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Annual Report 2009 / 2010

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Grounded in Science | Global in Scope


TABLE OF CONTENTS Dean’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vision and Mission & In the News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Undergraduate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Graduate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Learning Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Community Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Global Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Animal Welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Aquaculture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Avian Research Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Dairy Education and Research Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Biometeorology and Soil Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm . . . . . . . . . 20 Botanical Garden & Centre for Plant Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Food and Resource Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Food Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Human Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Wine Research Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Faculty Advisory Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 2

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010


DEAN’S MESSAGE same way and we encourage our students to be active participants in their education, wherever it may lead them. To that end, we offer programs that will help them develop practical skills they can use in the real-world.

Associate Deans

As well, our researchers are focused on finding viable solutions to pressing global crises and are known worldwide for their innovation and leadership in areas such as dairy, aquaculture and wine research. Whether it’s grape and wine yeast genomics or animal welfare, LFS research advances scientific knowledge while providing industry with practical solutions.

Green is the new black. Sustainability issues have become a hot topic in recent years as public concern for the health and well-being of the earth has continued to rise. This is great news for the planet and for our Faculty, as we focus on meeting urgent local and global challenges surrounding food safety, resource use and shared environmental resources. We do things a bit differently here. Our students are not limited by the four walls of a classroom or even by borders. We recognize that not everyone learns in the

This annual report is a year in the life of the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. It touches on just a few of the many accomplishments we have achieved during the past year. My hope is that, as you turn these pages, you will discover something new about the important work we are doing here – something that inspires you to join us in creating a more sustainable world.

Dr. Brent Skura, Associate Dean, Academic

Murray B. Isman, Dean Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Dr. Hennie van Vuuren, Associate Dean, Research Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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VISION & MISSION

Vision:

Grounded in science, the Faculty of Land and Food Systems is a leader in integrated research and education that addresses global issues surrounding health and sustainable land and food systems.

Mission:

The Faculty of Land and Food Systems uses student-centered learning to educate new generations of scientists equipped to solve the most fundamental issues faced by society — those focused around human health, a sustainable food supply and the responsible use of finite land and water resources.

IN THE NEWS The Globe and Mail

Kelowna News

Fish Farms Put Squeeze on Marine Resources Tony Farrell, September 2009

Local Winery Boosts Water Research

Calgary Herald

Research Centre, March 2010

Canada Digs in on Loosening Tariffs for WTO Rick Barichello, November 2009

Global TV Chafer Beetle

Vancouver Sun

Ingrid Hoff, UBC Botanical Garden and

Take it Without a Grain of Salt

Centre for Plant Research, April 2010

Susan Barr, November 2009

Edible Vancouver Magazine

Today/MSNBC (also: Ottawa Citizen, Washington Square News) Obesity Hits NY Neighbourhoods Hardest Asst. Prof. Jennifer Black, Human Nutrition, March 2010

CTV Where Does Our Food Come From? Dean Murray Isman, March 2010

CTV Farmed vs. Wild Salmon – Which One is Better? Dean Murray Isman, March 2010

The Province List of Processed Food Recalled Grows Asst, Prof. Kevin Allen, Food Science, March 2010

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Asst. Prof. Steven Lund, Wine

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

Local Heroes of our Food Scene UBC Farm, Spring 2010

Global TV Airline Food Asst. Prof. Kevin Allen, Food Science, July 2010

Georgia Straight Urban Foraging Lets No Good Food Go to Waste UBC Farm, September 2010

CBC Radio Listeria – Tainted Fish Supplier Failed Past Inspections Asst. Prof. Kevin Allen, Food Science, October 2010


AWARDS Beverton Medal Prof. Tony Farrell recently received the Beverton Medal from the Fisheries Society of the British Isles. The Beverton medal is awarded to a distinguished scientist for a lifelong contribution to all aspects of the study of fish biology and/or fisheries science, with a focus on groundbreaking research.

Prof. Quentin Cronk receives Harvard Honour Harvard University recognized Professor Quentin Cronk with the Charles Bullard Fellowship for research excellence in woody plant biology. The Charles Bullard fellowship program supports advanced research and study by individuals who show promise of making an important contribution, either as scholars or administrators, to forestry and forest-related subjects.

Prof. Eunice Li-Chan recognized by the American Chemical Society

Alejandro Rojas

Think&EatGreen@School Receives $1 Million Grant The Think&EatGreen@School Project is a five-year interdisciplinary study that explores innovative ways to teach elementary and high school students about the impact of individual food choices on the planet’s limited land and water resources. As principal investigator, Alejandro Rojas recently received a $1 million grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The study will investigate: the nutritional, ecological, social and economic practices of school food programs; the impact of on-site food production; the influence of curriculum and school physical design on student learning about the relationships between food security, sustainability and climate change; and the impact of creating a sustainable school food system on the ecological and carbon footprint of a school.

Professor Eunice Li-Chan was named a Fellow of the Agriculture and Food Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society. Chan, a professor in our Food, Nutrition and Health program, was recognized for her outstanding scientific contributions to the field of agricultural and food chemistry.

Killam Award Associate Professor Art Bomke was recently honoured with the Killam Teaching Award for 09/10. The Award is given annually in recognition of excellence in teaching and recipients are nominated by students, colleagues and alumni. Bomke also received the Killam in 1999.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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UNDERGRADUATE The Faculty of Land and Food Systems oers 10 majors and 2 minors under the following 4 degrees:

Agroecology As of 2010, the Agroecology Program will no longer be admitting new students and the program is in the process of being grandfathered due to declining enrollment.

Applied Biology The Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology program is a new degree program that admitted its first students in September 2009. Through the program, students study animal, plant, or soil sciences in a way that relates directly to the major issues facing the planet, including environmental protection and preservation, sustainability, and biodiversity. Students pursuing a B.Sc. in Applied Biology will learn to apply the principles of biology in one of three majors:

Applied Animal Biology Applied Animal Biology is intended for students interested in studying and/or working with animals, in careers such as veterinary medicine, the animal-based industries, and the humane movement. It provides students with sound, up-to-date fundamentals in the field of animal biology based on both theory and application.

Applied Plant and Soil Sciences This major integrates diverse topics in soil-water-plant-atmosphere systems with a focus on the science underpinning crop production and ecosystem management. It provides students with the flexibility to tailor their learning experience towards a major area of interest within the broader topic, focusing on current global and local environmental issues (e.g., climate change, water and air pollution, and food shortages).

Food and the Environment This major brings together agricultural sciences, ecology, and environmental thought to provide the background to issues surrounding the management of land and water to produce food, other agricultural products, and ecological services. Food and the Environment major allows students the flexibility to tailor their learning experiences to their specific interests within the broader topic including resource economics, conservation of wildlife habitat and biodiversity as related to agriculture, integrated agro-ecosystem management, pollution of surface and ground waters, or self-directed areas of study.

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Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010


Food, Nutrition and Health

Global Resource Systems

Dietetics

Resource and Region Specializations

The Dietetics curriculum includes general courses in biological and social sciences as well as courses directly related to dietetics including basic and applied human nutrition, food and food systems, and professional dietetic practice.

This program combines a field of study, such as international development or sustainable agriculture, within a specific region of the world. By studying internationally, students gain a uniquely integrated and interdisciplinary approach to the complex issues faced by local and global communities.

Food Market Analysis This major combines food science skills with an understanding of the management and marketing of food.

Food & Nutritional Sciences Students taking this double major focus on the core sections of Food Science and Nutritional Sciences.

Pre Vet Students planning to pursue a degree in veterinary science may take their pre-vet requirements in Applied Biology, Applied Animal Biology concentration or Nutritional Sciences major in the Food, Nutrition and Health program.

Food, Nutrition & Health The Food, Nutrition, and Health (FNH) Major offers students the flexibility to tailor the program to reflect specific interests in food, nutrition, and health without the specialization depth afforded by the other majors.

Food Science Encompasses food chemistry, food microbiology, physical, sensory and nutritional properties of food and food process science with respect to the manufacture, preservation, quality assurance and the safe development of food products.

Nutritional Sciences Intended for students who are interested in basic human and animal nutritional sciences or who plan to proceed to an area of agricultural sciences or health sciences.

Human Kinetics Minor Human Kinetics involves a learning environment in the study and practice of human movement.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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GRADUATE Graduate Studies Encompassing a range of studies surrounding human health, a sustainable food supply and the responsible use of scarce land and water resources, our Faculty offers graduate programs in the following areas:

Agricultural Economics (MSc) The MSc degree provides students with rigorous training in applied economics and quantitative methods with an emphasis on applied resource economics and food market analysis. Students develop specialized research skills by working with faculty throughout UBC on real-world issues.

The Master in Food and Resource Economics (Professional Program)

Human Nutrition (MSc, PhD) This program provides an opportunity for advanced study and original investigations in basic and applied human nutrition. The program is enriched through collaboration with colleagues in other graduate programs including Animal Science, Food Science, Pediatrics, Anatomy & Cell Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Integrated Studies of Land and Food Systems (MSc, PhD) The objective of this program is to help students develop the knowledge base and integrative skills necessary to evaluate the cycle of food systems, production, processing and disposal; And to develop sustainable solutions based on agroecological, economic and social dimensions.

Plant Science (MSc, PhD)

2009-10 saw the cohort of students from the MFRE program graduate in November 2010. This 12-month course-based program attracted applicants from around the world. All 19 students who started the program in September 2009 successfully completed it.

The Plant Science Graduate Program offers MSc and PhD degrees in fundamental and applied topics related to plant production, plant protection, biotechnology, plant physiology and biochemistry, and plant-environment interactions.

Animal Science (MSc, PhD)

Soil Science (MSc, PhD)

This program offers opportunities for advanced study and research in physiology, behavior, welfare, genetics and management of livestock, poultry, fish, and wildlife species.

Food Science (MSc, PhD and MFS) Opportunity for advanced study and research in food chemistry and biochemistry, food process science, food microbiology, food safety and toxicology, food biotechnology, food quality evaluation and wine biotechnology. The Master of Food Science (MFS) degree is a course-based professional program, designed to meet the worldwide demand for professional post-graduates by government and private industry.

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Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

A collaboration between the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and the Faculty of Forestry. Areas of study include biometeorology, forest nutrition and nutrient cycling, mycorrhizal ecology, soil-plant interactions, and soil and water conservation.


Graduate Student Services

Graduate Admission

Graduate Programs Recruitment Our Faculty continues to attract strong graduate students from around the world, as evidenced by a significant number holding prestigious scholarships and awards.

Table 1. Number of applications, admission offers and acceptances for each Graduate Program by degree for 2009-10 (Note: Only complete admission applications are recorded and the total inquiries received and responded to for each program is approximately five times the number listed).

* One-year course-based programs. All others are research-based. Programs AGEC

ANSC

FOOD

HUNU

PLNT

SOIL

ISLFS

TOTAL

Admission Offers

Accepted Offers

Degree

Applications

MSc

14

7

4

MFRE*

26

24

19

PhD

7

5

5

MSc

18

8

5

PhD

5

1

1

MSc

13

5

4

MFS

50

28

20

PhD

1

0

0

MSc

20

5

5

PhD

3

1

1

MSc

4

3

3

PhD

2

2

2

MSc

7

2

2

PhD

5

2

2

MSc

20

9

4

195

102

77

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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GRADUATE Graduate Student Enrollment and Graduation Table 2. Number of students registered in Land and Food Systems’ Graduate Programs. The Faculty had master’s students and doctoral students (2009 - 2010) Program

Degree

Registrants

Program

Degree

Graduates

AGEC

MSc

9

AGEC

MSc

1

MFRE

19

ANSC

MSc

8

MSc

16

PhD

2

PhD

16

MSc

6

MSc

14

PhD

1

PhD

7

MFS

15

MFS

20

MSc

4

MSc

14

PhD

2

PhD

5

MSc

3

MSc

7

PhD

1

PhD

11

MSc

8

PhD

9

MSc

6

PhD

5

ANSC

FOOD

HUNU

ISLFS

PLNT

SOIL

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Table 3. Number of students graduated from each Graduate Program by degree (November 2009 and May 2010 Graduation)

FOOD

HUNU

ISLFS

PLNT

SOIL

MSc subtotal

MSc

4

PhD

3

MSc

2

PhD

1 28

MSc subtotal

90

MFS subtotal

15

MFS subtotal

20

MFRE subtotal

N/A

MFRE subtotal

19

PhD subtotal

10

PhD subtotal

53

Grand Total

53

Grand TOTAL

182

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010


LEARNING CENTRE

Duncan McHugh and Morgan Reid

MacMillan Learning Commons

How Can We Help You?

Shortly after the MacMillan Learning Commons officially opened in the fall of 2009, the Learning Centre conducted a series of focus groups to identify how students are using the space.

In mid-2010, Learning Centre staff completed a detailed needs assessment in order to gain a better understanding of the needs of our instructors and students.

Twenty students recruited from our core LFS courses and from the Masters of Food and Resource Economics (MFRE) program were asked how they use the Learning Commons, what they liked about it and what they felt needed improvement. Although the participants expressed some concern about noise levels during class times, overall feedback was positive.

The first phase of research included a focus group of faculty members and staff from different LFS program areas. Led by Ranga Venkatachary, Director of the Learning Centre, and Morgan Reid, Learning Technologies Specialist, the focus group helped to pinpoint concerns as well as identify opportunities.

“The Learning Commons is primarily regarded as an informal learning space,” said Duncan McHugh, the Learning Centre’s Multimedia Developer. “It’s used very dynamically by the students; they move the furniture around and repurpose it for their use.” McHugh added that the Learning Commons is gaining a wordof-mouth reputation around the university. “It’s become a bit of a destination study space on campus. Students come here from other parts of campus just to enjoy it.”

TA Training The Learning Centre held several training sessions on Vista and Problem-Based Learning (PBL) during 2010 for the Faculty’s teaching assistants. “There was a strong interest in still using the PBL format, but TA’s were finding it difficult to commit to a three day workshop,” said Morgan Reid, Learning Technologies Specialist. “We responded by adapting the training and creating a high value, four-hour session.” The workshops were a partnership between the Learning Centre and UBC’s Centre for Teaching and Learning Technologies (CTLT). Session participants reported exceptionally high levels of satisfaction, with 98% strongly agreeing that the sessions were useful and should continue on a regular basis.

“Our purpose was to define faculty members’ beliefs and actions about their teaching practices, perceptions on how their students learn, and their needs in terms of learning technologies, facilities and instructional support,” said Venkatachary. The Learning Centre then created an online survey based on the issues identified by the focus group, which was sent to a wider audience to elicit more detailed feedback. “The results from the survey indicated that our teaching community is interested in community engagement and collaboration, as well as user-friendly technology,” said Reid. “This information has helped us to identify services that are important to the LFS community.” And the LFS community isn’t the only group interested in the results. The data is currently being used by UBC’s Learning Technology Advisory Council (LTAC) as part of the selection process of a new university-wide learning management system. As well, other UBC faculties have approached the Learning Centre for advice on how to conduct the process. “It’s definitely raised our profile on campus as a faculty that is concerned with high quality teaching and learning, community based research and student engagement,” added Reid.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS Learning Outside the Classroom In 2010, six LFS undergraduate students - Victoria Elliot, Amanda Hunter, Keely Johnston, Kim Lucas, Catherine Montes and Brianna Stewart– participated in a community-service learning project as part of the LFS 350 course (Land, Food and Community). The project focused on the local food distribution system in BC’s Gulf Islands and the development of a farm store on Mayne Island, a small island off the southwest coast of British Columbia. The group conducted an online survey about the barriers farmers face in distributing food and the changes they’d like to see to local food distribution. “Distribution is a huge challenge for local farmers,” said Victoria Elliot, a third year Global Resource Systems student. “We looked at the food distribution channels currently available on the Gulf Islands and which farmers might be interested in expanding their local food distribution.” The group sent the survey to more than 100 Gulf Island farmers; they received a 30% response rate. It is hoped the data will be used to help Don and Shanti McDougall, owners of Deacon Vale Farm, develop their Mayne Island Farm Store. The store will sell produce as well as products such as chutneys, jams and other grocery items. “The idea is to source as locally as possible,” added Elliot. “And the great thing is that farmers don’t have to be producing on a large scale in order to sell to the store.” In order to reinforce the importance of a local food system, products will be labelled with the number of miles the product travelled. And although there is not yet a set opening date, the students are proud to have helped lay the groundwork for the store. “Combining community service learning with research was an amazing experience,” said Amanda Hunter, a third year Nutritional Sciences student. “It gave me a better understanding of food marketing and I feel like I have an insider’s view.”

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Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

Anelyse Walker

Brianna Stewart, a third year Applied Biology student, agreed. “We got to have conservations with people actually involved in the food system, outside of the university context. This project made me realize that I have a passion for the marketing side of food. It turned my focus a little bit.”

Sharing Learning A group of students in our Land, Food and Community II (LFS 350) course worked on a project in 2010 that combined two of the areas that make our Faculty so unique: Community Service Learning and UBC Farm. The project explored establishing a student-led community farm at Okanagan College in Vernon, BC, modeled after our own UBC Farm, a 24 hectare learning and research farm located on UBC’s Vancouver campus. “The students focused on raising awareness among Okanagan College students, staff and faculty about the existence of their farm,” said Anelyse Weiler, teaching assistant for LFS 350 and a fourth year Global Resource Systems student focusing on sustainable agriculture. “They handed out leaflets, made presentations to classes and the Vernon City Council, and helped to establish a list of farm positions.” The group also tried to convey how the Farm would be relevant to Okanagan College students and how it could provide unique learning opportunities – learning opportunities that extend much farther than the field of traditional agriculture. Okanagan College business students, for example, were excited about the possibility of developing business plans for the Farm. “The LFS Community series challenges students to look past the silos of their discipline and be critical about the role they play in the food system,” added Weiler. “It was great to see our students pass on their learning and give the Okanagan College community a better understanding of what their Farm could really be.”


GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS

Laura Gosset

Tiffany Tong

GRS Alumni Goes to Oxford

Putting Skills to Use in Africa

There is no limit to where your education can take you. Just ask Laura Gosset, a graduate of our Global Resource Systems (GRS) program who is currently enrolled at England’s prestigious Oxford University.

Tiffany Tong loves to travel. Born in Hong Kong, Tong grew up in Vancouver but has spent a lot of time working in Africa in recent years, thanks in part to her decision to study in our Global Resource Systems (GRS) program.

“I switched from general science to GRS in my second year and I felt so happy to be in the right program, to be part of a community of people who were interested in the same things,” she said. Through the GRS program, students study science in the context of a region of the world, gaining an understanding of agricultural and natural resource systems from an international and interdisciplinary perspective. Gosset, who graduated in 2009, focused on environment and development. “I’ve always been interested in water and agriculture and how development ties into that,” she added. At the urging of one of her professors, she applied for the Masters program in Nature, Society and Environmental Policy at Oxford University. “The interdisciplinary approach of the GRS program really prepared me for my studies at Oxford,” said Gosset. “It instilled a sense of the complexities we face in addressing contemporary global environmental issues.” She also credits the international experience she gained through the GRS program for helping her get into Oxford. “I wanted to explore different things and the GRS program gave me the opportunity to do that.”

An interest in international development work, especially food security issues, is what initially drew her to the GRS program. “I’m interested in how the food security of ‘marginalized’ populations are affected by economic systems,” she said, adding that the Program’s minimal restrictions on electives gave her the flexibility to discover the niches she was most passionate about. As part of her studies, Tong went on exchanges to the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in Norway, Uganda, and Tanzania. She also took classes in development studies in Norway and Uganda and conducted research in Tanzania that included a dairy goat project for orphans in a rural village. From August 2010-February 2011, Tong did an internship with Sustainable Cities International, an organization that is focused on catalyzing action on urban sustainability in cities around the world. “My work in Dar es Salaam is to promote and advocate for better support of urban agriculture. The experience has been amazing and I’ve learned so much in a short amount of time,” said Tong. “Every course and experience in the GRS program contributed to what I have learned and has helped to solidify my future career. To read more about Tong’s experiences in Africa, please visit http://blogs.landfood.ubc.ca/tiffanyt/

Gosset spent six months at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark on an exchange and a month at the Research University in Thailand. In 2011, she will travel to India to research water governance and development for her master’s dissertation.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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RESEARCH GROUPS Animal Welfare Program AAFC/Avian Research Centre Biometeorology and Soil Science Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre DFO/UBC Centre for Aquaculture and Environmental Research (CAER) Food and Resource Economics Food Science Human Nutrition UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research Wine Research Centre

ANIMAL WELFARE

Liv Baker

PhD Student Bridges Animal Welfare and Conservation “My affinity for animals has really shaped my life and my research interests,” said Liv Baker, a PhD student in our Animal Welfare program. Baker, a native of Queens, New York, is currently working on a research project spearheaded by the San Diego Zoo’s Institute for Conservation Research. The project is looking at the translocation of 150 kangaroo rats in the semi-arid region between San Diego and Los Angeles. Considered an endangered species, the kangaroo rat is a nocturnal rodent with long hind legs that hops in a similar manner as the kangaroo, though the two species are not related. “Translocations, although well-intentioned, are often unsuccessful and as a result individual animals suffer greatly, and the stress of the move likely strains the coping mechanisms an animal requires to survive in the wild,” Baker said, adding that no viable populations had been successfully established via translocation prior to the Zoo’s involvement. The primary goals of the project are to identify the welfare problems that come with translocation, find solutions for those problems and then apply those solutions, which Baker hopes to do during the next field season. “I’m interested in the interface of conservation behavior and animal welfare,” she said. “I believe that by tending to the welfare of the individual, you can improve the welfare and survival of the whole population.” The cooperation with the Institute for Conservation Research developed out of the workshop on animal welfare and conservation organized by the Program in 2008.

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Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010


Dan Weary

David Fraser

Marina von Keyserlingk

Dan Weary Appointed Guest Professor in Sweden

Congratulations to Prof. Marina von Keyserlingk

Dan Weary, Professor, Animal Welfare, was appointed Guest Professor in the Department of Animal Environment and Health at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in the spring of 2010. Dan delivered lectures to veterinary students and SLU students in the Animal Welfare and Behavior program, as well as industry groups including veterinarians, the Swedish Board of Agriculture and AstraZeneca. He also initiated new collaborative projects on calf rearing systems, welfare of cattle on pasture, euthanasia, and public attitudes to animal use.

Marina (Nina) von Keyserlingk was promoted to full professor in 2010. Nina joined the Animal Welfare program in 2002 after working for several years as a research scientist in the animal feed industry. In 2008, she was appointed NSERC Industrial Research Chair. She is internationally recognized for her research on care and housing for dairy cows and calves and the impact of her research can be seen on farms around the world. Prof. von Keyserlingk’s studies have focused on the under-researched areas including behavior, housing and management and how these contribute to animal health and welfare of dairy cattle.

David Fraser Appointed to New National Council Prof. David Fraser has been appointed as one of the inaugural members of Canada’s new ‘National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council’, formed in 2010 to advise the federal and provincial governments and other bodies on measures to protect farm animal health and welfare across the country. The Council includes six senior officials from federal and provincial governments and seven non-government members drawn mostly from the animal industries. Prof. Fraser is the only academic. He has long been a critic of what he has called ‘the patchwork approach of federal, provincial and local programs’ currently in place to protect animal health and welfare across the country. Prof. Fraser sees the new Council as the first body with the potential to create a more consistent national approach.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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AQUACULTURE

Erika Eliason

Giving Salmon a Workout Reaps Prestigious Accolades Erika Eliason first met Professor Tony Farrell at Simon Fraser University in 2003 when she was an undergraduate student. She worked on her Masters degree under his guidance and in 2004, when Prof. Farrell joined UBC, Eliason followed. “Prof. Farrell is very supportive and his priority is always his students,” she said. “With his encouragement, I’ve had the opportunity to conduct research in Norway and England, to attend conferences and make new contacts. He’s really given me the tools to succeed.” Those tools come in handy as Eliason works on her PhD research, the impact of global warming on sockeye salmon migration. “Fraser River has increased by two degrees in temperature over the past 50 years and a lot of fish are dying en route to the spawning ground,” she said. As part of her thesis, she is comparing the athleticism of populations of sockeye salmon. “There are more than 100 genetically distinct populations in the Fraser Valley watershed,” she said. “We hypothesize that each sockeye population has adapted through natural selection to meet their unique environmental challenges of upstream migration for a once-ina-lifetime spawning event.” Eliason is also studying the mechanism of cardiorespiratory collapse at high temperature in salmon. She tests the fish with two massive swim tunnels at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans field station in Cultus Lake, BC. “We intercept migrating adult salmon as they start going up river and bring them to these swim tunnels, which are aquatic treadmills for fish. The swim tunnel encourages them to swim faster, so we can measure their heart rate, cardiac output and oxygen consumption when they are swimming flat out.”

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Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

A PhD student, Eliason has won many awards, including the Best Student Oral Presentation for Research (International Congress on the Biology of Fish, 2010) , the Hoar Award for Research (Best Student Presentation, Canadian Society of Zoologists Annual General Meeting, 2010) and a UBC Four Year Fellowship for PhD Students (2009).

Beaverton Medal Professor Tony Farrell received the Beaverton Medal from the Fisheries Society of the British Isles in July 2010. The Beaverton medal is awarded to a distinguished scientist for a lifelong contribution to all aspects of study of fish biology and/or fisheries science, with a focus on ground-breaking research.


AVIAN RESEARCH CENTRE

June Kim

Masoumeh Bejaei

Fat Is Beautiful

All Eggs Created Equal?

“My research is bucking the trend,” said Dr. June Kim, Research Associate, Avian Research Centre. “While most people are looking for a way to reduce fat, I’m trying to find out how to increase fat deposition.”

Masoumeh Bejaei can tell a lot about you from the type of egg you prefer. Like, for instance, your level of education or the size of your household. “There is a relationship between the characteristics of consumers and the kind of table egg they select,” said Bejaei, an Animal Science PhD student.

Working with Dr. Kim Cheng, Director of the Avian Research Centre, June is conducting research to see what gene action is affecting the metabolism and deposition of fat in emu. Emus are raised for their fat, which is used to make oils for a variety of different products, including skin cream, lip balm and cosmetics. Researchers at the Avian Research Centre recently found that emu oil has good antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and also contains factors that facilitate cell growth. “Once we discover what genes are involved, we can develop genetic markers to help detect which emus can produce more fat and use them for breeding,” she said. “The trick is to increase the amount of fat without altering the fatty acids profile and other ingredients that make the oil’s efficacy.” Four times a year, June travels to Saskatchewan to the biggest emu farm in Canada to collect samples of fat tissue from the back of the birds.

Originally from Tabriz, Iran, Bejaei has two Masters degrees: MSc, Poultry Nutrition, University of Tehran (2004) and an MSc, Animal Science, University of British Columbia (2009). Combining her knowledge of science, social science and market research, her research project focused on identifying preferences, attitudes and demographic characteristics of BC egg consumers. “Consumers with higher education and higher income are more interested in organic eggs or cage-free eggs. Price is less important to them than environmental or animal welfare issues,” she said. “Those with bigger households, lower income or lower education, however, are more concerned with price and tend to purchase regular eggs.” Bejaei sent an online survey to 1027 randomly selected people across the province. More than 700 people, all BC residents over 19 years of age, completed the survey, a response rate of 68%.

“Certain gene expressions are turned on and off depending on the time of year, so it’s really important that we collect samples before, during, and after the birds put on fat,” she added.

The project, which was funded by the UBC Specialty Birds Research Committee, also demonstrated that the proportion of BC consumers purchasing these specialty eggs is much higher than previously reported.

Originally from South Korea, June completed her PhD in Animal Science at UBC in 2007. After a post-doc fellowship at Utah State University, she returned to the Avian Research Centre in 2010 to work on this project, which is funded by the BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands via the UBC Specialty Birds Research Committee.

“Up until a few years ago, there were only two types of eggs on the market: brown and white. The market was transformed by the introduction of specialty eggs,” she added. “This research data could be used to help plan the future of production proportion of different types of eggs in BC.” In July 2010, Bejaei won a Certificate of Excellence at the Poultry Science Association Annual General Meeting in Denver. Her results will be published in the Poultry Science Journal in 2011.

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UBC DAIRY EDUCATION AND RESEARCH CENTRE Focus on Community and Education The UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre values community outreach and education. In 2010, more than 1,500 people from around the world visited the Dairy Centre to learn about the origin of dairy foods, good animal husbandry practices and the Canadian dairy industry. The Dairy Centre also hosted a number of educational programs throughout the past year, including the new BC Milk Producers Association’s Dairy Innovation Day and its new Dairy Production Technician Apprenticeship Program. Education is a major focus for the Dairy Centre. University research degree programs typically require two to five years of dedicated study and research. During this time, students are left with inadequate time to earn a living. Thankfully, our donors have made it possible for students to concentrate on their studies. Last year, two new scholarships, both valued at $2,000, were developed to help graduate students cover their living costs while studying at the Centre - the Pacific Dairy Centre Scholarship and the John and Mary Young Memorial Scholarship. Viterra Feed Products also made a very significant contribution to graduate student education by providing two $20,000 annual fellowships that fully support the livings costs of two students. The Dairy Centre recently completed construction of a state-of-the-art laboratory building which also provides students with office space and a conference room often used by the dairy industry. These facilities help us communicate our important research in animal welfare, nutrient recovery and animal reproduction to the general public and the dairy industry. During the past year, our scientists have worked with dairy producers across North America to perform on-farm assessments of lameness in dairy cattle and to explore means of reducing it. Building on this success, a new project is underway on improving calf care on farms in BC and Alberta. We wish to thank the large number of producers who provided access to their farms and who enthusiastically worked with our students.

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Ronaldo Cerri

Ronaldo Cerri, Assistant Professor, Animal Reproduction Brazilian-born Ronaldo Cerri joined our Faculty in September 2010 in the newly created role of Assistant Professor in Animal Reproduction. Cerri finished his post-doctoral research at the University of Florida and prior to that, he completed his MSc and PhD at the University of California, Davis. His original plan, when he was in veterinary school at San Paulo State University in Brazil, was to work with small animals but he soon changed his focus to dairy cows. “I fell in love with them,” said Cerri, adding that the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre was the main reason he was drawn to our Faculty. “The combination of talented researchers, outstanding infrastructure at the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre, and a robust local dairy industry offers a unique environment to conduct research in animal reproduction,” said Cerri, adding that creating a strong research program with links to industry and providing excellence in teaching are his main goals for this position. Cerri’s research involves solving infertility problems in dairy cows. “We push cows to produce a lot of milk, which affects their metabolism, and as a result reproduction has suffered,” he said. “I’m interested in how nutrition, animal health, animal behavior and animal welfare affect their reproduction.” During the next year, Cerri will be spending a lot of time in Agassiz at the Dairy Education and Research Centre, where his main lab is located. He will begin teaching courses in animal physiology and reproduction in the Fall of 2011.


BIOMETEOROLOGY AND SOIL SCIENCE

Sandra Brown

Down to Earth

UBC Killam Award

“I look at soil and water and how it affects – and how it’s affected by – the way we use and manage land,” said Brown, sessional lecturer and research associate in our Soil Sciences program.

Associate Professor Art Bomke was recently honoured with the Killam Teaching Award for 09/10. The Award is given annually in recognition of excellence in teaching and recipients are nominated by students, colleagues and alumni.

Brown works in land and water resource management in mountain regions within Canada and internationally. From 2002 to 2008, she worked in Cali, Colombia on a joint research project between UBC and the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture. She joined LFS in 2008 and continues to focus on South American-based research projects, including an eight-year integrated watershed management project in Nicaragua with the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the goal of which is to build local capacity and provide tools for better watershed management.

Bomke also received the Killam in 1999. The fact that he’s been recognized with another Killam speaks to his success as an educator and the impact he’s made at UBC and in our Faculty. Five other members of the Soil Science group have also received the UBC Killam Teaching Prize in the past, including Tim Ballard (’91), Les Lavkulich (’96), Maja Krzic (’06), Suzanne Simard (’06) and Andy Black, who was given the special Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring in 2006, only one of which is given out each year.

“We’re helping rural Nicaraguan communities identify their priority issues and developing plans from farm scale to watershed and working with farmer organizations to improve land management and protect water supplies,” she added. In 2011, Brown will begin working with Colombian partners on a three-year project focusing on the role of water governance in adaptation to climate change (funded by IDRC). She will work with the team on the generation and use of information at the local scale to support management. “Communities in the Andes Mountains typically have very limited water storage and depend on ecosystems for their water supply, making them vulnerable to shortages,” she said. “A municipality can try to make management decisions to address water quality and supply problems but science is needed to support those decisions, to see if existing practices really work, and to develop alternative strategies.” Brown was recently awarded a University Sustainability Initiative Teaching and Learning grant that will allow her to incorporate more sustainability issues into her courses.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS AT UBC FARM Sowing the Seeds for the Future

Bringing Flavour Back to the Tomato

For the past three seasons, The Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm has offered aspiring growers, educators and agricultural professionals the opportunity to further their education through a practicum in sustainable agriculture.

To many consumers, the tomato has become an indicator of food system health. Or – in the minds of foodies everywhere – the embodiment of a food system that’s lost its flavour. Indeed, this high-value crop is in great demand and tastes best when grown close to where it’s consumed. However, use of conventional fertilizers is thought to have robbed the tomato of its true taste.

The Sowing Seeds for the Future program is a part-time, eight month practicum that offers instruction and daily work experience in smallscale sustainable farm management. In a balanced, hands-on learning approach, students work alongside staff in the greenhouse, gardens, fields, and orchard, and attend lectures, demonstrations, and visits to other local farms. They also participate in a variety of practical and reflective educational activities. “This program offers students the opportunity to develop skills through daily and seasonal activities like planning, production, crop care, harvesting and marketing,” said Mark Bomford, the Centre’s Director. The program runs from March until November. During the growing season, the students spend between 7-21 hours a week on the 24 hectare UBC Farm, gaining experience in the production and direct marketing of a wide range of horticultural crops and animal enterprises in a mixed farm setting. Brittany Buchanan, an undergraduate in Applied Biology and one of ten students enrolled in the 2010 program, blogged about her experience as part of her directed-studies learning objective. “Being a farmer is hard work,” she said. “It’s a job that demands a huge breadth of skills and knowledge. I wanted to learn more about the inter-workings of an organic farm system, and this program seemed like a good fit for me.”

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Plant Science graduate student Greg Rekken and Dr. Andrew Riseman, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, have taken their quest for the perfect tasting local tomato to the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm, where they have embedded their research into the Farm’s existing production system. With the goal of developing a sustainable organic nutrient management system for tomato hoop house production, a range of local and farm-derived fertilizers were assessed. Alternative fertilizers included a green manure (i.e., hairy vetch), composted poultry manure, and a kelp-based liquid fertilizer. Preliminary results indicate these sustainable fertilizers produced high-quality tomatoes in sufficient quantities to be economically viable. Additional analyses on fruit traits will include sugar and protein content as well as total soluble solids. Through this research, Rekken and Dr. Riseman hope to inform farmers about the options available regarding alternative fertilizers that can improve their production systems and farm-wide sustainability while keeping costs down. Additionally, this project demonstrates how research and production goals can be synergistic, enabling farmers and researchers to quantify ways of improving their farming practices without a loss in production.


Andrew Riseman and Greg Rekken

Natalie Yuen and Dr.Temple Grandin

The Belted Galloway Cattle Project UBC Farm welcomed some special visitors this past Spring. Two Belted Galloway cattle arrived in mid-April, thanks to a directed-studies project by UBC Farm Administrative Coordinator and Agroecology undergrad, Natalie Yuen. The project involved designing and implementing a rotational grazing management system at the UBC Farm.

Yuen is now a Master’s student in the Integrated Studies in Land and Food Systems program and will mimic the Belted Galloway Project on a larger scale in 2011 by integrating cattle into the UBC Farm’s annual crop rotation.

“This project is a good marriage between my interests in animal welfare and agroecology,” says Yuen. The cattle were borrowed from Harold Steves, a former school teacher and local politician who owns a family-farm in Richmond. Belted Galloways are a rare breed of beef cattle that originated in Scotland. Black with a white band around their middle, they have a long, hairy coat and weigh an average of about 1,800 lbs. For Yuen, an enormous personal highlight of the project was the opportunity to meet world-renowned animal scientist Dr. Temple Grandin. Yuen studied Dr. Grandin’s work while doing research and subsequently became a huge fan. Born autistic, Dr. Grandin is a successful livestock-handling equipment designer and Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University. She was recently named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World for her work to improve the lives of beef cattle and was also the subject of the 2010 HBO biopic Temple Grandin. On June 19, 2010, Dr. Grandin was in Vancouver to give a sold-out SPCAsponsored lecture based on her book “Animals Make us Human,” and Yuen arranged for her to visit the Farm to see her project. “Having Dr. Grandin visit the Farm meant everything to me. She’s done so much for the well being of all animals, especially cattle,” says Yuen. “Meeting your hero is something that few people ever get to experience, so I feel very lucky.”

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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UBC BOTANICAL GARDEN AND CENTRE FOR PLANT RESEARCH

Rosaline Sturdy Amphitheatre

Centre for Plant Research

Roseline Sturdy Amphitheatre Opens

The Centre for Plant Research maintains an active presence in the Canadensys Project, a Canadian multi-institution biological collections database project. The UBC component is led by Dr. Sean Graham with research in the Garden led by Beryl Zhuang. Daniel Mosquin, Research Manager, has led the creation of the Garden’s database, a key output of the Canadensys Project, while Eric La Fountaine, Collections Technician and Zhuang have led the review of the Garden’s collections with support from Douglas Justice, the Garden’s Associate Director and Curator of Collections.

On June 19, 2010, friends and family of the late Roseline Sturdy gathered at the UBC Botanical Garden’s beautiful new amphitheatre named in her memory.

With the support of a donor, the Garden and Centre have funded a Physic Garden Research Assistantship to document species in the Garden collections with known medicinal uses, contribute DNA barcodes to the International Barcode of Life, and complete the collection of herbarium vouchers for known medicinal species within the Garden for deposit in the UBC Herbarium. At the time of printing, this assistantship has yet to be taken up.

UBC Botanical Garden Collection Recognized by Botanic Gardens Conservation International Of the 200 or so taxa of maples (Acer spp.) and close relatives known worldwide, over 10% (26) are considered endangered or critically endangered. In a recent assessment by Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), the collection of maples curated by the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research was ranked #2 in conservation importance worldwide in public gardens, second only to the collection at Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum.

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A long-time supporter of the Garden, Roseline Sturdy passed away in 2008. Her husband, Morgan, generously donated a large portion of the funds needed to build the amphitheatre. Located in the northeast corner of the Garden, the Roseline Sturdy Amphitheatre provides an intimate, unique environment for lectures, plays, musical performances, and wedding ceremonies. The theatre consists of a performance area surrounded by a curving, rammed-earth wall, and rising tiers of polished concrete that can seat up to 250 people. It also features a stunning stainless steel water feature created by internationally recognized artist William Pye. At the June event, three actors from the Fredrick Wood Theatre performed an excerpt from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night to demonstrate the theatre’s acoustics. “This amphitheatre is the first of its kind in Vancouver,” said Patrick Lewis, Director of the UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research. “We’re very excited to be able to provide a facility that will contribute to the city’s cultural scene.” While the amphitheatre is now open, it’s still in need of donor support for finishing touches, such as lighting for the pathways, improving wheelchair access and building washrooms.


Andrew Hill

Chanticleer Scholarship Andrew Hill, Curator of the David C. Lam Asian Garden at UBC Botanical Garden, was awarded the Chanticleer Scholarship in Professional Development in 2010. The Chanticleer Scholarship offers public garden professionals financial support for academic training to improve their leadership skills. Hill will use the Scholarship for an international garden research tour in the spring of 2011. The garden tour will focus on Scotland, where the climate and collections are similar to that of Vancouver. The opportunity to visit the Scottish gardens will further Andy’s study of plant collections and best management practices of successful institutions and professionals. This endeavour will also improve the botanical collection, the professional international connections of UBC Botanical Garden and Andrew’s own leadership skills.

Quentin Cronk

Prof. Quentin Cronk Receives Harvard Honour Harvard University recognized Professor Quentin Cronk—former Garden director and current member of the Centre for Plant Research—with the Charles Bullard Fellowship for research excellence in woody plant biology. The Charles Bullard fellowship program supports advanced research and study by individuals who show promise of making an important contribution, either as scholars or administrators, to forestry and forest-related subjects.

Japanese Partners The Botanical Garden and Makino Botanical Garden in Kochi Prefecture in Japan have initiated a project to collect and research plants in the Pacific Northwest. The Garden has hosted two visits by researchers from Makino in the past year and expects to develop a formal agreement between the two gardens in 2011. The Garden has reached out to Chiba University to renew a oncestrong relationship between the Nitobe Memorial Garden and the Japanese university. Chiba was the home institution of Kannosuke Mori, the designer of the Nitobe Garden. It is also the home institution of the Nitobe Garden’s current head gardener, Ryo Sugiyama.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

Sung-Kyu Kim

Sumeet Gulati

Making a Difference in Africa

Resource Economics

How far can a Masters degree in Food and Resource Economics take you? If you’re Sung-Kyu Kim, all the way to Africa.

The Food and Resource Economics (FRE) group uses rigorous tools of economic analysis to examine applied problems in the general area of food markets, and the economics of renewable resources and the environment.

Kim was one of 19 students enrolled in the Faculty’s inaugural Master of Food and Resource Economics (MFRE) program in 2009. “The MFRE program was very much aligned with my interests of food security and international development,” he said. “I was impressed with the professors, their expertise and experience, and I really enjoyed the small group feeling.” As part of the program, students are required to complete a graduating project such as a work placement or internship that meets their learning objectives for their future careers. Kim spent five months in Rwanda as part of an international nutrition project led by LFS Adjunct Professor Judy McLean, helping to conduct a baseline assessment of food security and nutrition in the Ngoma District. “The experience really opened my eyes,” said Kim. “Being from a western country, I thought I could do better, that I would show them things, but they taught me a lot.” While in Rwanda, Kim applied for a research intern position with the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) in Ottawa. He won the competition, open to graduate students all across Canada, and will begin with IDRC in January 2011. The year-long contract will allow Kim to continue his research, which proposes simple and practical strategies and interventions to improve the livelihood of subsistence farming communities by tackling food insecurity, maternal and child nutrition, and sustainable economic development. “I’ll also be working with the IDRC’s agriculture and food security division, so I’ll be learning about research on a program level as well,” he added. Kim received his MFRE degree at UBC’s Fall Convocation in November 2010.

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“Resource economics studies how we, as a society, use natural resources like clean air, minerals, fish and forests,” said Sumeet Gulati, Assistant Professor. “Environmental economics helps us understand the costs and benefits of using the environment.” Gulati’s research is centred on the cost-effectiveness and formation of environmental policy. He focuses on carbon taxes or subsidies for buying energy efficient appliances or vehicles. Gulati has studied such initiatives in the U.S., Canada and Japan and recently co-authored a study that analyzes the cost effectiveness of a B.C. government program that provides rebates to purchasers of hybrid cars. His work highlights the importance of measuring the price of our actions on the environment. “We may not be in a crisis of the environment at the moment, but we’re definitely at a critical point,” he said.


FOOD SCIENCE Boiled Salad Anyone? Consumers who like their veggies raw may find themselves in the position of “making faith-based purchases when it comes to produce,” says Kevin Allen, a UBC food safety expert who studies E. coli and other pathogens. In May, several U.S. states issued massive recalls for romaine lettuce contaminated by E. coli. Days later, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency also issued a recall of romaine lettuce. Currently, government and beef and produce industries have procedures in place to monitor and test for E. coli O157:H7 bacterium. However, there are not yet any detection methods available to show a strain such as E. coli O145 which was associated with the romaine outbreak in May. While it is important that consumers continue to include fresh fruit and vegetables in their diet, notes Allen, they also need to understand that our produce is not risk free. “Certain commodities such as alfalfa sprouts and certain leafy greens are frequently associated with foodborne disease.” An important facet of Allen’s work is looking at how and why E. coli is so successful at finding its way into, and surviving in, our food chain. Prior to joining LFS in January as an assistant professor in the Food, Nutrition and Health program, Allen worked within industry, researching a vaccine to minimize E. coli O157 prevalence in cattle. He continues this task at UBC. Allen is also comparing various strains of E. coli O157 to devise better food safety policies and intervention strategies. This fall, he will collect physiological data on how different stressors such as heat or chemicals affect the bacteria. “What we’re going to do is look at stress response and virulence gene expression and compare three lineages to see if there are differences explaining why these lineages are linked differentially to human disease.”

Kevin Allen

Roasting Coffee Beans a Dark Brown Produces Valued Antioxidants Two LFS food scientists have pinpointed more of the complex chemistry behind coffee’s antioxidant benefits, tracing valuable compounds to the roasting process. The study, led by MSc student Yazheng Liu and Prof. David Kitts, found that the prevailing antioxidants present in dark roasted coffee brew extracts result from the green beans being browned under high temperatures. Liu and Kitts analyzed the complex mixture of chemical compounds produced during the bean’s browning process, called the “Maillard reaction.” The term refers to the work by French chemist LouisCamille Maillard who in the 1900s looked at how heat affects the carbohydrates, sugars and proteins in food, such as when grilling steaks or toasting bread. Antioxidants aid in removing free radicals, the end products of metabolism which have been linked to the aging process. “Previous studies suggested that antioxidants in coffee could be traced to caffeine or the chlorogenic acid found in green coffee beans, but our results clearly show that the Maillard reaction is the main source of antioxidants,” said Liu. “We found, for example, that coffee beans lose 90 per cent of their chlorogenic acid during the roasting process,” said Kitts, LFS food science professor and director of the Food, Nutrition and Health program. The study sheds light on an area of research that has yielded largely inconsistent findings. While some scientists report increased antioxidant activity in coffee made from dark roasted beans, others found a decrease. Yet other theories insist that medium roast coffees yield the highest level of antioxidant activity. “We have yet to fully decipher all the complex compounds in roasted coffee beans. We only know the tip of the iceberg,” said Kitts, who has been studying Maillard reaction chemicals over the past 25 years. The study received support from the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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HUMAN NUTRITION

Jennifer Black

Vancouver Enjoys Lowest Obesity Rates Could living in certain geographic areas impact your risk of obesity? That appears to be the case according to UBC nutrition researcher Jennifer Black who found higher obesity rates in Canada’s eastern provinces, rural areas and northern Aboriginal communities than in Western Canada. “It’s not randomly distributed,” says Asst. Prof. Black, who discovered the east-to-west gradient upon reviewing 24 studies about the distribution of food and obesity in Canada conducted since 1997. Black’s findings show that women in Vancouver have the lowest obesity rates in the nation. For men, the lowest obesity rates are in Richmond. Her next step is to look at the larger contextual issues for obesity rates such as family income, the availability of healthy and affordable food and opportunities to be physically active. A registered dietitian, Black specializes in social determinants of health and dietary choice. “I’m interested in how attitudes and behaviors related to eating, cooking, food selection, and body weight shape nutrition and health.” Previously a post-doctoral fellow in UBC’s Dept. of Sociology, Black joined the Faculty’s Food, Nutrition and Health program in January. With LFS Nutrition Prof. Susan Barr, Black is also developing UBC research know-how and infrastructure to tackle data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), the first set of comprehensive Canadian nutrition data generated in more than 35 years. Released in 2004, the CCHS surveyed upwards of 35,000 respondents from across the country on their dietary intake, vitamin and mineral supplement use, health risks and behaviors.

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Tim Green

Extra Vitamin D for Pregnant and Breast-feeding Women Blame it on Canada’s watery winter sun, but women who are pregnant or breast feeding need to take vitamin D supplements, according to human nutrition researcher Tim Green. “Our preliminary data shows that Vitamin D levels in the mother’s blood are fairly low,” says Green, an associate professor in the Faculty’s Food, Nutrition and Health program and lead investigator of the study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. He explains that vitamin D is vital for bone health. Without it, babies can develop rickets, a condition when bones are too soft and do not form properly. Green’s research partners include the BC Women’s Hospital and Health Centre and the departments of pediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology at UBC’s Faculty of Medicine “Although we get a small amount of vitamin D from food, our bodies create it as it absorbs sunlight,” says Green. “And during the Canadian winter, especially in Vancouver, there isn’t enough sun for this to happen.” Green is exploring how much vitamin D pregnant and breast feeding women are currently getting and how much they should take as supplements to ensure health for themselves and their babies. The study makes use of donated supplements created by Natural Factors. With more than 200 pregnant women as study participants, the research team is measuring the effect of vitamin D supplements on the growth of the baby and on the bone health of mother and baby. As well, the study investigates the possible effect of skin colour on vitamin D levels. Skin with darker pigments, either naturally or from a tan, tend to absorb less light, and therefore affects the amount of vitamin D the body produces. Researchers will measure how much light is reflected by a person’s skin using a device called a colorimeter.


International Nutrition Students

Lessons from Rwanda Six of our International Nutrition students put their knowledge into practice as part of a nutrition project in Rwanda this past spring. Led by Judy McLean, Adjunct Professor, Food, Nutrition & Health, the students spent between six weeks and three months in Rwanda, working in partnership with local students to conduct a household survey on the causes of malnutrition.

Gurjeet Kaur agrees. “The practical experience of being out in the field is very important,” she says. “You gain a different perspective when you are actually out there interacting with people.” Kaur is heading back to Rwanda in September to take part in the second stage of the project, which includes collecting more qualitative data via key informant interviews, focus groups and discussions.

“In rural Rwanda, one in five kids die before age five,” says McLean. “The diet, based on bananas and cassava, is partly responsible for the high rate of malnutrition, but poor infant and child feeding practices and lack of clean water are more to blame. Diversifying crops is difficult due to inadequate rainfall and lack of arable land.” The students surveyed more than 400 households in 40 villages. The information collected will inform a nutrition intervention proposal. “You can study food security and nutrition, but it’s completely different to experience it,” says Roberta Wozniak, a recent Nutritional Science graduate who saw first-hand the challenges the country is facing. Outside a nearby orphanage, Wozniak met Pascasie, a 22 year old, HIV positive, genocide orphan, and her 7-month-old son Chelsea. She measured the boy’s mid upper arm circumference; it was the diameter of a loonie, indicating severe malnourishment. Although her son needed to be hospitalized, Pascasie didn’t have the $2 fee and so the hospital didn’t want to admit him. Thanks to the students’ intervention, however, the doctor eventually relented and treated the child. “Navigating through the system, getting Chelsea treated and tested for HIV- there’s no way I can teach the reality of that in the classroom,” McLean adds.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

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WINE RESEARCH CENTRE

Steven Lund

The Gene in the Bottle

Viticulture Research

By Susan Nerberg Article originally appeared in enRoute Magazine November 2010

Making the best wines starts with growing the best grapes. To advance both processes, the WRC is exploring grapevine biology at the molecular and biochemical levels.

Dr. Hennie van Vuuren, Director of the Wine Research Centre, was featured in enRoute, Canada’s inflight magazine: “I adore wine,” says van Vuuren as we stroll through the Wine Research Centre’s temperature- and humidity-controlled Wine Library and Vinotheque, which has space for up to 30,000 bottles in its floor-toceiling redwood racks. “But I react to the histamines in reds and some whites, so I had to do something.” The vinophile prof set out to create a yeast that would magically transmute all, not just some, of the offending acid; in the process, he beat out other scientists who’d been scratching their heads for three decades trying to solve the same riddle. Van Vuuren’s team took two genes from organisms already used in winemaking and added them to the DNA of a commercial yeast. The new, patented yeast – ML01, the world’s first genetically engineered yeast that’s available for sale – ferments the must and converts the malic acid in one fell swoop, for a better-tasting, headache-free wine. To read the entire article, please visit: http://enroute.aircanada.com/en/articles/the-gene-in-the-bottle

All viticulturists grapple with the fact that fruit quality can vary from one season to the next – even in the same vineyard block – leading to inconsistent vintages. But what if science can access the plant’s “black box,” looking at how the vine and berry respond to changing viticulture practices and environmental conditions at the molecular level along each season? By unlocking this box through genomics research, viticulturists could then be provided with new tools – molecular “biomarkers” – that would enable the capture of periodic snapshots of vine health and berry quality parameters. Canadian growers could potentially increase the net farmgate values for their fruit through fine tuning of management practices in concert with weather forecasts along each season. As well, Canadian winemakers could produce higher quality vintages in the styles that the individual winemakers desire. A portable, hand-held biomarker tool could prove most efficient for on-site vine monitoring in the vineyard rather than requiring growers to ship samples to an off-site laboratory. As an immediate goal, the WRC is looking at developing a biomarker tool that can easily show when a plant is water stressed, and perhaps include pathogen detection. Both situations cause high levels of protein biomarkers from plant or pathogen and thus are relatively easy to detect. The longer term goal is to develop biomarkers indicative of the berries’ ripening state for assessing and forecasting berry quality parameters in the vineyard along each session. While based in genomic sciences, biomarker technology does not involve genetic modification of grapevines and is fully compatible with organic viticulture practices. Steven Lund, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Viticulture/Plant Omics at the UBC Wine Research Centre and is an associate faculty member of the UBC Michael Smith Laboratories and the UBC Dept. of Botany.

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PUBLICATIONS Kevin Allen Allen, K, Dion Lepp, Robin McKellar and Mansel Griffiths. 2010. Targeted microarray analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 subjected to nutrient deprivation. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 109(6):2118-2127.

and Biology, Volume 1. Editor, Leon V. Berhardt. ISBM 978-1-60876-8639. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. Hauppauge, NY, 2010. (in press).

Darin Bennett

Susan Barr

Bennett, D.C., Cheng, K.M. 2010. Selenium enrichment of table eggs. Poultry Science, 89:2166-2172.

Bedford J.L., Linden, W., Barr, S.I. 2010. Negative eating and body attitudes are associated with increased daytime ambulatory blood pressure in healthy young women. International Journal of Psychophysiology (in press).

Bennett, D.C., Cheng KM. 2010. Nutritional requirements of Japanese Quail. Fourth International Symposium and Third Brazilian Congress on Quail Production, 173:186.

Hammond, G., Chapman, G.E., Barr, S.I. 2010. “Balance” or “hoping for the best”: Women in midlife, food choice systems, and bone health. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. doi:10.1111/j.1365-277X.2010.01125.x

Andy Black

Bedford, J.L., Prior, J.C., Barr, S.I. 2010. A prospective exploration of cognitive dietary restraint, subclinical ovulatory disturbances, cortisol and change in bone density over two years in healthy young women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 95:3291-9. Green, T.J., Barr, S.I., Chapman, G.E. 2010. The majority of older British Columbians use supplements containing vitamin D. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 101:246-250. Langsetmo, L., Poliquin, S., Hanley, D.A., Prior, J.C., Barr, S.I., Anastassiades, T., Towheed, T., Goltzman, D., Kreiger, N. 2010. Dietary patterns in Canadian men and women ages 25 and older: relationship to demographics, body mass index, and bone mineral density. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 11:20. Bedford, JL, Barr, S.I. 2010. The relationship between 24-hr urinary cortisol and bone in healthy young women. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 17:207-215. DOI 10.1007/s12529-009-9064-2. Barr, S.I. 2010. Reducing dietary sodium intake. The Canadian context. Journal of Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 35:1-8. Bedford, J.L, Barr, S.I. Intake of calcium and other nutrients and peak bone mass. In: Anderson JJB, ed. Calcium and phosphorus in health and disease. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2010 (in press). Vaghri, Z, Wong, H, Barr, S.I, Chapman, G.E, Hertzman, C. Population patterns of hair zinc; associations of socio-demographic and behavioral variables with hair zinc of Vancouver preschoolers. In: Advances in Medicine

Richardson, A.D., Black, T.A., Ciais, P., Delbart, N., Friedl, M.A., Gobron, N., Hollinger, D.Y., Kutsch, W.L., Longdoz, B., Luyssaert, S., Migliavacca, M., Montagnani, L., Munger, W., Moors, E., Piao, S., Rebmann, C., Reichstein, M., Saigusa, N., Tomelleri, E., Vargas, R., and Varlagin, A. 2010. Influence of spring and autumn phenological transitions on forest ecosystem productivity. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B2010, 365: 3227-3246 doi: 10. 1098/rstb.2010.0102. Chen, B., Coops, N.C., Fu, D., Margolis, H.A., Amiro, B.D., Barr, A.G., Black, T.A., Arain, M.A., Bourque, C. P.-A., Flanagan, L.B., Lafleur, P.M., McCaughey, J.H., Wofsy, S.C. 2010. Assessing eddy-covariance flux tower location bias across the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network based on remote sensing and footprint modeling. Agriculture and Forest Meteorology, 150: 87-100 Kidston, J., Brümmer, C., Black, T.A., Morgenstern, K., Nesic, Z., McCaughey, J.H., Barr, A.G. 2010. Energy balance closure using eddy covariance above two different land surfaces and implications for CO2 flux measurements. Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 136:193–218. Jassal, R.S., Black, T.A., Trofymow, A.J., Roy, R., Nesic, Z., 2010. Forestfloor CO2 and N2O flux dynamics in a nitrogen-fertilized Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir stand. Geoderma, 157: 118-125. Chen, B., Coops, N.C., Black, T.A., Jassal, R.S., Chen, J.M., Johnson, M., 2010. Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forest in the first-post fertilization year. Global Change Biology, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02298.x. Grant, R.F., Jassal, R.S., Black, T.A. 2010. Changes in net CO2 and N2O exchange with fertilization of Douglas fir: mathematical modelling in ecosys. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, doi:10.1029/2009JG001094.

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Jassal, R.S., Black, T.A., Cai, T., Ethier, G., Brümmer, C., Nesic, Z., 2010. Impact of nitrogen fertilization on carbon and water balances in a chronosequence of three Douglas-fir stands in the Pacific Northwest. Agriculture and Forest Meteorology, doi:10.1016 /j.agrformet.2009.10.005. Hember, R.A., Coops, N.C., Black, T.A., Guy, R.D. 2010. Simulating gross primary production across a chronosequence of coastal Douglas-fir forest stands with a production efficiency model. Agric. For. Meteorol. 150: 238–253. Hilker, T., Hall, F.G., Coops, N.C., Lyapustin, A., Wang, Y., Nesic, Z., Grant, N., Black, T.A., Wulder, M.A., Kljun, N., Hopkinson, C., Chasmer, L. 2010. Remote sensing of photosynthetic light-use efficiency across two forested biomes: Spatial scaling. Remote Sensing of Environment, 114: 2863–2874. Zha, T., Barr, A.G., Black, T.A., McCaughey, J.H., Bhatt, J., Hawthorne, I., Krishnan, P., Kidston, J., Saigusa, N., Shashkov, A., and Nesic, Z. 2009. Carbon sequestration in boreal jack pine stands following harvesting. Global Change Biology, 15: 1475–1487, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2008.01817.x. Chen, B., Black, T.A., Coops, N.C., Hilker, T., Trofymow, J.A., Morgenstern, K. 2009. Assessing tower flux footprint climatology and scaling between remotely sensed and eddy covariance measurements. Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 130: 137–167. Jassal, R.S., Black, T.A., Spittlehouse, D., Brümmer, C., Nesic, Z. 2009. Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir stands of different ages following clearcut harvesting. Agriculture and Forest Meteorology, 149: 1168-1178. Krishnan, P., Black, T.A., Jassal, R.S., Nesic, Z. 2009. Interannual variability in the carbon balance of three different-aged Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir stands. Journal of Geophysical ResearchBiogeosciences 114, G04011, doi:10.1029/2008JG000912. Chen, B., Black, T.A., Nicholas, C., Jassal, R., Brümmer, C., Nesic, Z. 2009. Seasonal controls on interannual variability in carbon dioxide exchange of a near-end-of rotation Douglas-fir stand in the Pacific Northwest. Global Change Biology, 15: 1962–1981. Cai, T., Black, T.A., Jassal, R.S., Morgenstern, K., Nesic, Z. 2009. Incorporating diffuse photosynthetically active radiation in a single-leaf model of canopy photosynthesis for a 56-year-old coastal Douglas-fir stand. International Journal of Biometeorology, DOI 10.1007/s00484-008-0196.x Gaumont-Guay, D., Black, T.A., McCaughey, H.,. Barr, A.G, Krishnan, P., Jassal, R.S. and Nesic, Z. 2009. Soil CO2 efflux in contrasting boreal deciduous and coniferous stands and its contribution to the ecosystem carbon balance. Global Change Biology, 15:1302-1319. Chasmer, L., Barr, A.G.,. Hopkinson, C., McCaughey, H., Treitz, P., Black, T. A., and Shashkov, A. 2009. Scaling and assessment of GPP from MODIS using a combination of airborne lidar and eddy covariance measurements over jack pine forests. Remote Sensing of Environment, 113: 182-93. Hilker, T., Lyapustin, A., Hall, F.G., Wang, Y., Coops, N.C., Drolet, G., Black, T.A. 2009. An assessment of photosynthetic light use efficiency from space: Modeling the atmospheric and directional impacts on PRI reflectance. Remote Sensing of Environment, 113: 2463-2475.

Jennifer Black Black, J.L. and Macinko, J. 2010. The changing distribution and determinants of obesity in the neighborhoods of New York City, 2003-2007. American Journal of Epidemiology, 171: 765-775. Black, J.L., Macinko, J., Dixon, L. B., Fryer, J. G. E. 2010. Neighborhoods and obesity in New York City. Health & Place, 16 :489-99.

Art Bomke Watson, K., Krzic, M., Bomke, A., Smith, S., Grand, S. Crowley, C., and Dyanatkar, S. 2010. Web-based learning tool on soil parent material and

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landscape development. Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference of the Canadian Society of Soil Science. Jun 21-24, 2010. Saskatoon, SK, p. 122.

Ronaldo Cerri Thompson, I.M., Cerri, R.L.A., Kim, I.H., Green, J.A., Santos, J.E.P., and Thatcher, W.W. 2010. Effects of resynchronization programs on pregnancy per artificial insemination, progesterone and pregnancy-associated glycoproteins in plasma of lactating dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93:4006-4018.

Gwen Chapman Mróz, L.W., Chapman, G.E., Oliffe, J.L., Bottorff, J.L. Men, food and prostate cancer: Gender influences on men’s diets. American Journal of Men’s Health, in press for 2011 (available online August 26, 2010). Chapman, G.E., Ristovski-Slijepcevic, S., Beagan, B.L. Meanings of food, eating, and health in Punjabi families living in Vancouver, Canada. Health Education Journal, in press for 2011 (available online July 2, 2010). Ristovski-Slijepcevic, S., Bell, K., Chapman, G.E., Beagan, B. 2010. Being ‘thick’ indicates you are eating, you are healthy and you have an attractive body shape: Fatness, food choice and body image perspectives of men and women in Canada. Health Sociology Review, 19:317-329. Mróz, L.W., Chapman, G.E., Oliffe, J.L., Bottorff, J.L. 2010. Prostate cancer, masculinity and food. Rationales for perceived diet change. Appetite, 55:398-406. Green, T.J., Barr, S.I., Chapman, G.E. 2010. The majority of older British Columbians take Vitamin D containing supplements. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 101:246-250. Mundel, E., Chapman, G.E. 2010. A decolonizing approach to health promotion: The case of the Urban Aboriginal Community Kitchen Garden Project. Health Promotion International, 25:166-173. Beagan, B.L., Chapman, G.E., Ristovski-Slijepcevic, S. 2010. “People are just becoming more conscious of how everything’s connected”: ‘Ethical’ food consumption in two regions of Canada. Sociology, 44:751-69. Ristovski-Slijepcevic, S., Chapman, G.E., Beagan, B.L. 2010. Being a ‘good mother’: Dietary governmentality in the family food practices of three ethnocultural groups in Canada. Health, 14: 467–483. Wassink, H.L., Chapman ,G.E. 2010. Promoting effective teamwork – Vancouver dietitians’ perspectives regarding their roles in long term care. Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, 71:e12-e17.

Kim Cheng Bennett, D.C .and Cheng, K.M. 2010. Selenium enrichment of table eggs. Poultry Science, 89:2166-2172 (2010). Song, Y. Cheng, K.M., Silversides, F.G. 2010. Formation of testicular structure under skin after auto-transplantation of dispersed testicular cells in the chicken. Animal Reproduction Science, 129:125-128 (2010) Liu, J., Song, Y., Cheng, K.M., Silversides, F.G. 2010. Production of donor-derived offspring from cryopreserved ovarian tissue in Japanese quail Coturnix japonica. Biology of Reproduction, 83:15-19 Chang, V., Lejeune, J., Cheng, K.M. 2010. The pattern of inheritance of melanin-based plumage color variants in the gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus). Journal of Raptor Research, 44: 224-232 Westman, A., Elliott, J.E., Cheng, K.M., VanAggelen, G., Bishop, C.A. 2010. Effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of endosulfan, azinphos-methyl and diazinon on Great Basin Spadefoot (Spea intermontana) and Pacific Treefrog (Pseudacris regilla). Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 29:1604-1612. Eadie, J.M., Smith, J.M.N., Zadworny, D., Kühnlein, U., Cheng, K.M. 2010. Probing parentage in parasitic birds: An evaluation of methods to


evaluate brood parasitism using goldeneyes Bucephala islandica and Bucephala clangula as a test case. Journal of Avian Biology, 41:1-14. Cheng, K.M, Bennett, D.C., Mills, A.D. The Japanese Quail. Chapter 42 In: UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals, 8th Edition. (R. Hurbrecht and J. Kirkwood, eds.) Blackwell Scientific Publications. London. pp. 655-673 (2010).

Quentin Cronk Dempewolf, H., Kane, N.C., Ostevik, K.L., Geleta, M., Barker, M.S., Lai, Z., Stewart, M.L., Bekele, E., Engels, J.M.M., Cronk, Q.C.B., Rieseberg, L.H. 2010. Establishing genomic tools and resources for Guizotia abyssinica(L.f.) Cass.-the development of a library of expressed sequence tags, microsatellite loci, and the sequencing of its chloroplast genome. Molecular Ecology Resources, 10: 1048-1058 Nowak, J.S., Ono, J., Cronk, Q.C.B. 2010. Anatomical study of an aquatic mustard: Subularia aquatica (Brassicaceae). Aquatic Botany, 93: 55-58

Brian Ellis Guo, J, Wang, S, Valerius, O, Hall, H, Zeng, Q, Ellis, B.E., and Chen, J-G. 2010. Involvement of Arabidopsis RACK1 in protein translation and its regulation by abscisic acid. Plant Physiology (in press). Bhargava, A., Mansfield, S. D., Hall, H. C. , Douglas, C. J. and Ellis, B. E. 2010. MYB75 functions in regulation of secondary cell wall formation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem. Plant Physiology (in press). Andreasson, E. and Ellis, B.E. 2010. Convergence and specificity in the

Arabidopsis MAPK nexus. Trends in Plant Science, 15: 106-113 Ellis, B.E., Jansson, S., Strauss, S.H., and Tuskan, G.A. 2010. Why and How Populus Became a Model Tree in ‘Populus Genetics and Genomics’ (2010) Eds. S. Jansson. R. Bhalerao. Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Anthony Farrell Donaldson, M.R., Clark, T.D. , Hinch, S.G. , Cooke, S.J., Patterson, D.A., Gale, M.K and Farrell, A.P. 2010. Physiological responses of free-swimming adult coho salmon to simulated predator and fisheries encounters. Physiol. Biochem. Zool, 83(6): 973-983. Cox, G.K., Sandblom, E., Farrell, A.P.. 2010. Cardiac responses to anoxia in the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stoutii. Journal of Experimental Biology, 213: 3692-3698. Grant, A.M., Gardner, M., Hanson, L.M., Farrell, A.P. , Brauner, C.J. 2010. Early life stage salinity tolerance of wild and hatchery-reared juvenile pink salmon (Onchorhynchus gorbuscha). Journal of Fish Biology, 77:1282-1292 Hruska, K.A., Hinch, S.G., Healey, M.C., Patterson, D.A., Larsson, S. and Farrell, A.P. 2010. Influences of sex and activity level on physiological changes in individual adult sockeye salmon during rapid senescence. Physiol. Biochem. Zool, 83(4): 663-676. Eliason, E.J., Djordjevic, B., Trattner, S., Pickova, J., Karlsson, A., Farrell, A.P., Keissling, A.K. 2010. The effect of hepatic passage on postprandial plasma lipid profile of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after a single meal. Aquaculture Nutrition, 18: 536-543. Clark, T.D., Sandblom, E., Hinch, S.G., Patterson, D.A., Frappell, P.B. , Farrell, A.P. 2010. Simultaneous biologging of heart rate and acceleration, and their relationships with energy expenditure in free-swimming sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Journal of Comparative Physiology. Biochem. B. 180: 673-684. Cooperman, M.S., Hinch, S.G., Crossin, G.T., Cooke, S.J., Patterson, D.A., Olsson, I., Lotto, A.G., Welch, D.W., Shrimpton, J.M., Van Der Kraak, G. and Farrell, A.P.. 2010. Effects of experimental manipulations of salinity and maturation status on the physiological condition and mortality of homing adult sockeye salmon held in a laboratory. Physiol. Biochem. Zool, 83: 459-472.

Donaldson, M.R., Hinch, S.G., Patterson, D.A., Farrell, A.P. , Shrimpton, J.M., Miller-Saunders, K.M., Robichaud, D., Hills, J., Hruska, K.A., Hanson, K.C., English, K.K., Van Der Kraak, G. and Cooke, S.J. 2010. Physiological condition differentially affects the behaviour and survival of two populations of sockeye salmon during their freshwater spawning migration. Physiol. Biochem. Zool. 83: 446-458. Farrell, A.P., Friesen, E.N., Higgs, D.A., Ikonomou, M.G.. 2010. Toward improved confidence in farmed fish quality: a Canadian perspective on the consequences of diet selection. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society, 41: 207-224. Farrell, A.P., Tang, S., Nomura, M., Brauner, C.J. 2010. Toward improved public confidence in farmed fish: a Canadian perspective on fish welfare during marine transport. J Journal of the World Aquaculture Society, 41: 225-239. Crossin, G.T., Hinch, S.G., Cooke, S.J., Patterson, D.A., Lotto, A.G., Van der Kraak, G. , Zohar, Y. , Klenke, U., Farrell, A.P. 2010. Testing the synergistic effects of GnRH and testosterone on the reproductive physiology of pre-adult pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha. Journal of Fish Biology, 76: 112-128. Speers-Roesch, B., Sandblom, E., Lau, G.Y., Farrell, A.P., Richards, J.G. 2010. Effects of environmental hypoxia on cardiac energy metabolism and performance in tilapia. American Journal of Physiology. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol. 298: R104-R119. Clark, T.D, Rummer, J.L., Sepulveda, C.A., Farrell, A.P., Brauner, C.J. 2010. Reduced and revised temperature dependence of blood oxygenation in an ectothermic scombrid fish: implications for the evolution of regional heterothermy? Journal of Comparative Physiology, B 180: 73-82. Mathes, M.T., Hinch, S.G., Cooke, S.J., Crossin, G.T., Patterson, D.A., Lotto, A.G., Farrell, A.P. 2010. Effect of water temperature, timing, physiological condition, and lake thermal refugia on migrating adult weaver Creek sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science, 67: 70-84. Perry, S.F., M. Ekker, A.P. Farrell and C.J. Brauner. 2010. Fish Neuroendocrinology. Fish Physiology, Vol. 29. Academic Press, San Diego. 455 pp.

David Fraser Fraser, D. (editor). 2010. Conservation and animal welfare science. Special issue of Animal Welfare, 19: 121-192. Fraser, D. 2010. Toward a synthesis of conservation and animal welfare science. Animal Welfare, 19: 121-124. Drake, A. and Fraser, D. 2010. Testing two husbandry protocols for mallard ducklings: Does running water or an older “mentor” bird improve brood weight gain and survival? Journal of Wildlife Rehabilitation, 30(2): 11-16. MacRae, A.M., Haulena, M. and Fraser, D. 2010. The effect of diet and feeding level on survival and weight gain of handraised harbor seal pups (Phoca vitulina). Zoo Biology. Sorensen, J.T. and Fraser, D. 2010. On-farm welfare assessment for regulatory purposes: Issues and possible solutions. Livestock Science, 131: 1-7. Fraser, D. 2010. Animal welfare. Pages 47-49 in M. Bekoff (editor), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare, Second Edition. Greenwood Press, Santa Barbara. Fraser, D. , Weary, D.M. and von Keyserlingk, M. A.G. 2010. Two interdisciplinary courses on the use and welfare of animals. Pages 341365 in M. Demello (editor), Teaching the Animal: Human Animal Studies Across the Disciplines. Lantern Books, Herndon, VA.

Sean Graham Saarela, J.M., and Graham, S.W. 2010. Inference of phylogenetic relationships among the subfamilies of grasses (Poaceae: Poales) using meso-scale exemplarbased sampling of the plastid genome. Botany, 88: 65-84.

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Rai, H.S., and Graham, S.W. 2010. Utility of a large, multigene plastid data set in inferring higher-order relationships in ferns and relatives (monilophytes). American Journal of Botany, 97:1444-1456. Givnish, T.J., Ames, M., McNeal, J.R., McKain, M.R., Steele, P.S., dePamphilis, C.W., Graham, S.W., Pires, J.C., Stevenson, D.W., Zomlefer, W.B., Briggs, B.G., Duvall, M.R., Moore, M.J., Heaney, J.M., Soltis, D.E., Soltis, P.S., Thiele, K. and Leebens-Mack, J.H. 2010. Assembling the tree of the monocotyledons: plastome sequence phylogeny and evolution of Poales. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 97:584-616.

Tim Green Knight, R,G,, McMahon, J, Skeaff C.M., Green T.J. 2010. Reliable change indices for the ruff 2 and 7 selective attention test in older adults. Applied Neuropsychology, 17:239-245. Shand, A., von Dadelszen, P., Innis, S.M., Green, T.J. 2010. Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes in a high-risk group. BJOG, 117:1593-8. Venn B.J., Perry, T., Green, T.J., Skeaff, C.M., Aitken, W., Moore, N.J., Mann, J.I., Wallace, A.J., Monro, J., Bradshaw, A., Brown, R.C., Skidmore, P.M., Doel, K., O’Brien, K., Frampton, C. 2010. The effect of increasing consumption of pulses and wholegrains in obese people: a randomized control trial. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29:365-72. Vatanparast, H., Calvo, M.S., Green, T.J., 2010. Whiting SJ. Despite mandatory fortification of staple foods, Vitamin D intakes of Canadian Children and Adults are inadequate. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Green, T.J., Barr, S.I., Chapman, G.E. 2010. The majority of older British Columbians take Vitamin D-containing supplements. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 101:246-50 Green, T.J., Skeaff, C.M, Rockell, J.E. 2010. Milk fortified with the current adequate intake for vitamin D (5 ug) increases serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D compared to control milk but is not sufficient to prevent a seasonal decline in young women. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 19:195-9. Green, T.J., Skeaff, C.M, McMahon J.A., Venn, B.J., Williams, S.M., Devlin, A.M., Innis, S.M. 2010. Homocysteine lowering vitamins do not lower plasma s-adenosylhomocysteine in older people with elevated homocysteine concentrations. British Journal of Nutrition, 103:1629-34. Heere, C., Skeaff, C.M., Waqatakirewa, L., Vatucawaqa, P., Khan, A.N., Green, T.J. 2010. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration of Indigenous-Fijian and Fijian-Indian women. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 19:43-8. Devlin, A.M., Singh, R., Bottiglieri, T., Innis, S.M., Green, T.J.. 2010. Decreased hepatic acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-2 expression in mice with hyperhomocysteinemia. Journal of Nutrition, 140:231-7. Bradbury, K.E., Skeaff, C.M., Green, T.J., Gray, A.R., Crowe, F.L. 2010. The serum fatty acids myristic acid and linoleic acid are better predictors of serum cholesterol concentrations when measured as molecular percentages rather than as absolute concentrations. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91:398-405. Ning, B., Brown, R.C., Venn, B.J., Williams, S.M., Green, T.J. 2010. The effect on GI of the fat and carbohydrate content of the evening meal preceding GI testing. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64:224-6

Sumeet Gulati Gulati, S. 2010. Price and Quantity Policies in a Simple Political Economy Framework. The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy: Vol. 10 : Iss. 1 (Topics), Article 99; DOI: 10.2202/1935-1682.2176. Chandra, A., Gulati, S., Kandlikar, M. 2010. Green Drivers or Free Riders: An Analysis of Tax Rebates for Hybrid Vehicles. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 60 (2), 57-144.

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Murray Isman Shikano, I., Y. Akhtar and M.B. Isman (2010) Relationship between adult and larval host plant selection and larval performance in the generalist moth, Trichoplusia ni. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 4: 197-205 Miresmailli, S., R. Bradbury and M.B. Isman (2010) Qualitative assessment of an ultra-fast portable gas chromatograph (zNose) for analyzing volatile organic chemicals and essential oils in laboratory and greenhouses. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 4: 175-180 Shikano, I., Y. Akhtar, M.B. Isman and C.H. Rankin (2010) Dishabituating long-term memory for gustatory habituation in the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni. Behavioral Neuroscience 124: 701-705 Mullinix, K., M.B. Isman and J.F. Brunner (2010) Key and secondary arthropod pest population trends in apple cultivated over four seasons with no insecticides and having a grass or legume cover. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture 34: 584-594. Machial, C.M., I. Shikano, M. Smirle, R. Bradbury and M.B. Isman (2010) Evaluation of the toxicity of 17 essential oils against Choristoneura rosaceana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Trichoplusia ni (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Pest Management Science 66: 1116-1121 Miresmailli, S., R.M. Gries, G.J. Gries, R.H. Zumar and M.B. Isman (2010) Using herbivore-induced plant volatiles for detecting cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni, Noctuidae) infestation on greenhouse tomato plants. Pest Management Science 66: 916-924 Akhtar, Y., Y. Yang, M.B. Isman and E. Plettner (2010) Dialkoxybenzene and dialkoxy-allylbenzene feeding and oviposition deterrents against the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni: potential insect behavior control agents. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 58: 4983-4991 Seffrin, R. deC., I. Shikano, Y. Akhtar and M.B. Isman (2010) Effects of crude seed extracts of Annona atemoya and A. squamosa L. against the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni in the laboratory and greenhouse. Crop Protection 29: 20-24 Isman, M.B. (2010) Botanical insecticides, deterrents, repellents and oils. In: Industrial Crops and Uses (B.P. Singh, ed.), CAB International, pp. 433-445. Isman, M.B., S. Miresmailli and C. Machial (2010) Commercial opportunities for pesticides based on plant essential oils in agriculture, industry and consumer products. Phytochemistry Reviews, DOI: 10.1007/ s11101-010-9170-4 Online First™ (published online 16 Mar 2010).

David Kitts Jing, H., Yap, M., Wong, P.Y.Y., Kitts, D.D. 2010. Comparison of physiochemical and antioxidant properties of egg-white proteins and fructose and inulin Maillard Reaction Products. Food Bioprocess Technology, DOI 10. 1007/s11947-009-0279-7. Samaranayaka, A.G. P., Kitts, D.D., Li-Chan, E.C.Y. 2010. Antioxidative and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory potential of a Pacific Hake (Merluccius productus) fish protein hydrolysate subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion and Caco-2 cell permeation. Journal Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 58: 1535-1542. Leusink, G.L., Kitts, D.D., Yaghmaee, P, and Durance, T.D. 2010. Retention of antioxidant capacity of vacuum microwave dried cranberry. Journal of Food Science, 75 : 311-316. Chen, X. Elisia, I., Kitts, D.D. 2010. Defining conditions for the coculture of Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells using Taguchi design. Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicology Methods, 61: 334-342. Chen, X. Hu, C. Raghubeer, E., Kitts, D.D. 2010. Effect of high pressure pasteurization on bacterial load and bioactivity of Echinacea purpurea. Journal of Food Science, 75: 613-618.


Kiddy, J., Weiss, M. Kitts, D.D., Levy-Milne, R., Wasdell, M.B. 2010. Nutritional status of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A pilot study. International Journal of Paediatrics. 2010: Article id-767318. doi:10.1155/20/2010/767318. Purnama, M., Yaghmaee, P., Durance, T.D., Kitts, D.D. 2010. Porosity changes and retention of ginsenosides in North American ginseng root using different dehydration processes. Journal of Food Science, 75: 487-492. Sahib, N.G., Hamid, A.A., Kitts, D.D., Purnama, M., Saari, N., Abas, F. 2010. The effects of Morinda Citrifolia, Momordca Charantia and Centella Asiatica extracts on lipoprotein lipase and 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes. Journal of Food Biochemistry, COI: 10.111/j.1745-4514. 2010.00444.x . Nakamura, S., Hata, J., Nakamura, K., Jing, H., Kitts, D.D., Nakai, S. 2010. Site-specific glycosylation using Pichia expression system imporves structural stability and antimicrobial activity of human Cystatin C. in. Advances in Medicine and Biology. Volume 3. Chapter 10. Ed. I. V. Berhardt. Nova Science Publishers, N.Y. pp. 243-254.

Maja Krzic Zhao, Y., Krzic, M., Bulmer, C.E., Schmidt, M.G., Simard, S.W. 2010. Relative bulk density as a measure of compaction and its influence on tree height. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 40: 1724-1735. Sabau, J., Schmidt, M.G., Krzic, M. 2010. The impact of black cottonwood on soil fertility in coastal western hemlock forest. Forest Ecology and Management, 260: 1350-1358. Ripley, S.W., Krzic, M., Bradfield, G.E., Bomke, A.A. 2010. Land-use impacts on soil quality of the Yungas/Chaco transition forest of Jujuy province, northwestern Argentina. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 90: 679-683. Krzic, M., Strivelli, R.A. 2010. Emerging approaches to soil science education. Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference of the Canadian Society of Soil Science. Jun 21-24, 2010. Saskatoon, SK, p. 46. Strivelli, R.A., Krzic, M., Crowley, C. , Sanborn, P. , Watson, K. , Poon, D. 2010. Development of an innovative community of practice platform for soils professionals in British Columbia. Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference of the Canadian Society of Soil Science. Jun 21-24, 2010. Saskatoon, SK, p. 81 Watson, K., Krzic, M., Bomke, A., Smith, S., Grand, S. , Crowley, C, Dyanatkar, S. 2010. Web-Based learning tool on soil parent material and landscape development. proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference of the Canadian Society of Soil Science. Jun 21-24, 2010. Saskatoon, SK, p. 122. Strivelli, R.A., Krzic, M., Crowley, C., Dyanatkar, S., Basiliko, N., Shabaga, J., Winsborough, C., Bedard-Hughn, A., Pare, M., Price, G., Gillis, D., Humphreys, E., Vandewint, J., Dampier, L.. 2010. Soils: charting new territory in high school education. Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference of the Soil Science Society of America. Oct 31 – Nov 3, 2010. Long Beach, CA.

Interactions between aroma compounds and β-lactoglobulin in the heat-induced molten globule state. Food Chemsitry, 119: 1550-1556. Li-Chan, E.C.Y., Griffiths, P.R. and Chalmers, J.M. (editors) 2010. “Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Food Science”, Volume I “Instrumentation and Fundamental Applications” and Volume II “Analysis of Food, Drink and Related Materials”. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Mine, Y., Li-Chan, E.C.Y. and Jiang, B. (editors) 2010. “Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals”. Wiley-Blackwell IFT Press Series. Li-Chan, E.C.Y. 2010. Introduction to applications of vibrational spectroscopy in food science. Ch 1 in Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Food Science”, Li-Chan, E.C.Y., Griffiths, P.R. and Chalmers, J.M., Editors, John Wiley & Sons, 35 chapters. Li-Chan, E.C.Y. and Cheung, I.W.Y. 2010. “Flavor-active properties of amino acids, peptides and proteins”, Ch 28 in “Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals”, Y. Mine, E Li-Chan & B Jiang, Editors, Wiley-Blackwell IFT Press Series. Mine, Y., Li-Chan, E.C.Y. and Jiang, B. 2010. “Biologically active food proteins and peptides in health: an overview”, Ch 1 in “Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals”, Y. Mine, E Li-Chan & B Jiang, Editors, Wiley-Blackwell IFT Press Series Samaranayaka, A.G.P. and Li-Chan, E.C.Y. 2010. Bioactive peptides from seafoods and their health effects. Ch 40 in “Seafood Quality, Safety and Health Effects”, C. Alasalvar, K. Miyashita, F. Shahidi and U. Wanasundara, Editors, Blackwell Publishing.

Rajadurai Rajamahendran Pretheeban, T., Balendran, A., Gordon, M.B., Rajamahendran, R. 2010. mRNA of luteal genes associated with progesterone synthesis, maintenance, and apoptosis in dairy heifers and lactating dairy cows. Animal Reproduction Science, 121: 218-224. Gordon, M.B., Dinn, N., Rajamahendran, R. 2010. Effects of presynchronization and postinsemination treatments on pregnancy rates to a timed breeding Ovsynch protocol in dairy cows and heifers. Canadian Journal of Animal Science, 90: 35-44.

Alejandro Rojas Rojas, A. 2010. (In press) Polycultures of the Mind: The “end” of the peasant and the birth of agroecology. In Arif Dirlik and Alexander Woodside, ed. 2010, Global Capitalism and the Future of Agrarian Society Paradigm Publishers. Rojas, A. 2010. (In Spanish). Polycultures of the mind. Lessons from peasants and agroecology for education in sustainability. (Policultivos de la mente. Ensenanzas del campesinado y de la agroecologia para le educacion en la sustentabilidad. Agroecologia, Vol. 4. University of Murcia, Spain. Pages 29-29.

Yvonne Lamers

Thomas Sullivan

Gregory, J.F., da Silva, V., Lamers, Y., Kinetics of folate and onecarbon metabolism. In: Folate in Health and Disease Editor: Bailey LB. 2010 2nd Edition by Taylor and Francis Group, Florida.

Sullivan, T.P., Sullivan, D.S., Lindgren, P.M.F., Ransome, D.B. 2010. Green-tree retention and life after the beetle: Stand structure and small mammals 30 years after salvage harvesting. Silva Fennica, 44, 749-774.

Eunice Li-Chan

Sullivan, T.P., Sullivan, D.S., Lindgren, P.M.F., Ransome, D.B. 2010. Long-term responses of mammalian herbivores to stand thinning and fertilization in young lodgepole pine forest. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 40: 2302-2312.

Cheung, I.W.Y., Li-Chan, E.C.Y. 2010. Bitterness in enzymaticallyproduced hydrolysates of commercial shrimp (Pandalopsis dispar) processing waste. Food Chemistry, 122: 1003–1012. Samaranayaka, A.G.P., Kitts, D.D. and Li-Chan, E.C.Y. 2010. Antioxidative and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory potential of a Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) fish protein hydrolysate subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion and Caco-2 cell permeation. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 58:1535-1542.

Sullivan, T.P., Sullivan, D.S. 2010. Forecasting vole population outbreaks in forest plantations: the rise and fall of a major mammalian pest. Forest and Ecology Management, 260: 983-993.

Tavel, L., Moreau, C. Bouhallab, S, Li-Chan, E.C.Y. and Guichard, E. 2010.

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Hennie van Vuuren Dahabieh, M., Husnik, J. I., van Vuuren, H.J.J. 2010. Functional enhancement of Sake yeast strains to minimize the production of ethyl carbamate in Sake wine. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 109: 963-973. Adams, C., van Vuuren, H.J.J. 2010. The timing of diammonium phosphate addition to fermenting grape must affects the production of ethyl carbamate in wine. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, 61: 125-129

Jim Vercammen

Burfeind, O., Sepúlveda, P., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M., Veira, D.M., Heuwieser, W. 2010. Technical note: Evaluation of a scoring system for rumen fill in dairy Cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3635-3640. Proudfoot, K.L., Weary, D.M., von Keyserlingk, M. A. G. 2010. Behavior during transition differs for cows diagnosed with claw horn lesions in mid- lactation. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3970-3978. von Keyserlingk, M. A. G. and Weary, D. M. 2010. Feeding behaviour of dairy cattle: Measures and applications. Canadian Journal of Animal Science, 90: 303-309.

Vercammen, J. Agri-environmental regulations, policies, and programs. Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics (in press).

Ito, K., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., LeBlanc, S.J., Weary, D.M. 2010. Lying behavior as an indicator of lameness in dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3553-3560.

Marina von Keyserlingk

Chapinal, N., L.G. Baird, L.C. Pinheiro Machado, M.A.G. von Keyserlingk, Weary, D.M. 2010. Short communication: Risk of severe heel erosion increased with parity and stage of lactation in freestallhoused dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3070-3073.

von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M. 2010. INVITED REVIEW: Feeding Behaviour of Dairy Cattle: Measures and Applications. Canadian Journal of Animal Science. 90:303-30 Vickers, L.A., Burfeind, O., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Veira, D.M., Weary, D.M., Heuwieser, W. 2010. Technical note: Comparison of rectal and vaginal temperatures in lactating dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 5246-5251. Lombard, J.E., Tucker, C.B., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Kopral, C.A., Weary, D.M. 2010. Associations between cow hygiene, hock injuries, and free stall usage on US dairy farms. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 4668–4676. Burfeind, O., Sepúlveda, P., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M., Veira, D.M., Heuwieser W. 2010. Technical note: Evaluation of a scoring system for rumen fill in dairy Cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3635-3640. Proudfoot, K.L., D.M. Weary, and M. A. G. von Keyserlingk. 2010. Behavior during transition differs for cows diagnosed with claw horn lesions in mid- lactation. Journal of Dairy Science. 93: 3970-3978. Ito, K., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., LeBlanc, S.J., Weary, D.M. 2010. Lying behavior as an indicator of lameness in dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3553-3560. Chapinal, N., Baird, L.G., Pinheiro Machado, L.C., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M. 2010. Short communication: Risk of severe heel erosion increased with parity and stage of lactation in freestallhoused dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3070-3073. De Paula Vieira, A., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M. 2010. Effects of pair versus single housing on performance and behavior of dairy calves before and after weaning from milk. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3079-3085. Reich, L.R., Weary, D.M., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G. 2010. Effects of saw dust bedding dry matter on lying behavior of dairy cows: A dose dependent response. Journal of Dairy Science, 93:1561-1565 Burfeind, O., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M., Veira, D.M., Heuwieser, W. 2010. Short communication: Repeatability of measures of rectal temperature in dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 624-627.

Dan Weary Chapinal, N., Weary, D.M., Rushen, J., de Passillé, A.M., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G. 2010. Effects of temporal restriction in availability of the total mixed ration on feeding and competitive behavior in lactating dairy cows. Livestock Science, doi:10.1016/j.livsci.2010.11.006 Schuppli, C., Weary, D.M. 2010. Attitudes towards the use of genetically modified animals in research. Public Understanding of Science, 19: 686–697. Vickers, L.A., Burfeind, O., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Veira, D.M., Weary, D.M., Heuwieser, W. 2010. Technical note: Comparison of rectal and vaginal temperatures in lactating dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 5246-5251. Lombard, J.E., Tucker, C.B., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Kopral, C.A., Weary, D.M. 2010. Associations between cow hygiene, hock injuries, and free stall usage on US dairy farms. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 4668–4676.

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Faculty of Land and Food Systems Annual Report 2009 | 2010

De Paula Vieira, A., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M. 2010. Effects of pair versus single housing on performance and behavior of dairy calves before and after weaning from milk. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 3079-3085. Reich, L.J., Weary, D.M., Veira, D.M., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G.. 2010. Effects of sawdust bedding dry matter on lying behavior of dairy cows: A dosedependent response. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 1561-1565. Burfeind, O., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M., Veira, D.M., and Heuwieser, W. 2010. Short communication: Repeatability of measures of rectal temperature in dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 624-627.

Chapinal, N., Goldhawk, C., de Passillé, A.M., von Keyserlingk, M.A.G., Weary, D.M., and Rushen, J. 2010. Overnight access to pasture does not reduce milk production or feed intake in dairy cows. Livestock Science, 129: 104–110. Sweeney, B.C., Rushen, J., Weary, D.M., de Passillé, A.M. 2010. Duration of weaning, starter intake and weight gain of dairy calves fed large amounts of milk. Journal of Dairy Science, 93: 148-152. Walker, K.A., Mellish, J.E., Weary, D.M. 2010. Behavioural responses of juvenile Steller sea lions to hot-iron branding. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 122: 58-62.


Advisory Council Don Enns Chief Executive Officer, Cantest Ltd. Cynthia Enns Laughing Stock Vineyards Kirsten Flood President, Agriculture Undergraduate Students Society Marc Fortin Assistant Deputy Minister, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Harold Kalke President, Kalico Developments John Kennelly Dean, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences University of Alberta Anne Lindsay Anne Lindsay & Associates Ltd. Silvia Martinez Program Director, Tec de Monterrey – UBC Joint Academic Program Larry Pedersen Deputy Minister, B.C. Ministry of Agriculture and Lands Yves Potvin President and Founder, Garden Protein International Katy Proudfoot Land and Food Systems Graduate Student Representative Nola Kate Seymoar President & CEO, International Centre for Sustainable Cities Bobbe Wood President and CEO, Heart and Stroke Foundation of B.C. and Yukon

Credits Produced by the Faculty of Land and Food Systems Writer/Editor: Jennifer Honeybourn with files from Lorraine Chan Design: Ballistic Arts Media Studios Inc. Contributing Photographer: Martin Dee


ANNUAL REPORT

2009 / 2010 Faculty of Land and Food Systems Grounded in Science | Global in Scope MacMillan Building 2357 Main Mall Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 Canada T: 604.822.1219

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Faculty of Land & Food Systems Annual Report 2009-2010