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ALL PHOTOS BY LATITUDE / RICHARD

IN LATITUDES

Spread; The Lee family with their 5-day, $750, self-built dinghy 'Red Rover', which replaced 'Split Pea'. The girls helped with construction. Flotation is provided by empty water bottles. Inset top left; The dinghy clearly has capacity for four. Inset bottom; Going ashore at the cove at Chacala.

They decided the only solution was to build a new nesting dinghy. Building a new dinghy in Cabo in a timely fashion might seem like a nearly insurmountable task, but the Lees, with an assist from some other cruisers and the very accommodating Marina Cabo San Lucas, finished the new dinghy in just five days! The marina gave the Lees a parking space next to the desal plant as a work area, and all the security guys kept an extra close eye on things. While the Lees already had a jig- saw, a fellow boater loaned them a Skilsaw. Sourcing materials in Cabo required some walking around, as the cloth came from one place, the resin from another, and the tape from yet another. Home Depot delivered the plywood to the marina. "Five days after making the first cut, our family christened LATITUDE/RICHARD

rough weather, and Puget Sound. They sailed south from San Diego, and plan to Bash back north in the spring. "We only have one year off," Bethany explained. It can be difficult to carry a fourperson dinghy on a small boat, so as a family project five years ago, the Lees built a nesting dinghy they could stow on the cabin top. They painted her green and christened her Split Pea. "She had been perfect for us," says Bethany. Nobody is sure how, but while anchored at Bahia Santa Maria in early December, Split Pea and her paddles, disappeared. So the family soon found themselves at Cabo with no way to get to and from shore. Taking a berth in a marina, they quickly did some research on possible replacements. An inflatable was going to be too big to fit on the boat, and in any event, their small outboard, which they'd hardly ever used with Split Pea, wasn't going to be powerful enough.

her Red Rover and launched her," reports a proud Bethany. "Red Rover is a little more lively than Split Pea, sort of like a playful puppy," says Brian. "Initially we thought her flat bow might be a problem, but she's been great and we love her." says Brian. The cost of materials was $750. The next cruiser we met was Robert Scholl — a great, great, great nephew of 'the' Dr. Scholl — of the Redwood City-based Islander Freeport 36 Four Choices. Scholl's dream is to do a circumnavigation, which he expects will really get going with a Puddle Jump in 2015, and take about 10 years. "My wife Robin fully supports my dream, but says that I have to complete it in two years," he laughs. Scholl started heading south the day after the Ha-Ha Crew List Party last September, with his seasickness-prone wife joining him for part of the trip to San Diego. He hopes that she'll join him for more cruising this summer in the calmer waters of the Sea of Cortez. Scholl bought his first boat, a swing keel Venture 23, in 1980. He'd put his two-year-old daughter Roseanne into a car seat, strap it to the bottom of the mast inside the cabin, then take off from the boat's berth at the 5th Street Marina in Oakland. "I'd sail the Bay with the 150% genoa up, and we'd be on our ass the whole time," Robert remembers." Despite a rough introduction to sailing, Roseanne became an excellent sailor, and recently brought her boyfriend along to cruise to Isla Isabella aboard Four Choices. "We had a marvelous time," says Robert. A short time after owning the Venture, Robert moved up to an Ericson 29, which he would own for 25 years. In addition, Robert figures he'll need 10 years to do a proper circumnavigation. His wife Robin, who is prone to seasickness, says he has two years.

Profile for Latitude 38 Media, LLC

Latitude 38 March 2014  

The March 2014 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.

Latitude 38 March 2014  

The March 2014 issue of the West's premier sailing and marine magazine.