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INTERPRETIVE CENTERS AND TRAILS FUNDING GUIDE Pacific Northwest Case Studies November 2012

Prepared by Laura Higashi-Poynter Environmental Studies; Urban Planning Huxley College of the Environment Western Washington University Supported by Maul Foster & Alongi, Inc. 1329 North State Street, Suite 301 Bellingham, WA 98225


TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface Introduction General Sources of Funding PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES SUMMARY TABLE PRIVATE FUNDING SOURCES SUMMARY TABLE NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE Programs Facilities Organizational Model and Theme Capital Funding Grant Funding Operational Funding Problems and Solutions Contacts OLYMPIC DISCOVERY TRAIL Programs Facilities Organizational Model and Theme Capital Funding Grant Funding Operational Funding Problems and Solutions Contacts CAPE DISAPPOINTMENT STATE PARK / CONFLUENCE PROJECT Programs Facilities Organizational Model and Theme Capital Funding Grant Funding Operational Funding Problems and Solutions Contacts NORTHWEST MARITIME CENTER Programs Facilities Organizational Model and Theme Capital Funding Grant Funding Operational Funding Problems and Solutions

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Contacts METHOW VALLEY INTERPRETIVE CENTER Programs Facilities Organizational Model and Theme Capital Funding Grant Funding Operational Funding Problems and Solutions Contacts

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PREFACE This funding guide was produced through an internship at Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University and sponsored by Maul Foster & Alongi, Inc. (MFA). It is intended to serve as a portal to the wide range of potential funding sources for Environmental, Cultural, and Historic Interpretive Centers and trails throughout the Pacific Northwest. Sources of funding are explored through real world case studies, including: the North Cascades Institute, Olympic Discovery Trail, Cape Disappointment State Park, Northwest Maritime Center, and Methow Valley Interpretive Center. Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment is a premier institution for the education of future environmental experts and leaders. Located between the Cascade Mountains to the east, the shores of Puget Sound to the west, Seattle to the south and Vancouver, British Columbia, to the north it can truly be said that there is no other place so unique in which to study the environment. By addressing today's environmental issues and preparing tomorrow's interdisciplinary problem solvers, Huxley College produces properly trained environmental professionals capable of addressing the challenges we face in achieving a sustainable society. 1 MFA is an integrated engineering, environmental science, planning, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and environmental data management consulting firm with offices in Portland, Oregon; Vancouver, Seattle, and Bellingham, Washington; and Kellogg, Idaho. MFA offers creative and award-winning professional services to clients representing diverse industry sectors throughout the Pacific Northwest, the western U.S., and the nation.

1

www.wwu.edu/Huxley

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INTRODUCTION Across the nation, increasing awareness for environmental issues such as forestry and wildlife protection has led to a considerable need for places and programs that focus on future preservation of the history, culture, and environment in the Pacific Northwest. Interpretive centers are devoted to the conservation, acquisition, exhibition, study, and educational interpretation of objects having scientific, historical, or artistic value and often include multi-media, living history demonstrations, exhibits, and interpretive trails. What Is Environmental, Cultural, and Historic Education? Environmental education is the study of the relationships and interactions between dynamic natural and human systems.2 The ultimate goal of environmental, cultural, and historic education through interpretive centers and programs is to strengthen our commitment to the stewardship of the environment and awareness of our history and culture, along with strategies and solutions to address future challenges and threats. Environmental, Cultural, and Historic Interpretive Centers offer:  Learning and teaching methods that extend beyond the classroom and help to promote education on topics and issues such as wetland and water quality management, resource preservation, and understanding the important role the environment has played in historical events. Summer programs and after school programs are also often offered at interpretive centers.  Assemblage of various media sources such as video displays and films, exhibitions of material, statues, historical signage, interactive investigations and computer programs, and imaginative play spaces.  Economic growth and community integration through promotion of schools, community partnerships, heritage tourism, and historical education.  Hands-on, interdisciplinary and inquiry-driven educational experiences through activities such as exploration of material, trails, art, teaching curriculums, guided activities through various mediums, and ultimately, these centers act as a gateway between a community and its historical background and future preservation of culture and environment. Interpretive centers in the Pacific Northwest provide key insight to the unique history, wildlife, and development of this region. The Pacific Northwest is not only home to a distinctive array of wildlife and scenery, but also to widely celebrated figures and icons such as Lewis and Clark who traveled the Oregon Trail, Robert Gray who discovered the mouth of the Columbia River, George Vancouver who created a detailed map of the Northwest Coast, and the Native Americans who originally inhabited the area. Centers such as the North Cascades National Park Complex offer guided trail tours, junior ranger programs, multimedia presentations, and celebration of special events such as the Bald Eagle Festival.3 Interpretive centers offer a unique way of educating the public about the history and future preservation of the Pacific Northwest.

2 3

Campaign for Environmental Literacy, Environmental Education, 2007 National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior, North Cascades National Park Complex, 2011

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What is the Economic Impact of Heritage and Eco-Tourism? Economic value and gain from Eco and Historic/Heritage Tourism can be measured by both the activity and employment generated along with net economic benefits (economic gain minus costs to society). The cultural heritage tourism industry in the United States makes up 14% of the top tourism activities, with a 10% increase from 1996 to 2000.4 The heritage and cultural traveler is generally more affluent, has higher expectations for travel experiences, and is willing to spend more per trip versus other travelers.5 There are a growing number of tourists and travelers who seek these cultural and historical/heritage experiences which enhance their enjoyment of a place, and play as an important factor and motivator for their travel decisions and expectations. How are Interpretive Centers Funded? This guide is intended to outline the funding plans that have supported the construction and operation of five successful interpretive centers and trails in the Pacific Northwest. Common strategies employed by these organizations are:  Diversification- Each of the interpretive centers obtained funding from a variety of sources, from federal and state grants, to private foundation awards, to individual private donations, to fee for service charges.  Community Outreach- All organizations have successfully reached out and educated their communities on the importance of having interpretive centers within a society.  Leveraging- Successfully obtaining one grant or meeting one fundraising goal provided the momentum and demonstrated capacity that made other funding entities willing to support the organization.  Committed Leadership- Each of the organizations has a clean mission and vision that is carried forward by a core group of leaders, whether paid staff or volunteers.  Flexibility- Each of the five interpretive centers have shown a great capacity to evolve and progress along with the ever-changing financial climate, in order to fully carry forward their missions.

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Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Office of Travel & Tourism Industries, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce

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GENERAL SOURCES OF FUNDING There are two major categories of funding sources for interpretive centers. Funding agencies often encourage or require projects to combine resources from each of these categories as “match” to leverage their investment. Public— There are a number of public sources for both comprehensive and component funding of interpretive center projects. These sources are found in federal and state programs (Washington, Oregon, Idaho), and each comes with differing applicability to and requirements of the grantee. Funding sources are either grants with a match requirement or support for a loan. Loan support comes in the form of interest rate buy downs or guarantees that are essential for traditional commercial financing. Private Foundations— Private charitable foundations and many corporations have established grant programs to fund environmental and cultural programs. These private funders typically support non-profit organizations, but may also provide support to projects lead by local governments. Private foundations and corporations generally focus their grant programs on a mission statement and several core issue areas, such as education, youth, or natural resource protection. Many of these funders require applicants to pursue matching funds from private and/or public sector to leverage their funding to promote larger projects with greater impact.

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PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCES SUMMARY TABLE PUBLIC FUNDING SOURCE

NOTES

National Endowment for the Arts

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

National Forest Service

Supported North Cascades Institute

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Community Habitat Restoration Program

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Seattle City Light

Supported North Cascades Institute

US Department of Interior

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

US Department of Transportation

Supported Olympic Peninsula

Washington State Department of Ecology Shorelands Program

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Washington State Department of Ecology Toxics Cleanup Program, Remedial Action Grant Washington State Department of Natural Resources - Recreation and Conservation Office

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Washington State Department of Transportation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Washington State Historical Society

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

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PRIVATE FUNDING SOURCES SUMMARY TABLE PRIVATE FUNDING SOURCE

NOTES

Alcoa Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Camilla Chandler Family Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

First Federal Savings & Loan

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Fred Meyer Corporation

Supported North Cascades Institute

Hugh & Jane Ferguson Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Hugh and Jane Ferguson Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Icicle Fund

Supported Methow Interpretive Center

Janson Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute

Kinsman Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Kongsgaard-Goldman Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Margaret A. Cargill Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute

Martin Faber Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Methow Valley Fund

Supported Methow Interpretive Center

Meyer Memorial Trust

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

MJ Murdock Charitable Trust

Supported Caped Disappointment / Confluence Project and the Northwest Maritime Center

National Parks Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute

Norcliffe Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Oregon Community Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

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PRIVATE FUNDING SOURCES SUMMARY TABLE (Continued) PRIVATE FUNDING SOURCE

NOTES

Otto Haas Charitable Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Port Townsend Paper Corporation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

REI

Supported North Cascades Institute

Sage Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Satterberg Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Schneider Family Fund

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Seattle Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute and Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Skagit Community Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute

Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission

Supported North Cascades Institute

Southwest Washington Community Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Spirit Mountain Community Fund

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Summit Family Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

The Kresge Foundation

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

The Martin Foundation, Inc.

Supported Northwest Maritime Center

Thurston Charitable Foundation

Supported Cape Disappointment State Park – Confluence Project

Whatcom Community Foundation

Supported North Cascades Institute

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NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE “The mission of North Cascades Institute (NCI) is to conserve and restore Northwest environments through education. We are committed to quality education, effective community engagement, sound business practices and a clear sense of purpose.” 6 Programs The majority of programs offered at NCI are based out of the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center, located on Diablo Lake, within the North Cascades National Park. There are programs offered for both youth and adults. Programs focus on the convergence of history, culture, science, humanities, and the arts, with emphasis placed on the value of public lands, education, and community engagement. Major programs include:  Mountain School: Mountain School is held at NCI’s Learning Center. Students can experience a hands-on learning environment, where they gain knowledge about geology, ecology, and the natural/cultural history of the mountains.  North Cascades Wild: This is a tuition-free program for underserved youth. This program takes place in the “back country”, and runs over the course of 12 days. Students can participate in canoeing, backpacking and service projects as part of the North Cascades Wild program.  Cascades Climate Challenge: This is a three-week, tuition-free program for students that gives a first-hand experience on climate change. Students learn about mitigation measures and preparing for future changes in the climate.  Stewardship Programs: The focus of this program is to connect people to the public lands through education and meaningful service projects in the following areas: native plant restoration, trail work, and scientific research.  Community and Neighborhood Programs: Both Skagit Valley and Seattle’s International District participate in a variety of outdoor activities including all-day field trips.  Base Camp: Base Camp is offered during the summer season from June 15 until the end of September, and offers the experience of exploring and learning about “the American Alps”. Base camp is offered for either a day, weekend, or extended stay.  Family Getaways: Family getaways offer a unique way to connect with both family and nature by spending the weekend near Diablo Lake. There is a wide variety of activities offered including arts and crafts, and hiking.  Sourdough Speaker Series: The Sourdough Speaker Series is a one-night dinner & drinks style evening with a guest speaker and presentation. All proceeds from this event benefit the summer youth activities in the North Cascades.  Skagit Tours: Skagit Tours is a unique way of showcasing the history of the Upper Skagit Valley during the summer. Various types of tours are offered including boat tours, North Cascades expeditions, powerhouse tours, and walking tours.

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North Cascades Institute: ncascades.org

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Facilities The North Cascades Environmental Learning Center is located in North Cascades National Park on the shores of Diablo Lake. Facilities are owned by Seattle City Lights, but operated by NCI. The learning center includes 16 buildings clustered in a tree-sheltered campus. Facilities include:  Multimedia classrooms  Research library  Aquatic and terrestrial labs  Overnight lodging for up to 92 guests  Housing for graduate students and staff  Lakeside dining hall with a recycling/composting center  Amphitheater  Outdoor learning shelters and trails leading into the surrounding wild lands  Diablo Lake dock for paddling adventures  ADA-accessible facilities and pathways Organizational Model and Theme The North Cascades Institute has over 30 partners throughout the Pacific Northwest, and operates with an executive director, advisory board, board of directors, staff, and volunteers. Executive Director: Paul Weisberg 15 Member Board of Directors

7 Member Advisory Council

47 Member Professional Staff

25 Member Graduate Student Staff

Volunteer Staff

Capital Funding Donated Facilities and Services:  Water and Septic: North Cascades National Park  Facilities Electricity: Seattle City Light North Cascades Environmental Learning Center Fund: Seattle City Light transferred over $4 million to “the Fund” to be used for support of the program for the next 20 years.

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Grant Funding Source

Amount

Notes

The Seattle Foundation

Above $250,000

North Cascades Environmental Learning Center Fund

The Margaret A. Cargill Foundation

$100,000-$249,999

Seattle City Light

$100,000-$249,999

Alcoa Foundation

$50,000-$99,999

Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

$50,000-$99,999

Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission

$50,000-$99,999

National Park Foundation

$25,000-$49,999

Fred Meyer Corporation

$5,000-$9,999

Janson Foundation

$5,000-$9,999

REI

$5,000-$9,999

Skagit Community Foundation

$5,000-$9,999

Skagit Publishing

$5,000-$9,999

Whatcom Community Foundation

$5,000-$9,999

Operational Funding Income: Each year thousands of young people are able to participate in programs intended to educate and inspire. Donations, grants, tuition fees, contracts, special events, and funds from the learning center make this possible by covering operational costs. North Cascades Institute currently operates under a $3 million budget, 40% of which comes from earned income, 26% from individual donations, corporate contributions and in-kind support, 24% comes from grants, and the remaining 10%, from an endowment. For every dollar that North Cascade Institute raises, 88 cents goes directly to support programs. Income for 2011 breaks down as follows:  Tuition and Fees- $364,000  Contracts- $648,000  Special Events- $17,000 Interpretive Centers and Trails Funding Guide

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     

Bookstores (retail/outreach)- $118,000 Learning Center Fund- $300,000 Government Grants- $297,000 Investment Income- $30,000 Contributions- $240,000 In-kind Contributions- $364,000

Expenses: Expenses include programs offered, overhead costs, and fund raising costs.  Programs- $2,476,000  Management and general- $219,000  Fundraising- $118,000 Problems and Solutions 

Problem: Strategic planning to ensure that North Cascades Institute may continue to reinforce the core values while focusing on new initiatives.  Solution: Over the span of several months, the board of directors came up with a plan to achieve the goals set by North Cascades Institute. Those goals include:  Broadening the audience in which NCI’s programs reach. This includes strengthening the regional impact while growing the national reputation and influence.  Engaging more young people in programs that emphasize leadership and adventure.  Developing health and wellness goals for selected programs, while maintaining the ability to achieve the mission of existing programs.  Strengthening the sustainable volunteer program while improving the costeffectiveness of programs.

Contacts Communications Coordinator and Media Liaison: Christian Martin: 360.854.2599 christian_martin@ncascades.org North Cascades Institute (Main Office) 810 State Route 20 Sedro Woolley, WA 98284

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OLYMPIC DISCOVERY TRAIL “Its mission was to establish a shared trail for its constituent groups. The trail was to connect the population centers of the area, from Port Townsend on Puget Sound west to Forks, about 100 miles, utilizing as much as possible the abandoned Milwaukee Railroad corridor. This mission was later expanded to extend the trail another 25 miles to LaPush on the Pacific Ocean. During the 24 years since the inception of the Peninsula Trails Coalition, the trail has been named the Olympic Discovery Trail and has grown from a vision of the coalition members to a broadly accepted regional objective.”7 Programs The Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT) is considered a major highway for non-motorized travelers, and includes many natural attractions along the 130 miles that the trail covers. Major non-motorized user categories are: local recreation, local commuting, and out of area tourism. For tourists, various types of trips are available, with some sample itineraries listed on the ODT website. Local business partners provide support for non-motorized users along the trail route. Major trips and activities include:  Camping Trips  Bike, Bed and Breakfast Trips  Hiking Trips  Biking Trips Facilities The ODT is a 10-foot wide (in most parts) paved, shared use path, which covers a route from Port Townsend to La Push, Washington. The ODT links populated centers on the North Olympic Peninsula with trails that are designed for users including road cyclists, mountain bikers, pedestrians, equestrians, mobility impaired users, and others. The ODT route passes through numerous jurisdictions including tribal, federal, state, county, and city jurisdictions, who are the underlying owners of the trail segments. Access points along the trail have been developed in varying degrees, along with parking, picnic tables, and restrooms in more populated areas. Shared use paths include:  East End Trail: This portion of the trail extends from Port Townsend to Blyn with 3 separate access points.  East Central Trail: This portion of the trail connects Blyn and travels through Sequim, to Port Angeles. There are 9 bridges along this trail and 6 access points.  West Central Trail: This portion of the trail runs from Port Angeles and spans across the Elwha River and coastal lowlands, ending at Fairholm Hill. This trail has 4 bridges and 7 access points.  West End Trail: Significant portions of the trail in the west end are now under construction, with the first portions to open in 2013. Organizational Model and Theme The Olympic Discovery Trail is coordinated by the Peninsula Trails Coalition (PTC), which represents the hiking, biking, and equestrian communities in this area. PTC was incorporated as a 7

Olympic Discovery Trail: www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com/

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non-profit, 503(c) corporation in 1988 to provide advocacy, mobilize volunteer support, and coordinate a consistent standard and image, for implementation of the ODT concept. PTC both supports and coordinates with the 10 jurisdictions that are responsible for portions of the trail. PTC manages funds, which have been donated in order to support trail construction and maintenance.

14 Person Board of Directors

President

Vice President

Treasurer

Secretary

Volunteer officers are confirmed by the membership at the annual meeting, and responsibilities are divided by county.  Clallam County (80% of Trail) is managed by the board and officers  Jefferson County (20% of Trail) is managed by a chapter of PTC called the Jefferson Trails Coalition (JTC) Capital Funding Volunteers, staff or contractors, under the supervision of the owner agency cover construction of the ODT. Funding includes a mixture of public funds, capital funds, grants, and donations. Federal and state grants have been matched by corresponding jurisdictions. The ODT is an ongoing project expected to cost approximately $30-40 million; 75% of which will be from grant funding, and 25% will come from local jurisdiction funding and tourism development. Match funding for the grants generally comes from a variety of sources, including other grants, donations, tourism development, and local government funds. Grant Funding Source

Amount

Notes

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$380,000

1:1 Match with City of Port Angeles

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Grant Funding (Continued) Source

Amount

Notes

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$200,000

1:1 Match with Jefferson Co Public Works

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$100,000

1:1 Match with Jefferson Co Public Works

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$290,000

1:1 Match with City of Sequim

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$130,000

1:1 Match with Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$97,000

1:1 Match with Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe for Parking and Access Points

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program

$800,000

Pending Legislative Action

US Dept of Transportation- Public Lands Hwy Discretionary Program

$980,000

Upgrading Roads

Operational Funding Income: Donations and membership fees to the PTC pay for many PTC volunteer projects, maintenance, and building materials. Expenses: Financial support covers expenses such as work crew liability insurance, publications, festivals, displays, web page upkeep costs, feeding the all-volunteer crews, relief stations, general maintenance, doggie poop bags, and trail signs. Problems and Solutions 

Problem: None of the jurisdictions have maintenance staff dedicated to the trail, as of yet. o Solution: The PTC has carried out routine maintenance, unless there is a natural disaster occurrence (such as a landslide). o Solution: Sections of the trail have been adopted out to work parties. Problem: Funding operational costs and expenses, and preparing to fund upcoming years. o Solution: Donations have contributed to approximately $15k to $20k per year.

Contacts Peninsula Trails Coalition PO Box 1836, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.683.4549; http://www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com/ Interpretive Centers and Trails Funding Guide

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CAPE DISAPPOINTMENT STATE PARK / CONFLUENCE PROJECT “Cape Disappointment State Park (formerly Fort Canby State Park) is a 1,882-acre camping park on the Long Beach Peninsula, fronted by the Pacific Ocean. The park offers two miles of ocean beach, two lighthouses, an interpretive center and hiking trails. Visitors enjoy beachcombing, ship watching and exploring the area's rich natural and cultural history. The nearby coastal towns of Ilwaco and Long Beach feature special events and festivals spring through fall. Confluence Project is a collaborative effort of Pacific Northwest tribes, renowned artist Maya Lin, civic groups from Washington and Oregon and other artists, architects and landscape designers. The project stretches more than 300 miles from where the Columbia River flows into the Pacific Ocean, to Clarkston, WA, with sites in both Oregon and Washington. Each of its seven sites features an art installation by Ms. Lin that interprets the area's ecology and history, encouraging the visitor to reflect on how the surroundings have changed over time. Each references a passage from the Lewis and Clark journals.”8 Programs Programs offered through the Confluence Project are focused around educating youth through engagement between students and forms of artistic, musical, and oral expression. Major programs include:  Celilo Arts Education Program: Covered under the Celilo Arts Education Program, is the Gifts from Our Ancestors arts-education program. This is a proposal-based program which showcases student creations, which empower and create a sense of place for youth. 15-20 schools currently participate in this in-the-classroom educational program.  Confluence Project in the Schools (CIS): CIS is a school-based program, which links students and teachers with professional artists. This is a two-year project in which twentynine schools completed public art projects.  Tours: Tours of the Confluence Project site at Cape Disappointment State Park can be arranged by contacting the Cape Disappointment State Park’s Interpretive Center. Facilities The Confluence Project has seven sites along the Columbia River Basin, which explore and bridge together the environment, culture, and history of this unique area. Project sites and artworks within the Cape Disappointment State Park include:  Cape Disappointment State Park: o Boardwalk: Read text from journals inscribed on a boardwalk that leads from the existing amphitheater to Waikiki Beach. o Cedar Circle: In a secluded grove, cedar driftwood columns surround a cedar tree trunk that predates Lewis and Clark's arrival. o Fish-Cleaning Table: Near a viewing platform overlooking Baker Bay, you'll find a massive, fully functional fish-cleaning table formed from a single polished block of native basalt.

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Cape Disappointment State Park: www.parks.wa.gov Confluence Project: www.confluenceproject.org

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o Amphitheater Trail: From the existing amphitheater, a path of crushed oyster shells leads you from the coastal forest environment through dune grasses to a secluded grove. o Viewing Platform: On the bay side of Cape Disappointment, a simple, curved viewing platform offers an unobstructed view of the surroundings. Organizational Model and Theme Cape Disappointment State Park is in partnership with Cape Disappointment Site Events. Partners and Artists of the Confluence Project include:  Maya Lin: Incorporating art and architecture, Lin creates a vision of two- and threedimensional spaces that tie history and artwork into the land.  AHA!: AHA! has provided research, established standards, and involvement within the Confluence Project through writing, editing, and research services.  RMB Vivid: RMB Vivid has provided print communications, fundraising campaigns, site artwork design, and an interactive history of the Confluence Project.

Board of Directors

10 Member Staff

Capital Funding Approximately $35 million has been awarded towards the project costs for the Confluence Project & Cape Disappointment State Park with $8.5 million coming from the State of Washington. Grant Funding Source

Amount

Federal Transportation Fund

$10 million

Washington State Department of Transportation

$1,000,000+

Washington State Department of Commerce

$1,000,000+

Washington Society

$1,000,000+

State

Historical

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Grant Funding (Continued) Source

Amount

MJ Murdock Charitable Trust

$650,000

Kinsman Foundation

$400,000-$999,999

Meyer Memorial Trust

$450,000

National Endowment for the Arts

$350,000

Collins Foundation

$250,000

City of Vancouver

$150,000-$249,999

Otto Haas Foundation

Charitable

$150,000-$249,999

Spirit Mountain Community Fund

$100,000-$149,999

Hugh and Foundation

$100,000-$149,999

Ferguson

11 separate grants

$150,000-$249,999

Kongsgaard-Goldman Foundation

Jane

Notes

Lazar Foundation

$100,000-$149,999

Southwest Washington Community Foundation

$100,000

Clark County, Washington

$75,000-$99,999

Oregon Community Foundation

$50,000-$80,000

Oregon Cultural Trust

$25,000-$74,999

Seattle Foundation

$25,000-$74,999

Thurston Charitable Foundation

$25,000-$74,999

Rose Tucker Foundation

$5,000

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Operational Funding Income: Donations and private contributions, to the Confluence Project fulfill most of the overhead and maintenance costs. Expenses: Expenses include programs offered, overhead costs, educational and school costs, and fundraising costs. Problems and Solutions 

Problem: This has been an ongoing project for the past 11 years, and raising funds during a two recessions has been the most challenging aspect of this project.  Solution: Connecting the community with the Confluence Project has been essential to successful fundraising.

Contacts Email info@confluenceproject.org Phone 360-693-0123 Fax 360-693-7770 Mailing Address: 1701 Broadway #144 Vancouver, WA 98663 Street Address: 1610 C Street, Suite 203 Vancouver, WA 98663

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NORTHWEST MARITIME CENTER “The mission of the Northwest Maritime Center is to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life, in a spirit of adventure and discovery.”9 Programs The Northwest Maritime Center offers educational programs for both school-aged youth and adults. Located on the waterfront of Port Townsend, it acts as a gathering place for events and classes. Major programs include:  Youth Programs: There is a diverse range of youth programs designed for beginners all the way to advanced sailors, including an overnight program. Youth programs include: o Youth Learn to Sail Classes o Messing About in Boats o Voyaging and Exploring  Adult, and Family Programs: Northwest Maritime Center offers a learning experience in which families or adults can learn to sail. Adult and Family Programs include: o Schooner Martha o Learn to Sail Classes o Basic Keelboat Certification (Crew, Skipper, or Full Course) o Thunderbird Club o Customized Sailing Classes o No Impact Docking o Navigation and Plotting o Build-a-boat  Business and Professional Programs: Business professionals can develop leadership skills on a longboat for either single or multi-day workshops.  Women’s Only Program: This is the same class as the Basic Keelboat Full Course, but with an all female crew including the instructor.  Maritime Club Programs: Maritime Club Programs are co-educational activities and competitive. Programs include: o Sea Scouts o High School Sailing Team  Public Programming: Every Wednesday from September-May there is a public speaker, which talks about maritime topics. This program is free to the public. Facilities The Northwest Maritime Center is home to an array of facilities, which are used to host programs, festivals, events, and general day-to-day use. Facilities include:  First Federal Commons, which includes over 1400 pavers to make a compass rose with the names of supporting community members engraved on each paver.  The Wooden Boat Chandlery Gift Shop and Café  Conference rooms, classrooms, and meeting spaces available for hosting events  The Boat Shop & Helen Keeley Boathouse 9

Northwest Maritime Center: www.nwmaritime.org

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 

The H.W. McCurdy Library The Pilothouse

Organizational Model and Theme Northwest Maritime Center is in partnership with the Wooden Boat Foundation. Each of which is part of the same company, but they are individually marketed to promote the missions of each.

17 Member Board of Directors

10 Member Staff

30 Member Seasonal Staff

Capital Funding Capital costs for the Northwest Maritime Center have been covered through grants, and loans. Grant Funding Source

Amount

Camilla Chandler Family Foundation

Over $1 million

City of Port Townsend

Over $1 Million

State of Washington

Over $1 Million

US Department of Housing and Urban Development

Over $1 Million

The Bill & Melinda Gate Foundation

$500,000-$999,999

The Kresge Foundation

$500,000-$999,999

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Grant Funding (Continued) Source

Amount

First Federal Savings and Loan

$500,000-$999,999

Schneider Family Fund

$500,000-$999,999

Washington State Historical Society

$500,000-$999,999

Department of Natural Resources

$250,000-$499,999

Hugh & Jane Ferguson Foundation

$250,000-$499,999

The Martin Foundation, Inc

$250,000-$499,999

Martin-Fabert Foundation

$250,000-$499,999

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

$250,000-$499,999

Norcliffe Foundation

$250,000-$499,999

NOAA

$100,000-$249,999

Port Townsend Paper Corporation

$100,000-$249,999

Puget Sound Energy

$100,000-$249,999

Sage Foundation

$100,000-$249,999

Satterberg Foundation

$100,000-$249,999

Summit Family Foundation

$100,000-$249,999

Department of Ecology

$50,000-$99,999

Toxics Cleanup Program

Department of Ecology

$50,000-$99,999

Shorelands Program

U.S. Department of the Interior

$50,000-$99,999

Interpretive Centers and Trails Funding Guide

Notes

IAC Water Access

Community Habitat Restoration Program

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Operational Funding Income: Income to cover operational costs primarily comes from donations, grants, festivals, merchandise, programs, and events.  75% Earned Income from events, festivals, educational programs, and merchandise.  25% from grants, memberships, and donations. Expenses: Expenses include programs offered, overhead costs, and fund raising costs. To date, there has been $120k worth of maintenance done to facilities at Northwest Maritime Center.  Staff  Crew Members Problems and Solutions 

Problem: There is an existing balance on the Bridge Loan, which has been the largest challenge for the Northwest Maritime Center. o Solution: Pursuing forgiveness forbearance, along with operating more like a for-profit business, and restructuring finances has been a successful solution.

Contacts 431 Water Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368 Phone 360.385.3628 Fax 360.385.4742 info@nwmaritime.org www.nwmaritime.org www.woodenboat.org

Interpretive Centers and Trails Funding Guide

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METHOW VALLEY INTERPRETIVE CENTER “Our mission is to create, fund and operate an interpretive center that recognizes the pre-European native inhabitants and portrays the geology and natural history of the Methow Valley.” 10 Programs Methow Valley Interpretive Center offers a variety of programs including a series of revolving features and displays. Programs are updated and exhibits are listed on the Methow Valley Interpretive Center website, which is updated regularly. Programs include:  Last Sunday Series: The Last Sunday Series features experts in related fields and is offered free to the public, on the last Sunday of each month.  Wolves in Washington State: This program begins April of 2013, and is a traveling exhibit produced by the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. Wolves in Washington State exhibits the importance of wolves in both Washington’s history as well as Native American culture and history.  Salish Bounty Food Gathering: Coming in 2014, will show the interaction between upper plateau tribes and coastal natives. Facilities The Methow Valley Interpretive Center is located in TwispWorks, the former U.S. Forest Service complex in Twisp. Permanent and evolving displays depicting the Methow Band and the natural history of the Methow Valley watershed can be found here. Facilities include:  Interpretive garden  Native Methow exhibit which shoes how the native peoples have lived in the valley. o This display will include revolving exhibits about the specific native families that are descendants from the Methow families that lived in this area.  Ribbon of Life, coming this fall, which will show the importance of the Methow Valley Watershed. o This exhibit will include revolving displays that educate the public on the plant and animal species that are part of the watershed.  Permanent & Revolving geology displays  Native Encampment Display, which is currently in the process of being built. This exhibit will show how native peoples lived during the summer and winter months in the Methow Valley. Organizational Model and Theme The interpretive center is in partnership with Twisp Works, which is a center for arts, culture, local agriculture, education, and economic vitality within the Methow Valley. Other partnerships include the Cove, a charitable organization, the Methow Restoration Council, a watershed action team, and the WA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. The Methow Valley Interpretive Center has become a part of the Methow Field Institute, a federal tax exempt educational corporation. In doing so, the two boards have merged to form an 8 person board of directors. All other staff is currently volunteers.

10

Methow Valley Interpretive Center: www.methowvalleyinterpretivecenter.com

Interpretive Centers and Trails Funding Guide

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8 Member Board of Directors

Volunteer Staff

Capital Funding Construction costs have been covered primarily through grants and volunteer donations of time. Volunteer donations of time (i.e., electricians working as community service to install lighting) have helped to cover $9k of the startup costs. Grant Funding Source

Amount

Notes

Icicle Fund

$10,000

For building re-model

Icicle Fund

$10,000

$5,000 Match, for displays and publicity

Methow Valley Fund

$2500

Remodel

Methow Valley Fund

$4,000

Lighting

Humanities Washington

$1,000

For Opening speakers and publicity

Operational Funding Income: Donations, fundraisers, and grants make this possible by covering operational costs. Memberships, grants, and business sponsors are expected to bring in the most revenue. Expenses: Expenses include programs offered, overhead costs, publicity costs, and fund raising costs. The original remodeling of the interpretive center was approximately $40k. Upcoming expenses will include hiring a curator for the interpretive center.

Interpretive Centers and Trails Funding Guide

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Problems and Solutions 

Problem: The largest problem that the Methow Valley Interpretive Center has been faced with is connecting the community, and those outside the community to the interpretive center by helping members become aware and involved with projects. o Solution: Reaching out electronically through social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and email has helped put a more personal feel to membership.

Contacts Email: Admin@methowvalleyinterpretivecenter.com Mailing Address: PO Box 771, Twisp WA 98856 Phone: (509) 997-0620 (Message Phone) Physical Location: 210 5th St., Twisp WA 98856 Located at Twisp Works Campus, corner of Hwy 20 and Glover Street, Twisp, WA

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Case Study Funding