Opportunity Act,” or AB 1266. (27 percent) As of January 1, transgender students are Hard not to be closeted allowed to choose to use the school bathroom (20 percent) or locker room facility or join the sports team that best fits their gender identity. Feeling out of place or lonely (18 percent) The term “transgender” is defined by the HRC, an organization that supports equality for LGBTQ Americans, as “people who experience and/or express their gender differently from what most people expect—either in terms of expressing a gender that does not of LGBT youth report match the sex listed on that their state their original birth government is not certificate (i.e., accepting of LGBT designated sex people, with local governments being at birth), or slightly higher at physically changing their sex.”

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MARCH 2014

So, for example, a student who may have been identified as female at birth, but who now identifies as male, will now be allowed to use the girls’ facilities. The bill is designed to allow all students, including transgender students, to feel safe and comfortable at school. While issues related to transgender teens may not be familiar to all students, the idea that students should feel comfortable at school appeals to students on campus. “If they’re born in the wrong body then they constantly feel like they should be someone they’re not,” junior Casey Jacobs said. “They should express who they are and what they feel on the inside.” A transgender student at La Costa Canyon is grateful for the law. The student, who prefers to remain anonymous, shared that Bill AB 1266 is a positive step in creating a more accepting environment for transgender teens. “I think it’s wonderful,” the student said. “Not that it will help reduce harassment, because it can’t really do that. But for the transgender students themselves, if being a female to male transgender, it makes you happy to go into the men’s bathroom, then you should be able to do that. Same vice versa, male to female.” The HRC found in its survey that students “who express a transgender identity or gender non-conformity while in grades K-12 reported alarming rates of harassment (78 percent).” After coming out of the closet, the student we spoke with became a victim of such harassment. “There was this person I went to school with and she had people jump me—I was jumped a lot,” the student said. Such physical abuse and harassment is a fact of life for many transgender teens. of LGBT youth say Laila Al-Shamma, GSA club president they will need to and a guest speaker at the HRC’s “Right move to a different to Thrive” conference in February, town or part of the recognizes that it will take more than country to feel just Bill AB 1266 to solve the issue of LGBTQ discrimination. accepted “It’s one thing to change laws, but it’s another thing to entirely to change public opinion or social morals,” Al-Shamma said. “It’s going to take a while for the

population to be accepting of transgender students.” Public opinion will play a large role in the success of Bill AB 1266’s goal to improve the level of acceptance in a transgender student’s educational environment. A recent petition supported by those against the bill to put the new law up for a referendum to California voters failed to get the required number of signatures. “It might make some kids uncomfortable, but I think it’s just something we have to get used to because it’s out there and it’s normal,” junior Ana Diaz said. “We can’t just stop people from being who they are.” According to Principal Kyle Ruggles, administrators have already met to determine the best way to implement AB 1266 and are in communication with transgender students on campus to ensure that they feel safe. “This law will help students who are transgender feel more comfortable using the bathroom facilities, but we need to go further than that,” Dr. Ruggles said. “I believe we need to go more in depth in really providing support. I have met with students who identify as transgender and I try to give them as much support as I can.” Dr. Ruggles also acknowledged that there will be some community members who do not agree with AB 1266. “I think there may be some frustration out there,” Dr. Ruggles said. “There were some people who were strongly opposed to this. We need to educate people on as much as we can, because it is something that’s sensitive.” While many individuals are still uncertain about what it means to be transgender or how to interact with transgender individuals, those who choose to accept and be a visible ally for LGBTQ individuals can provide support in a variety of ways. “Those people who except me and are there for me—they have courage,” the student said. “If you except and have a friend who is like me, that is something that I would look up to. They’re like, ‘Oh, [transgender students] they are ok.” Megan Mineiro Editor-in-Chief with reporting by Anna Gardiner-Feldman

Anthony Fregoso

Drivers Under 18 Prohibited from Using Voice-Recognition Apps

new law amending the California vehicle code passed on October 11, 2013, banning the use of Siri and similar voice-recognition programs for teenage drivers. According to Bill SB 194, “Drivers under the age of 18 are not allowed to use voice recognition software, like Apple’s ‘Siri’ to write, send or read a text while behind the wheel.” Although Siri allows drivers to keep their hands on the wheel and eyes on the road, fumbling with a phone can still be a distraction for many drivers.

“The accidents caused by being on your phone, even if it’s ‘hands free,’ is that your mind is preoccupied with something else,” junior Casey Jacobs said. The law is directed specifically toward people under the age of 18, with the mindset that teenagers can be more easily distracted on the road. This is reflected by the fact that teen drivers’ accident rates are four times that of adults. “We are so much more vulnerable to everything going on, and we’re completely less experienced,” junior Kelsea Critin said.

It is unclear how police officers will determine if a driver is using a voice recognition software, versus simply talking to passenger or listening to music. “I think it should be illegal to use anything that directs your attention off of the road,” Principal Kyle Ruggles said. “Remember that when you get behind the wheel you’re taking your life and the lives of others in your hands.”

Anna Gardiner-Feldman

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Meghan Lumsden

Minimum Wage to Increase from $8 to $10 by 2016

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tudent employees can look forward to higher pay at minimum wage jobs beginning in summer of 2014, as companies align to a new wage law. Bill SB 7 was passed on October 13, 2013, stating that minimum wage would be raised from eight dollars to nine dollars per hour on July 1, 2014 and would be once again raised on January 1, 2016 to $10 per hour. A pay increase of $2 not only means extra money for students as they prepare to pay for college tuition but also more dramatically

affects the lives of those who provide for their families with a minimum wage salary. “I don’t have to make more; $8.25 is okay for me,” junior Casey Jacobs said. “But people who are working to support a family definitely need more than that.” Many concerns arose before the law was approved. One issue was the possibility of inflation and its effects on businesses. “Having owned a small business, I would be concerned that it would increase my costs on labor,” Spanish teacher Jim Teague said. “You raise the minimum wage, now all the costs go up.”

Even though some are concerned that a raise in minimum wage may create problems, it may also prove to be beneficial for the community by improving lower class citizens’ lives and providing more meaningful and beneficial careers. “I believe that the minimum wage can be raised in a way that can impact our society in a positive way,” Principal Kyle Ruggles said.

Anna Gardiner-Feldman Staff Writer


News 3 Juniors to Pilot New Common Core-Aligned Exam MAVLIFENEWS.COM

‘Smarter Balanced’ assessments will help districts prepare for the new Common Core process

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ccording to the San Dieguito Union High School District, students in grade 11 will pilot the new Common Core examination for English Language Arts and Math between April 14 and May 16 of this year. Students will not receive their scores for this year’s practice tests. Beginning in spring of 2015, the test will be fully implemented and scores will begin to be recorded. Since 1999, every California student from kindergarten to grade 11 has taken the annual Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) test. But this year, thanks to new Common Core standards being implemented in 45 states, the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) will be taking the place of the STAR test. “What they’re doing this year is field testing, like one great big experiment to see all the things that could possibly go wrong,” Van Over said. “So if there is room for error, they could find ways to correct for it in terms of the way the test is built.” Unlike the STAR test, the CAASPP will be taken entirely on computers. “It’s now all through an online and secure system that will eventually become adaptive,” Van Over said. “If [a student is] responding at

a higher level, it’ll serve to throw higher level questions at the student. Gone will be the days of bubbling.” The CAASPP test will feature a new formatting of questions, changing from simple fill-in-the-blank questions to a short answer response style. “It won’t be entirely all multiple-choice,” Van Over said. “Sometimes your answers will be short answer and you have to explain your answer. They’re not testing your ability to persevere through a standardized test; they’re testing your ability to think or your knowledge.” The change to a Common Core standard system has introduced changes in both the way students are tested and the way they are taught. “I think the advantage, at least in terms of teaching and curriculum is that it emphasizes critical reading, writing and critical thinking,” United States history teacher Lucia Franke said. “Students will have more time [to learn] because teachers will have more time to slow down and go deeper into various subjects.” In response to the testing, juniors have mixed feelings. Some believe that the new test will be an improvement from the previous STAR tests.

“The STAR testing was kind of pointless in the way it was structured,” junior Andre Sanavi said. “Common Core seems like it’s going to test our abilities better than the STAR test.” Other juniors feel that students will not give their full efforts on the practice CAASPP, or that the test format will be a hindrance to productivity. “If it was a grade, then people would try,” junior Shannon Dorr said. “Everyone’s going to get distracted. I don’t like technology. I get confused and other people do, too.” Although this year’s CAASPP is only a test-run, school administrators and teachers want juniors to take the test seriously and try their best. “The approach is to see how it is and try to do our best, as a chance to show how good of a school LCC is,” Franke said.

Anthony Fregoso

Sample question taken from the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.The exams will be administered on computers, rather than via pencil and paper as in the past. More sample questions are available online at www.smarterbalanced.org.

Keith Demolder Staff Writer

Students Topple Teachers in ASB’s Lunchtime Battle of Wits

Molly Naudi

Seniors Johnny Visotcky (left) and Zach Lax (center) check AP US History teacher Paul Giuliano’s (right) answer to “What was the date and time of the bombing at Pearl Harbor?” His answer of “December 7, 1941 at 8:45 a.m.” was incorrect—the actual time was 7:55 a.m.

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tudents and teachers gathered on the student center stage on March 12 to face off in the ASB hosted event “Are You Smarter than a Senior?” With questions ranging in a variety of academic courses from grades nine through 12, with an additional school spirit category, both teams proved to be capable competitors. The student team comprised of seniors Laila Al-Shamma, Sammy Anderson, Maddy

Belin, Nico Fassardi, Tanner Taguchi and Owen Wilson, and the teacher team included Michelle Anderson, John DiGiulio, Paul Giuliano, Jill Lax, Jim Teague and Katie Stapko. In the end, the student team was victorious, with a final scores of 650 for the students and 600 for the teachers. “I know what the seniors are capable of and how smart they are, but I still thought the

Lady Mavericks Make a Difference CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

hundreds of dollars and has recruited 27 participants for her team for the race. “Anyone is free to join,” Lowery said. “There’s a Facebook page, and it would mean the world to me if you were able to come.” Another student making a difference in the lives of others is senior Jenna Lizerbram. She and her brother Noah, an LCC alumnus who is now studying at UCLA, founded Youth Jamz four years ago to give musical instruments to underprivileged children. “We host benefit concerts for music programs for children across the world,” Lizerbram said. “We have hosted four successful benefit concerts since 2010. We’ve been able to raise $16,000 for over 900 underprivileged children in Congo, India and San Diego.” Youth Jamz helps bring music to children in need, and inspires others to take action on important issues. “We think that Youth Jamz also serves

It’s inspiring to see all these families come out to support others.”

Amanda Lowery

as a template that shows how every teen has potential to change the world,” Lizerbram said. “Noah and I, we were just everyday teenagers— school, sports and all that. We decided to take time out of our lives and do something for someone else, and help out others, because it gives you the best feeling ever.”

teachers would win,” Giuliano said. “We have some pretty smart teachers, so that we lost, I was a little surprised.” Senior Maddy Belin scored the final points for the student team by defining the word “ratchet.” “I felt it hard to succinctly describe that in just a few words but I managed to do it for the win,” Belin said. “I defined it as ghetto, then using it in a sentence I said ‘that gurl ratchet’ but I had to spell ‘girl’ with a ‘u’ to go along with the meaning of the sentence as whole, the work as a whole.” But participating in “Are You Smarter than a Senior?” was about more than just scoring points. “Ultimately everything on campus boils down to relationships,” Teague said. “If we don’t have a good relationship with students and we don’t have a good relationship with each other, than there is no emotional investment and it’s hard to learn.” In light of Senior Tagout no longer being allowed on campus, ASB has planned events such as “Are You Smarter than a Senior?” to provide an alternative opportunity for seniors to get involved in fun activities before graduation. “Since we can’t do senior tagout this year, we are trying to come up with a couple senior events to do,” senior class president Abby Rose said. “We are also doing a senior scavenger hunt later on in the year.” The senior team was comprised of some of the most talented students in the graduating class of 2014.

AP English Lit & Lang AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Physics B/C

and a Harvey Mudd.You guys really stacked the deck and this is a great senior class.”

Jim Teague

“Well, you had two Stanfords up there and you had a Harvey Mudd,” Teague said. “You guys really stacked the deck and this is a great senior class.” While the competition itself was nothing complicated, the participants believed that it contributed to the environment on campus in a positive way. “I think the questions were pretty simple and I don’t think it’s about knowledge per se or academic vitality,” Al-Shamma said. “I just think it speaks to our campus as a whole and how we interact with our teachers.” Megan Mineiro and Dana McConnell Editor-in-Chief and Staff Writer

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Opinion

4 MavLife 2013-2014 Staff Editor-In-Chief: Megan Mineiro Managing Editor: Anthony Fregoso Design Editor: Meghan Lumsden Feature Editor: Molly Mineiro News Editor: Cassandra Cyphers Sports Editor: Jackson Cowart Opinion Editor: Claudia Mathews Entertainment Editor: Jessica Woods Head Photographer: Molly Naudi Web Manager: Keith Demolder Copy Editor: Molly Mineiro Editor-at-Large: Jennie Barnes Senior Staff Writers: Emily Brown, Jacob Castrejon, Natalie Engel, Cooper Gee, Kara Gibson, Reilly Tiglio, Emily Schacht Staff Writers: Devin Berry, Clayton Brown, Lucy Bruemmer, Michael Casinelli, Stihl Coleman, Hannah Flowers, Ryan Fox, Aneleise Frandsen, Anna Gardiner-Feldman, Soren Gregory, Jade Harabedian, Sophia Ilas, Danielle Lee, Sierra Lyle, Dana McConnell, Molly Naudi, Kasandra Rezler, Michael Rice, David Shuman, Quinn Smith, Daniel Stuart, Alexa Szabo, Cameron VanBrabant, Kheresa Yeno Business Manager: Devon Whitlam Adviser: Suzi Van Steenbergen

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avLife is the student newspaper of La Costa Canyon High School. LCCHS student media products are public forums for student expression. Students are responsible for their work in print publications, online content and video broadcasts, as well as in other products, none of which are subject to administrative approval. Students make all final content decisions. Media programs follow Scholastic Press Association, Journalism Education Association, and Student Press Law Center standards. In addition, student media programs work to follow all copyright laws and avoid libel, slander, and infringing upon the rights of others. Unsigned editorials represent the opinions of the editorial board, while opinion columns represent the writer’s perspective. Advertisements do not necessarily represent the newspaper’s views.

MARCH 2014

Editorial: Dedicate Time to a Worthy Cause Students should follow the example set by fellow Mavericks

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he MavLife editorial board believes that being an active member of the student body is important and commendable. However, the most recent coverage of three Maverick students who volunteer in our community reminded the MavLife editorial board of the importance of taking time out of one’s daily life to make an impact in someone else’s life. There are countless volunteer opportunities available to those willing to take even just a few hours to better the community. Here are just a few: If you are one of the many students whose go-to spot for a view of the Pacific is Moonlight Beach, and you take pride in this community highlight, then the North County Beach Clean Up would be a rewarding volunteer opportunity for you! Community members meet once a month at 9 a.m. to clean up trash and to preserve the coastal ecosystem. Students interested in volunteering should sign up at www. meetup.com/BeachClean-Up. Supplies are provided (and sometimes even snacks!) for those willing to take a few hours out of their Saturday to care for the beauty of one of our community’s most popular beaches. But if picking up trash doesn’t appeal to you and you would still like to preserve our community’s natural environment, than the Batiquitos Lagoon Foundation Trail Maintenance volunteer opportunity is the ideal alternative. Taking place on the first and third Saturdays of every month from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., the event brings volunteers together to remove invasive plants from the

sensitive salt marsh habitat and ecological preserve and also repair the Nature Center. While registration is not required, students aged 16 and under must have a waiver signed by a parent. For students looking to interact with people rather than plants, there are many opportunities to volunteer at homeless shelters and soup kitchens. According to the 2013 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress, California accounts for 22 percent of the nation’s homeless population, with San Diego having the fourth highest rate of homelessness out of major cities in the country. The Society of Vincent St. Paul, one of the larger local organizations serving the homeless, has a dining room, shelter, five stores and a pharmacy. The organization depends on volunteers. More information can be found at www.svdpbr.org/Volunteer.aspx. For students who were inspired by the work of Amanda Lowery, Jenna Lizerbram and Makaila Eddington, you can get involved in their causes as well. The Youth Jamz concert is held annually at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. Purchasing a ticket supports bringing music into the lives of children in San Diego, as well as to Congo and India. If you’re interested in raising awareness for Turner’s Syndrome, Eddington plans to lead another event this summer similar to the 5K race she hosted at Stagecoach park in 2013. Lastly, for students looking to jump right into volunteering, Lowery’s 5K race for

Autism is taking place Saturday, March 22 beginning at 7:30 a.m. For more information, visit the Facebook page “Race for Autism 5k 2014- Logan’s Heroes!” Lowery, Lizerbram and Eddington are in some ways typical teenagers. But with an urge to make an impact they took the extra time to improve the lives of others and raise awareness for a worthwhile cause. We encourage you to follow the example set by these dedicated young women by giving just a few hours each month to improving the lives of those around you.Your own lives will develop an even deeper meaning and you will experience the joy of making a positive impact in your community.

are “ There countless volunteer opportunities available to those willing to take even just a few hours to better the community.”

Teens Should Be Cautious When Choosing What to Watch on TV

Lucy Bruemmer Staff Writer

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atching television is a big part of many individuals’ daily lives, and while we would like to think that we are unaffected by it, the hours we spend watching television have an alarming impact on both our individual lives and the culture of our society. Over the decades what is acceptable on television has changed dramatically and that change has affected viewers. It is hard to say whether society has changed or been changed by what is on television. Although watching television is fun and can have many positive elements such as education and entertainment, it can also bring immeasurable shifts in both physical and mental health. Recently, many comedy shows have introduced more gay people into television shows and most create a specific, stereotypical image. Throughout comedy shows, such as “Modern Family,”gay individuals are primarily used as comedic characters. As a result, gay people are represented as flamboyant and ostentatious, creating an unfair stereotype. Along with the unfair image of the gay community, many other unfair generalizations are made by television shows, such as an unrealistic image of high school girls. Teenage girls are often depicted as unintelligent, boy crazed and self-obsessed. Shown in multiple shows such as “Gossip Girl”and “90210,” the girls are focused on

shopping and flirting with members of the opposite sex. Thus, those qualities can become the norm for the average teenage girl. Many girls grow up watching shows where the female actor playing “an average high school girl” is much older than the average high schooler and thus the character is portrayed in an unrealistic way. This unreal characterization has caused a change in the expectations of young girls and in the long term, can cause them to be discouraged with their image. Clothing choice on television shows has impacted the style trends that “normal” girls follow. Television also includes much more sexual content and many shows make sex out to be very casual. According to the University of Michigan health system, the number of sex scenes in television has doubled since 1998, with 70 percent of the top 20 shows watched by teens including sexual content. These shows have an average of five scenes per hour involving sexual content. Due to this laid back depiction created by television, many teenagers’ future social lives will be significantly affected in thinking that sex isn’t as much of a “big deal” as it was in the previous generation. Repeatedly watching these shows does have an effect. Unconsciously, your mind is taking in this information and whether you realize it or not, you are being impacted. How much you are affected is determined by your ability to distinguish between fiction and reality. Although some people are minimally affected by television, it still has an effect on our society. The best way to stay an original person and not become a carbon copy molded by media corporations is to first form your own opinions without the influence of a television show.

Watching television can also bring immeasurable shifts in both physical and mental health.”

Students Speak Up: TV and Our Culture

“When teenagers see other teenagers doing something on TV they feel obligated to do it themselves.” -Elena Yei, 9 “I think that television has changed and I think that it has a large impact on our society.” -Megan Pearsall, 12

“I think that television has changed, because our society has changed a lot— not the other way around.” -Jacob Cesear, 10

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5 Opinion Stand Your Ground Laws Serve No Purpose Kheresa Yeno

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Staff Writer

earing a sweatshirt, listening to loud music, texting in a movie theatre, throwing popcorn. Common annoyances, or worth a death sentence? Florida teen Jordan Davis died at age 17 after Michael Dunn shot him in a St. Augustine, Florida gas station in November, 2012. Dunn shot Davis after an argument over loud music. Florida’s controversial “Stand Your Ground” law, which allows people to claim self defense in certain cases, led some to believe Dunn’s action was justified. While Michael Dunn was found guilty on four charges, including three counts of attempted second degree murder and one count of firing into a vehicle, the jury hung on the fifth charge of the first degree murder of Jordan Davis. But the real question is, was a hung jury necessary? On January 13, 2014, retired Miami

Police Captain Curtis Reeves shot and killed Chad Oulson after a dispute between the two men because Oulson was texting his three year old daughter’s babysitter in a Florida theater. Minor inconveniences? Yes. A reason to kill someone? Not in a million years. The Stand Your Ground Law was made to protect people from danger, not create vigilante justice. If a person is attacked in his or her own home by a violent perpetrator and the person defends himself, that is standing your ground. If a person believes that there is a threat, he or she is obligated to call the police and then retreat. If clear and present danger is unavoidable, then and only then, does the law state that self defense is appropriate. At this point, the justification of this law has gotten far out of hand. The law in its truest form was supposed to be used as self defense. But now it is abused and is losing its meaning. I’m sure the law was passed with good intentions. But it has, in most cases, failed to do its job. What will it take? What makes people think that their annoyances are grounds for killing another human being? As far as I’m concerned, this law has put more people at risk than anything else. The concept the law has developed into is shoot first, ask questions

later. Using Stand Your Ground laws for invalid cases is wrong. If you kill someone for playing loud music or “looking” suspicious you probably deserve 25 to life in prison, because your moral compass doesn’t exactly point due north and you weren’t protecting yourself. You were thinking irrationally and you cost someone his or her life. Laws like this do not have to be overturned completely. In the case of a true emergency, self defense may be justified. But Florida’s Stand Your Ground law must be revised. Another death should not occur for people to finally desire change. It must be mandatory to retreat first unless a situation has escalated and your life is threatened. Nobody else should die because of the misuse of both this law and firearms. Think using your brain—not your trigger finger.

Claudia Mathews

MAVLIFENEWS.COM

“Stand Your Ground” Laws in America States with Florida-Style “Stand Your Ground” laws States with “Stand Your Ground” laws extending to certain locations outside the home States that do not have “Stand your Ground” laws Information from http://smartgunlaws.org/

‘Literally’ Annoyed by How Teens Communicate

Reilly Tiglio

Senior Staff Writer

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very teen is different and we are all special in our own ways. But there are a few things that our generation, in particular, is guilty of saying or doing—me included. Unfortunately, these things can be extremely agitating to others. The basic terminology that teens use

these days is easily one of the most annoying that I have ever heard. The party scene is in the spotlight 24/7, because the teens of our generation are always ready for a party. Take the saying “turn up” for example. Though you may at first think that this means to turn the temperature up on the pan sitting on the stove, it actually means to party and go a little (or a lot) wild. Believe me, if you say “turn up,” in fact no one will ever want to “turn up” with you—ever. There will be no “turning up” to be done. Also, if you’re reading this and at any time laughed and said “I literally can’t right now” or “I just died,” you actually did not die.You are still breathing. You’re alive. Everything is going to be okay. Everyone knows that social media plays a huge role in how we communicate in this day and age. In fact, for some it seems that it’s the

only way to communicate. There are hundreds of different social media sites, with the most common being Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr. The two that I would like to address are Tumblr and Twitter. Twitter is a place where you can not only see your followers’ exciting tweets regarding the acai bowl that they just had for lunch (#pleasedon’tdothatever) but you can follow celebrities and view their tweets as well. However, Tumblr is a place where you can post practically anything you want to post without having to worry about being judged. But with this privilege, problems can develop. Our generation of girls is slightly obsessed with the term and idea of a “thigh gap.” A thigh gap is when you touch your knees

A Pair of Oxfords Can Spark Confidence I

n this day and age, so many different strains of fashion exist.You have the athletic style, the uber preppy style and even the vintage from head-to-toe style. Although clothing and fashion may seem confusing from the outside, the beauty behind it is that you get to control how you dress. Dressing your best will definitely act as a huge stepping stone to a better self image. Studies show that seeing yourself in the mirror and liking what you see will increase your drive in life, simply because you feel you deserve success. We all have our personal quirks and looks we find more appealing than others. Skinny jeans and denim jackets are my go-to’s for feeling stylish and comfortable. I wear one of those two almost everyday. Pair those with a nice pair of oxfords and I’m golden. Find what you like and incorporate it into a wardrobe that will keep you stylish and confident in yourself while also not stepping you too far out of your comfort zone. I speak from complete experience here. In my late elementary, early middle school days I definitely had an eye for the clothes I loved but was too afraid to wear them. I started with sweater vests, which then evolved into cardigans, which then opened

me up to a world of clothing that I was so happy to identify with. Sounds silly, but it was definitely a process. For many people it could be a simple trip to Urban Outfitters to pick up the basic necessities to a bigger and better closet. To others it could be a thrifting kind of day, to find vintage items to spice up your attire. Whatever look appeals to you, go for it. Instead of going straight to the jeans and a t-shirt, change things up. Throw on that vintage sweater your dad never wears that you never appreciated before. We are essentially in the ‘80s when it comes to the fashion department, minus the neon colors and tacky leg warmers, so clothing with history can seriously style you up, without the huge price tag. On a side note, always remember to stay respectful when in a school or other professional environment. Lack of self confidence is a problem rooted so deeply within us, it’s sometimes hard to see through it. Even if it won’t completely remedy the problem, fashion is something that can make a huge difference in a person’s self image.

Cooper Gee

Senior Staff Writer

together and your thighs don’t touch. This idea of “perfect legs” spread through Tumblr rapidly, causing teenage girls to think that if they didn’t have a thigh gap then they weren’t “perfect,” or skinny enough. In regards to a thigh gap, many studies showed that if you have said “thigh gap” then you are extremely unhealthy. So the moral of the story is (and this is to you girls) keep on eating pizza and cookies and put down the celery and water! Because being yourself is more important than the width of your thighs. Our generation, no matter how much I complain and rant and rave, is a good one to grow up in. I say all these things out of love, and I admit that I’m just as much to blame as any of you when it comes to participating in any of these annoyances.

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Photo Feature

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SAY NO TO THE R-WORD &IT’S GOOD TO BE ME

Club events create a safe space for students with special needs

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tudents gathered in the student center on March 5 to take part in the “Say No to the R-Word” campaign, which takes place nationwide on the first Wednesday of March. Senior Tyler Tackleberry (Photo 2) was one of hundreds of students who pledged to create a more supportive environment for special education students by raising awareness that the word “retard(ed)” is hurtful and derogatory. Supporters, such as senior Grace Halvorson and junior Miranda Gamboa (Photo 3, left to right), wore blue to show their support. Students also donned

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Photos by Molly Naudi

blue “Say No to the R-Word” bracelets and stickers, such as the one given to junior Drew Anderson by senior Maddy Uebelhor (Photo 1, left to right). On March 6, the annual “It’s Good To Be Me” fashion show returned to the theater. Seniors Orla Putnam and Haya Barakat, who show freshman Josh Friedman the program for the fashion show (Photo 4, left to right), were two of the many Best Buddies club members who accompanied TAP students down the runway in their casual and formal attire. The Transitional Alternative Program

is part of SDUHSD’s Special Education program, and provides valuable vocational and independant skills for students as they move into young adulthood. The night concluded with a performance of “Over the Rainbow” by TAP students Madison Brumfield (9), Adriana Ramirez (11), Acacia Southwell (10), Tabita Echavarria (10), Alex Zuniga (9), Ethan Marr (9), Elizabeth Stress (11), Kaitlin Goetz (11), Jillian Stoodley (10), Alfredo Verde (10), Elisa Alvardo (9), Tyler Hammack (9) and Aly Hays (12) (Photo 5, left to right). Megan Mineiro Editor-in-Chief

In the fashion show it was fun and you see your friends. I was feeling nervous and feeling popular and feeling famous. I feel very good and this is my first time in the fashion show but we should do it next year. Be in the fashion show— it’s fun!”

Freshman

Alex Zuniga TAP Program Student

The kids don’t really get seen most of the time at school. [The fashion show] boosts their self esteem and brings a lot of joy to them Senior that people care about them. That Jill Baylon is the whole basis of the show is that they feel It’s Good to Be Me Club President appreciated.” The fashion show really, for most of my students, it was the highlight of the year for them because they get a chance to really shine and show themselves. And they never ever get a chance to do that.”

People fill in “stupid” or “dumb” now with “retarded.” They don’t really think that this could affect people who actually have intellectual disabilities or families who have a loved one with a learning disability.”

Elizabeth

Engelberg TAP Program Special Education Teacher

Senior

Allie Mulloy Say No to the R-Word Club President


They portray us as totally different people. People see us as the single mom, the dropout, as funny but not smart, the people who are in gangs or live in a really bad side of town.” Sayda Chales

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Hispanic and Latino students are disproving expectations that tell them that they do not belong in the same academically rigorous environments as their peers.

OUTSIDE THE LINES

hen Sonia Sotomayor became the first Hispanic U.S. Supreme Court justice in 2009, media coverage celebrated this milestone. In many cases, however, the Hispanic or Latino person on the screen is not represented as a Princeton and Yale Law School graduate, like Sotomayor, but rather as a gardener, single mom, housekeeper, or “illegal” immigrant. These limiting media stereotypes mirror low expectations that some have for Hispanic and Latino students when it comes to academics, something that Sotomayor herself encountered throughout her education. On May 2, 2013, Sotomayor answered questions from a group of Colorado eighth, ninth and tenth graders. When asked by a student what her biggest challenge had been as the first Latina lawyer to become a United States Supreme Court justice, Sotomayor talked about the stereotypes she encountered growing up. “People organize their dealings with other people often based on stereotypes,” Sotomayor said. “It’s a way to simplify life because human beings are very complex and to get to know somebody you have to spend a lot of time and you have to make a lot of effort, and for a lot of people, they just don’t know how to do that. It’s too much for them.” Sotomayor, who grew up in a Puerto Rican family in the Bronx, New York, explained how stereotypes about Latinos have impacted her. “During my career at various times that I was being nominated to do things, a lot of people looked and said, ‘a poor Latina from New York. She can’t be smart enough,’” Sotomayor said. “During my nomination process, there were a lot of people who wrote that and it was very hurtful to me because here I had graduated very near the top of my class at college, did very well at law school, had lots of really important jobs, but people were still saying I wasn’t smart enough.” Sotomayor is an example of what many Hispanics and Latinos experience as they move through their education. Hispanic and Latino students on a high school campus can feel that people don’t believe in them. At LCC, 15 percent of students identify as Hispanic or Latino. Many of these students are overcoming low expectations, just as Sotomayor defied the stereotypical mold for Hispanics and Latinos. I sat down with a small group of Hispanic and Latino seniors to talk about their experiences at LCC. They explained what it’s like to be the “only one” or one of a few Hispanic and Latino students in an honors or AP class. They expressed what it fees like when “everybody doubts us” and “people put us in stereotype boxes.” The students I spoke with had all overcome low expectations, finding a way to step outside the “stereotype box.” After talking with these students as a group, I then interviewed them individually to learn more about their lives.


Feature Pages 8-9

“Oh, you’re actually smart!”

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otomayor graduated with honors from both Princeton and Yale, yet some don’t easily envision a Hispanic or Latino student walking the halls of prestigious Ivy League universities. At LCC, Hispanic and Latino students have expressed that there is little expectation for them to be in rigorous honors or AP classes due to their ethnic background. Senior Andrea Cortez grew up in City Heights, one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in San Diego, for the first seven years of her life. As a middle schooler, she transitioned from an area where over half the population is Hispanic or Latino to a school district with fewer than 15 percent Hispanic and Latino students. “I didn’t really know the kind of stereotypes that were around because [in City Heights] we were all categorized as the same,” Cortez said. “Because we’re Latinos, they expect us to be in lower classes. When I moved here there were honors [classes]. Why don’t they have those in other schools that are in more Mexican populated places? The stereotype is there, too. They have certain classes in certain schools in certain areas.” The lives of Hispanic and Latino students don’t always match the stereotypical representation of their ethnicity in popular culture. Senior Sayda Chales, who moved to the U.S. from Guatemala when she was five, explained how people have false expectations for Hispanics and Latinos. “They portray us at totally different people,” Chales said. “People see us as the single mom, the dropout, as funny but not smart, the people who are in gangs or live in a really bad side of town. That’s not true. Those things also apply to everybody else—it’s not just us.” Counselor Lisa Levario recognizes that how Hispanics and Latinos are represented in the media does matter. “It feels good to see a person that looks like me on the screen doing something positive,” Levario said. “Just seeing somebody on the big screen that looks like me that I can relate to in a positive manner helps obviously to boost our esteem that we’re worthy. When you go to a theater or a movie and you don’t see anyone that reflects your life or your culture or who you are, it makes you feel like you don’t exist.” Due to the misconception of the Hispanic and Latino “dropout,” other students may not expect them to reach the same level of academic success. “They are really surprised and taken aback when I tell them I’ve earned above a 4.0, I took three AP class, I passed all my AP tests, I got straight A’s,” Chales said. “They’re like, ‘oh, you’re actually smart!’ That hurts.” In some cases, their peers’ jokes reveal hidden assumptions and low expectations that may not be conscious. “Sometimes when you say something right, they’re like, ‘Oh look at you.You know what you’re doing,’” Cortez said. Some students even comment on perceived immigration status in conversations about college or the future. “Sometimes they say, ‘Oh are you sure you’re going to have papers?’” Cortez said. “It hurts, but what can I do about it?” Although their peers may never directly express doubts about their abilities, simply seeing people who look like them negatively portrayed in movies and television and witnessing such stereotypes that unfairly categorize them can cause Hispanic and Latino students to, over time, come to believe the expectations that they will not amount to as much in life as their other peers will. Such beliefs develop over time, over numerous interactions. Senior Erick Nieto, who took AP English as a junior, is one student who once believed that he wasn’t capable of succeeding in difficult academic classes, not necessarily because of what any one person said to him. “It was nothing that [the other students] did,” Nieto said. “I felt like an outcast in a way because it was my first time taking an AP class. I just felt like I was never going to be as smart as them.” The students I spoke with pointed out during our conversations that while many of their peers do expect less of them, this is not the case for everyone. AVID teacher Kari DiGiulio recognizes this. “I think we have a stellar group of kids on campus that do get it right and don’t see anything beyond you are who you are on this campus without a race attached to that,” DiGiulio said. “That would be my hope.” Low expectations for Hispanic and Latino students can come from within their own ethnic group as well. Students talked about hearing such terms such as “whitewashed” and “coconut,” labels given to Hispanic and Latino students who show behavior considered to be “white.” “If you’re ‘whitewashed’ then you hang out with white people,” Chales said. “They would call you ‘coconut’—brown on the outside, white on the inside.You behave as a white person, but you’re Hispanic.” Such labels can be painful. Counselor Lisa Levario recalls a Hispanic student she worked with who did not live by the expectations set for her. “Years ago I had a student of mine who was very Mexican and was tied to her culture,” Levario said. “She was in ASB and she lost a lot of her friends because her friends thought that she was being too ‘white.’ That is a horrible way to degrade somebody who is actually trying to improve and be successful and be a part of the culture at LCC.” Levario explains that Hispanic and Latino students can reach beyond their ethnic group while still identifying with their background. “Latino students here tend to feel that if a student is not hanging around Mexican kids, they’re trying to deny who they are,” Levario said. “If the Latino students see a Mexican person—who may be very proud of their race, who may be very culturally tied to their Mexican or Latino roots—hanging out with white kids, does it mean that they are ‘whitewashed’?” Despite the challenges, however, students find pride in overcoming low expectations. “If you are the only one representing your ethnicity in an AP or honors class, you are separated,” Senior Daniela Carreon said. “It makes me feel proud that I am representing as one person and there will later be more.”

You’re just as smart and you’re just as valuable as anybody in that classroom. It’s all about academics—what you know—and not the color of your skin.” Lisa Levario

“I want to prove them wrong.”

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otomayor felt a responsibility to prove wrong those who didn’t believe in her. When I asked the students what motivates them, the immediate, overwhelming response was “to prove them wrong,” just as Sotomayor expressed. Hispanic and Latino students at LCC feel motivated to overcome the expectations that they would not take rigorous classes or that they could not attend a four-year college. “[I am motivated] to prove kids wrong that as Latino students we don’t just flunk out of school,” Nieto said. “We actually try to go to college. Maintaining this kind of focus on school can be challenging for some students. As Carreon explained, some Hispanic and Latino students’ family circumstances do not allow them to focus on graduating high school or attending college, and not because education is not valued. “A lot of high school Latino students end up dropping out or don’t graduate because we’re raised with the mentality of getting a job, grow up, pay the bills, help your family in Mexico,” Carreon said. These family pressures—to help contribute to the family financially—contrast sharply with the outlook of many students from affluent La Costa families. “[Latino students] don’t have the opportunities as much as other ethnicities,” Nieto said. “For the white kids, most of their parents are well-educated and have been to college, especially in this area. “As Latino students—we don’t really get that much opportunity. Some Latinos are just raised to find a job, make money and get food on the table.” However, many Hispanic and Latino students plan to attend four-year universities and pursue careers. Nieto’s parents are very supportive of his education because they were unable to graduate high school and attend college because they had to support their families and help raise their siblings. “[My parents are] really focused on me going to college,” Nieto said. “I try to make them proud all the time, and it’s sometimes hard because they expect a lot from me. They taught me to try hard in school because they didn’t get to graduate and go to college.” Like Nieto, Carreon is motivated by her family. She hopes to attend a UC or San Diego State University in the fall. “My older two sisters went to college, so they expect me to go,” Carreon said. “That’s my motivation. Also, my mom came here in 1980 from Mexico, and so she obviously came here for a purpose and I don’t want to disappoint her.” Cortez is also highly motivated for her future. “[I am motivated] mostly to just prove people wrong, to not have that stereotype of ‘Oh, she’s Latino. She’s just going to go to a community college,’” Cortez said. “I’m going to go to a four-year just like any of these people. I’ve always wanted to go to San Diego State or UCSD. I’ve always wanted to be a pediatrician. I put myself in that route. I’m going to do it. I had that mindset—if I worked hard enough I would get there.” Like the other students I spoke with, Chales finds motivation both in proving stereotypical expectations wrong, and in her family and personal goals. “I’ve had this dream of going to a really good university ever since I was little,” Chales said. “I’ve always wanted to do something really big with my life and make my parents proud.” Levario empathizes with her Hispanic and Latino students who express their motivation to disprove low expectations. “When I was in school, I had a teacher who told me, ‘You’re just going to wind up dropping out of school and getting pregnant like all your friends,’” Levario said. “My motivation was ‘I’m going to prove her wrong.’ I got accepted to UCLA. I got my master’s degree. When I graduated from college, I got a job at the same high school where I graduated from. I went to that teacher’s classroom and I introduced myself and I said, ‘I’m a counselor here. I will be working with you.’ And her mouth just dropped.” Unlike this story of Levario’s teacher expecting very little of her, some teachers at LCC have held high expectations that push them to overcome stereotypes. Senior Tristan Alvarado is grateful that his AVID teacher, Suzi Van Steenbergen, encouraged him to take more rigorous classes. “Ms. V made me take AP Language,” Alvarado said. “I wanted to drop out of that class right away. She kept me in there and it all worked out. She really pushed me to take harder classes.” Alvarado now plans to play lacrosse at a competitive college, a future he would not have originally anticipated for himself. “When I was a freshman, I didn’t think I was going to go to college to be honest,”Alvarado said. But ever since I started playing lacrosse I got so many more offers. I might go play for Notre Dame de Namur. Everything is really falling into place now.” AVID Senior Seminar and government teacher Angie Groseclose addresses the importance of teachers’ expectations. “Teachers in our classrooms are aware that every kid has a right to gain the highest education that they want and they’re willing to work hard right along with them,” Groseclose said. “Let’s figure out a way to empower kids so that they can be successful. Let’s show kids that all kids, no matter what their ethnic background, can contribute to a really rich learning environment.” As Sotomayor attended competitive colleges and pursued a career that would eventually lead her to her position as Supreme Court justice, she surely faced many situations in which she was the only Hispanic or Latino in the room. Levario reminds all students who might find themselves outside their comfort zones to not doubt their abilities in such situations. “There’s going to be a lot of other situations where you’re the only one,” Levario said. “You’re just as smart and you’re just as worthy and you’re just as valuable as anybody in that classroom. It’s all about academics—what you know—and not the color of your skin.” Sotomayor recognizes that “we all have to spend time fighting” stereotypes. “That’s been my biggest challenge—dealing with people’s expectations and having fun proving them wrong,” Sotomayor said. Molly Mineiro Feature Editor


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11 The Explainer A Brief Introduction to the Crisis In The Ukraine

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12

Sports

MARCH 2014

Fahy Places Sixth in USA Junior Mens Cross Country Championships

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enior cross country runner Steven Fahy ran in the junior men’s splits in the USATF Cross Country Championships on the Flatirons Golf Course in Boulder, Colorado on February 15. Fahy finished sixth out of a total of 55 participants, including both high school and college runners. The race provided many adversities to those unfamiliar with the course. “It was definitely a different race than anything I’ve ever done,” Fahy said. “It was longer, it was up at altitude which definitely I’m not used to, and [I was] up against some pretty fast competition. I had to mentally prepare myself and know what I was going to do in a race that I wasn’t very familiar with.” Finishing the 8K race in a time of 25:54, Fahy primarily viewed the race as preparation for the same course next year. “I was nervous at first going into it, just because of the circumstances and the unfamiliarity of it, but what I realized was that I really didn’t have anything to lose,” Fahy said. “I’m going to be able to run that race again next year as a freshman in college, so I was just kind of coming in for experience to get used to the course and what it’s like to run that 8K distance.” The race also provided Fahy, who earlier this season committed to run for Stanford,

the opportunity to familiarize himself with his future teammates. “There were guys from Stanford running in the race as well,” cross country coach Bill Vice said. “He gets practice for next year, and gets to look beside him and see some of his teammates he will be running with next year.” While the national recognition that can result from strong performances can be daunting, it can also be rewarding and a motivating force. “Knowing that I’m being watched a little bit and my performances are being taken into consideration puts a little bit of pressure,” Fahy said. “But it definitely makes me want to run harder and it makes me feel like I’m doing it for a purpose. It’s good to know that I’m getting some recognition for the hard work that I’m doing.” While he may have experienced success in this competition, the result seems to not affect his calm and controlled nature, as those close to Fahy note his unwavering demeanor in response to both successes and failures. “If he [does] bad, he’s the kind of person that kind of just shrugs it off,” senior cross country runner Brenton Bender said. “If he does well, all the better, and he’ll just move forward from there.” Throughout his running career, Fahy has

Photo courtesy of Eoin Fahy.

Senior runner Steven Fahy stands on the podium in sixth place (from the left) following his finish at the Junior Mens National Championships on February 15. Fahy was one of two high school runners to place in the meet—all others who shared the podium with him have already started their collegiate running careers.

grown before those that have supported him. “I have seen him run from a scrawny freshman to becoming a leader,” Vice said. “From the moment I met him, I knew he was

going to be successful. He is always motivated and always focused.” Emily Schacht Senior Staff Writer

The Other Side of the Track: The ‘field’ events in track and field often go overlooked F

Claudia Mathews

Senior and throwing captain Jarret Loke throws discus during practice on March 6.

or nearly 200 students, spring marks the beginning of the track and field season. While distance, hurdles and sprint races are centered on the track, there is a separate operation just beyond the track. Field, the commonly overlooked element of track and field, consists of high jump, long jump, triple jump, pole vault, discus and shot. For jumpers, the focus during workouts is well-rounded to encompass both strengthening exercises and the technical aspects of their event. “I run stairs. I sprint. I do jumping drills. I lift,” senior varsity jumper Racquel Rackley said. “I like having to know technique and skill when I do things. It’s like I’m a jumping engineer.” It is important that jumpers and throwers use the correct form in order to be successful and injury-free. “There’s a lot of technical prowess that goes into being able to do these events correctly and get good marks,” head coach Bob Sisler said. “If you don’t do things just right, you can really hurt yourself.” This focus on technique allows the jumpers to accomplish feats that are unique to their craft. “From the time between when I jump and when I land, I fly for twenty feet,” senior varsity jumper Zack Fernandez said. “All of

the jumping events are the only events where people are off the ground for more than a split second.” While field events may seem less strenuous than running, the jumpers and throwers invest a lot of time and effort into improving. “I feel like the other events kind of don’t take the field events very seriously,” senior varsity high jumper and hurdler Natalie Burns said. “They think they do more work, even though we do a lot of work too; it’s just a different kind of work.” Field athletes must demonstrate both physical and mental strength to be successful. “They’re mentally strong as well as tough,” Sisler said. “I’ve got great athletes as well as great thinkers, and that’s how they learn how to do their event better.” All of this hard work culminates at weekly track and field meets. For some athletes, competing in field events can be discouraging without motivation from spectators. “People stand in the stands and watch all the track events while we’re off to the side,” Fernandez said. “People don’t generally walk over to watch us.” This lack of support can often make field athletes feel unappreciated for their efforts. “I do think field event people are

overlooked because most people don’t know when records are broken,” Rackley said. “Field events are underestimated and I wish more people came and watched us compete.” Despite the lack of attention from the outside, the coaches have made an effort to unify the track events and the field events into a single cohesive team. “Over the last few years we’ve tried to foster an appreciation amongst all the different groups,” Sisler said. “We’ve really tried to bring it more together so that they’re appreciative of each other by doing our warmups together.” Ultimately, the track and field team is full of opportunities for new friendship and encouragement across all events. “It’s not too competitive so we can really support one another,” senior varsity thrower Harrison Roth said. Track and field meets offer a great opportunity to see the diversity among all of the events. “Come out and experience a track meet,” Sisler said. “It’s like a circus. There’s five things going on all at the same time. There’s pole vaulting, there’s high jumping, there’s long jumping, there’s events on the track. There’s a variety of things to take in.” Molly Naudi Staff Writer

Spring Athlete Q&A Emily Schacht

Casey Feldmeir (12) Boys Baseball

Bailey Romano (11) Girls Softball

My favorite athlete is...

Robinson Cano

David Beckham

LaDainian Tomlinson Kobe Bryant

Yadier Molina

My favorite crayon color is...

Periwinkle

Purple

Teal

Lilac

Blue

My favorite TV show is...

Workaholics

Gossip Girl

Modern Family

Grey’s Anatomy

Shark Tank

The animal I would be is a...

Turtle

Cheetah

Tiger

Sloth

Grizzly bear

When people cut me off and then slow down

When people talk while going to the bathroom

When people don’t say thank you

When people mispronounce my name

When people tell me I can’t do something

Staff Writer

My biggest pet peeve is...

Jared Maffucci (12) Boys Lacrosse

Seton Conley (12) Girls Basketball

Sean McElroy (12) Boys Baseball


MAVLIFENEWS.COM

Catching Up With the Herd

13

Sports

Former Maverick athletes find success at the college level

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ith the dedication to sports and the athletic success that La Costa Canyon has championed in the past, it’s no surprise that some of the school’s most revered athletes have found success in their collegiate careers as well. These athletes include Darren Fahy, Scott Quessenberry and Natalie Hagglund, a former LCC volleyball standout and 2009 graduate, is now a senior at USC with a strong college career under her belt. While at LCC, Hagglund won a San Diego Section Division I Championship, CIF Division I State Championship and was a part of the 2008 team named national high school champions by Max Preps and Prep Volleyball. Her memorable moments didn’t end in high school. “There are a lot of amazing memories with USC volleyball but the most memorable are the games in the NCAA tournament,” USC senior Natalie Hagglund said. “It is just a completely different atmosphere and a completely different feeling knowing you have to give it your all to stay in season.” Though Hagglund was unable to capture an NCAA Championship during her career at USC, there remains the possibility of Olympic success in her future, as she is currently doing an eight-week training session with Team USA. “It is honestly an incredible experience and I am loving every moment of it,” Hagglund said. “It is extremely frustrating at times to learn new things and to essentially fail at times, but it is also very rewarding knowing that you are developing as a player and a person.” Hagglund’s competitive personality is evident on and off the court, leading her to much success in volleyball and academics. “I thrive off this idea of never giving anything less than my best, because if I were to do so it would be sacrificing this athletic gift that I have,” Hagglund said. “If there is a little dip in my career, a little frustration, I just keep pushing and striving to get myself back on track.” Though Hagglund has received several awards and recognitions, competing at the highest level in volleyball, she doesn’t want to be remembered just for her success. “I would much rather be remembered as someone who represented USC in a good way and who just took every

Photo courtesy of USC Sports Information.

Natalie Hagglund, former LCC student-athlete, is a USC All-American volleyball player. Now in her senior year as a Trojan, Hagglund has found success in both her high school and collegiate careers.

opportunity and ran with it,” Hagglund said. ”I just want to be remembered as someone who loved the game, worked hard and had passion for every moment.” In addition to volleyball success, LCC also has a rich tradition of running success. Darren Fahy, a 2012 alumnus and cross country and track star, is now a sophomore at Georgetown University. Winning the Gatorade Player of the Year in cross country as a senior at LCC was just one of the moments that highlighted Fahy’s remarkable high school career. “Winning state my senior year when I won the mile [and] two mile—that was definitely a big moment in high school because that was a goal I had for a long time,” Fahy said. Fahy has continued to have a prosperous career, not only in the Big East Conference but also internationally. “My biggest college accomplishment was making Junior Worlds in cross country—that was a lot of fun,” Fahy said. “I went to Poland [on a USA team] and raced with some of the best kids in the world.” Fahy gives credit for his success to his coaches and teammates throughout high school and college. “Having good teammates has definitely motivated me,” Fahy said. “In high school I had good coaches, and I have good coaches here at Georgetown and teammates that definitely push me.” Another decorated program that has produced successful athletes is the football team. Scott Quessenberry, a 2013 LCC graduate and football team captain, is now a freshman at

UCLA, having started at center for five of the last six games this past season. “Beating USC was my best memory at UCLA so far, for sure,” Quessenberry said. “Playing for 98,000 people is also very cool.” A three-year varsity football player and highly-regarded recruit, Quessenberry cherishes the heated rivalries and team camaraderie of his high school career. “Torrey Pines games definitely were some of my favorite memories of playing football at LCC,” Quessenberry said. “Those are times I will always remember no matter what.” Quessenberry has grand aspirations for his future as a football player. His dedication, his love for the game and his desire to always improve has geared him towards a bright future. “I want to play in the NFL,” Quessenberry said. “I think anyone in college football does. It’s been my goal since I was six years old, and it hasn’t changed and won’t change until I get there. I want to be remembered as one of the best offensive linemen.” Hagglund, Fahy and Quessenberry have all continued their successful athletic careers on collegiate teams. They are all hoping to carry their talent and passion for their sports into the pros or even the Olympics, as they continue to reflect the athletic achievement of La Costa Canyon’s athletic program.

Sierra Lyle Staff Writer

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Entertainment

14

cancer 6/21-7/22

MARCH 2014

Teacher vs. Student

Spring Horoscopes

Mark Roberts

scorpio 10/23-11/21

Pisces (2/19 - 3/20)

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Jamie Ritchie

appy birthday to you, Pisces! It’s time to branch out and make some new friends. Don’t forget the ones you love the most, but pisces don’t isolate yourself to one group either. This 2/19-3/20 is your month—own it! Aries (3/21 - 4/19)

Y

our birthday is coming up on the horizon and lately you’ve been doubting yourself. Let go of all that fretting. Everything will work out taurus as it is meant to if you’re confident gemini Aries Aries. 5/21-6/20 3/21-4/19 in yourself, 4/20-5/20

Hannah Flowers

Question

Roberts

Ritchie

1. Which is the only mammal

Elephant

Platypus

The Simpsons

The Bunkel Family

Mark strikes again. He ups his score by one, and Mr. Ritchie remains with a score of zero. MR: 2, JR: 0

Billy Ray

It’s not her stage name nor her dad’s name. Her name was originally Destiny. Both competitors fail to get on the board this round. MR: 2, JR: 0

50

Mark proves his intelligence once again. The roman numeral “C” represents 100. At this point, Ritchie will not be able to catch up. MR: 3, JR: 0

Tallahassee

Mr. Ritchie finally gets on the board. Looks like he’s capital savvy. Florida’s capital is Tallahassee. However, Mark takes the gold.

cancer that cannot jump? 6/21-7/22

Answer Elephant

The elephant is indeed the only mammal that cannot jump. Mark makes it on the board first. MR: 1, JR: 0

Taurus (4/20 - 5/20)

Y

ou always choose your mind over your 2. Which fictional family lives heart, Taurus. But don’t let anyone, inat 742 Evergreen Terrace? cluding yourself, make you think your feelings are not important. Make your voice heard and cancer gemini leo virgo taurus scorpio libra in the decisions6/21-7/22 that you want to 10/23-11/21 5/21-6/20 7/23-8/22 be confident 8/23-9/22 4/20-5/20 9/23-10/22 make. Gemini (5/21 - 6/20) 3. Before she legally changed ou never feel good enough. But sadly, it in 2008, what was Miley Gemini, you are neglecting to see how many people adore you.Your hard work is Cyrus’ first name? saggitarius capricorn aquarius pisces amounting to great things and everyone can virgo scorpio libra cancer gemini 11/22-12/21 12/22-1/19 1/20-2/18 2/19-3/20 You are important10/23-11/21 and can do the 8/23-9/22 9/23-10/22 6/21-7/22 5/21-6/20 see that. impossible! Cancer (6/21 - 7/22) 4. What does roman numeral

Y

L

ately, you’ve been dealing with an internal battle that waged war within you. Do not how others will feel about your decicapricornfocus onaquarius pisces scorpio libra sions; your happiness comes first. Do what cancer gemini Aries taurus 12/22-1/19 1/20-2/18 2/19-3/20 9/23-10/22 you happiest Cancer! 5/21-6/20 6/21-7/22 3/21-4/19 makes10/23-11/21 4/20-5/20 Leo (7/23 - 8/22)

“C” represent?

Destiny

Hannah Montana

100

100

cancer 6/21-7/22

5. What is the capital of

L

The Simpsons

Florida? et loose Leo! You have been feeling cooped up. This month, take yourself out on a joy ride. Adventure awaits you, so channel your aquarius inner Beyoncé. piscesPeople will absolutely notice leo virgo scorpio libra scorpio cancer gemini taurus the fun2/19-3/20 1/20-2/18 and free change in you. 7/23-8/22 8/23-9/22 10/23-11/21 9/23-10/22 10/23-11/21 6/21-7/22 5/21-6/20 4/20-5/20

Tallahassee

Miami

FINAL SCORE = ROBERTS: 3, RITCHIE: 1 Hannah Flowers

Virgo (8/23 - 9/22)

Y

ou’ve been feeling extra carefree and those around you are loving the new liberation and generosity you are radiating.Your saggitarius capricorn aquarius pisces work iscancer alllibra caught up and organized. You go, virgo scorpio gemini 11/22-12/21 12/22-1/19 1/20-2/18 2/19-3/20 Virgo! Keep up that positive attitude. 6/21-7/22 8/23-9/22 10/23-11/21 9/23-10/22 5/21-6/20

Staff Writer

Winter Necesseties Become Spring Essentials

pisces 2/19-3/20

As spring approaches, learn how to save money and recreate winter outfits for a new season

W

inter is a season that revolves around the ven though you are the symbol of balance, comforts of being warm. you are not quite in sync with your emoMost people find themselves tions.You must reevaluate your priorities. in the holiday season with capricorn aquarius Once you are organized, goodpisces fortune will be pieces like scarves, fur jackets cancer scorpio libra cancer gemini Aries taurus 12/22-1/19 1/20-2/18 sent 10/23-11/21 your way. Stay focused,2/19-3/20 Libra. and beanies. Although these 6/21-7/22 9/23-10/22 6/21-7/22 5/21-6/20 3/21-4/19 4/20-5/20 winter essentials keep you Scorpio (10/23 - 11/21) warm during the cold flash, there is no need to pack ou’re in for the ride of your life, Scorpio. these items away until next This roller coaster has many ups and December. downs for you, ranging from explosive exciteScarves and beanies are aquarius pisces ment to gemini downer days. Hold tight and enjoy scorpio cancer known as a symbol of the taurus leo virgo scorpio libra 1/20-2/18 2/19-3/20 coming for you! 6/21-7/22 10/23-11/21 4/20-5/20 what’s5/21-6/20 Libra (9/23 - 10/22)

E

Y

7/23-8/22

8/23-9/22

9/23-10/22

Sagittarius (11/22 - 12/21)

E

mpowerment is the name of the game and you, Sagittarius, are taking home the gold! You are in a state of balance and you are efpisces ficientlycapricorn picking Keep it up, you virgo scorpio saggitarius libraup the slack.aquarius cancer gemini 2/19-3/20 great. 8/23-9/22 are doing 10/23-11/21 11/22-12/21 12/22-1/19 1/20-2/18 9/23-10/22 6/21-7/22 5/21-6/20

Capricorn (12/22 - 1/19)

A

rocky relationship has risen out of the water and it’s really taking a toll on you. However, what’s broken can always be capricorn mended aquarius and there are friendlypisces surprises in scorpio libra 12/22-1/19store. 1/20-2/18 2/19-3/20 Stay strong, Capricorn! 10/23-11/21 9/23-10/22 Aquarius (1/20 - 2/18)

L

ove is definitely in the air for you, Aquarius, and you’re glowing. Do not be afraid to take a leap of faith and go for that aquarius special someone. pisces Your heart is on fire, so don’t 1/20-2/18 cool the 2/19-3/20 flame.

winter season, which makes them almost impossible to wear in hot weather. But don’t worry. It is simple to take off some of your other layers in order to include that bold scarf or head accessory. Try compromising with a knit head wrap to create a cooler spring look. Try wearing a scarf by pairing it with a t-shirt, jean shorts and gladiator sandals. Loose, plain tees are a trend

for this season and by adding a fun scarf accessory, you can add definition to your outfit. Although fur jackets are well-known for winter looks, use it to create an edgy spring outfit. Try pairing your fur jacket with a tank top and skirt, or a dress. This can be used for going out in the evening when it cools down. For a daytime look, try wearing a fur vest to complete your look.

Spring has officially begun, but there is no need to buy a new wardrobe. You can take your winter essentials and put a twist on them to create the perfect spring outfit, all the while keeping the extra money in your piggy bank.

Alexa Szabo Staff Writer

10/23-11/21

Oopsy Daisy!

pisces 2/19-3/20

Have a laugh at two students’ traumatic experiences and be thankful they didn’t happen to you

In seventh grade, I was sitting, at lunch, right on the stage.Then a bird just goes over my head and I look up. My worst fear happened, it just pooped on my face. And the poop ran all over my side of the face and all down my shirt.To make it worse, some hot eighth grade boys were like “Lick it! Lick it!”

I was in middle school, and I was hanging on a basketball hoop in P.E. My whole class of eighth grade was in front of me on a wall and some kid came down and pantsed me with my boxers and my shorts and everyone saw everything. I got up and cried and ran to the office.

Jade Harabedian Staff Writer


MAVLIFENEWS.COM

Entertainment

The Hungry Maverick

15

As the sun is shining and the beach is calling, nothing goes better with a warm California day than a satisfying snack of chips and guacamole. This month, a variety of Mavericks visited the MavLife classroom to help taste test three different guacamole flavors to see which fresh green appetizer stole the show. Jessica Woods

1

Entertainment Editor

2

7662 N. El Camino Real, La Costa, CA 92009 (760) 944-8226

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onveniently located by La Costa Canyon, Rudy’s is often visited by senior students at lunchtime and fortunately won this month’s competition. “It looked very appetizing. The color was bright and cheerful,” junior Kailee Hall said. While on the topic of appearance, junior Guinevere Kelley said, “It is fresh-looking and the chunks make it seem homemade.” Luckily, the guacamole was just as delicious as it appeared. “It had a really subtle taste and it was pretty chunky which I thought was good,” junior Shannon Dorr said. According to junior Michael Stewart, the taste was “quite strong, like a Chuck Norris punch.” With a total of 12 votes under its belt, Rudy’s won the hearts of those who indulged in the fresh guacamole.

268 N. El Camino Real, Encinitas, CA 92024 (760) 635-3863

K

nown for its delectable custom-made burritos, Chipotle has a reputation for serving filling meals. However, its guacamole did not take the prize. “[It] tastes like pure avocado,” junior Leizl Rodriguez said. Fellow junior Molly Mineiro said, “It is well accented by the other flavors, like lemon.” Certain parts of the guacamole helped contribute to the whole. “The salt was a great aspect,” freshman Kendall Lewis said. While Kendall appreciated the salt, some felt the flavor was too much. “[The avocado flavor] was too strong for me, I guess I’m just not California enough,” junior Zuleyma Sanchez said. Given only six votes, Chipotle was a little above average on the tastiness scale.

3 267 N. El Camino Real, Encinitas, California 92024 (760) 942-6809

M

uch to students’ surprise, local favorite Jorge’s did not make an outstanding impression and its guacamole was not up to par. “[The guacamole] is super smooth, like a really good pick-up line,” senior Maddy Belin said. She went on to say it was “cool, like an ocean breeze.” Apparently, someone is a big fan of Jorge’s guacamole (and of similes). In contrast to those who favored the guacamole, others often described it as “runny” and “watery.” “[There was] not a ton of flavor but good consistency,” freshman Brittany Bloom said. Acquiring only two votes, Jorge’s sadly placed last in the test of tastes.

Best-Selling Novels Transform Into Motion Pictures

Molly Naudi

Want to read the books first? Find out which one is best for you

Danielle Lee Staff Writer

B

oth “Divergent” and “The Maze Runner” are great for anyone who is looking for a good book to read. While they are both young adult novels set in dystopian futures, “Divergent” is a trilogy about a young woman looking to make a difference in her society as she learns that it may not be as perfect as it seems. “Divergent” is a lot like “The Hunger Games,” with its own twist on future society. It features an exciting story line and, in my opinion, is one of the best young adult novels. Although it is a bit on the longer side, “Divergent” is a great trilogy and a good read for anyone interested in dystopian stories. While “Divergent” is more directed towards women, “The Maze Runner” has a strong male lead. After “Twilight,” most young adult novels have been at least somewhat towards women. “The Maze Runner” has little to no female cast with a type of genre that stands out from the rest. There is no love triangle or romance in “The Maze Runner.” It is not supernatural. Many people are excited about the movie, because it doesn’t necessarily fit the standard mold. The unusual situations and outcomes of “The Maze Runner” is what pulls you into the book. There is a lot to speculate and wonder about. It is lots of books nowadays and is a perfect fit for anyone looking for something different.

Author: James Dashner Starring: Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario Movie release date: September 19, 2014

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et in a post-apocalyptic future, “The Maze Runner” is about a boy named Thomas who wakes up in a rusty elevator and can’t remember anything except his first name. He finds other boys who don’t know why or how they got there. All the boys work hard at specific jobs and form their society called the Glade, a place in the middle of an elaborate maze. The most important job is the Runners, who go out into the Maze to track the paths and find a way out. Every 30 days a boy is delivered. However, the day after Thomas comes, a girl enters the Glade for the first time. Through piecing together parts of his past, Thomas and the new girl must do everything they can to find a way out.

Author: Veronica Roth Starring: Shailene Woodley, Theo James Movie release date: March 21, 2014

B

eatrice Prior lives in future dystopian Chicago, where the people maintain peace by dividing into five factions: Abnegation (the selfless), Candor (the honest), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful) and Erudite (the intelligent). All the 16-year-olds take an aptitude test to determine where they will fit in society. Beatrice was born into Abnegation, but decides to join Dauntless. The book follows her through the initiation process and keeping her true aptitude results secret. She is Divergent, meaning she has different skills and traits to be potential for more than one faction. Throughout the novel, Tris learns more about being Divergent and the dangers that it presents.


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March 2014 MavLife