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IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

25 YEARS OF CELEBRATE 25 YEARS OF THE ORIGINAL LAND ROVER MAGAZINE REPORT

CONGRATULATIONS FROM

1988

25 YEARS OF

After numerous well-documented business troubles, British Leyland is broken up and privatised by the British government. The Rover Group, including Land Rover, is bought by aircraft and munitions company British Aerospace, a controversial sale that sees the government write off Rover’s debt.

Got an event planned?

UK EVENT OF THE MONTH

If so, give Neil Watterson a ring on 01733 468237 or email him at neil@lro.com

Far left: The Military Lightweight Club provided plenty of entertainment. Left: Steve Forster’s tattoo shows admirable dedication to the cause – it took 28 hours to get this far. Below left: Tasty Defender/pizza oven combo kept the faithful fed. Below: V8 racer built for just £3000. Bottom: Monster Tuning’s 8x8 Defender is pure excess in every area

PHOTOS: MATT HOWELL

IN JULY 1987 THERE WERE ONLY TWO MODEL RANGES: ONE FOR LAND ROVER, ONE FOR RANGE ROVER. PETER SKILTON AND MARK SAVILLE UNITE THEM WITH THEIR 2012 EQUIVALENTS. AFTER ALL THIS TIME, ARE THEY SO VERY DIFFERENT?

1989

OLD vs NEW September’s Frankfurt Motor Show sees the launch of the hotly anticipated Discovery 1. It’s Land Rover’s first new vehicle since the Range Rover was launched in 1970.

8 LRO July 2012

July 2012 LRO 9

afield this year too. A strong French contingent made themselves at home at the campsite and the Dutch weren’t far behind them, showing the levels of commitment that European enthusiasts have for the green oval. ‘It’s all the parts in the autojumble,’ explained Mathieu Giraud, when asked why he had travelled all the way from Epernay in France to visit the show. The lure of the autojumble seemed to have been the main attraction for a number of showgoers, all hoping to find the elusive parts they’d long been searching for. The serious buyers picked their way through the crowds, dragging wheeled trolleys precariously loaded with bumpers, wheels and a whole array of assorted parts. As a measure of how busy it was, I had to give up trying to chat to Alan Walker at Avenger 4x4 from Peterborough as he was being inundated by bartering bidders for his wide range of Land Rover spares. It wasn’t just the used parts that sold well. Flatdog 4x4 had a record-breaking show, which included selling out its first imported batch of the ÂŁ1197 Tentco Pro roof tent: showgoers were clearly won over by its great value for money. One of the highlights for LRO, though, was when Steve Forster turned up on the LRO stand. Before uttering a word, Steve had taken off his coat and was rolling up his shirt sleeve to reveal his Land Rover-inspired tattoo. ‘It took 28 hours to complete,’ said Steve, proudly exhibiting the creation that showcases a Series I, II and III in perfect detail – from his shoulder to his wrist.

driffield delights LAND ROVER SPRING ADVENTURE

The first big Land Rover show of this year put everyone on a high, with a great mix of extreme vehicles, fun people and good weather, as Peter Skilton reports

B

efore I’d even arrived at May’s Spring Adventure, I knew I was in for a good weekend. The sun was shining, which helped, and the closer I got to the Driffield Showground the more Land Rovers joined in what seemed to be a never-ending convoy – all towing caravans, show vehicles or loaded up to the hilt with tents and camping equipment. The A614 was buzzing with excitement that seemed to pass from vehicle to vehicle. The Spring Adventure in Yorkshire has become synonymous with the start of the show season, with crowds – predominantly from the north of England – flocking to be a part of this first gathering. And there were plenty of showgoers from further 84 LRO July 2012

NEW LAND ROVER TESTS

EVENT REPORTS

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3PVOEVQTGSPNUIFCFTUFWFOUTJOUIF6,BOECFZPOE

2012 Land Rover Defender 90 TDCi and Range Rover L322 Westminster meet their ’80s equivalents.

Europe’s toughest off-road challenge event, the Croatia Trophy, and The Spring Adventure in association with Land Rover Owner *OUFSOBUJPOBMBU%SJGmFME RELIVING THE CAMEL TROPHY IN BORNEO

JAMES ROVERPHILE WITH TAYLOR

IN THE TRACKS OF THE CAMEL

JP AT LARGE

PG TIPS

CLICK TO

WIN A SET OF TYRES

DELVE INTO THE ODDEST CORNERS OF LAND ROVER HISTORY, WHERE LOST ITEMS LURK AND SNIPPETS OF FASCINATING INFORMATION COME TO THE SURFACE

VERSATILITY

IT’S ON TAPE

Towards the end of the 1980s, tape decals became the latest styling accessory for every 4x4, instigated by Japanese manufacturers. The first on Land Rovers (the 1988 County models) came as a bit of a shock, but it shouldn’t have been a surprise when the Discovery was announced in 1989 with GALILEE PETER

some fairly loud tape stripes on the side. It was, though. I’ve recently come across a whole series of photographs showing trials with different tape designs. I think these date from between 1987 and ‘88, although it’s a little hard to tell. Some of the designs certainly entered production on 1989 models. Pictured below are a couple of favourites that didn’t make production.

IT’S A NUMBERS GAME WHEN DOES RARE ACTUALLY MEAN RARE – AND WHAT DOES THIS DO TO VALUES? PETER SCRATCHES HIS HEAD AS HE CONSIDERS THE PERPLEXING CASE OF THE SERIES I STATION WAGON ILLUSTRATION: GRAHAM GACHES

n the May 2012 issue, I noted that 107 station wagons are becoming affordable as restoration projects. However, since saying this I’ve had to recalibrate ‘affordable’. Certainly 107s used to be rare, but lately Series I long-wheelbase station wagons have been popping up all over the place. Some look good but generally these are not UK versions; they’re from places where the sun shines. However, even in the UK, previously unknown 107 station the wagons are surfacing. Maybe recession is driving them out of look their hiding places, as owners to bolster flagging bank balances. As for ‘affordable’, a 107 SW just sold in New Zealand for $50, which but is about ÂŁ26. It needed work, even a few spare parts from it would be worth more than that.

I

wouldn’t be any riveting, cappings or detail work. Once this is understood, it’s easy to see how assembling a shortthe wheelbase station wagon on be standard assembly line would no problem. Doors and bulkhead the would arrive already trimmed, back body tub would have the hinge points for the side-opening rear door already fitted. The hard top would be lowered on fully finished – tropical roof, windows, off interior lamp etc, all assembled the line. The lamp’s wiring simply on connected to a bullet-fastener fast. and Easy dash. the top of So, assembling a shorty station wagon wasn’t much different a from assembling a hard top or canvas-topped pick-up. Because of this Rover never gave them a ‘station wagon’ chassis-prefix identifier; it just used the same

Thecould upper photo shows some County stripes on a 1989 the longget more you means more whichwindow-hard-top model-year One Ten. Behind it is a Disco wheelbase, Assuming a better ride. andprototype seatstest with its ‘bread van’ hard-top disguise. you had the extra cash, the longThe other picture shows a striking colour-scheme for wheelbase was better value. the are tapes a Onewhy Ten; they may actually be on the same reasons fouron There been have worked well with light colours, vehicle. The have red would there may I think station fewer butshort-wheelbase it appears Land Rover’s accountants limited the colour than everyone imagines. wagons schemes available, and red UK was one of the casualties. Firstly, in countries outside the the where tax and shipping made purchasing decision look different, for a buyers were more likely to go long-wheelbase version. Secondly, more and more 107s are turning up, so the balance between the rare long-wheelbase and the less-rare short-wheelbase station wagons is changing. Thirdly, UK-based perceptions of about the relative survival rates long- and short-wheelbase station the wagons are distorted because in government bought the SWB

Zealand for $50NZ ‘A 107 SW recently sold in New work, but it’s worth (that’s about ÂŁ26). Sure, it needed spare parts’ far more than that just for the quantity. But it’s unlikely there All this has made me think about the less-spectacular (but much more park-able) Series I short-wheelbase station wagons, especially as I’ve got one. Like the long-wheelbase versions, they are around. But unlike the 107 station wagons with their special chassis and complex construction, the shorties are just a lot of special parts added to a standard pick-up. As far as Rover’s production process was concerned, parts would arrive at the production line as sub-assemblies whenever possible. For example, a complete back body would be swung into place, ready to bolt down. There

204 LRO July 2012

numbering system as normal short-wheelbase models. And because of this, they appear as ‘Basic’ in Rover’s build records, which is the same description used for soft tops and hard tops. Result: nobody has a clue how many were made. The consensus among enthusiasts seems to be that the long-wheelbase Series I station wagon was the rare item and the shortie was more common. But is this right? According to the 1957 price list the 88in petrol regular (soft top) cost ÂŁ630; the 88in petrol station wagon cost ÂŁ1058 and the 107in petrol station wagon cost ÂŁ1223. From this we see that for ÂŁ165

would have been governmentbought batches of SWB station wagons in every country to which Land Rovers were exported. Finally, when SWB station wagons were scrapped, it was easy to transplant their special parts on to a standard pick-up and transform that into a station wagon, so there are apparently still a lot of survivors. That didn’t were happen with the 107s, which so simply scrapped or left to rot, they are now apparently rarer. I wonder just how many factorybuilt short-wheelbase Series I in station wagons are still hiding the woodwork?

GIVE ’EM A MEDAL

The 20th anniversary of the Range Rover in 1990 wasn’t celebrated by a limited edition in the UK. All the publicity thrust at the time went into the then-new Discovery (launched in autumn 1989), so the celebrations were saved until 1991 for the Range Rover’s 21st anniversary. That’s when we got the limited-edition CSK. However, the 20th anniversary didn’t go entirely unnoticed. If you’d been working on Range Rover assembly in 1990, you’d have been given a special gold-coloured medal. The medals were issued in June

Old adverts can be fascinating, as much for what they reveal about their period as for what they say about the product. I rediscovered this one in my archive recently. Issued in October 1970, it was clearly intended to link the original Range Rover closely to Rover’s saloon cars rather than to Land Rovers. That pleased the marketing people, but it actually caused some Land Rover diehards to wonder whether the Range Rover was really as tough as a Land Rover. Rover had two other car models in production at the time: the P5B saloon and coupÊ, both powered by the same V8 as the Range Rover and 3500 (P6) pictured. I guess the reason they didn’t figure in the ad was because they were old designs, which wouldn’t have given the right image.

COLOUR MATTERS

These days, we’re used to colour photography for everything, and black-and-white stuff is used only for artistic effect – or where no colour exists. That’s the case with most early Land Rover factory photography. I remember pointing out to Land Rover PR man Vin Hammersley some time around 1993 that most of its competitors were issuing colour shots to the media, and asked pretty pointedly why Land Rover didn’t do so. Vin was a little ruffled, but it wasn’t long before colour press shots became standard Land Rover issue. Sometimes, colour does matter. I’ve seen lots of black-and-white pictures of the Land Rover exhibition unit, which I believe was originally painted green and

that year, originally in a protective packet, and came with a letter that presumably explained what the item was. I’d never seen one until Gary Pusey recently came up with this medal. A bit of trawling on the web (with help from engineer Geof Miller’s wife, Pat) found the information. One was sold on eBay recently. There must have been hundreds issued, but I wonder how many are still around?

HAPPY BIRTHDAY LRO

JOHN PEARSON

A LOT HAS HAPPENED TO LRO DURING

T

wenty-five years of being the world’s best Land Rover magazine is something for this publication to be proud of, and I’m honoured to have played a part in its success for the past 10 years. Other mags have come and gone since LRO was launched in July 1987, but we’ve worked hard to maintain its position as the market leader in the UK and around the world. I do hope you enjoy this special issue that takes a look back at some of the highlights of the past 25 years. So much has happened since LRO was launched and since I started editing the magazine. However, the takeover of (and subsequent massive investment in) Land Rover by Tata in recent times has been a real catalyst to prolific product development. One can’t help but wonder what the next 25 years will bring.

ITS 25-YEAR HISTORY – AND MUCH OF THAT HAS BEEN SHAPED BY THE CHAP WHO WRITES THIS COLUMN ILLUSTRATION: KAR LEE

yellow. What I hadn’t seen was pictures of it in the British Leyland colours of blue and white. So here is one, taken by Land Rover’s Roger Crathorne some time around 1973, before BL and the blue-and-white became something you didn’t mention in polite society.

MEANWHILE

Land Rover is tantalising the press by revealing increasingly less camouflaged versions of the new Range Rover (see p40), and the Solihull factory is getting itself ready for production. Meanwhile, the company is quietly putting another production line into its Halewood factory, ready for the upcoming new seven-seat Freelander. The existing Halewood line – which produces Freelander 2s, Evoques and some Jaguar models – wouldn’t be able to cope with the longer-wheelbase version, hence the new facility.

The Defenders took river crossings in their stride – the Range Rover less so

which leads me to speculate on how much of that has been diverted to the Beckham bank account. A million or two for using her name and creative input? I never saw her smile during any of the presentations, but she really ought to have done.

A

s birthday celebrations go, this was really something. My husband Martin and I have been members of Land Rover Owners Malaysia (LROM) for 14 years and were invited to join in its 15th anniversary celebration – to drive part of the old Camel Trophy route, zig-zagging our way through four states of Kalimantan in Borneo. We didn’t need asking twice. Kalimantan is the name given to the three-quarters of Borneo owned by Indonesia. The rest of this massive island is Malaysian territory, with the exception of the tiny independent state of Brunei on the northern coast. Renowned for its tropical forests, challenging topography and rich cultural mix, Kalimantan has all the great ingredients for an adventure off the beaten track. Our expedition composed of seven Land Rovers which mustered at Kuching in the Malaysian-owned north to transport 18 club members and three invited friends. After being flagged off from the hotel by the local parliamentary minister and two representatives from Land Rover Malaysia, we headed south towards the Indonesian border. We had two breakdowns along the way – not the ideal start – but both were easily fixed. Crossing into Indonesia took two hours, which wasn’t bad considering it involved 21 passports being stamped, two Brits buying visas and seven Land Rovers clearing customs. Our first stop was the Mount Hope Training Centre in Balai Karangan, where we unloaded large bags of provisions donated by LROM. Bob Teoh, one of our team of adventurers, helps to run the centre, a foundation established to help the poor among the Dayak tribal

NO RGS OVERLAND WORKSHOP IN 2012

I was disappointed to learn that Sam Watson has had to cancel the RGS (Royal Geographical Society) Overland Workshop he has run in Yorkshire for the past few years. I always look forward to this one, which has been a delightful gathering for overlanders, whether experienced or aspirational. It’s been a simple event – two days of lectures by people who have been there and done it, interspersed with opportunities to meet with lots of

‘Land Rover is tantalising the less camouflaged versions of press with increasingly the new Range Rover’ COMING SOON

One of the early front covers during my editorship featured our scoop drive in the Range Rover L322. We were seriously impressed with its overall package of luxury matched with extreme capability – and Land Rover has continued to improve it over the past decade, keeping it very much as the vehicle that other manufacturers dream of matching. The only real chinks in its armour have been its weight and fuel consumption. Now these are being addressed with the next-generation Range Rover, due to be confirmed this autumn and to go on sale in 2013. 198 LRO July 2012

The use of an aluminium chassis and panels, along with other lighter-weight materials, will help shed about 400kg, which will surely play a big part in reducing fuel consumption – as will a reputed hybrid version.

In fact, word has it that there are so many differences between the Evoque and Freelander that it would have been better to have put in a new line for the Evoque.

VB EDITION EVOQUE

Talking of the Evoque, I can’t help wondering how much Victoria Beckham was paid for her input into the special edition that bears her name. With the £80,000 price tag being double that of the 2.0-litre four-cylinder model it’s based on, Land Rover will make an extra £8 million for the 200 examples. Yes, there are some expensive extras, but it must have been a very lucrative operation‌

like-minded people. I’ve travelled the world quite a bit myself, but I always came away from each workshop having learned a lot. Sam has always booked inspirational speakers, such as world travellers Tom Sheppard and Peter Crichton, but equally enjoyable have been the talks given by the likes of LRO’s Mark Saville on his adventures in the famous PSL 193, his 1957 Series I. Although Sam had to change the venue when the original location was double-booked, it was all looking good for 2012. Then some local RGS bureaucracy forced him to cancel the event – which is a real shame.

There were plenty of bush repairs – or should that be jungle? Here the fan gets some attention

WHAT BETTER WAY TO CELEBRATE A CLUB’S ANNIVERSARY THAN TACKLING THE TERRAIN OF THE OLD CAMEL TROPHY ROUTE IN KALIMANTAN, BORNEO? LIZ LEWIS TAKES US ON A TRIP THROUGH ORANGUTAN COUNTRY

PHOTOS: IGOR MANINTA, LIZ LEWIS, BOB TEOH

CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE & RECEIVE A SCREWDRIVER SET

WHO: Liz Lewis WHERE: Kalimantan, Borneo VEHICLE: Defender 110 300Tdi

July 2012 CLASSIC LRO 143

peoples, both practically and spiritually. It looks after 100 boarding children and outreaches another 300 children in the local villages. With the goods now being safely stored, we continued our journey. The tarmac roads didn’t last long. Small villages of wooden-stilted houses flanked narrow potholed roads, and having to dodge traffic slowed us down. Darkness falls quickly in this part of the world and many local vehicles had no rear lights, so safe progress was slow. By now we’d given up trying to make the last ferry at Tayan and around 8pm we pulled into what the guys ominously called a ‘lost man’ budget hotel. Our expectations of Kalimantan were based on memories of Camel Trophy videos, but so far it wasn’t quite what we’d expected. Things had changed since the event passed this way in 1996 – traditional old wooden homes were now adorned with solar panels and nearly everybody boasted a satellite dish. Next morning we took the ferry from Tayan across the Sungai Kapuas, one of the widest rivers in Indonesia, to Maliau. On the way to Delang we were expecting old trails and jungle tracks, but found compacted, mostly graded roads with many new stretches of tarmac. It was dark by the time we arrived at our lodgings – a stilted wooden longhouse 10 feet off the ground. There was a balcony at the front for relaxing and a small, open side landing adjacent to the main room with two huge water drums where the guys would shower al fresco. There was a loo with water butt for the girls. Dinner was served in the longhouse, which was divided into one side for eating and one where we could spread our sleeping bags out.

76 LRO July 2012

EXPERT WRITERS -FBSOGSPNUIFXPSMETNPTULOPXMFEHFBCMFBOE FOUIVTJBTUJD-BOE3PWFSFYQFSUTtLRO welcomes back Land Rover authority James Taylor and his Roverphile column, which charts the weird and wonderful of the Land Rover world.

This constitutes a bridge in Kalimantan. Caution is the key in this environment

The author’s husband Martin (left) with event leader Atek

TEAM VEHICLES Q Defender 110 300Tdi (aka Speedy) From: Indonesia QDefender 110 300Tdi (aka Luke) From: Malaysia Q Defender 110 300Tdi (aka Dusty) From: Malaysia Q Range Rover Classic 300Tdi From: Malaysia Q Defender 110 300Tdi Philippines (aka V8) From: Phillipines Q Series IIA Lightweight (aka Nice Butt) From: Singapore Q Defender 90 (aka Sweeper) From: Malaysia

The ‘fuel stop’ consisted of plastic containers stored at a wooden hut next to the provisions store – no service stations here. There was another stretch of tarmac before the route reverted to jungle track for 30 miles. It was packed and rutted earth, with dodgy bridges to negotiate, along with gullies, mud and water pools – the lot. It would have been a serious challenge had it rained! We passed through Pangkalanbuun and in the middle of nowhere found a service station – a real one, with pumps and everything. We all filled up before continuing for Kumai. Too late to go to the hotel, we headed straight to the ferry port, and obtained permission to camp overnight at the Tourist Office. Next morning we headed on foot for the 6.30am boat that would take us up the Sekonyer River to the Leakey Orangutan Sanctuary in the Tangjun Puting National Park, four hours upstream. Here, Suswi, an old female orangutan, greeted us at the entrance, posed for photos then walked with us up the path, surprising and delighting one of our troupe when she grabbed his hand as he walked. Lunch wasn’t for 20 minutes, but there were already orangutans in the trees, all with babies. We were told that in the months when there was no fruit in the surrounding jungle, the centre fed up to 100 a day. The following day we had nearly 40 miles of tracks to negotiate to get to Sampit, the busy intersection of several main roads. We refuelled at a roadside stall, ironically opposite a modern filling station that had ‘no fuel’ signs up. More than 80 stranded lorries queued outside. We pushed on, up the broken roads, as fast as we could, ending the day at July 2012 LRO 77

GREAT ADVENTURES &YQFSJFODFBMMDPSOFSTPGUIFHMPCF PGGUIFCFBUFOUSBDL The 25 greatest adventures from 25 years of LRO, plus driving Borneo’s Camel Trophy routes and rock-crawling in Texas.


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25 YEARS OF

CONGRATULATIONS FROM

1

2001

In May, the first Range Rover L322s roll off the production line at the Solihull factory, but it’s not until November that the most expensive product ever to be developed by the UK motor industry (£1 billion) is revealed to the world’s press at the London Design Museum.

25 GREATEST ACCESSORIES

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

11 9 10 12

NEIL WATTERSON’S PICK OF THE 25 GREATEST LAND ROVER GOODIES OF THE PAST 4 QUARTER CENTURY

13

2 5

3

7

8 15

16

14

2002

6

On March 15, the first customers take delivery of their new L322 Range Rovers. The Discovery 2 undergoes a facelift, modernising the styling and bridging the gap until its successor is ready. It’ll be another two years before the Discovery 3 goes on sale.

JACK

2 RELOCATION 3 BF GOODRICH 4 X-ENG DISC CONE

ALL-TERRAIN

Land Rover’s coil-sprung suspension keeps the wheels in contact with the ground longer than rival offerings – but fitting relocation cones takes it even further. These allow springs that have dislocated from the mounts to relocate into their correct position, so the axle can drop further and the wheel can track the ground longer. Most extreme suspension kits wouldn’t work without a relocation device.

6 ELECTRIC WINCH

The BF Goodrich all-terrain tyre is one of those items that is described perfectly by its name. It works on every surface – from snow and ice to desert sand and everything in between. Other tyres may excel in specific areas, but if you want a great all-round tyre, the BFG AT is hard to beat.

HANDBRAKE

When they’re new and working properly, the transmission brakes on Land Rovers are excellent. But on vehicles used heavily off-road, the constant dunking in abrasive dirt takes its toll, clogging the mechanism. The X-Eng uses components from earth-moving machinery to produce a simple handbrake that shrugs off dirt, increases service intervals and holds the Land Rover securely, no matter what you do with it.

7 RAISED AIR INTAKE

Mechanical and hydraulic winches are great for sustained working, but because they tend to be quite an investment – both in financial and engineering terms – they’re beyond the reach of most recreational drivers. Electric winches brought self-recovery to the masses, thereby allowing drivers to take their vehicles further, safe in the knowledge that they’d be able to get themselves out of just about anything they drove into.

The engine is the most critical part of most Land Rovers. If it stops, you ain’t going anywhere. So, keeping dust and water out of it when off-roading or overlanding is vital – and that’s where the raised air intake comes in. If properly sealed, it allows you to drive through deeper water and stops the engine drawing in so much dirt when driving in convoy in dusty areas. But don’t forget – you’ll also need axle and transmission breathers.

5 OVERDRIVE For every owner of a four- or five-speed Land Rover who is happy with the vehicle’s cruising speed, you’ll find another who’s crying out for an extra gear. The overdrive was created for these people, raising the comfortable cruising speed significantly by dropping the engine speed relative to road speed. It’ll also improve your fuel economy, as you won’t be thrashing the engine everywhere.

8 DOG GUARD Land Rovers and dogs are natural companions, but if you don’t want Fido jumping on your lap as you trundle down the lanes, you need a dog guard between him and you. But a dog guard also makes a great cargo barrier, allowing you to maximise your carrying capacity without worrying about your kit falling into the passenger area. Plus you can attach essentials such as hi-viz jackets to it – close to hand, but out of the way.

9 SILICONE HOSES

Rubber hoses have two things against them: they don’t have a very long life expectancy, especially when they make tightradius turns on vibration-prone diesel engines; and they expand under pressure. Silicone hoses, on the other hand, last for ages and maintain their bore fairly steadily, giving more consistency when driving. And they brighten up the engine bay, too.

10 SATNAV/GPS RECEIVERS

Many drivers have never used a satnav or GPS receiver, but the number is dropping every day. Satnav is brilliant – key in your destination and it’ll take you there with little fuss. A GPS receiver tells you where you are at any given time – thoroughly indispensable for adventurers. Everyone should still know how to read a map, but this technology has made travel to unfamiliar places so much easier.

11 LED LIGHTS Fitting something that saves money and could save lives has to be worthwhile. LED lights draw far less power than filament bulbs, so you’ll waste less fuel producing the electricity to power them, plus they come on much quicker – so drivers behind can react sooner.

12 ARB AIR

LOCKER

Irrespective of how good your suspension is, there will be times when your Land Rover gets crossaxled, with diagonally opposite wheels spinning. The ARB diff air locker operates with a reassuring hiss as the compressed air activates it, locking the halfshafts together and restoring traction. There are other lockers, but the ARB was instrumental in taking Land Rovers further off-road than they ever had been before.

14 DEEP-CYCLE BATTERIES

15 DIXON-BATE ADJUSTABLE

So much electrical equipment is carried in Land Rovers, keeping the engine running is only half the work of the battery. A winch, auxiliary lighting, fridge and other high-drain items take their toll on batteries and can quickly kill standard fitments. Deep-cycle batteries tolerate abuse more readily and, when used with a splitcharge system, let you power everything without ever risking running your main battery flat.

You need a good tow hitch to work with Land Rovers – and the simple-to-use Dixon-Bate adjustable unit fulfils the role perfectly. You can choose the perfect towball height for your trailer, whatever it is. Have a separate slider for each tow hook and you’ll be ready to tow in no time. It’s incredibly robust – it’ll simply shrug off knocks on rocks and being dragged through mud.

TOW HITCH

13 TIRFOR/

ROPE HOIST

Mechanical simplicity is the key to the Tirfor/rope hoist’s success. It can pull in any direction, can be stored out of harm’s way inside the Land Rover and can be used away from the vehicle – all issues with front-mounted winches. Admittedly, it’s hard work using one compared to an electric equivalent, but you’re probably less likely to drive into a deep bog as you’ll know how much effort it will take to get you out!

LAND ROVER TREASURES

16 KINETIC ENERGY

RECOVERY ROPE

PHOTOS: STUART COLLINS

1 HIGH-LIFT The high-lift jack is more than a device for lifting Land Rovers – it can be used for lifting out fence posts, as a rudimentary winch and as a cramping device, as well as many other applications. Once the ultimate Land Rover accessory, it has fallen out of favour due to more vehicles having ‘soft’ bumpers. Best suited to a Defender or Series, it works with any vehicle that has accessible steel crossmembers.

If your Land Rover is properly stuck, the quickest way to recover it is often a sharp tug with a stretchy rope. A vast amount of force is transferred from the recovery vehicle through the rope to the stricken motor, allowing the stuck vehicle to pop out. But accidents have been caused by inexperienced operators using the kit incorrectly on unsafe recovery points, so treat it with respect.

26 LRO July 2012

July 2012 LRO 27

WORDS: JOHN CARROLL

148 CLASSIC LRO July 2012

July 2012 CLASSIC LRO 149

BEST GEAR & PARTS

CLASSIC VEHICLES

&TTFOUJBMTUVGGUPIFMQZPVNBLFUIFNPTUPGZPVSUJNFJO ZPVS-BOE3PWFStThe 25 best accessories you shouldn’t be

&WFSZNPOUIXFEFWPUFNPSFUIBOQBHFTUPQSF -BOE3PWFSTtThe 1989 Camel Trophy-winning One Ten of the

without, and what to look for when buying a satnav.

only British winners, Bob and Joe Ives.

WORKSHOP

TRADER

OFF-ROD PART 1 1

2

Buying a Land Rover?

BUYING EXPERTISE

Make sure you read John Carroll’s insightful buying guides before you leave home. johnc@lro.com

triple choice

This month’s trio of Land Rovers are all fitted with the venerable 300Tdi engine. John Carroll unearths a tempting selection, from a bargain Disco for less than two grand to some serious utility for sub-£10k

1994 DISCOVERY 1 AUTO

The kicking tyres phase of the project started last summer when we held up a 109in Series III offside wing to the side of my Discovery van to get a rough idea of what a 100in pick-up could look like. It was immediately apparent that the Off-Rod project was feasible and that the Discovery’s rear overhang almost matches that of the 109in.

Land Rover invented the coil-sprung Land Rover by putting Series III panels on a V8 Range Rover chassis in the early 1980s. This is one of the engineering test vehicles and it uses a five-door station wagon body with the overhang chopped off. We intend to shorten the leading edge of the back body to preserve the overhang and avoid cutting the wheelarches.

3

OFF-ROD – GAME ON! I

f I say I’m about to build a shed out of secondhand wood, you’ll imagine one thing, but if I say I’m going to build a garden room out of recycled timber you’ll think something quite different. Well, it’s the same with Land Rovers, and we’re about to build one out of £750 worth of scrap. Despite the image this statement no doubt conjures up, we’re aiming for a cool truck. Think American street rod – an old vehicle that’s been updated with a newer engine, better suspension and some creature comforts. Think a combination of old-style motoring with modern levels of performance and comfort. This mix-and-match concept appeals to me, as does the convenience of an updated

X LRO Xxxx 0000

classic. And one of the street rods my heart desires is a Series vehicle with the engine and suspension of a coil-sprung Land Rover. Mind you, there’s not much ‘street’ about a Land Rover, it’s more of an off-road rod. Project Off-Rod it is. I got my start writing for magazines in the 1980s and one of the pro-greenlaning 4x4 titles of the time featured Mike Scott from the All-Wheel Drive Club (AWDC) as a columnist. Mike drove the first 100in hybrid Land Rover I’d seen. That magazine’s editor, Russell Fisher, commissioned a similar machine from Pete Rowe and ran it as an occasional buildup series. I diligently collected every instalment. Pete Rowe is a noted AWDC competitor and engineer and Fisher’s machine was one of

1996 DEFENDER 110 HIGHCAPACITY PICK-UP

Desirable heavy-duty commercial that’s suitable for work or play, but in need of some cosmetic attention

1997 DEFENDER 110 TRUCK-CAB TIPPER

A two-owner specialistconverted tipper truck that’s ready for work (or for someone with a tipper truck craving)

Churchill 4x4, Hanbury Garage, Droitwich Road, Hanbury, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire B60 4DH. churchill4x4.co.uk, 01527 821440

An off-road hot-rod Discovery/ Series III hybrid? Now, that’s what you call a project. And who better to mastermind it than John Carroll‌ 80/88/100in-coiler trialler built by Qt and Whitbread 4x4 is one of the 21st century incarnations of that vehicle. The machine I’m planning is more conventional: a 100-inch Series III Land Rover pick-up.

Just £100 bought this 1997 Discovery 1 as the basis for the Off-Rod build. It’s a non-running, five-door, 300Tdi Discovery that’s been cut about a bit to fit off-road accessories. Crucially, its chassis is structurally sound and its axles, gearbox and V5C are present and correct.

5

6

ÂŁ1950 DISCOVERY 1 300Tdi

STAY SAFE ■ Check your driving licence allows you to tow the kind of trailer required for shifting large pieces of Land Rover. Make sure the loads are secured with ratchet straps, check the trailer is hitched correctly to the towing vehicle and that the trailer’s lights and brakes work. ■ In the workshop, take care to drain fuel and fluids from the donor vehicle and not to stand under an unpropped body while it’s being lifted clear of the chassis.

as a three-door version, although the five-door was introduced the following year. From the outset, the diesel Discovery was powered by the new 2.5-litre 200Tdi. Then in 1994, the year this Discovery was made, the vehicle received a raft of cosmetic and mechanical upgrades, headlined by the replacement of the 200Tdi engine with the 300Tdi. This motor was quieter and vibrated less than its predecessor and was generally more refined. Aesthetic improvements included larger headlamps and a second set of rear lights in the bumper. If you want a first-generation Discovery to use as a family

This is the world’s rustiest Ninety, bought on eBay for £370. It’s fit only for scrap but will yield a number of useful items, including a repairable bulkhead and seatbox as well as usable floor panels and transmission tunnel. There is also an LT77 gearbox with a short bellhousing.

F

This rear tub from a 1977 Series III 109in, bought for £65, is pretty straight and not badly corroded. It’s also ideal for shortening to suit the 100in Discovery wheelbase. Add a £30 Series III windscreen to this lot and I’m short of a truck cab, tailgate and front panels. I’ve spent £565 so far and anticipate that I’ll have all the raw material for around £750.

Land Rover’s prototype coiler, seen here, uses a Stage 1 V8 front panel, while Russell Fisher’s 100-inch uses a Ninety grille and panel to leave room under the front for the engine, fan and radiator. For the Off-Rod, I’ve decided to use a Series III front panel set back between the wings in the standard position.

www.britpart.com sales@britpart.com

July 2012 LRO 185

is far less common or many than the manual would-be AUTOMATIC version – and buyers in FIVE-SEATER there was never the market for a RECENT an automatic 300Tdi-powered CAMB ELT version of the Land Rover, Defender 300Tdi. seeing the lever of CHANG E The price will an automatic appeal to those transmission in the browsing for a bargain: cabin will have them less than two grand won’t get asking the salesman for a you a nice Defender of any sort, test-drive – automatics are but this kind of budget gives you desirable as they’re more a huge choice of Discos. But you user-friendly off-road than need to buy carefully as many are manuals. The Disco 1 300Tdi auto

suffering from severe corrosion. This 1994 300Tdi automatic in metallic green at £1950 is typical. It features alloy wheels, anti-lock brakes, air-conditioning, remote central locking, cruise control, electric mirrors and all-round electric windows. That’s a nice roster of kit, although this is one of the minority of Discos with only five seats, which limits its appeal to some. The lack of sunroofs may be seen as a positive by canny buyers, given their propensity

to leak (and they do little when opened except increase wind noise in the cab, anyway). Its mileage of 162,466 miles is on the high side – but you should always judge a Land Rover of this age on condition, not mileage. And on that basis, this one is well worth a second look. The Discovery 1 was launched in 1989, based on the chassis and LT77 transmission of the Range Rover with permanent fourwheel drive and a locking centre diff. It was initially available only

WINDOWS AND INTERIORS Electric window mechanisms can fail and the doors can drop. This one is surprisingly clean and tidy considering its age and mileage.

■ The VIN is on the front panel of the vehicle, visible when the bonnet is opened. ■ Mods to consider: this Discovery already has the ever-useful tow hitch, but a new owner may want to fit lifted suspension and chunkier tyres to give it more ability when it comes to off-roading or greenlaning. ■ Essential reading: ask questions on the forum at discoveryownersclub.org. It would be a good idea to join the club while you’re there. ■ How to find history: trace previous owners via DVLA and V5C supplied with it. WHAT WILL IT COST ME? VED £215 Economy 26mpg Fuel cost per mile 25.3p* Insurance group 12 Front hub £12 Tyre (as fitted) £100 Steering box £183 exchange Windscreen £160 Headlamp £30 Road spring £25 *Diesel 145p per litre

ON SALE AT

The donor Discovery body is lifted clear of its rolling chassis to provide the basis for the new LRO project, a 100-inch Series III coiler hybrid – or the Off-Rod as it will be known

a succession of Land Roverbodied Range Rovers he built. The reason these home-built coilers became popular back then was that the Ninety and One Ten were still new and expensive, but rusty old Range Rovers and Series body panels were plentiful and cheap. When it came to clubs such as the AWDC, where homebuilt specials abounded, the 100-inch Land Rover/Range Rover hybrid was inevitable. I hankered after one back then, but it would take me 25 years to do anything about it. Defender-shaped Land Rovers are still expensive and rusty old Discovery 1s and Series body panels are still plentiful and cheap. It seems like the perfect time to revisit the 100in hybrid concept. In some ways it never went away and the

Britpart, The Grove, Craven Arms, Shropshire SY7 8DA, England.

4

No sunroofs, and only five seats, but has aircon, cruise control and ABS. Some corrosion but basically sound

NEED TO KNOW

Unmolested interior features original branded radiocassette player

WHEELS AND TYRES

BOOT FLOOR

Check the condition of the tyres. Look for off-road and building site damage such as cuts to sidewalls. These General Grabber AWs are fine, although the Pirelli spare will need changing soon. The alloy wheels show minimal signs of corrosion.

Very prone to rusting. By this age they either need a new floor or will have had one. There are no exceptions – check to see which is the case, as you may need to budget to replace the rear floor. Pattern-part floors cost about £45 and need welding in.

runabout, works hack or haulanything towcar, you should go for a 300Tdi, whether manual or auto. Not only is the 300 a better engine than its predecessor, but the vehicles it lives in are also more recent – and there are many more of them around these days. This example is structurally sound, but needs cosmetic attention. It’s suffering a bit from corrosion, particularly in the alloy of the doors. You can see the rusty steel of the wheelarches when you open the rear doors, and alloy is bubbling behind the trims on the doors and body. It’s straight enough, sits square on its springs and hasn’t

ENGINE The cambelt and cylinder head are always suspect on high-mileage 300Tdis. Cambelt changes are recommended every 70,000 miles; if the belt fails it will cause damage to the valves and cylinder head. This engine had it changed just last year – good news! been messed with, shown by the presence of the original Discovery-branded radio/ cassette, and the interior is clean and undamaged (apart from a few holes where a phone has been removed). I guess you could say it’s simply showing its age.

Its 255/65 R16 General Grabber tyres all have loads of tread left on them, there’s a fitted towbar and there’s lots of service history, including proof that a cambelt change has been carried out as recently as 2011 – that’s an important selling point.

VERDICT

Towbar and plenty of tyre tread are in this Disco’s favour

218 LRO July 2012

The price is about right, we’d say. It’s hardly concours, but neither is it particularly shabby. It drives well and is MoT’d until January 2013. You could have three examples of the Discovery 1 of a similar age and specification parked next to each other and they could vary widely in terms of condition and price. This will be a legacy of what they’ve been used for, and how they’ve been cared for and maintained. There are hundreds of the things for sale at any given time, so don’t succumb to bidding online for one, hoping that the description is accurate – never buy any Discovery 1 without actually looking at it.

July 2012 LRO 219

WORKSHOP ADVICE

BUYING ADVICE

&YQFSUUFDIOJDBMBEWJDF ZPVSQSPCMFNTTPMWFE BOEIPXUP %*:UVUPSJBMTtRemoving a failed Freelander Intermediate

8IBUUPMPPLGPSXIFOCVZJOHB-BOE3PWFSo BOEIPXNVDIUPQBZt300Tdi-powered Discovery 1, Defender

Reduction Drive unit, assessing the condition of a Rover V8 engine, and building a 100in Discovery 1/Series III hybrid.

110 Hi-Cap and Defender 110 Tipper assessed, and up to date values for more than 290 models.

JULY 2012 ISSUE 8 2012


25 YEARS OF

CLICK TO

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PHOTOS: MATT HOWELL

A SET OF TYRES

8 LRO July 2012

1988

IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

After numerous well-documented business troubles, British Leyland is broken up and privatised by the British government. The Rover Group, including Land Rover, is bought by aircraft and munitions company British Aerospace, a controversial sale that sees the government write off Rover’s debt.


CONGRATULATIONS FROM

IN EVERY ISSUE NEW LAND ROVER TESTS (FUPVSEFmOJUJWFWJFX POUIFMBUFTUNPEFMT

IN JULY 1987 THERE WERE ONLY TWO MODEL RANGES: ONE FOR LAND ROVER, ONE FOR RANGE ROVER. PETER SKILTON AND MARK SAVILLE UNITE THEM WITH THEIR 2012 EQUIVALENTS. AFTER ALL THIS TIME, ARE THEY SO VERY DIFFERENT?

1989

OLD vs NEW September’s Frankfurt Motor Show sees the launch of the hotly anticipated Discovery 1. It’s Land Rover’s first new vehicle since the Range Rover was launched in 1970.

July 2012 LRO 9


IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

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REPORT

UK EVENT OF THE MONTH

driffield delights LAND ROVER SPRING ADVENTURE

The first big Land Rover show of this year put everyone on a high, with a great mix of extreme vehicles, fun people and good weather, as Peter Skilton reports

B

efore I’d even arrived at May’s Spring Adventure, I knew I was in for a good weekend. The sun was shining, which helped, and the closer I got to the Driffield Showground the more Land Rovers joined in what seemed to be a never-ending convoy – all towing caravans, show vehicles or loaded up to the hilt with tents and camping equipment. The A614 was buzzing with excitement that seemed to pass from vehicle to vehicle. The Spring Adventure in Yorkshire has become synonymous with the start of the show season, with crowds – predominantly from the north of England – flocking to be a part of this first gathering. And there were plenty of showgoers from further 84 LRO July 2012


Got an event planned?

If so, give Neil Watterson a ring on 01733 468237 or email him at neil@lro.com

Far left: The Military Lightweight Club provided plenty of entertainment. Left: Steve Forster’s tattoo shows admirable dedication to the cause – it took 28 hours to get this far. Below left: Tasty Defender/pizza oven combo kept the faithful fed. Below: V8 racer built for just £3000. Bottom: Monster Tuning’s 8x8 Defender is pure excess in every area

IN EVERY ISSUE EVENT REPORTS 3PVOEVQTGSPNUIF CFTUFWFOUTJOUIF6, BOECFZPOE

afield this year too. A strong French contingent made themselves at home at the campsite and the Dutch weren’t far behind them, showing the levels of commitment that European enthusiasts have for the green oval. ‘It’s all the parts in the autojumble,’ explained Mathieu Giraud, when asked why he had travelled all the way from Epernay in France to visit the show. The lure of the autojumble seemed to have been the main attraction for a number of showgoers, all hoping to find the elusive parts they’d long been searching for. The serious buyers picked their way through the crowds, dragging wheeled trolleys precariously loaded with bumpers, wheels and a whole array of assorted parts. As a measure of how busy it was, I had to give up trying to chat to Alan Walker at Avenger 4x4 from Peterborough as he was being inundated by bartering bidders for his wide range of Land Rover spares. It wasn’t just the used parts that sold well. Flatdog 4x4 had a record-breaking show, which included selling out its first imported batch of the ÂŁ1197 Tentco Pro roof tent: showgoers were clearly won over by its great value for money. One of the highlights for LRO, though, was when Steve Forster turned up on the LRO stand. Before uttering a word, Steve had taken off his coat and was rolling up his shirt sleeve to reveal his Land Rover-inspired tattoo. ‘It took 28 hours to complete,’ said Steve, proudly exhibiting the creation that showcases a Series I, II and III in perfect detail – from his shoulder to his wrist.


IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

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ROVERPHILE

WITH JAMES TAYLOR

DELVE INTO THE ODDEST CORNERS OF LAND ROVER HISTORY, WHERE LOST ITEMS LURK AND SNIPPETS OF FASCINATING INFORMATION COME TO THE SURFACE

IT’S ON TAPE

VERSATILITY

Towards the end of the 1980s, tape decals became the latest styling accessory for every 4x4, instigated by Japanese manufacturers. The first on Land Rovers (the 1988 County models) came as a bit of a shock, but it shouldn’t have been a surprise when the Discovery was announced in 1989 with some fairly loud tape stripes on the side. It was, though. I’ve recently come across a whole series of photographs showing trials with different tape designs. I think these date from between 1987 and ‘88, although it’s a little hard to tell. Some of the designs certainly entered production on 1989 models. Pictured below are a couple of favourites that didn’t make production. The upper photo shows some County stripes on a 1989 model-year window-hard-top One Ten. Behind it is a Disco test prototype with its ‘bread van’ hard-top disguise. The other picture shows a striking colour-scheme for the tapes on a One Ten; they may actually be on the same vehicle. The red would have worked well with light colours, but it appears Land Rover’s accountants limited the colour schemes available, and red was one of the casualties.

Old adverts can be fascinating, as much for what they reveal about their period as for what they say about the product. I rediscovered this one in my archive recently. Issued in October 1970, it was clearly intended to link the original Range Rover closely to Rover’s saloon cars rather than to Land Rovers. That pleased the marketing people, but it actually caused some Land Rover diehards to wonder whether the Range Rover was really as tough as a Land Rover. Rover had two other car models in production at the time: the P5B saloon and coupÊ, both powered by the same V8 as the Range Rover and 3500 (P6) pictured. I guess the reason they didn’t figure in the ad was because they were old designs, which wouldn’t have given the right image.

COLOUR MATTERS

These days, we’re used to colour photography for everything, and black-and-white stuff is used only for artistic effect – or where no colour exists. That’s the case with most early Land Rover factory photography. I remember pointing out to Land Rover PR man Vin Hammersley some time around 1993 that most of its competitors were issuing colour shots to the media, and asked pretty pointedly why Land Rover didn’t do so. Vin was a little ruffled, but it wasn’t long before colour press shots became standard Land Rover issue. Sometimes, colour does matter. I’ve seen lots of black-and-white pictures of the Land Rover exhibition unit, which I believe was originally painted green and

GIVE ’EM A MEDAL

The 20th anniversary of the Range Rover in 1990 wasn’t celebrated by a limited edition in the UK. All the publicity thrust at the time went into the then-new Discovery (launched in autumn 1989), so the celebrations were saved until 1991 for the Range Rover’s 21st anniversary. That’s when we got the limited-edition CSK. However, the 20th anniversary didn’t go entirely unnoticed. If you’d been working on Range Rover assembly in 1990, you’d have been given a special gold-coloured medal. The medals were issued in June

yellow. What I hadn’t seen was pictures of it in the British Leyland colours of blue and white. So here is one, taken by Land Rover’s Roger Crathorne some time around 1973, before BL and the blue-and-white became something you didn’t mention in polite society.

that year, originally in a protective packet, and came with a letter that presumably explained what the item was. I’d never seen one until Gary Pusey recently came up with this medal. A bit of trawling on the web (with help from engineer Geof Miller’s wife, Pat) found the information. One was sold on eBay recently. There must have been hundreds issued, but I wonder how many are still around?

July 2012 CLASSIC LRO 143

IN EVERY ISSUE EXPERT WRITERS -FBSOGSPNUIFXPSMET NPTULOPXMFEHFBCMF BOEFOUIVTJBTUJD-BOE 3PWFSFYQFSUT


IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

RELIVING THE CAMEL TROPHY IN BORNEO

IN THE TRACKS OF THE CAMEL WHAT BETTER WAY TO CELEBRATE A CLUB’S ANNIVERSARY THAN TACKLING THE TERRAIN OF THE OLD CAMEL TROPHY ROUTE IN KALIMANTAN, BORNEO? LIZ LEWIS TAKES US ON A TRIP THROUGH ORANGUTAN COUNTRY

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PHOTOS: IGOR MANINTA, LIZ LEWIS, BOB TEOH

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76 LRO July 2012


WHO: Liz Lewis WHERE: Kalimantan, Borneo VEHICLE: Defender 110 300Tdi

IN EVERY ISSUE GREAT ADVENTURES OVERSEAS

There were plenty of bush repairs – or should that be jungle? Here the fan gets some attention

&YQFSJFODFBMMDPSOFST PGUIFHMPCF PGGUIF CFBUFOUSBDL

The Defenders took river crossings in their stride – the Range Rover less so

A

s birthday celebrations go, this was really something. My husband Martin and I have been members of Land Rover Owners Malaysia (LROM) for 14 years and were invited to join in its 15th anniversary celebration – to drive part of the old Camel Trophy route, zig-zagging our way through four states of Kalimantan in Borneo. We didn’t need asking twice. Kalimantan is the name given to the three-quarters of Borneo owned by Indonesia. The rest of this massive island is Malaysian territory, with the exception of the tiny independent state of Brunei on the northern coast. Renowned for its tropical forests, challenging topography and rich cultural mix, Kalimantan has all the great ingredients for an adventure off the beaten track. Our expedition composed of seven Land Rovers which mustered at Kuching in the Malaysian-owned north to transport 18 club members and three invited friends. After being flagged off from the hotel by the local parliamentary minister and two representatives from Land Rover Malaysia, we headed south towards the Indonesian border. We had two breakdowns along the way – not the ideal start – but both were easily fixed. Crossing into Indonesia took two hours, which wasn’t bad considering it involved 21 passports being stamped, two Brits buying visas and seven Land Rovers clearing customs. Our first stop was the Mount Hope Training Centre in Balai Karangan, where we unloaded large bags of provisions donated by LROM. Bob Teoh, one of our team of adventurers, helps to run the centre, a foundation established to help the poor among the Dayak tribal

peoples, both practically and spiritually. It looks after 100 boarding children and outreaches another 300 children in the local villages. With the goods now being safely stored, we continued our journey. The tarmac roads didn’t last long. Small villages of wooden-stilted houses flanked narrow potholed roads, and having to dodge traffic slowed us down. Darkness falls quickly in this part of the world and many local vehicles had no rear lights, so safe progress was slow. By now we’d given up trying to make the last ferry at Tayan and around 8pm we pulled into what the guys ominously called a ‘lost man’ budget hotel. Our expectations of Kalimantan were based on memories of Camel Trophy videos, but so far it wasn’t quite what we’d expected. Things had changed since the event passed this way in 1996 – traditional old wooden homes were now adorned with solar panels and nearly everybody boasted a satellite dish. Next morning we took the ferry from Tayan across the Sungai Kapuas, one of the widest rivers in Indonesia, to Maliau. On the way to Delang we were expecting old trails and jungle tracks, but found compacted, mostly graded roads with many new stretches of tarmac. It was dark by the time we arrived at our lodgings – a stilted wooden longhouse 10 feet off the ground. There was a balcony at the front for relaxing and a small, open side landing adjacent to the main room with two huge water drums where the guys would shower al fresco. There was a loo with water butt for the girls. Dinner was served in the longhouse, which was divided into one side for eating and one where we could spread our sleeping bags out.

This constitutes a bridge in Kalimantan. Caution is the key in this environment

The author’s husband Martin (left) with event leader Atek

TEAM VEHICLES Q Defender 110 300Tdi (aka Speedy) From: Indonesia QDefender 110 300Tdi (aka Luke) From: Malaysia Q Defender 110 300Tdi (aka Dusty) From: Malaysia Q Range Rover Classic 300Tdi From: Malaysia Q Defender 110 300Tdi Philippines (aka V8) From: Phillipines Q Series IIA Lightweight (aka Nice Butt) From: Singapore Q Defender 90 (aka Sweeper) From: Malaysia

The ‘fuel stop’ consisted of plastic containers stored at a wooden hut next to the provisions store – no service stations here. There was another stretch of tarmac before the route reverted to jungle track for 30 miles. It was packed and rutted earth, with dodgy bridges to negotiate, along with gullies, mud and water pools – the lot. It would have been a serious challenge had it rained! We passed through Pangkalanbuun and in the middle of nowhere found a service station – a real one, with pumps and everything. We all filled up before continuing for Kumai. Too late to go to the hotel, we headed straight to the ferry port, and obtained permission to camp overnight at the Tourist Office. Next morning we headed on foot for the 6.30am boat that would take us up the Sekonyer River to the Leakey Orangutan Sanctuary in the Tangjun Puting National Park, four hours upstream. Here, Suswi, an old female orangutan, greeted us at the entrance, posed for photos then walked with us up the path, surprising and delighting one of our troupe when she grabbed his hand as he walked. Lunch wasn’t for 20 minutes, but there were already orangutans in the trees, all with babies. We were told that in the months when there was no fruit in the surrounding jungle, the centre fed up to 100 a day. The following day we had nearly 40 miles of tracks to negotiate to get to Sampit, the busy intersection of several main roads. We refuelled at a roadside stall, ironically opposite a modern filling station that had ‘no fuel’ signs up. More than 80 stranded lorries queued outside. We pushed on, up the broken roads, as fast as we could, ending the day at July 2012 LRO 77


25 YEARS OF

1

In May, the first Range Rover L322s roll off the production line at the Solihull factory, but it’s not until November that the most expensive product ever to be developed by the UK motor industry (£1 billion) is revealed to the world’s press at the London Design Museum.

2001

IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

25 GREATEST ACCESSORIES

NEIL WATTERSON’S PICK OF THE 25 GREATEST LAND ROVER GOODIES OF THE PAST 4 QUARTER CENTURY

2 5

3

7

8

6

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1 HIGH-LIFT JACK

The high-lift jack is more than a device for lifting Land Rovers – it can be used for lifting out fence posts, as a rudimentary winch and as a cramping device, as well as many other applications. Once the ultimate Land Rover accessory, it has fallen out of favour due to more vehicles having ‘soft’ bumpers. Best suited to a Defender or Series, it works with any vehicle that has accessible steel crossmembers.

2 RELOCATION 3 BF GOODRICH 4 X-ENG DISC CONE

Land Rover’s coil-sprung suspension keeps the wheels in contact with the ground longer than rival offerings – but fitting relocation cones takes it even further. These allow springs that have dislocated from the mounts to relocate into their correct position, so the axle can drop further and the wheel can track the ground longer. Most extreme suspension kits wouldn’t work without a relocation device.

6 ELECTRIC WINCH CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE & RECEIVE A SCREWDRIVER SET

Mechanical and hydraulic winches are great for sustained working, but because they tend to be quite an investment – both in financial and engineering terms – they’re beyond the reach of most recreational drivers. Electric winches brought self-recovery to the masses, thereby allowing drivers to take their vehicles further, safe in the knowledge that they’d be able to get themselves out of just about anything they drove into. 26 LRO July 2012

ALL-TERRAIN

The BF Goodrich all-terrain tyre is one of those items that is described perfectly by its name. It works on every surface – from snow and ice to desert sand and everything in between. Other tyres may excel in specific areas, but if you want a great all-round tyre, the BFG AT is hard to beat.

HANDBRAKE

When they’re new and working properly, the transmission brakes on Land Rovers are excellent. But on vehicles used heavily off-road, the constant dunking in abrasive dirt takes its toll, clogging the mechanism. The X-Eng uses components from earth-moving machinery to produce a simple handbrake that shrugs off dirt, increases service intervals and holds the Land Rover securely, no matter what you do with it.

7 RAISED AIR INTAKE The engine is the most critical part of most Land Rovers. If it stops, you ain’t going anywhere. So, keeping dust and water out of it when off-roading or overlanding is vital – and that’s where the raised air intake comes in. If properly sealed, it allows you to drive through deeper water and stops the engine drawing in so much dirt when driving in convoy in dusty areas. But don’t forget – you’ll also need axle and transmission breathers.

5 OVERDRIVE For every owner of a four- or five-speed Land Rover who is happy with the vehicle’s cruising speed, you’ll find another who’s crying out for an extra gear. The overdrive was created for these people, raising the comfortable cruising speed significantly by dropping the engine speed relative to road speed. It’ll also improve your fuel economy, as you won’t be thrashing the engine everywhere.

8 DOG GUARD Land Rovers and dogs are natural companions, but if you don’t want Fido jumping on your lap as you trundle down the lanes, you need a dog guard between him and you. But a dog guard also makes a great cargo barrier, allowing you to maximise your carrying capacity without worrying about your kit falling into the passenger area. Plus you can attach essentials such as hi-viz jackets to it – close to hand, but out of the way.


CONGRATULATIONS FROM

IN EVERY ISSUE

11

BEST GEAR & PARTS

9 10 12

13

15

16

2002

14 On March 15, the first customers take delivery of their new L322 Range Rovers. The Discovery 2 undergoes a facelift, modernising the styling and bridging the gap until its successor is ready. It’ll be another two years before the Discovery 3 goes on sale.

9 SILICONE HOSES

Rubber hoses have two things against them: they don’t have a very long life expectancy, especially when they make tightradius turns on vibration-prone diesel engines; and they expand under pressure. Silicone hoses, on the other hand, last for ages and maintain their bore fairly steadily, giving more consistency when driving. And they brighten up the engine bay, too.

10 SATNAV/GPS RECEIVERS

Many drivers have never used a satnav or GPS receiver, but the number is dropping every day. Satnav is brilliant – key in your destination and it’ll take you there with little fuss. A GPS receiver tells you where you are at any given time – thoroughly indispensable for adventurers. Everyone should still know how to read a map, but this technology has made travel to unfamiliar places so much easier.

11 LED LIGHTS Fitting something that saves money and could save lives has to be worthwhile. LED lights draw far less power than filament bulbs, so you’ll waste less fuel producing the electricity to power them, plus they come on much quicker – so drivers behind can react sooner.

12 ARB AIR

LOCKER

Irrespective of how good your suspension is, there will be times when your Land Rover gets crossaxled, with diagonally opposite wheels spinning. The ARB diff air locker operates with a reassuring hiss as the compressed air activates it, locking the halfshafts together and restoring traction. There are other lockers, but the ARB was instrumental in taking Land Rovers further off-road than they ever had been before.

14 DEEP-CYCLE BATTERIES

15 DIXON-BATE ADJUSTABLE

So much electrical equipment is carried in Land Rovers, keeping the engine running is only half the work of the battery. A winch, auxiliary lighting, fridge and other high-drain items take their toll on batteries and can quickly kill standard fitments. Deep-cycle batteries tolerate abuse more readily and, when used with a splitcharge system, let you power everything without ever risking running your main battery flat.

You need a good tow hitch to work with Land Rovers – and the simple-to-use Dixon-Bate adjustable unit fulfils the role perfectly. You can choose the perfect towball height for your trailer, whatever it is. Have a separate slider for each tow hook and you’ll be ready to tow in no time. It’s incredibly robust – it’ll simply shrug off knocks on rocks and being dragged through mud.

TOW HITCH

13 TIRFOR/

ROPE HOIST

Mechanical simplicity is the key to the Tirfor/rope hoist’s success. It can pull in any direction, can be stored out of harm’s way inside the Land Rover and can be used away from the vehicle – all issues with front-mounted winches. Admittedly, it’s hard work using one compared to an electric equivalent, but you’re probably less likely to drive into a deep bog as you’ll know how much effort it will take to get you out!

16 KINETIC ENERGY

RECOVERY ROPE

If your Land Rover is properly stuck, the quickest way to recover it is often a sharp tug with a stretchy rope. A vast amount of force is transferred from the recovery vehicle through the rope to the stricken motor, allowing the stuck vehicle to pop out. But accidents have been caused by inexperienced operators using the kit incorrectly on unsafe recovery points, so treat it with respect. July 2012 LRO 27

&TTFOUJBMTUVGGUPIFMQ ZPVNBLFUIFNPTUPG ZPVSUJNFJOZPVS-BOE 3PWFS


IVE R S U L VE W EXCND ROREVIE LA ER P N OW

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PHOTOS: STUART COLLINS

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148 CLASSIC LRO July 2012


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IN EVERY ISSUE CLASSIC VEHICLES &WFSZNPOUIXFEFWPUF NPSFUIBOQBHFTUP QSF-BOE3PWFST

LAND ROVER TREASURES

WORDS: JOHN CARROLL

July 2012 CLASSIC LRO 149


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WORKSHOP

OFF-ROD PART 1

OFF-ROD – GAME ON!

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I

f I say I’m about to build a shed out of secondhand wood, you’ll imagine one thing, but if I say I’m going to build a garden room out of recycled timber you’ll think something quite different. Well, it’s the same with Land Rovers, and we’re about to build one out of £750 worth of scrap. Despite the image this statement no doubt conjures up, we’re aiming for a cool truck. Think American street rod – an old vehicle that’s been updated with a newer engine, better suspension and some creature comforts. Think a combination of old-style motoring with modern levels of performance and comfort. This mix-and-match concept appeals to me, as does the convenience of an updated

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classic. And one of the street rods my heart desires is a Series vehicle with the engine and suspension of a coil-sprung Land Rover. Mind you, there’s not much ‘street’ about a Land Rover, it’s more of an off-road rod. Project Off-Rod it is. I got my start writing for magazines in the 1980s and one of the pro-greenlaning 4x4 titles of the time featured Mike Scott from the All-Wheel Drive Club (AWDC) as a columnist. Mike drove the first 100in hybrid Land Rover I’d seen. That magazine’s editor, Russell Fisher, commissioned a similar machine from Pete Rowe and ran it as an occasional buildup series. I diligently collected every instalment. Pete Rowe is a noted AWDC competitor and engineer and Fisher’s machine was one of

The donor Discovery body is lifted clear of its rolling chassis to provide the basis for the new LRO project, a 100-inch Series III coiler hybrid – or the Off-Rod as it will be known

An off-road hot-rod Discovery/ Series III hybrid? Now, that’s what you call a project. And who better to mastermind it than John Carroll…

a succession of Land Roverbodied Range Rovers he built. The reason these home-built coilers became popular back then was that the Ninety and One Ten were still new and expensive, but rusty old Range Rovers and Series body panels were plentiful and cheap. When it came to clubs such as the AWDC, where homebuilt specials abounded, the 100-inch Land Rover/Range Rover hybrid was inevitable. I hankered after one back then, but it would take me 25 years to do anything about it. Defender-shaped Land Rovers are still expensive and rusty old Discovery 1s and Series body panels are still plentiful and cheap. It seems like the perfect time to revisit the 100in hybrid concept. In some ways it never went away and the

Britpart, The Grove, Craven Arms, Shropshire SY7 8DA, England.

80/88/100in-coiler trialler built by Qt and Whitbread 4x4 is one of the 21st century incarnations of that vehicle. The machine I’m planning is more conventional: a 100-inch Series III Land Rover pick-up.

STAY SAFE ■ Check your driving licence allows you to tow the kind of trailer required for shifting large pieces of Land Rover. Make sure the loads are secured with ratchet straps, check the trailer is hitched correctly to the towing vehicle and that the trailer’s lights and brakes work. ■ In the workshop, take care to drain fuel and fluids from the donor vehicle and not to stand under an unpropped body while it’s being lifted clear of the chassis.


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IN EVERY ISSUE WORKSHOP ADVICE &YQFSUUFDIOJDBM BEWJDF ZPVSQSPCMFNT TPMWFE BOEIPXUP%*: UVUPSJBMT

The kicking tyres phase of the project started last summer when we held up a 109in Series III offside wing to the side of my Discovery van to get a rough idea of what a 100in pick-up could look like. It was immediately apparent that the Off-Rod project was feasible and that the Discovery’s rear overhang almost matches that of the 109in.

Land Rover invented the coil-sprung Land Rover by putting Series III panels on a V8 Range Rover chassis in the early 1980s. This is one of the engineering test vehicles and it uses a five-door station wagon body with the overhang chopped off. We intend to shorten the leading edge of the back body to preserve the overhang and avoid cutting the wheelarches.

3

Just £100 bought this 1997 Discovery 1 as the basis for the Off-Rod build. It’s a non-running, five-door, 300Tdi Discovery that’s been cut about a bit to fit off-road accessories. Crucially, its chassis is structurally sound and its axles, gearbox and V5C are present and correct.

4

This is the world’s rustiest Ninety, bought on eBay for £370. It’s fit only for scrap but will yield a number of useful items, including a repairable bulkhead and seatbox as well as usable floor panels and transmission tunnel. There is also an LT77 gearbox with a short bellhousing.

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This rear tub from a 1977 Series III 109in, bought for £65, is pretty straight and not badly corroded. It’s also ideal for shortening to suit the 100in Discovery wheelbase. Add a £30 Series III windscreen to this lot and I’m short of a truck cab, tailgate and front panels. I’ve spent £565 so far and anticipate that I’ll have all the raw material for around £750.

Land Rover’s prototype coiler, seen here, uses a Stage 1 V8 front panel, while Russell Fisher’s 100-inch uses a Ninety grille and panel to leave room under the front for the engine, fan and radiator. For the Off-Rod, I’ve decided to use a Series III front panel set back between the wings in the standard position.

www.britpart.com sales@britpart.com

July 2012 LRO 185


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BREAKING OUT IN BERKSHIRE

RIDGE

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NEIL WATTERSON HEADS TO WEST BERKSHIRE TO SAMPLE LANES AROUND THE RIDGEWAY, ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S BEST-KNOWN ROADS – AND ONE-TIME GREENLANING HEAVEN

50 LRO July 2012


IN EVERY ISSUE UK ADVENTURES (SFFOMBOFTBSPVOEUIF 6,UIBUZPVDBOESJWF UIJTXFFLFOE

July 2012 LRO 51


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TRADER

BUYING EXPERTISE

triple choice

This month’s trio of Land Rovers are all fitted with the venerable 300Tdi engine. John Carroll unearths a tempting selection, from a bargain Disco for less than two grand to some serious utility for sub-£10k

1994 DISCOVERY 1 AUTO

No sunroofs, and only five seats, but has aircon, cruise control and ABS. Some corrosion but basically sound

1996 DEFENDER 110 HIGHCAPACITY PICK-UP

Desirable heavy-duty commercial that’s suitable for work or play, but in need of some cosmetic attention

1997 DEFENDER 110 TRUCK-CAB TIPPER

A two-owner specialistconverted tipper truck that’s ready for work (or for someone with a tipper truck craving)

ON SALE AT

Churchill 4x4, Hanbury Garage, Droitwich Road, Hanbury, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire B60 4DH. churchill4x4.co.uk, 01527 821440

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£1950 DISCOVERY 1 300Tdi

F

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is far less common or many than the manual would-be UTOMATIC A version – and buyers in R E AT FIVE-SE there was never the market for a T N E R EC an automatic 300Tdi-powered CAM B E LT version of the Land Rover, Defender 300Tdi. seeing the lever of CHANG E The price will an automatic appeal to those transmission in the browsing for a bargain: cabin will have them less than two grand won’t get asking the salesman for a you a nice Defender of any sort, test-drive – automatics are but this kind of budget gives you desirable as they’re more a huge choice of Discos. But you user-friendly off-road than need to buy carefully as many are manuals. The Disco 1 300Tdi auto 218 LRO July 2012

suffering from severe corrosion. This 1994 300Tdi automatic in metallic green at £1950 is typical. It features alloy wheels, anti-lock brakes, air-conditioning, remote central locking, cruise control, electric mirrors and all-round electric windows. That’s a nice roster of kit, although this is one of the minority of Discos with only five seats, which limits its appeal to some. The lack of sunroofs may be seen as a positive by canny buyers, given their propensity

to leak (and they do little when opened except increase wind noise in the cab, anyway). Its mileage of 162,466 miles is on the high side – but you should always judge a Land Rover of this age on condition, not mileage. And on that basis, this one is well worth a second look. The Discovery 1 was launched in 1989, based on the chassis and LT77 transmission of the Range Rover with permanent fourwheel drive and a locking centre diff. It was initially available only


Buying a Land Rover?

Make sure you read John Carroll’s insightful buying guides before you leave home. johnc@lro.com

NEED TO KNOW

WINDOWS AND INTERIORS Electric window mechanisms can fail and the doors can drop. This one is surprisingly clean and tidy considering its age and mileage.

■ The VIN is on the front panel of the vehicle, visible when the bonnet is opened. ■ Mods to consider: this Discovery already has the ever-useful tow hitch, but a new owner may want to fit lifted suspension and chunkier tyres to give it more ability when it comes to off-roading or greenlaning. ■ Essential reading: ask questions on the forum at discoveryownersclub.org. It would be a good idea to join the club while you’re there. ■ How to find history: trace previous owners via DVLA and V5C supplied with it. WHAT WILL IT COST ME? VED £215 Economy 26mpg Fuel cost per mile 25.3p* Insurance group 12 Front hub £12 Tyre (as fitted) £100 Steering box £183 exchange Windscreen £160 Headlamp £30 Road spring £25 *Diesel 145p per litre as a three-door version, although the five-door was introduced the following year. From the outset, the diesel Discovery was powered by the new 2.5-litre 200Tdi. Then in 1994, the year this Discovery was made, the vehicle received a raft of cosmetic and mechanical upgrades, headlined by the replacement of the 200Tdi engine with the 300Tdi. This motor was quieter and vibrated less than its predecessor and was generally more refined. Aesthetic improvements included larger headlamps and a second set of rear lights in the bumper. If you want a first-generation Discovery to use as a family

BUYING ADVICE 8IBUUPMPPLGPSXIFO CVZJOHB-BOE3PWFSo BOEIPXNVDIUPQBZ

Unmolested interior features original branded radiocassette player

WHEELS AND TYRES

BOOT FLOOR

Check the condition of the tyres. Look for off-road and building site damage such as cuts to sidewalls. These General Grabber AWs are fine, although the Pirelli spare will need changing soon. The alloy wheels show minimal signs of corrosion.

Very prone to rusting. By this age they either need a new floor or will have had one. There are no exceptions – check to see which is the case, as you may need to budget to replace the rear floor. Pattern-part floors cost about £45 and need welding in.

runabout, works hack or haulanything towcar, you should go for a 300Tdi, whether manual or auto. Not only is the 300 a better engine than its predecessor, but the vehicles it lives in are also more recent – and there are many more of them around these days. This example is structurally sound, but needs cosmetic attention. It’s suffering a bit from corrosion, particularly in the alloy of the doors. You can see the rusty steel of the wheelarches when you open the rear doors, and alloy is bubbling behind the trims on the doors and body. It’s straight enough, sits square on its springs and hasn’t

ENGINE The cambelt and cylinder head are always suspect on high-mileage 300Tdis. Cambelt changes are recommended every 70,000 miles; if the belt fails it will cause damage to the valves and cylinder head. This engine had it changed just last year – good news! been messed with, shown by the presence of the original Discovery-branded radio/ cassette, and the interior is clean and undamaged (apart from a few holes where a phone has been removed). I guess you could say it’s simply showing its age.

Its 255/65 R16 General Grabber tyres all have loads of tread left on them, there’s a fitted towbar and there’s lots of service history, including proof that a cambelt change has been carried out as recently as 2011 – that’s an important selling point.

VERDICT

Towbar and plenty of tyre tread are in this Disco’s favour

IN EVERY ISSUE

The price is about right, we’d say. It’s hardly concours, but neither is it particularly shabby. It drives well and is MoT’d until January 2013. You could have three examples of the Discovery 1 of a similar age and specification parked next to each other and they could vary widely in terms of condition and price. This will be a legacy of what they’ve been used for, and how they’ve been cared for and maintained. There are hundreds of the things for sale at any given time, so don’t succumb to bidding online for one, hoping that the description is accurate – never buy any Discovery 1 without actually looking at it.

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COMPETITION WIN! A SET OF TYRES To celebrate LRO’s 25th anniversary, off-road tyre specialist 4Site4x4 is offering around £1500-worth of tyres as prizes in this month’s fantastic competition. Two lucky winners will receive five tyres and free fitting at one of 4Site4x4s independent dealers nationwide. We have one set of BF Goodrich T/A-KM2 Mud-Terrains and one set of the latest General Grabber All-Terrains to give away.

T

BF GOODRICH MUD-TERRAIN T/A-KM2

GENERAL GRABBER AT ALL-TERRAIN

The superb BFGoodrich T/A-KM2 is designed for serious off-road enthusiasts, with an aggressive tread design inspired by the world-renowned rock-climbing tyre, the BFGoodrich Krawler T/A KX.

1 SET TO GIVE AWAY

The new General Grabber All-Terrain is engineered to deliver great traction and handling whether on- or off-road, in the wet or dry, on mud or grass. Its angled block design ensures minimal noise, even wear, and gives improved fuel consumption compared to its predecessor, while open shoulders give better self-cleaning too.

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Click here to enter You can enter both prize draws, but each set of tyres will have a different winner. Closing date: September 13, 2012 46 LRO July 2012


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Do you think your Land Rover is good enough to grace the pages of next year’s LRO/BEARMACH calendar? Then enter your vehicle in our exciting new competition and not only could your Land Rover be a calendar star, you will also win £500’s worth of BEARMACH goodies. Be creative with your photos. Your Land Rover could be greenlaning, off-roading, splashing through a ford, being used for recovery, on safari… the more exciting, inspiring and surprising the better. And make sure you buy LRO every month, as it will contain updates on the progress of the competition, feature some of the entrants and give you details on how you can vote for your favourites. What are you waiting for? Enter today!

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