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LAMA 16145 Hart Street Van Nuys, CA 91406 Preview: February 4 - 16, 2019 10am–6pm (PT) Auction: Sunday, February 17, 2019 12pm (PT)


Art & Design in Los Angeles The newest edition of the London/New York-based

Then there are the less acknowledged California artists,

Frieze art fair is about to descend upon Los Angeles,

many of whom were represented by the group of L.A.

briefly making our city the focus of the art world. Much

gallerists that just pre-dated Ferus Gallery, such as Felix

like curating a masterworks show, L.A. is preparing

Landau Gallery, Esther Robles Gallery, and Dalzell Hat-

to put its best face forward, offering discounts at the

field. Early works by Craig Kauffman, Hans Burkhardt,

trendiest hotels, pop-up locations of the city’s most

Emerson Woelffer, Peter Voulkos, Oskar Fischinger, Jack

highly regarded restaurants, and walking tours of L.A.’s

Zajac, and Glen Lukens tell the history of contemporary

homegrown heavy-hitter galleries to the expected influx

L.A. art that is often overlooked.

of out-of-towners. All of this is to say that while Frieze’s arrival in Los We confess, LAMA is not immune to the Frieze excite-

Angeles can feel like an acknowledgement from the

ment. As we’ve prepared for the February auction, we’ve

international artworld that L.A. is now a contender, our

thought about the art that has come to define LAMA

city has a long(ish) history in this field that LAMA has

throughout the years. On offer are the mainstays of

always sought to tell.

modern California art that we have become known for—a 1969 painting by Mary Corse, a show stopping paint-

On another note, you may have noticed that this cat-

ing by Frederick Hammersley, a resin sculpture by De

alogue essay was not penned by our Director, Peter

Wain Valentine, Ed Ruscha’s Mocha Standard, a petite

Loughrey. Just as the L.A. art world has grown over

early work by Billy Al Bengston featuring his signature

the years, so too has LAMA. While Peter and Shannon

chevron motif, and countless other gems by California

Loughrey, the founders of LAMA, continue to drive the

artists, many of whom were captured by photographer

company forward, new voices and new ideas are helping

and gallerist Patricia Faure in her 1958 photograph,

to shape LAMA’s future, so expect to hear more from the

FERUS Gallery.

LAMA team!

Clo Pazera, Fine Art Specialist


1 ANDY WARHOL

Bald Eagle (from Endangered Species Portfolio) 1983 Color screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #87 of 150 Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in graphite lower left edge of sheet in image; retains printer’s blind stamp lower right

F/S #II.296 Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 51" x 51" L I T E RAT U R E Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.296.

$50,000–70,000


5

2 ANDY WARHOL

African Elephant (from Endangered Species Portfolio) 1983 Color screenprint on Lenox Museum Board

F/S #II.293

#141 of 150

Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 46" x 46"

Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York

LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints:

Signed with edition in graphite lower right edge of sheet; retains printer’s blind stamp lower left

A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.293.

$40,000–60,000


3 ANDY WARHOL

Siberian Tiger (from Endangered Species Portfolio) 1983 Color screenprint on Lenox Museum Board Unique proof aside from the edition of 150 Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Retains “Andy Warhol Authentication Board, Inc./Outside the Published Edition” stamp sheet verso; inscribed “A162.083” in graphite sheet verso

F/S #II.297 Together with copy of invoice from Silver Echo Gallery dated March 13, 2009 Image/sheet: 39.25" x 39.25" Frame: 52" x 52" L I T E RAT U R E Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.297.

$40,000–60,000


4 ANDY WARHOL

San Francisco Silverspot (from Endangered Species Portfolio)

F/S #II.298

1983 Color screenprint on Lenox Museum Board

Together with copy of invoice from Silver Echo Gallery dated April 13, 2009

#21 of 150

Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 50.125" x 50.125"

Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in graphite lower right edge of sheet; retains printer’s blind stamp lower left

LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.298.

$30,000–50,000

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5 ANDY WARHOL

Bighorn Ram (from Endangered Species Portfolio) 1983 Color screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #94 of 150

F/S #II.302

Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York

Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 50.375" x 50.375"

Signed with edition lower center edge of sheet; retains printer’s blind stamp lower left edge of sheet; retains Martin Lawrence Gallery label frame verso

A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F.

L I T E RAT U R E Andy Warhol Prints: Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.302.

$30,000–50,000


6 ANDY WARHOL

Alexander the Great 1982 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board Unique proof aside from the edition of 25 Published by Alexander Iolas, New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Retains printer’s blind stamp lower left edge of sheet; stamped “Andy Warhol Authentication Board, Inc./ Outside the Published Edition” in blue ink sheet verso; inscribed “A404.076” in graphite sheet verso

F/S #II.291-292 Image/sheet: 39.5" x 39.5" Frame: 50.75" x 50.75" LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.291-292.

$50,000–70,000

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7 ANDY WARHOL

Untitled (from À La Recherche du Shoe Perdu) c. 1955 Offset lithograph and watercolor on paper Unknown edition size Signed in ink center left F/S #IV.69A-B Sheet: 8.375" x 10.875" Frame: 22.125" x 23.5" LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #IV.69A-B.

$5,000–7,000

8 ANDY WARHOL Shoe and Leg

c. 1955 Offset lithograph and watercolor on paper Signed in graphite along right upper edge of sheet F/S #IV.85 Sheet (vis.): 9" x 3.875" Frame: 22.625" x 17.5" LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #IV.85.

$8,000–12,000


9 ANDY WARHOL Shoes

1980 Screenprint with diamond dust on Arches Aquarelle paper Trial proof aside from the edition of 60 Published by the artist; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed, dated, and inscribed “To Victor” with edition sheet verso F/S #II.255 Trial proof not noted in F/S Image/sheet: 40" x 59.5" Frame: 42.25" x 62" LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.255.

$50,000–70,000

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10 ANDY WARHOL Liz

1964 Offset lithograph on paper From the edition of approximately 300 Published by Leo Castelli Gallery, New York; printed by Total Color, New York Signed and dated “65” in blue ballpoint pen lower right margin beneath image F/S #II.7 Together with original invoice from Hamilton-Selway Fine Art dated October 25, 2005 Image: 21.875" x 21.875" Sheet: 22.75" x 23" Frame: 37.5" x 37.5" P ROVENA NC E Hamilton-Selway Fine Art, West Hollywood, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2005) LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.7.

$40,000–60,000


11 ANDY WARHOL

Jacqueline Kennedy I (Jackie I) 1966 Screenprint on paper #5 of 50 aside from the edition of 200 inscribed in Arabic numerals Published by Original Editions, New York; printed by Knickerbocker Machine & Foundry, Inc., New York Retains stamped signature verso; edition inscribed in Roman numerals verso F/S #II.13 Image: 20.625" x 17.125" Sheet (vis.): 22.5" x 18.5" Frame: 31" x 26.75" LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue RaisonnĂŠ. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.13.

$6,000–8,000

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12 ANDY WARHOL

The Star (from Myths) 1981 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board

F/S #II.258

#17 of 200

Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 48.25" x 48.25"

Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York

L I T E RAT U R E Andy Warhol Prints:

Signed with edition in graphite sheet verso; retains Martin Lawrence Gallery label frame verso

A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.258.

$40,000–60,000


13 ANDY WARHOL

Letter to the World (The Kick) (from Martha Graham) 1986 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board Proof aside from the edition of 100 Published by Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York

F/S #II.389

Retains “The Estate of Andy Warhol” and “Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts” ink stamps sheet verso; inscribed “T.J.4.” and “144CVT.045” in graphite sheet verso

LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints:

Image/sheet: 36" x 36" Frame: 48" x 48"

A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.389.

$15,000–20,000

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14 ANDY WARHOL

Marilyn Monroe (Marilyn) 1967 Screenprint on paper Artist’s proof aside from the edition of 100 Published by Factory Additions, New York; printed by Aetna Silkscreen Products, Inc., New York Signed with edition in graphite verso F/S #II.21 Together with copy of invoice from Hamilton-Selway Fine Art dated June 11, 2007

ILLUSTRATED OPPOSITE PAGE

15 ANDY WARHOL

Vegetable (from Campbell’s Soup I) 1968 Screenprint on paper #61 of 250 Published by Factory Additions, New York; printed by Salvatore Silkscreen Co., Inc., New York Signed in ballpoint pen with stamped edition number sheet verso F/S #II.48

Image/sheet: 6" x 6" Frame: 18.625" x 18.625"

Sheet: 35" x 23" Frame: 50.75" x 38.875"

P ROVENA NC E Hamilton-Selway

PROVE N A N CE Hamilton-Selway

Fine Art, West Hollywood, Califor-

Fine Art, West Hollywood, Califor-

nia; Private Collection, Los Angeles,

nia; Private Collection, Los Angeles,

California (acquired directly from the

California (acquired directly from

above, 2007)

the above)

LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A

L I T E RAT U R E Andy Warhol Prints: A

Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feld-

Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feld-

man and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.21.

man and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.48.

$30,000–50,000

$20,000–30,000


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16 ANDY WARHOL

Volkswagen (from Ads) 1985 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #103 of 190 Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in graphite lower right edge of sheet; retains printer’s and publisher’s blind stamps lower left

F/S #II.358 Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 39.75" x 39.75" L I T E RAT U R E Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.358.

$30,000–50,000


17 ANDY WARHOL

Life Savers (from Ads) 1985 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #5 of 5 E.P. aside from the edition of 190 Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in graphite lower left edge of sheet; retains printer’s and publisher’s blind stamps lower right

F/S #II.353 Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 49" x 49" LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.353.

$40,000–60,000

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18 ANDY WARHOL

Diamond Dust Candy Box 1981 Synthetic polymer paint, screenprint ink, and diamond dust on canvas Retains “The Andy Warhol Estate” and “Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts” ink stamps and inscribed “PA13.003” to canvas overlap verso; inscribed “PA13.003” twice to canvas stretcher verso; retains Acquavella Galleries label verso Together with copy of invoice from Hamilton-Selway Fine Art dated June 11, 2007 Canvas: 14" x 10" Frame: 15.125" x 11.125" P ROVENA NC E Hamilton-Selway Fine Art, West Hollywood, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2007)

$60,000–80,000


19 ANDY WARHOL Sidewalk

1983 Screenprint on Dutch Etching paper #4 of 45 unique trial proofs aside from the edition of 250 Published by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in graphite lower left edge of sheet F/S #IIB.304 Image/sheet: 30" x 44.5" Frame: 42.25" x 57.25" LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #IIB.304.

$20,000–30,000

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20 ANDY WARHOL Fish

1983 Screenprint on wallpaper Printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Retains “The Estate of Andy Warhol” and “Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts” ink stamps verso; inscribed “UP.88.77” in graphite sheet verso F/S #IIIA.39 Sheet (vis.): 41" x 29.125" Frame: 50" x 38.375" LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #IIIA.39.

$6,000–8,000

21 ANDY WARHOL Muhammad Ali

1978 Screenprint on Strathmore Bristol paper #83 of 150 Published by Andy Warhol Enterprises, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in black felt-tip marker lower right edge of sheet; retains Martin Lawrence Limited Editions Inc. label frame verso F/S #II.181 Image/sheet: 40" x 30" Frame: 52.5" x 42.5" LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.181.

$12,000–15,000


22 ANDY WARHOL

F/S #II.327

Details of Renaissance Paintings (Paolo Uccello, St. George and the Dragon, 1460)

Together with invoice from Martin Lawrence Galleries dated September 13, 2010

1984 Screenprint on Arches Aquarelle paper

Image: 25" x 37" Sheet (vis.): 27.375" x 39.125" Frame: 40" x 51.625"

#8 of 12 artist’s proofs aside from the edition of 50

P ROV E NANC E Martin Lawrence

Published by Editions Schellmann & Klüser, Munich and New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition lower left margin beneath image; retains Martin Lawrence Galleries label frame verso

Galleries, La Jolla, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2010) LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.327.

$10,000–15,000

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The Iconic Nature of Mickey Mouse In November of last year Mickey Mouse celebrated his 90th birthday. While the mouse was featured in two previously undistributed shorts, it was Steamboat Willie (1928), a light parody of Buster Keaton's Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928), that first introduced the legend to American audiences. As the country was seized by the horrors of the Great Depression in the years immediately following Mickey’s incarnation, Walt Disney’s animated shorts gained popularity by providing viewers with much-needed comic relief. While early portrayals of the mouse painted him as a bit devious, Mickey is said to have nevertheless embodied “wholesome values of farm land” that spoke to the great number of people migrating from rural territories to America’s urban centers in hopes of economic reprieve through goodwill and hard work. Some argue that Mickey resonated with audiences, because despite being a mouse (an ultimate symbol of meekness) he triumphed in Disney’s various vignettes, continuously defying the odds narratively stacked against him. Viewers could turn to Mickey for constant reassurance that “justice” would eventually prevail. As America moved out of the Depression and into the war, Mickey was increasingly portrayed as a leader and a hero who always secured a path to victory. The evolution of Mickey’s character and popularity quickly positioned Disney as the standard bearer for America’s “utopian” and “idealized” self-image. Walt Disney was an undisputed pioneer in cross-marketing. Mickey Mouse in particular appeared across all mass-media platforms, eventually proving himself to be the ideal host for Disney’s “total merchandising” ambitions. Touting the culturally idiosyncratic associations previously mentioned, Disney began to offer products that posed as material substitutions for on-screen "happily ever afters." Because of Disney’s shrewd promotion in the years following World War II, Mickey Mouse not only became an international symbol of the Disney brand, but a universal logo for America’s vast entertainment empire as well.

As the brainchild of “the merchandising king of America,” Mickey Mouse provided rich fodder for the Pop artists of the mid- to late-twentieth century. Andy Warhol was enamored with Mickey’s status as a cultural icon. His inclusion of the character in the 1981 series Myths brings to light the interesting cultural circumstances surrounding Mickey’s stardom. As with each of the figures framed in the series, the famous mouse’s grand mythology is distilled down to a commodity. Some critics have assessed that the world of Disney has provided a system in which commercial products easily replace life experiences. Giving the comparison of Port Orleans at Walt Disney World to the actual city of New Orleans, they argue that the synthetic substitute often becomes preferable to the real thing because of its purchasable ease of access and its simplification of circumstance. Similar to this academic framing, Mickey Mouse (1981) calls into question the socially corrosive effects of this model. Known for his simplified figures and bold use of primary colors, Keith Haring visually proposes an easy-to-read graphic language in his work. The subject of iconography is therefore inseparable from his practice. Reflecting on the history of American pop culture, Haring produced his series of Andy Mouse images that compound the visual codes of both his “heroes,” Disney and Warhol. Expressing his sincere admiration for Warhol, who he credited with making his own art possible, Haring appropriates Disney’s resonant character to immortalize the artist as an American icon. Through Haring’s framing, Warhol becomes “a ubiquitous piece of culture as commonplace and recognizable as [Mickey Mouse] and the dollar bill.” As Haring’s use of the character proves, Mickey Mouse continues to perform as an indelible emblem of the dynamic and fluid exchange of high art and pop culture that remains so central to the American artistic lexicon. Suddath, Claire. “A Brief History of Mickey Mouse.” Time, Time Inc., 18 Nov. 2008. Forbes, Bruce David. “Taking Popular Culture Seriously.” Word & World, vol. 23, no. 3, 2003.


23 WALT DISNEY Mickey Mouse

c. 1939 Ink and watercolor on paper Inscribed “Birthday Greetings/To Ginger Rogers/Walt Disney” lower center edge of sheet; inscribed given to/Ginger Rogers/by Walt Disney/1939” in black felt-tip marker backing board verso Framed together with picture of Walt Disney and silver information plaque Sheet (vis.): 11.625" x 8.625" Frame: 17.75" x 23.75" P ROV E NANC E The Estate of Gerard L. Cafesjian (acquired through Rago Auctions, Lambertville, New Jersey, December 8, 2012, lot 955)

$1,500–2,000

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24 ANDY WARHOL

Mickey Mouse (from Myths) 1981 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #146 of 200 Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed with edition in graphite lower left edge of sheet; retains printer’s blind stamp lower right F/S #II.265 Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 51" x 51" LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.265.

$100,000–150,000


25 KEITH HARING

Plate from Andy Mouse Portfolio 1986 Color screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #29 of 30 Published by George Mulder, New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image; signed by Andy Warhol with printer’s blind stamp lower left; retains Martin Lawrence Galleries label frame verso Image: 35.75" x 35.5" Sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 48.5" x 48.5" LIT E RAT URE Keith Haring: Editions on Paper 1982-1990. K. Littmann, ed. 1993. 65.

$120,000–180,000

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26 KEITH HARING

Plate from Icons Portfolio 1990 Screenprint with embossing on Arches Cover paper #82 of 250 Published by Tony Shafrazi Editions, Inc., New York; printed by Studio Heinrici, Ltd., New York Retains printer’s blind stamp lower left edge of sheet; retains Keith Haring Estate stamp signed and dated by Julia Gruen with edition sheet verso; retains Martin Lawrence Gallery label frame verso Together with copy of invoice from Martin Lawrence Gallery dated April 22, 2006 Image/sheet: 21" x 25" Frame: 31.25" x 35.25" P ROVENA NC E Martin Lawrence Gallery, Beverly Hills, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2006) LITERATURE Keith Haring: Editions on Paper 1982-1990. K. Littmann, ed. 1993. 171.

$6,000–8,000

27 VARIOUS ARTISTS One Cent Life

1964 Color lithographs on wove paper #181 of 2,000 Published by E.W. Kornfeld, Bern; printed by Maurice Beaudet, Paris Facsimile signature and red artist’s seal of Walasse Ting, Sam Francis, and E.W. Kornfeld to justification page Folded sheets each: 16.125" x 11.375" Full sheets each: 16.125" x 22.75" Book: 16.5" x 12" x 1.375" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California

$2,000–3,000


28 JAMES ROSENQUIST Other Great Cities

1978 3-color intaglio and screenprint with pochoir and additional graphite marks on Pescia Italia paper #44 of 78 Published by Multiples, Inc., New York; printed by Aripeka Ltd., Editions, Aripeka and Brand X Editions, New York Signed and dated in graphite with Aripeka blind stamp lower right beneath image; titled with edition in graphite lower left margin beneath image Image: 17.625" x 35.5" Sheet: 22.625" x 39.5" Frame: 29.5" x 46.375" LIT E RAT URE Time Dust: Rosenquist Complete Graphics: 1962-1992. C. W. Glenn. 1993. #153.

$800–1,200

29 JAMES ROSENQUIST

The Book Disappears for the Fast Student (2nd State) 1978 1-color etching and aquatint on paper #2 of 8 artist’s proofs aside from the edition of 78 Published by Multiples, Inc., New York; printed by Aripeka Ltd., Editions, Aripeka Signed and dated in graphite with Charles Levine blind stamp lower right margin beneath image; titled in plate; inscribed “2nd state” with edition in graphite lower left margin beneath image Image: 17.625" x 35.5" Sheet: 22.75" x 39.5" Frame: 30.75" x 47.75" LIT E RAT URE Time Dust: Rosenquist Complete Graphics: 1962-1992. C. W. Glenn. 1993. #124.

$800–1,200

29


30 GEORGE NELSON Jewelry cabinet

Herman Miller, designed 1952; this example produced 1994 Model no. 5215 Retains designer and manufacturer’s metal tag Together with certificate of authenticity 6" x 30.25" x 12.875" LITERATURE George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher. J. Eisenbrand. 2008. 245.

$1,500–2,000

31 PAUL MCCOBB

Lounge chairs (2) Custom Craft, Inc., designed c. 1950 Each retains Custom Craft, Inc. label and upholstery tag Each: 31.5" x 28.5" x 29"

$3,000–5,000


32 CHARLES & RAY EAMES

Lounge chair and ottoman (2) Herman Miller, designed 1956 Model nos. 670 (chair) and 671 (ottoman) Each retains Herman Miller upholstery tag Chair: 32.5" x 33" 32.25" Ottoman: 17" x 25.625" x 21.5" LIT E RAT URE Eames Design: The Work of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames. J. Neuhart. 1989. 206-207.

$4,000–6,000

33 CHARLES & RAY EAMES

Lounge chair and ottoman (2) Herman Miller, designed 1956; this example produced 1976 Model nos. 670 (chair) and 671 (ottoman) Each retains Herman Miller metal tag Chair: 31.375" x 33" x 34.975" Ottoman: 17" x 25.75" x 21.5" LIT E RAT URE Eames Design: The Work of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames. J. Neuhart. 1989. 206-207.

$2,500–3,500

34 CHARLES & RAY EAMES Lounge chair

Herman Miller, designed 1946; this example c. 1990 Model no. LCW Retains manufacturer’s tag to underside 25.875" x 21.875" x 25.5" LIT E RAT URE Eames Design: The Work of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames. J. Neuhart. 1989. 73.

$1,200–1,800

31


35 HARRY BERTOIA Slat bench

Knoll International, designed 1952 Model no. 400 R Retains remnants of manufacturer’s label to underside 15.5" x 72" x 18.25" LITERATURE Knoll Furniture: 1938-1960. L. Rouland and S. Rouland. 1999. 112.

$600–800

36 ANDRÉ DUPRÉ

Stacking chairs (6) Knoll Associates, Inc., designed c. 1950 Model no. 130 Each: 31.5" x 18.75" x 19" LITERATURE Knoll Furniture: 1938-1960. L. Rouland and S. Rouland. 1999. 46.

$3,000–5,000

37 FLORENCE KNOLL Sideboard

Knoll, custom ordered c. 1970 24.375" x 159.75" x 21"

$6,000–9,000


38 WILLIAM KATAVOLOS, DOUGLAS KELLEY & ROSS LITTELL Bench

Laverne International, designed c. 1955 14.5" x 49" x 21"

$1,500–2,000

39 MARCEL BREUER

Laccio side tables and coffee table (3) Knoll, designed 1925 Model nos. 50T1 (side tables) and 50T2 (coffee table) Comprised of two side tables and a coffee table Side tables each: 17.75" x 21.625" x 19.75" Coffee table: 13.25" x 53.5" x 18.75"

$800–1,200

40 MARIO DAL FABBRO Coffee table

Studio, designed c. 1955 17" x 41.625" x 17.5"

$1,500–2,000

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ALTERNATE VIEW

41 ROBERT IRWIN, JACK BROGAN & FRANK GEHRY Dining chair prototype

Studio, designed 1970 Laminated corrugated cardboard 32.5" x 16.125" x 28.375"

$25,000–35,000

42 ROBERT IRWIN, JACK BROGAN & FRANK GEHRY Occasional table

Easy Edges, designed 1972 15.5" x 15.5" x 16.875"

$2,000–3,000


A Series of Little Discoveries: The Easy Edges Collection In 1966, Maurice Tuchman, then curator of modern art at Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), introduced the Art and Technology (A & T) program. Among other prominent California artists, Tuchman invited Robert Irwin to contribute to the project. Through a series of introductions associated with A & T, Irwin made the acquaintance of experimental psychologist Dr. Edward Wortz. Wortz and Irwin thus began a conversation that Irwin says “went on for twenty years.” Shortly after their first “meeting of the minds,” Wortz invited Irwin to speak at the first National Symposium on Habitability of Environments that he was organizing for NASA. Scientists from all over the world were coming to Los Angeles to discuss what it would take to send a man into space long-term and “bring him back sane.” While Irwin was honored to be included, he says it was a very “daunting invitation.” After considering it for some time, Irwin offered to host the event instead. Initially, Irwin struggled to come up with a way to contribute something material that would be “relevant” to these top thinkers who “were of course living in a world of words.” Eventually the artist came to the idea of creating an environment that could fundamentally shape the way in which the symposium attendees would talk about the subject of experiencing an environment. “Normally,” Irwin says, “when you come to town for a conference like that [you] all holed up in a hotel somewhere, with a conference table downstairs [that you] all sit around.” He believed that that level of predictability and comfort ran counter to the mission of the symposium. In 1969, at his Venice studio on Market Street, as well as in several others borrowed from friends such as Larry Bell, Irwin set to creating spaces that imposed limitations on their own habitability. In addition to the disorienting rubble-strewn, back-alley, impact hole that was to serve as the event’s formal entrance, there were five manipulated rooms in which the “high-level” attendees would have to “adjust,” “persevere,” and hopefully come up with some “interesting ideas and thinking” along the way; “one was too big, one was too small, one was too bright, one was too loud,” notes Irwin. The main technical issue that Irwin encountered lay in creating a functional central location. In the process of gutting his studio for the fabrication of the symposium’s habitat, Irwin had inadvertently created a highly reverberant acoustical issue. The artist then turned to L.A. art world fixture and “true Jack-of-all-trades,” Jack Brogan. Applying the same principles that govern echo chamber walls, the two recognized that the internal structure of a common sheet of cardboard had a potentially noise-cancelling effect. Through

trial and error, they came to discover that by turning the cardboard sheets up on their edges and simply gluing the pieces one next to the other, they could create a powerful sound-absorbing substance. They then composed twentyfoot-long “blocks” out of the laminated material, which they used to assemble a platform with a sort of stadium seating up the sides for speakers to address the conference. After the symposium had ended in May of 1970, Irwin still “had these logs lying around.” “At the time it was just Jack and myself,” Irwin recalls, and “I was trying to figure out what to do with [them], maybe I’d just throw [them] away.” Instead, Jack Brogan took them back to his shop and started using a bandsaw to “mess around with [them].” Soon he and Irwin realized that they could sculpt curved structures out of the material, and it would still maintain its tensile strength. “You could sit there and bounce on it a little bit and it didn't break or fall down, and it was flexible,” says Irwin. “When you see that thing and you start imagining what you might do with it: a chair or a couch or an ottoman, it became a toy.” The infant sculptures had a “curious look” to them that instinctually “brought up a hundred ideas.” By Irwin’s account, Frank Gehry, who was hanging out with the Venice artists, “got involved in it” at this point. Irwin, Brogan, Gehry, and two of Irwin’s former students began collaboratively shaping the furniture pieces that populated the Easy Edges collection. Brogan set up a manufacturing avenue on the East Coast and Gehry angled a special Bloomingdale's exhibition in New York. The line quickly gained national attention, but in 1973 Gehry pulled the plug on the project. While Robert Irwin insists that Easy Edges was just “a series of little discoveries” and laughs at the notion that its pieces might represent something grander than the group’s pure artistic play, it’s hard not to associate these sumptuous, yet efficient household structures with the optimistic Space Age ambitions of interplanetary living. It’s almost as if Irwin and the others unintentionally illustrated a new form of cosmic domesticity. Though the Easy Edges collaboration failed to reach the wide audience it was intended for, works such as the Dining chair prototype and the Occasional table still radiate the electric exploratory pulse of the first National Symposium on Habitability of Environments for which the materials were first conceived.

Los Angeles Modern Auctions. “The Easy Edges Collection: An Interview with Robert Irwin.” 30 Dec. 2018.

35


ALTERNATE VIEW

SIGNATURE AND DATE DETAIL

43 CHARLES ARNOLDI Nix

1974 Acrylic on found wooden sticks Signed and dated in graphite verso 94.75" x 74.75" x 8" P ROVENA NC E Texas Gallery, Houston, Texas (acquired directly from the artist, 1976); Private Collection, United States (acquired directly from the above, 1976)

$20,000–30,000


44 CHARLES ARNOLDI Untitled

2000 Gouache on collaged paper Signed and dated in black ink lower center right edge of sheet; retains Charles Arnoldi Studio label verso Sheet: 27.875" x 20.875" Frame: 36.375" x 29.5" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist)

$4,000–6,000

45 CHARLES ARNOLDI Untitled #5

1983 Color woodcut on Arches paper #36 of 70 Published by New City Editions, Venice Signed and dated in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains publisher’s blind stamp lower right edge of sheet Image: 38" x 28" Sheet: 46.75" x 35.75" Frame: 48" x 37.125"

$1,500–2,000

37


46 ED MOSES

Ring-D-Whip 2005 Acrylic on canvas Signed “Moses Y Branco” verso; titled and dated verso Canvas: 60" x 48"

$20,000–30,000


39

47 ED MOSES Untitled

1974 Watercolor, graphite, charcoal, ink, colored pencil, and tape on vellum Initialed and dated lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet (vis.): 18.375" x 38.375" Frame: 25.25" x 45.25"

$4,000–6,000


48 ED MOSES

Untitled (2) 1989 Lithographs on paper Each: #16 of 25 Published and printed by Ediciones Polígrafa, Barcelona Each initialed and dated lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Images each: 23.75" x 16" Sheets (vis.) each: 25" x 17.5" Frames each: 35" x 27.5"

$2,000–3,000

49 ED MOSES Untitled

1997 Acrylic, watercolor, and collage on paper Initialed and dated lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 24" x 30" Frame: 29.625" x 35.625"

$2,000–3,000


41

50 ED MOSES

Wedge Series 1973 The complete set of seven color lithographs on paper #9 of 50 Published and printed by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles Each initialed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; each titled with edition lower left; each retains Joyce Hunsaker & Associates label frame verso Image/sheets each: 24" x 18" Frames each: 28.625" x 22.625" LIT E RAT URE Made in LA: Prints of Cirrus Editions. B. Davis. 1995. 312-315.

$6,000–8,000


Patricia Faure and Billy Al Bengston Over the course of the late 1950s and 1960s, Ferus Gallery’s group of irreverent and captivating artists came to represent a creative oasis in the long stagnant California art scene. According to Robert Irwin, they were the first generation to resist the allure of art centers such as New York or Paris, and in their commitment to stay in Los Angeles, had inadvertently become architects of the city’s artistic identity. Robert Irwin, Billy Al Bengston, John Altoon, and the others in the gallery’s stable benefited from the distinct advantage of their environment's blank historical slate. Unlike New York, Los Angeles did not yet have a critical establishment, and so there was no “orthodoxy” or precedent for the Ferus gang to contend with. Instead, they were free to fully test the limits of their creative habitat and to make up the rules as they went along. While this freedom certainly applied to their formal practices, it also shaped their personas. In the early 1960s, Bengston, who was a notorious motorcycle racer and much adored party host, helped define a new notion of the artist, whose identity was fundamentally informed by “subcultural affinities and leisure-time activities.” In this wellspring of cultural definition, the then-model, photographer, and future legendary gallerist, Patricia Faure, returned to Los Angeles after having spent a number of years in New York, where she had become a familiar fixture in some of the city’s most influential art groups. Upon arriving in Los Angeles, Faure developed a particularly close relationship with Bengston, who she considered the “most amazing colorist” and a “very gifted painter.” Amongst their

51 PATRICIA FAURE FERUS Gallery

1958; printed 2005 Epson Ultra Chrome print #4 of 50 Dated with edition in graphite with artist’s thumbprint sheet verso; retains information sheet frame verso Image: 12" x 9.125" Sheet (vis.): 12.375" x 9.375" Frame: 21.75" x 17.625"

$1,500–2,000

many adventures, Faure once broke her leg while riding on the back of Bengston’s motorcycle on their way to deliver film. Faure also seemed to have an open-door invitation to Bengston’s “wonderful parties” where he’d routinely serve “Kentucky Fried Chicken.” When Faure married Jacques Faure in 1959, Bengston presented the couple with Untitled Miniature (1959), which features his signature chevron icon, as a wedding gift. Through her connection to Irving Blum, Faure quickly forged friendships with the other artists of the Ferus gang, who she described as a “very fun-loving and kind of marvelous...lot of talented people.” In Faure’s recollection of her relationship with the Ferus group, she “had just started taking pictures” and “thought it would be amusing to photograph those fellows.” She “piled them all inside” her studio, snapped quirky “jumbled up” images, “and that was that.” In the moment, little thought could have been given to the iconic imagery this playful exercise would produce. Nevertheless, Faure’s photographs of the Ferus group, including FERUS Gallery (1958), not only propagated the artists’ flourishing aura, but would come to typify the exuberant mood of the moment. Ehrlich, Susan. “Oral History Interview with Patricia Faure, 2004 Nov. 17-24.” Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, 2004, www.aaa.si.edu/ collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-patricia-faure-11894. Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter. Rebels In Paradise: the Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s. Henry Holt and Company, 2012.


43

52 BILLY AL BENGSTON Untitled Miniature

1959 Oil on board in artist’s frame Together with Billy exhibition catalogue Board: 4" x 4" Frame: 8.75" x 8.75" P ROV E NANC E Patricia and Jacques Faure, Los Angeles, California (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1959); Thence by descent

$25,000–35,000


53 BILLY AL BENGSTON Honolulu Watercolor

1981 Watercolor on collaged paper Retains Artist Studio and Texas Gallery labels frame verso Composition/sheet (irreg.): 45" x 82.5" Frame: 47.75" x 86.25" P ROVENA NC E Texas Gallery, Houston, Texas (acquired directly from the artist, 1981); Private Collection, United States (acquired directly from the above, 1981)

$6,000–8,000


54 TONY BERLANT

Arizona Avenue #74 1999 Metal collage on plywood with steel brads Signed, titled, and dated “#741999” in felt-tip marker verso; retains L.A. Louver Gallery label verso 26" x 32"

$4,000–6,000

55 TONY BERLANT

California Night Life 1984 Metal collage on plywood with steel brads 7.25" x 7.25" x 5.25"

$3,000–5,000

45


ILLUSTRATED PREVIOUS PAGE

56 DAVID HOCKNEY

Sun (from Weather Series) 1973 8-color lithograph and screenprint on Arjomari paper #18 of 98 Published and printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Signed and dated extremely faintly lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains Gemini G.E.L. blind stamps lower right edge of sheet Gemini G.E.L. #23.6 Image: 30.25" x 25.25" Sheet: 37.25" x 30.75" Frame: 42.875" x 36.25"

57 DAVID HOCKNEY

Glass Table with Objects 1969 Color lithograph on Rives BFK mould-made paper #32 of 75 Published by Petersburg Press, London; printed by Atelier Desjobert, Paris Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower center sheet beneath image Image/sheet: 17.75" x 22" Frame: 19.5" x 24"

LIT E RAT URE David Hockney Prints

LIT E RAT URE David Hockney Prints

1954-1995. 1996. #127.

1954-1995. 1996. #65.

$15,000–20,000

$3,000–5,000

47


58 WALTER LAMB

Chaise lounge and coffee table (2) Brown-Jordan Co., designed c. 1950 Model nos. C-4700 (chaise lounge) and AH3700 (coffee table) Chaise lounge: 32.5" x 26" x 66" Coffee table: 16.75" x 41.625" x 25.75" LITERATURE Walter Lamb. Manufacturer cat. 1954. N.pag.

$3,000–5,000

59 WALTER LAMB Rocking chair

Brown-Jordan Co., designed c. 1950 Model no. C-5701 32" x 22" x 33" LITERATURE Walter Lamb. Manufacturer cat. 1954. N.pag.

$2,000–3,000


60 WALTER LAMB Chairs (4)

Brown-Jordan Co., designed c. 1950 Model nos. C1700A (armchairs) and C-1700 (side chairs) Comprised of two armchairs and two side chairs Armchairs each: 33" x 21" x 23" Side chairs each: 32" x 18.5" x 21.625" LIT E RAT URE Walter Lamb. Manufacturer cat. 1954. N.pag.

$2,500–3,500

61 DAVID CRESSEY Phoenix planter

Architectural Pottery, designed c. 1963 From the Pro/Artisan series 18.75" x 23.5" diameter

$1,500–2,000

49


62 SERGIO RODRIGUES

Sheriff chairs and ottoman (3) I.S.A. Italy Ponte San Pietro-Bergamo, designed c. 1961 Ottoman and one chair retain I.S.A. metal tag Comprised of two chairs and an ottoman Chairs each: 30.25" x 41.5" x 38.125" Ottoman: 15.625" x 23.25" x 23.25"

$4,000–6,000


63 MICHAEL & FRANCIS HIGGINS Mobile

Studio, executed c. 1990 Retains etched signature “Higgins/ studio” 30.25" x 23"

$3,000–5,000

SIGNATURE DETAIL

51

64 VLADIMIR KAGAN Sofa

Vladimir Kagan Designs, designed 1950 29" x 101" x 56.5" LIT E RAT URE The Complete Kagan. V. Kagan. 2004. 70-71.

$7,000–9,000


A Rare State of Painting: Maria Helena Vieira da Silva Born the daughter of a Portuguese diplomat and the granddaughter of the founder of the O Século daily newspaper, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva was exposed to a wide array of avant-garde art forms early on in life. At the age of eleven, Vieira da Silva was already studying painting and drawing at Lisbon’s Academia das Belas Artes. In 1928, Vieira da Silva continued her formal training at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris, where she initially studied sculpture before fully committing to abstract, geometric painting. There in the heart of the art world, she was deeply impacted by the zeitgeist of the École de Paris, the loose group of artists who produced works in various avant-garde styles, including Futurism, Cubism, and Constructivism. While Vieira da Silva would come to be regarded as Portugal’s greatest contemporary artist, she lived the vast majority of her adult life in Paris. At the Galerie Jeanne Bucher, Vieira da Silva had her first solo show in 1933 and was met with critical acclaim. At the outbreak of WWII however, the artist and her husband, Hungarian painter Árpád Szenes, fled France for Rio de Janeiro, where they remained until 1947.

da Silva began painting “space without dimensions.” With her dynamic application of a muted color palette, which reflected the mood of post-war Europe, the artist created dense reflections on the changed cityscape, and the ways in which Europe was being rebuilt following the destruction of the war. These compositions ambiguously figure interior rooms and city views, and delicately obscure the boundaries between abstraction and representation. What poet René Char referred to as Vieira da Silva’s “sense of labyrinth” continued to blossom throughout the decade, and by the late 1950s the painter had become internationally renowned for her unique forms. Along with a preceding multitude of high-profile exhibitions, Vieira da Silva received her first retrospective in 1958 at the Kestnergesellschaft in Hannover, Germany. Critics and fellow artists alike wrote rapturously of Vieira da Silva’s contribution to the French canon, calling her works “an irreplaceable form of art, a rare state of painting.” In 1966, Vieira da Silva became the first woman to receive the French Government’s Grand Prix Nationale des Arts, and in 1979 she was named a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor.

Upon returning to Paris, Vieira da Silva immediately began exhibiting across the city. As a member of the burgeoning Nouvelle École de Paris, she rejected the popular emphasis that had been placed on capturing the objective or seen world by the group of artists (known as the Jeunes Peintres) who had remained in France throughout its occupation. Synthesizing years of architectural appreciation, Vieira

Adamson, Natalie. “Pierre Soulages and the Nouvelle École De Paris.” The National Gallery of Victoria, 2014, www.ngv.vic.gov.au. Harambourg, Lydia. L'École De Paris, 1945-1965: Dictionnaire Des Peintres. Ides & Calendes, 2010. “Maria Helena Vieira Da Silva .” Guggenheim, www.guggenheim.org/artwork/ artist/maria-helena-vieira-da-silva.


65 MARIA HELENA VIEIRA DA SILVA Untitled

1956 Gouache on paper Signed and dated lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 20.5" x 20.625" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California

$80,000–100,000

53


66 PABLO PICASSO

Francesco Petrarca (from Cinq Sonnets) 1947 Etching with burin and aquatint on Arches cream wove paper From the edition of 100 Published by À la Fontaine de Vaucluse, Paris; printed by Atelier Lacourière, Paris Dated and inscribed “9 Janvier 45” in plate upper right Together with original invoice from Galerie Michael dated March 22, 2007 Image: 5.375" x 4.625" Sheet (vis.): 7.625" x 6.625" Frame: 23.375" x 22.125" P ROVENA NC E Galerie Michael, Beverly Hills, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2007) LITERATURE Pablo Picasso: Catalogue of the Printed Graphic Work 1904-1967. Vol I. G. Bloch. 1968. #370.; Pablo Picasso: Catalogue Raisonné des Livres Illustrés. P. Cramer, ed. 1983. #47.

$6,000–8,000

67 PABLO PICASSO

La Femme aux Dés (Jacqueline) 1960 Color lithograph on handmade Japon paper #17 of 100 Published and printed by Mourlot, Paris Signed in graphite lower right; signed and dated in plate lower right; edition lower left Together with copy of invoice from Art Showcase dated September 29, 2007 Image/sheet: 21.625" x 15.125" Frame: 43.5" x 37.5" P ROVENA NC E Art Showcase, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2007)

$5,000–7,000


68 AFTER PABLO PICASSO

Plate from Imaginary Portraits 1969 Color offset lithograph on Arches wove paper #80 of 250 Published by Harry N. Abrams, New York; printed by Marcel Salinas, Mougins Signed and dated “7-5-69” in plate upper left sheet; inscribed in graphite “A” with edition lower left Image/sheet (vis.): 24" x 18" Frame: 38.25" x 32.25" This print is from the American edition of Imaginary Portraits by Pablo Picasso. There was also a French edition of 250 created of this series of prints. P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California

$2,500–3,500

69 PABLO PICASSO

L’Atelier de Cannes (Cover for Ces Peintres Nos Amis, Volume II) (2nd State) 1958 17-color lithograph on Arches paper From the edition of 250 Published and printed by Mourlot, Paris Dated “7.4.56.” in plate upper left edge of sheet; signed and inscribed in plate “Pour Gilberte et Serge/ Picasso/65.12./58.” upper center sheet Together with copy of invoice from Timothy Yarger Fine Art dated July 6, 2006 Image/sheet: 17.5" x 12.5" Frame: 28.125" x 23" P ROV E NANC E Timothy Yarger Fine Art, Beverly Hills, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2006) LIT E RAT URE Pablo Picasso: Catalogue of the Printed Graphic Work 1904-1967. Vol I. G. Bloch. 1968. #794.; Picasso Lithographe. F. Mourlot. 1970. #279.

$1,500–2,000

55


70 PABLO PICASSO Joy of Living

1956 Round dish of white earthenware clay #96 of 100 Madoura Inscribed “C. 102/96/100” verso; stamped “Empreinte Originale de Picasso” and “Madoura Plein Feu” verso Ramié #346 16.5" diameter LITERATURE Pablo Picasso: Catalogue of the Edited Ceramic Works 1947-1971. A. Ramié. 1988. #346.

$6,000–9,000


71 PABLO PICASSO Face tankard

1959 Turned pitcher of white earthenware clay, decoration in engobes, glaze inside #281 of 300 Madoura Bears the inscription “Edition/ Picasso/281/300/Madoura” with “Edition Picasso” and “Madoura Plein Feu” stamps to underside Ramié #434 8.625" x 3.75" x 6" LIT E RAT URE Pablo Picasso: Catalogue of the Edited Ceramic Works 1947-1971. A. Ramié. 1988. #434.

$6,000–8,000

72 PABLO PICASSO Little sun

1968-1969 Rectangular plaque of red earthenware clay, engobe ground, engraving enhanced with oxides under partial brushed glaze patina From the edition of 100 Madoura Ramié #545 3.875" x 6.375" x 1" LIT E RAT URE Pablo Picasso: Catalogue of the Edited Ceramic Works 1947-1971. A. Ramié. 1988. #545.

$1,500–2,000

57


MARKINGS DETAIL

59

73 FRANÇOIS-XAVIER LALANNE Oiseau d’Argent table

Edition Artcurial, designed c. 1990 Initialed “FXL” and stamped “Lalanne” and “Artcurial” 30.125" x 35” x 31.75” (extended)

$35,000–40,000

ALTERNATE VIEW


74 CHARLOTTE PERRIAND Rush-seat chairs (8) Studio, designed 1941 Each: 33.75" x 16.5" x 17" LITERATURE Charlotte Perriand: Complete Works 1940-1955. Vol. 2. J. Barsac. 2014. 102-103.

$8,000–12,000


75 FERNAND LÉGER

Moulin Rouge (Plate 29 from La Ville Portfolio) 1959 Color lithograph on Arches paper #41 of 180 Published by Tériade, Paris; printed by Mourlot Frères, Paris Stamped signature lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Image: 12" x 19.5" Sheet (vis.): 17.375" x 23.875" Frame: 31.875" x 38.375"

$200–300

76 FERNAND LÉGER

Les Loisirs Sur Fond Rouge 1949 Color lithograph on paper #117 of 250 Published by Musée Fernand Léger, Biot Stamped signature with Musée Fernand Léger blind stamp lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Image: 20.125" x 26" Sheet (vis.): 21.875" x 27.875" Frame: 38.625" x 44.125"

$600–800

61


79 SALVADOR DALÍ

ILLUSTRATED PREVIOUS PAGE

77

78

MARC CHAGALL

SALVADOR DALÍ

La Leçon de Philétas (from Daphnis et Chloé) 1961 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper #130 of 250 Published by Tériade Éditeur, Paris; printed by Mourlot, Paris Image/sheet: 16.625" x 12.625" Frame: 35.125" x 30.75"

Kabuki Dancer

1973 Color lithograph on Arches paper #40 of 200 Published by Editions Graphiques Internationales, Paris; printed by Desjobert, Paris Signed in graphite lower right in image; signed and dated in plate center sheet in image; edition in Roman numerals lower left

Release of the Psychic Spirit (from Magic Butterfly and the Dream) 1973 Color lithograph on Japon paper with original reworking #19 of 150 Published by Levine & Levine, New York; printed by Atelier Dumas Inc., New York Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains Martin Lawrence Galleries label verso

Image/sheet: 30.125" x 21.625" Frame: 32.25" x 23.875"

Image: 22.875" x 17.125" Sheet (vis.): 28" x 19.625" Frame: 42" x 32.5"

ographs. U. Gauss, ed. 1998. #323.;

LIT E RAT URE The Official Catalog of

LIT E RAT URE The Official Catalog of

Marc Chagall: The Illustrated Books.

the Graphic Works of Salvador Dalí. A.

the Graphic Works of Salvador Dalí. A.

C. Sorlier. 1990. 86-87.

Field. 1996. #73-1.

Field. 1996. #78-2A.

$3,000–5,000

$800–1,200

$800–1,200

PROVE N A N CE Private Collection, Los Angeles, California L I T E RAT U R E Marc Chagall: The Lith-

63


80 CLAUDE VENARD

Untitled (Still Life) N.d. Oil on canvas Signed in black paint lower left Canvas (vis.): 29.25" x 29.25" Frame: 36.875" x 36.875"

$4,000–6,000

81 CLAUDE VENARD

Untitled (Men and Train) N.d. Oil on canvas Signed lower left; retains two Galerie Romanet stamps to canvas and frame verso Canvas (vis.): 14.75" x 17.75" Frame: 22.125" x 25.375"

$3,000–5,000


82 CLAUDE VENARD

Untitled (St. Rémy-lèsChevreuse) N.d. Oil on canvas Signed lower right; titled in composition; signed and inscribed “Paris” in black felt-tip marker canvas verso; retains unknown information label verso Canvas (vis.): 17.5" x 20.875" Frame: 28.25" x 31.75"

$2,000–3,000

83 ROGER BEZOMBES Fleurs et Fruits N.d. Oil on panel Signed lower left; signed, titled, and inscribed “Paris/8F” verso Panel (vis.): 14.625" x 17.625" Frame: 21.25" x 24.375"

$2,000–3,000

65


84 PEDRO FRIEDEBERG Astrocological clock

Studio, executed 2014 Wood, paint, and gold leaf Signed to verso; signed to underside of base; initialed “P.F.” to one foot Together with certificate of authenticity 23.5" x 15.5" x 9.5"

$4,000–6,000

85 PEDRO FRIEDEBERG

Six Fingered Hands (4) Studio, executed 2003 Wood and gold leaf Each signed to underside Together with certificate of authenticity Largest: 10.75" x 7.375" x 5" Smallest: 7.75" x 4.75" x 3.75"

$5,000–7,000


86 RUFINO TAMAYO Sandías

1980 Mixografía print on handmade paper #14 of 25 artist’s proofs aside from the edition of 100 Published by Mixografía, Los Angeles; printed by Taller de Gráfica Mexicana, Mexico City Signed lower right; edition inscribed in Roman numerals lower left Image: 25.5" x 34.5" Sheet: 30" x 40" Frame: 44" x 54" LIT E RAT URE Rufino Tamayo: Catalogue Raisonné: Gráfica 1925-1991. J. Carlos Pereda. 2004. #285.

$7,000–9,000

87 RUFINO TAMAYO Femme Souriante

1969 Color lithograph on paper H.C. aside from the edition of 150 Published by Touchstone Publishers, New York; printed by Atelier Desjobert, Paris Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Image: 21.125" x 27.25" Sheet (vis.): 22" x 29.125" Frame: 28.25" x 35.5" LIT E RAT URE Rufino Tamayo: Catalogue Raisonné: Gráfica 1925-1991. J. Carlos Pereda. 2004. #123.

$1,500–2,000

67


88 KAARE KLINT

Dining suite (11) Rud. Rasmussens Snedkerier, designed c. 1930 (dining table); designed 1927 (side chairs) Model no. 3758 (side chairs) Dining table and side chairs each retain Rud. Rasmussens Snedkerier labels Comprised of a dining table and ten side chairs Dining table: 29.625" x 85" x 42.5" Side chairs each: 33.5" x 19.25" x 20"

$10,000–15,000


89 POUL HENNINGSEN Pendant light

Louis Poulsen, designed c. 1926; this example produced c. 1929 Model no. PH 5/4 Impressed “PH 4” and “Patent” 14" x 20" diameter LIT E RAT URE Light Years Ahead: The Story of the PH Lamp. 2nd ed. T. Jorstian and P. Nielsen, eds. 2000. 168-169.

$10,000–15,000

69 90 FRITS HENNINGSEN Armchair

Frits Henningsen, designed c. 1940 34.625" x 26.625" x 24.25"

$4,000–6,000

91 JENS QUISTGAARD

Serving tray and bowl (2) Dansk, designed c. 1955 Each marked “Staved Teak/Danmark/Dansk Designs” and “IHQ” to underside Tray: 12.75" x 26.75" x 1.75" Bowl: 11.5" x 28.75" x 6" These examples appear to feature embellishments not found on the standard Dansk productions, such as silver additions and an ebonized finish.

$1,500–2,000


92 DALE CHIHULY

Larkspur Seaform Set with Golden Lip Wraps (2) Portland Press Edition, executed 2000 One signed, dated, and inscribed “PP 00” to underside Together with copy of invoice from Portland Press, Inc. dated March 30, 2001 5.625" x 10.75" x 7.125" 5.25" x 8.75" x 6.625"

$2,500–3,500

93 DALE CHIHULY

Cinnamon Macchia Portland Press Edition, executed 2001 Signed, dated, and inscribed “PP 01” to underside Together with copy of invoice from Portland Press, Inc. dated November 29, 2001 7" x 6.5" x 5.75"

$2,500–3,500


94 DALE CHIHULY

Imperial Iris Persian Set (2) Portland Press Edition, executed 1999 One signed, dated, and inscribed “PP 99” to underside Together with copy of invoice from Portland Press, Inc. dated November 29, 1999 6.75" x 11.75" x 9.75" 1.625" x 5" (diameter)

$2,500–3,500

71

95 DALE CHIHULY Citron Basket

Portland Press Edition, executed 2002 Signed, dated, and inscribed “PP 02” to underside Together with copy of invoice from Portland Press, Inc. dated December 4, 2002 7" x 7.5" x 7.25"

$2,000–3,000


96 TAKASHI MURAKAMI

DOB in Pure White Robe (2) 2013 Offset color lithographs on paper #28 of 300; #27 of 300 Published by Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., Tokyo and New York Comprised of DOB In Pure White Robe (Navy and Vermilion) and DOB In Pure White Robe (Pink and Blue) Each signed with edition lower right sheet Sheets (vis.) each: 19.25" x 19.25" Frames each: 23.875" x 23.875"

$2,000–3,000

97 TAKASHI MURAKAMI

And then and then and then and then and then (Red) 1999 Offset lithograph on paper #114 of 300 Published by Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., Tokyo and New York Signed with edition in black felt-tip marker lower right edge of sheet Image/sheet: 26.75" x 26.75" Frame: 30.5" x 30.5"

$800–1,200


73

98 TAKASHI MURAKAMI Flower Ball (3D) (3)

2010 Offset lithographs on paper A: #44 of 300; B: #40 of 300; C: #127 of 300 Published by Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., Tokyo and New York Each signed with edition Sheets (vis.) each: 27.5" diameter Frames each: 31" x 31"

$3,000–5,000


ALTERNATE VIEW

99 JEFF KOONS Puppy (Vase)

1998 White glazed ceramic #1,768 of 3,000 Published by Art of this Century, New York and Paris Signed and dated with impressed edition and publisher and manufacturer’s stamps to underside 17.5" x 17.5" x 11.5"

$7,000–10,000


100 JEFF KOONS

Balloon Dog (Red) 1995 Cast porcelain with red reflective finish #1,671 of 2,300 Published by MOCA Editions, Los Angeles Retains facsimile of signature on MOCA label verso with edition Together with original plate stands 10.25" diameter

$7,000–10,000

101 JONATHAN HOROWITZ

Larry Gagosian is a Person Too 2008 Gold-plated bronze #3 of 5 Incised signature, date, and edition to base 5" x 3" x 3"

$7,000–10,000

75


ILLUSTRATED OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP

102 PETER DOIG

103 PETER DOIG

ILLUSTRATED OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM

104

Big Sur (from 100 Years Ago)

Muldenberg (from 100 Years Ago)

PETER DOIG

2000-2001 Color etching and aquatint on Hahnemühle paper

2000-2001 Color etching and aquatint on Hahnemühle paper

2000-2001 Color etching and aquatint on Hahnemühle paper

#18 of 46

#18 of 46

#18 of 46

Published by Paragon Press, London

Published by Paragon Press, London

Published by Paragon Press, London

Signed with edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image

Signed with edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image

Signed with edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image

Image: 35.25" x 54.25" Sheet: 44.75" x 63"

Image: 28.25" x 43.75" Sheet: 37.875" x 52.5"

Image: 34.75" x 57.25" Sheet: 44.375" x 66"

$7,000–10,000

$6,000–8,000

$5,000–7,000

Drifter (from 100 Years Ago)


77


ALTERNATE VIEW

105 FERNANDO & HUMBERTO CAMPANA

Banquete Dolphins in Leather Estudio Campana, Brazil, designed 2011 #1 of 8 Retains stitched label to underside “Campana/Dolphins in Leather/#01/08” Together with slip case and copy of certificate from Estudio Campana 32" x 53.75" x 35"

$25,000–35,000


LABEL DETAIL

106 FERNANDO & HUMBERTO CAMPANA Cake Stool

Estudio Campana, Brazil, designed 2008 #76 of 150 Retains stitched label to raccoon’s tail “Campana/Cake Stool #076/150” Together with copy of certificate from Estudio Campana 27" x 52" x 46" LIT E RAT URE The Campana Brothers: Complete Works (So Far). D. Alfred, et al. 2010. 286.

$20,000–30,000

79


107 MARK BRADFORD 630C-MB03

2003 Color lithograph on paper #35 of 45 Published by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles Initialed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; edition with Cirrus Editions blind stamp lower left Together with copy of invoice from Sragow Gallery dated August 12, 2015 Image/sheet: 32.25" x 32.5" Frame: 48.5" x 48.625" P ROVENA NC E Sragow Gallery, New York, New York; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2015)

$2,000–3,000

108 MARK BRADFORD 629C-MB03

2003 Color lithograph on paper #30 of 45 Published by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles Initialed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; edition with Cirrus Editions blind stamp lower left Together with copy of invoice from Sragow Gallery dated August 12, 2015 Image/sheet: 32.375" x 32.625" Frame: 48.375" x 48.5" P ROVENA NC E Sragow Gallery, New York, New York; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2015)

$2,000–3,000


81

109 AMIR NIKRAVAN Untitled (Site 8)

2014 Acrylic on muslin over aluminum panel Retains Various Small Fires label verso Panel: 100.125" x 60.125" Frame: 100.75" x 60.75"

$10,000–15,000


110 WILLIAM ANASTASI

Untitled (12-3-1990 3:20-3:50 PM) 1990 Graphite on paper Signed, titled, and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; inscribed “Dec. 3, 1990/3:20-3:50 PM/9H” Composition/sheet: 50" x 38.125" Frame: 52.625" x 40.625" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Palm Springs, California

$8,000–12,000


111 MICHAEL PIERZYNSKI Jump

2006 Ceramic, acrylic, and wood Together with copy of original invoice from Carl Berg Gallery dated March 6, 2007 19" x 14" x 11" (including base) P ROV E NANC E Carl Berg Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2007)

$3,000–5,000

83


112 CHRISTIAN ROSA Untitled

2014 Oil, charcoal, graphite, and oil stick on canvas Signed and dated to canvas overlap verso 79.25" x 87"

$25,000–35,000


One of the key Los Angeles artists to emerge in the mid-1990s, Martin Kersels has created drawings, photographs, sculptures, and performances that build on the experimental breakthroughs of Paul McCarthy, Mike Kelley, and Chris Burden. In 1993, inspired by the early installation work of McCarthy, Kersels decided to return for his graduate degree at UCLA, where he began to shape his performance ideas into mechanical sculptures and installations.

Kersels has served as Director of Graduate Studies in Sculpture at Yale School of Art since 2012. Much of his work has toyed with the quirks and mishaps resultant from our over-dependence on machinery and technology. Approaching the mechanical world with the comic spirit of Rube Goldberg, in this drawing Kersels presents an off-kilter TV antenna as a mischievous god-like force.

113 MARTIN KERSELS Antenna 14

1999 Colored pencil on paper Signed, titled, and dated in graphite lower left edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 14" x 17" Frame: 20.75" x 23.75"

$1,500–2,000

114 MARCELO BONEVARDI Trophy Variation XII

1983 Mixed-media construction on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower left Composition: 29.125" x 21.75" x 1.875" Frame: 32.75" x 24.625"

$3,000–5,000

85


115 SAM GILLIAM Peru Suite (4)

2000 Color intaglio, lithograph, and relief on paper #5 of 5 Published and printed by Vermillion Editions Limited, Minneapolis Each signed and dated in graphite lower right; edition lower left Image/sheets each: 11" x 16.25" Frames each: 15.125" x 21.125"

$4,000–6,000


116 SAM GILLIAM Echo I

1995 Acrylic on wood Signed, titled, and dated in black felt-tip marker verso 19.5" x 29" x 1.5" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Rancho Mirage, California

$10,000–15,000

87

117 SAM GILLIAM Echo IV

1995 Acrylic on wood Signed, titled, and dated in black felt-tip marker verso 16" x 24.375" x 1.5" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Rancho Mirage, California

$10,000–15,000


118 PETER SCHUYFF Miami Globes (2)

1999 Oil on canvas diptych Each signed and dated in Roman numerals to canvas overlap verso Canvases each: 72" x 72" P ROVENA NC E The Estate of Gerard L. Cafesjian (acquired through Sotheby’s, New York, New York, March 15, 2006, lot 203)

$10,000–15,000


89

119 PETER DAVIES

Grey and Mainly Neutral Colours Receding Structure 1999 Acrylic on linen 84" x 179.25" P ROV E NANC E Gagosian Gallery, New York, New York; The Estate of Gerard L. Cafesjian (acquired through Phillips, New York, New York, March 9, 2009, lot 56)

$6,000–8,000


120 PHILIP & KELVIN LAVERNE Hanging plaques (30)

Studio, designed c. 1965

Etched and perforated brass Together with three additional 23.25” x 5” plaques, and 11 additional 15” x 5” plaques As illustrated: 70.5" x 52"

$7,000–10,000

121 PAUL EVANS Dining table

Directional, designed 1971 Initialed and dated 27.25" x 80" x 40"

$5,000–7,000


122 GEORGE NAKASHIMA

Triple sliding door cabinet Studio, executed 1975 American black walnut and pandanus cloth Inscribed “Zinmeister” verso Together with copy of Nakashima studio order card dated October 11, 1975 and payment receipt 32.25" x 100" x 21.5" P ROV E NANC E Walter & Renie Zinmeister, East Windsor, New Jersey (acquired directly from the Nakashima studio, 1975); Thence by descent

$30,000–50,000

91


123 SAM MALOOF, BOB STOCKSDALE, CLEAD CHRISTIANSEN, CHARLES HARVEY, HOWARD LEWIN & RUDE OSOLNIK Totem

Studio, executed 1987 Painted wood Etched signature by Howard Lewin verso; inscribed “Early example of/ The “Shaker”/Could they have learned this/From the Indians??!!” in green ink verso Together with handwritten letter from Howard Lewin dated December 1, 2018 54.375" x 11.5" x 12.25" P ROVENA NC E Howard Lewin, Claremont, California; Private Collection, Sebastopol, California (acquired directly from the above)

$5,000–7,000


124 PETER SCHLUMBOHM

Group of Chemex objects (7) Chemex Corporation, New York, designed 1937-1961 Borosilicate glass, cork, wood, nylon string, and leather Four stamped with manufacturer’s mark; six stamped “PYREX”; one stamped “PYREX/Made in USA/Fahrenheitor” to underside; one labelled “Fahrenheitor Pot-of-Cold” Comprised of three coffee makers in three different sizes, one Fahrenheitor bottle cooler, one carafe kettle, one cocktail glass with cover, and one Fahrenheitor Pot-of-Cold Together with two original packages of coffee filters and one original packaging box Largest: 14.25" x 6.5" diameter Smallest: 3.625" x 3.25" diameter

$4,000–6,000

125 LA GARDO TACKETT & KENJI FUJITA

Serving tray and vessel (2) Freeman Lederman, designed c. 1960 Serving tray: 8.25" x 14.5" x 2.375" Vessel: 10.75" x 4" x 3.25"

$2,000–3,000

93


SIGNATURE DETAIL

126 PETER VOULKOS Bird plate

Studio, executed c. 1956 Partially glazed stoneware Signed to underside 17" x 16.5"

$8,000–12,000

127 GLEN LUKENS Bowl

Studio, executed c. 1940 Partially glazed ceramic Signed “Glen Lukens” 2.625" x 11.375" diameter P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, California

$5,000–7,000

128 HARRISON MCINTOSH Untitled

Studio, N.d. Glazed stoneware and chrome-plated steel Signed to underside; retains paper label “Hand Thrown Stoneware/Harrison McIntosh/Claremont California”; inscribed “#7375” 6" x 24.75" x 11.5"

$2,500–3,500


129 BEATRICE WOOD Large chalice

Studio, executed c. 1990 Iridescent glazed ceramic Signed “Beato” to underside 9.875" x 10.25" diameter

$4,000–6,000

130 BEATRICE WOOD Bottle vase

Studio, executed c. 1980 Volcanic glazed ceramic Signed “Beato” to underside 7.5" x 4.875" diameter

$2,000–3,000

131 BEATRICE WOOD Ceramic brooch

Studio, executed c. 1978 Glazed ceramic Signed “Beato” to reverse 2.625" x 1.875" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Ojai, California (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1978); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 1998)

$1,500–2,000

132 BEATRICE WOOD Ceramic pendant

Studio, executed c. 1978 Glazed ceramic Signed “Beato” to reverse 4.125" diameter P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Ojai, California (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1978); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 1998)

$1,500–2,000

95


Fred Eversley’s Kinetic Lenses After earning his engineering degree from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, Fred Eversley had intended to continue his studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. However, in the summer after his graduation, Eversley resolved to follow his then-girlfriend to Mexico, where she had enrolled in a painting course. When his parents refused to support this ‘derailment,’ Eversley made a last-ditch effort to raise the cash he needed. In desperation he reached out to the California aerospace engineering firm Wyle Laboratories, offering a six- to twelve-month commitment with the company in exchange for a cash advance. Upon the firm’s eager agreement, Eversley took the money and “tagged along” to Mexico, where he says he “pretended to study mural painting.” Upon returning stateside in 1964, Eversley moved to Los Angeles and began working at Wyle Laboratories as a supervisor on projects for the French atomic energy commission, the European space agency, and NASA. After many failed attempts to secure a rental, Eversley settled in Venice which, at the time, was one of the only integrated beach communities in L.A. By Eversley’s account, he started “hanging out with [his] neighbors including Larry Bell, Jim Turrell, Ed Moses, Bob Irwin, John McCracken, John Altoon, and Charles Mattox” in his spare time. Eventually he began helping them execute the technical elements of their projects and became a familiar face around their Venice studios. The L.A. art world at this point was still small and Eversley easily found himself “rubbing shoulders” with major artists, museum directors, and curators at openings and parties. However, it took a near-death experience to push Eversley into becoming an artist himself. After an accident in 1967 left him on crutches for a year, Charles Mattox invited

Eversley to move in with him rent-free in exchange for technical help with his kinetic sculptures. Eversley took him up on the offer and left Wyle Laboratories. When Mattox left for New Mexico six months later, Eversley suddenly had the place to himself. This is when he began developing his first resin sculptures. From the beginning, Eversley aimed to craft kinetic sculptures that used the natural fluctuations, in both their setting and relationship to the viewer, to produce movement. In bringing his aerospace engineering knowledge into the creative realm, Eversley became fixated on the ways in which parabolic shapes could illustrate the character of energy. By the 1970s the artist’s sculptures evolved into translucent, concave discs, or rings of colored resin. While many Light and Space artists focused on the viewer’s perception of their works, Eversley focused on creating objects that could be used by the spectator to perceive the world around them. Because the morphing reflection in Eversley’s resin is produced by the viewer’s movement, they are made more aware of their own important role in the kinetic “choreography” of their surroundings. Upon reflection, Eversley says that he unconsciously used his technical understanding of physics to channel “the broader metaphysical” currents of Venice beach in the 1960s and 1970s. He notes, “I always considered that energy and how to harness that energy to make people happy.” Cook, Greg. “How Fred Eversley Went From NASA Engineer To Cosmic Artist In '60s LA.” WBUR, 8 Mar. 2017, www.wbur.org/artery/2017/03/08/fred-eversley. Eversley, Fred. Energy. fredeversley.com/about/energy. Frank, Peter. “The Dance Of Seeing.” Oct. 2011.


ALTERNATE VIEW

133 FRED EVERSLEY Untitled (Lens)

N.d. Cast polyester resin 22.125" x 22.25" x 7" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, United States

$30,000–50,000

97


134 LARRY BELL VFGY 5

1979 Vaporized metal on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower center edge of sheet Together with copy of original invoice from The Museum of Contemporary Art dated June 16, 1998, and letter of provenance Composition/sheet: 39.375" x 27.5" Frame: 40" x 28" P ROVENA NC E Janus Gallery, Venice, California; Joe Austin (acquired directly from the above, 1979); Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California (acquired directly from the above through MOCA Auction, Los Angeles, California, June 16, 1998, lot S 64); Thence by descent

$15,000–20,000


135 LARRY BELL Untitled

2002 Mixed-media on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower center edge of sheet Sheet: 22.5" x 22.625" Frame: 24.5" x 24.5"

$2,500–3,500

99

136 LARRY BELL

Mirage Series—#7 1988 Mixed-media on coated canvas Signed and dated lower center 28" x 36" P ROV E NANC E Los Angeles Valley College, Van Nuys, California (donated directly by the artist); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 1989); Thence by descent E XHIBIT E D “Exhibition in Memory of Fidel Danielli,” Los Angeles Valley College, Van Nuys, April 17-May 10, 1989

$5,000–7,000


137 MARY CORSE

Untitled (White Light Grid) 1969 Glass microspheres in acrylic on canvas Signed and dated verso 24.25" x 24" P ROVENA NC E Richard Bellamy, New York, New York; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 1971); Thence by descent

$100,000–150,000

SIGNATURE AND DATE DETAIL


Mary Corse’s Engaging Spaces Having been exposed to the works of Josef Albers and Hans Hoffman at a young age, Mary Corse became fascinated with their ability to coax out the viewer’s recognition of their own perception. She recalls tracing their fundamental shapes over and over, marveling at the ways in which her visual interaction with the forms could animate and transform them. In her own words, these artists allowed the viewer to become “part of the work” as “their position and movement actually creates the painting.” This discovery sparked her enduring interest in the “pictorial tools” that could create and alter perceived spaces, as opposed to simply depicting them. Together, Untitled (White Light Grid) (1969), Untitled (Black Earth Series) (c. 1977), and Untitled (c. 1990), present a survey of Corse’s evolving pursuit to activate her viewer’s participation through a variety of mediums.

the work’s function, as Corse believes that the maintenance of a two-dimensional situation promotes abstraction and leaves more room for the viewer’s active immersion, given that it does not preemptively assert the work’s physical (i.e. three dimensional) values and limitations. Continuing her career-long discussion of the relationship between subjectivity and viewer participation, Corse again turned to minimal composition. To create Untitled (Black Earth Series) (c. 1977) Corse took a mold directly from a mountain rock and the only indication of her intervention in the clay is the ceramic glaze applied to reveal the terrestrial material’s capacity to transmit light. Where many of her previous works present the ultimate reduction of color, Untitled (Black Earth Series) (c. 1977), captures the ultimate reduction of texture, that which has been “molded off the earth.”

Corse is ubiquitously known for her numerous monochromatic white paintings, and the particular series to which Untitled (White Light Grid) (1969) belongs, demonstrates an important development in the artist’s practice. The question of subjectivity has remained central to the Corse’s investigation of perception. Throughout the early to mid-1960s, Corse rejected all forms of representation and attempted to remove any trace of her artistic interference with her materials. In order to create the impression that her pure plains of color were free of manipulation, Corse would sand down even her smallest brushstrokes. In this process, Corse went to great lengths to steer the viewer away from logical thought and towards an enveloping perceptual experience. By the late 1960s however, Corse realized that an artist’s subjectivity could never truly be erased from their work. As a result, the White Light Grid series shows Corse decidedly putting “the brushstroke and the human touch back in,” as she emphasizes the alternating directions in which she has pulled the paint across the canvas in each square of the grid. This shift in theory was also accompanied by Corse’s new integration of glass microspheres with her pigment, which allowed the painting to emit a unique luminosity.

Untitled (c. 1990) appears to be a study for a planned painting. Corse began painting her arch form in the late 1980s in monochromatic palettes. The differentiation between the outer and inner fields in this composition is often entirely dependent on the viewer’s position in relation to the work. Untitled (c. 1990) intriguingly reveals Corse’s inclusion of a band within the arch, a figuration that she would not paint until 1996. This ‘inner-band’ revisits the forms of her wood column series produced in the mid-1960s. According to Corse, the flattened application of this composition pushes the viewer even further into the experience of the work. By combining the subtle color gradient that constitutes shape in her earlier arches with the inner-band of her columns, the work’s creation of space through light disappears and reappears in response to the viewer’s engagement. While her techniques and materials have varied widely over the fifty years of her career, Corse persistently teases out the viewer’s sensitivity to their own act of creation through perception. This set of three works offers a multidimensional review, not only of the transformations in Corse’s artistic vocabulary, but of the consistency in her objectives. Bacon, Alex. “Mary Corse.” Kayne Griffin Corcoran, www.kaynegriffincorcoran.

While Untitled (Black Earth Series) (c. 1977) might initially present as a relief sculpture, Corse insists that it is yet another iteration of the painting medium. This is critical to

com/features/mary-corse. “Mary Corse: A Survey in Light.” Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018, whitney. org/Exhibitions/MaryCorse.

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SIGNATURE DETAIL

138 MARY CORSE

Untitled (Black Earth Series) c. 1977 Fired and glazed clay Signed in graphite verso 15.75" x 15.375" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist, 1978)

$10,000–15,000


103

139 MARY CORSE Untitled

c. 1990 Charcoal on paper Signed in graphite lower right Composition: 10" x 19.75" Sheet (vis.): 12" x 21.875" Frame: 18.375" x 28.125" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist, c. 1990)

$15,000–20,000


140 DE WAIN VALENTINE Column

1970 Cast polyester resin 22.125" x 13.125" x 3.125" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (gifted directly by the artist)

$30,000–50,000


141 JOE GOODE Untitled (3)

1971 Color lithographs on paper A: Artist’s proof aside from the edition of 50; B: #8 of 50; C: Artist’s proof aside from the edition of 50 Published by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles A: Signed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; edition lower left; B, C: Signed and dated in graphite lower center edge of sheet; edition lower left A: Image: 17.25" x 23.375" Sheet: 18" x 24" Frame: 21.75" x 27.75" B: Image/sheet: 13.75" x 23" Frame: 17.75" x 26.625" C: Image: 23.125" x 23.375" Sheet: 24" x 24" Frame: 27.625" x 27.625"

$3,000–5,000

142 JOE GOODE

Homage to Gutai 28 2002 Oil on Indigo Gampi Signed in graphite lower right edge of sheet; retains Joe Goode Studio label frame verso Composition/sheet: 12.25" x 19" Frame: 14.625" x 21.625"

$4,000–6,000

105


143 ED RUSCHA

Mocha Standard 1969 8-color screenprint on paper #70 of 100 Published by the artist; printed by Jean Milant and Daniel Socha, Hollywood Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower left margin beneath image Image: 19.625" x 37" Sheet: 25.625" x 40" Frame: 26.25" x 40.625" LITERATURE Edward Ruscha: Editions, 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol. II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #30.

$80,000–120,000


144 ED RUSCHA

Cheese Oval (from Various Cheeses) 1976 2-color lithograph on Arches 88 paper #30 of 39 Published and printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Signed with edition in graphite sheet verso; retains Gemini G.E.L. blind stamps lower right edge of sheet; retains Richard Green Gallery label frame verso Gemini G.E.L. #45.10 Image/sheet: 14.625" x 20.5" Frame: 18.125" x 24" LIT E RAT URE Edward Ruscha: Editions 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #93.

$3,000–5,000

145 ED RUSCHA Stranger

1983 2-color lithograph on white Rives BFK paper #5 of 7 Published and printed by the Printmaking Department, University of Houston, Houston Signed and dated in graphite with publisher’s blind stamp lower right edge of sheet; edition lower left Image: 22" x 16.875" Sheet: 30" x 22.25" Frame: 32.25" x 24.5" LIT E RAT URE Edward Ruscha: Editions 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #135.

$15,000–20,000

107


146 ED RUSCHA

Western Horizontal 1986 4-color lithograph on Arches 88 paper #4 of 35 Published and printed by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles Signed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; edition lower left; retains Cirrus Editions blind stamp lower left edge of sheet Image: 28" x 48" Sheet: 38" x 56" Frame: 42" x 62.5" LITERATURE Edward Ruscha: Editions 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #146.

$3,000–5,000


147 ED RUSCHA

Vowel #77 (E) 1996 Acrylic on book cover Signed, dated “Aug. 24, 1996,” and inscribed “#77” to interior page; retains Galerie 1900-2000 label frame verso Book: 10.25" x 8.75" Frame: 15.375" x 13.75" P ROV E NANC E Gagosian Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Dennis Hopper, Los Angeles, California; Galerie 19002000, Paris, France; Private Collection, Midwest (acquired directly from the above, 2011) E XHIBIT E D “Ed Ruscha, Vowels,” Gagosian Gallery, Los Angeles, September 11-28, 1996

$12,000–18,000

109

ILLUSTRATION OF SIMILAR EXAMPLE

148 MASON WILLIAMS Bus Book

1967 Screenprint on billboard stock in 16 sections From the edition of 200 Published by the artist; printed by The Benline Process Color Company, Deland and Pacific Display, Los Angeles Together with original box Sheet (overall): 123.5" x 434" Box: 15" x 17.25" x 5"

$4,000–6,000


149 ED KIENHOLZ

For 2 Phony Rocks and a Snag 1971 Watercolor and ink stamp on paper in artist’s frame Signed and dated in graphite with artist’s thumbprint lower right edge of sheet Sheet (vis.): 11.75" x 15.75" Frame: 12.375" x 16.25"

$5,000–7,000

150 ED KIENHOLZ For $114.00

1969 Watercolor and ink stamp on paper in artist’s frame Signed and dated in graphite with artist’s thumbprint lower right edge of sheet; retains Eugenia Butler Gallery label frame verso Sheet (vis.): 11.625" x 15.625" Frame: 12.25" x 16.25"

$4,000–6,000


151 RICHARD PETTIBONE

Untitled (Proust’s bedroom with train, red) c. 1965 Acrylic and photoengraving on canvas in artist’s frame Inscribed “RP-38/GM + CC Kent” to canvas stretcher verso Canvas: 11.125" x 10.125" Frame: 11.375" x 10.25" E XHIBIT E D “Richard Pettibone: A Retrospective,” traveling exhibition, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, April 30-August 1, 2005; Frances Young Tang Museum, Saratoga Springs, November 19, 2005-February 12, 2006; Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, March 12-May 28, 2006 ILLUST RAT E D Richard Pettibone: A Retrospective. I. Berry and M. Duncan. 2005. 33, #18.

$12,000–15,000

111


152 CONNOR EVERTS Untitled (3)

c. 1971 Pastel and graphite on paper Composition/sheets each: 13" x 10" Frames each: 19.875" x 16.875" P ROVENA NC E Cardwell Jimmerson Contemporary Art, Culver City, California; Private Collection, Santa Paula, California (acquired directly from the above, 2008)

$2,000–3,000


153 ROBERT ARNESON

Untitled (Vase with Brick) c. 1971 Unglazed stoneware 23" x 11" diameter

$12,000–15,000

154 JAMES GILL

Untitled (Triptych) 1964 Mixed-media on Masonite panels in three parts Each panel signed and dated Panels each: 30.5" x 19.375" Frames each: 32.25" x 21.25"

$5,000–7,000

113


155 RICHARD DIEBENKORN

Works from Seated Woman Series (4) 1965 Lithographs on Rives BFK paper A: #71 of 100; B: #77 of 100; C: #15 of 100; D: #15 of 100 Published and printed by Original Press, San Francisco Each initialed and dated lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; each retains Original Press blind stamps lower right; one retains Martin Sumers Graphics label frame verso Comprised of A: Seated Woman (with arms and legs crossed); B: Seated Woman in Director’s Chair; C: Seated Woman on Sofa (removing her shoes); D: Seated Woman in an Armchair (with wine glass) Largest (A): Image: 25" x 19.375" Sheet (vis.): 27" x 20.875" Frame: 35.625" x 27.75" Smallest (C): Image/sheet (vis): 23.5" x 18.5" Frame: 35.625" x 27.875"

$9,000–12,000


156 RICHARD DIEBENKORN

Untitled (from Club/Spade Group ‘81-82) (from Eight by Eight to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary Portfolio) 1982; published 1986 6-color lithograph on Arches Cover white paper #156 of 250 Published by MOCA, Los Angeles; printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Initialed and dated with Gemini G.E.L. blind stamp lower right edge of sheet; edition lower left Gemini G.E.L. #15.1 Image: 38" x 25.375" Sheet: 40" x 27" Frame: 45.125" x 32.25"

$3,000–5,000

115

157 WAYNE THIEBAUD Pie Slice

1962 Etching on Fabriano wove paper #17 of 60 Published by Arturo Schwartz, Milan Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains Pace Editions Inc. label frame verso Image: 5.75" x 4.125" Sheet: 10" x 8" Frame: 11.5" x 9.5"

$6,000–9,000


ILLUSTRATED OPPOSITE PAGE

158 LARRY COHEN

View of Hollywood Reservoir at Night 2008 Oil on canvas Signed and inscribed in black felt-tip marker to canvas stretcher verso; signed in graphite canvas verso

159 LARRY COHEN

View of Santa Monica Beach 2007 Oil on canvas Signed in paint to canvas stretcher verso; signed in graphite canvas verso

Canvas: 30" x 20" Frame: 31.25" x 21.25"

Canvas: 21.875" x 21.875" Frame: 22.5" x 22.625"

$2,000–3,000

$2,000–3,000

117


Timo Sarpaneva and the Golden Age of Finnish Design During the 1930s, architect and designer Alvar Aalto became an art world sensation as he was the first to draw attention to the expressive, clean elegance of Finnish design. At this time, the Finnish economy was largely agrarian and a majority of the Finnish population relied on barter systems. This culture promoted technical acuity and an immense appreciation for finely-crafted objects. In the aftermath of World War II, large numbers of workers began to move from rural communities to town centers, bringing with them a vast multi-generational inheritance of craftsmanship. Coupled with this economic shift, “there was a great yearning for beauty after [years of] war and suffering,” noted Finnish designer Timo Sarpaneva. Thus set the stage for Finland's ‘Golden Age’ of design which followed the war. In 1950, Iittala, Finland’s most prominent glass manufacturer, hired the young Sarpaneva to design their pieces. While he was a skilled artist in a variety of materials, Sarpaneva gravitated to glass because of its inherent transmission of light, a pinnacle of beauty in the harsh Nordic landscape. After much trial and error, Sarpaneva transformed the traditional ‘wet-stick’ glassmaking method. Where glass is typically blown to form a shape, Sarpaneva instead formed a steam bubble inside the molten glass. Through this process each

piece was designed “from the inside out.” Sarpaneva then ventured to create “artistic yet functional” objects that Iittala’s influx of skilled workmen could mass produce for Finnish homes and workplaces. The earliest incarnations of Sarpaneva’s steam-blowing method included Iittala’s “Lansetti” and “Orchid” vases. When exhibited together at the Milan Triennial in 1954, these vase sculptures won Sarpaneva a Grand Prix. Later in 1954, House Beautiful also named his “Orchid” vase their “Most Beautiful Object of the Year.” Sarpaneva soon gained the adoring reputation of being one of Finland’s most important cultural ambassadors as his works boasted “all that was satisfyingly minimal and contemporary” in Nordic art. Iittala went on to receive numerous prestigious awards for Sarpaneva’s commanding forms, which had helped to define mid-century Finnish design. “‘Lansetti II’ (Lancet II) Vase.” The Met's Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/56.31.3/. “Scandinavian Glass.” Antiques Roadshow Collectibles, by Carol Prisant, Workman Publishing Company, 2003, p. 101. Weideger, Paula. “The Golden Boy of Finland’s Golden Age of Design.” Introspective Magazine, 29 July 2018.


160 TIMO SARPANEVA Lansetti I vase

Iittala, designed 1952 Model no. 3841 Retains etched signature “Timo Sarpaneva Iittala” 11.375" x 6.75" x 2" LIT E RAT URE The Nordic Modern Movement: Masterworks in Glass, Ceramics, Silver and Wood. Gansevoort Gallery exh. cat. 1998. 22.

$12,000–15,000

119


161 MILO BAUGHMAN Dining set (7)

Thayer Coggin, Inc., designed c. 1975 Model no. 1236 (dining chairs) Four chairs retain Thayer Coggin, Inc. tags to underside Comprised of a dining table and six dining chairs Dining table: 28.5" x 71.75" x 41.875" Chairs each: 43.375" x 18.5" x 19"

$3,000–5,000


162 MARK BRAZIER-JONES Atlantis chair

Studio, designed 1988; this chair an early example before the regular production LAMA would like to thank the Mark Brazier-Jones studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work 27" x 27" x 32"

$5,000–7,000

163 CHRIS FEREBEE

Low-Tek table prototype 521 Design, executed c. 1999 Model no. 1 9.875" x 37.75" x 27.875" This example is the only one of its kind that was ever produced. This prototype debuted at ICFF in 2000. P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Virginia Beach, Virginia LIT E RAT URE Ultimate New York Design. A. L. Oriol, ed. 2006. 395.; Young Designers Americas. C. K. Dougherty, ed. 2006. 15.

$3,000–5,000

121


The Wearable Art of Margaret De Patta After training as a sculptor and painter at the California School of Fine Arts, California native Margaret De Patta began studying at the New York Arts Students League. It was here that the young artist was first immersed in the brand of Modernism, typified by artists such Ibram Lassaw and John Graham, which flourished in the 1920s New York art scene. It wasn’t until 1929, after having returned to San Francisco, that De Patta took to the jewelry medium that would inevitably distinguish her career. After futilely searching for a wedding ring that would satisfy her freshly formed Modernist aesthetic, De Patta resolved to design and forge her own piece. To acquire the necessary metalsmithing skills for the job, De Patta took on an apprenticeship with San Francisco jeweler, Armin Hairenian at the Art Copper Shop. Over the course of this intense training, De Patta began including the foundational tenets of fine art, such as light, tension, and organic structure, within her metal craft. De Patta increasingly approached her works as sculptures “scaled to a wearable size.” This method placed her on the forefront of the infant Wearable Art Movement. In 1939 De Patta entered into a creative partnership with Francis Sperisen, with whom she worked to develop the “opticut.” The new stone-cutting method manipulated principles of light transmission to create unique and dramatic prism patterns that reacted to the wearer’s movement. In the summer of 1940, De Patta went on to enroll in a course taught by the Bauhaus artist László Moholy-Nagy at Mills College. Moholy-Nagy was quick to identify De Patta’s talent and reaffirmed her visual rhetoric. He reportedly told De Patta that her practice already echoed fundamental Bauhaus and Constructivist principles. Later that year, De Patta sought to extend her formal training under Moholy-Nagy and moved to Chicago to attend the School of Design. During this year, De Patta perfected her signature ‘floating’ stone composition. The designer’s affinity for stainless steel, beach stone, and other materials typically disregarded by purveyors of fine jewelry, allowed her to rigorously interpret the basic tenets of architectural design. While De Patta’s works presented an apex of modern design, she held to the democratic philosophy that they should be accessible to the masses. Once again in San Francisco, De Patta launched the Designs Contemporary jewelry line in 1946 with her second husband, Eugene Bielawski. While

intermittently creating custom pieces for some clients, De Patta devoted most of her energy to her catalog collection, which started off with eight reproducible pieces. Up until 1957, De Patta sold items from her catalog at small retailers and farmers markets throughout California (including the Los Angeles Farmers Market on Third and Fairfax). At the same time, De Patta taught various courses at art and design schools around the Bay Area. Though De Patta often struggled with dismissive fine art critics and institutions, her jewelry was prominently featured alongside the works of Alexander Calder and Jacques Lipchitz in MoMA’s 1946 exhibition, “Modern Handmade Jewelry.” This show was the first of its kind to acknowledge "wearable art as a movement in America." De Patta was also later included in a series of exhibitions beginning in 1948 at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, that celebrated the small group of “artist jewelers” who were bringing the craft “into the realm of art” in the postwar period. Within her writings, De Patta asserted that "contemporary jewelry must characterize our times with its emphasis on space and structure, strong light, open forms, cantilever, floating structures and movement." With this ethos, De Patta pioneered an intellectual form of jewelry that monumentally set the course for the integration of modern design into personal objects of the everyday.

Ilse-Neuman, Ursula, et al. Space, Light, Structure: the Jewelry of Margaret De Patta. Museum of Arts and Design, 2012. Lauria, Jo. "Margaret De Patta: Pioneer of Modern Studio Jewelry." Ornament, vol. 35, no. 5, 2012, pp. 34-39, 6-7. Moses, Monica. “Groundbreaking Jeweler: Margaret De Patta.” American Craft Council, 2012, craftcouncil.org/post/groundbreaking-jeweler-margaret-de-patta.


164 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1960 Signed with impressed artist’s cipher and inscribed “Sterling” to underside 1.875" x 3.75" x .625" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent LIT E RAT URE Space, Light, Structure: The Jewelry of Margaret De Patta. U. Ilse-Neuman and J. M. Muñiz. 2012. 96 for a similar example illustrated.

$7,000–10,000

165 MARGARET DE PATTA Ring

Studio, designed c. 1938 Impressed with artist’s cipher 1.25" x .75" x 1.25" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent LIT E RAT URE Space, Light, Structure: The Jewelry of Margaret De Patta. U. Ilse-Neuman and J. M. Muñiz. 2012. 24 for a similar example illustrated.

$2,500–3,500

166 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1930 Impressed with artist’s cipher 1.375" x 3.375" x .25" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000

123


167 MARGARET DE PATTA Earrings (2)

Studio, designed c. 1942 One signed with impressed artist’s cipher; one inscribed “Sterling” .875" x .75" x .625" These earrings were among the earliest examples of the pieces that would later feature in De Patta's production line for her business, Designs Contemporary. They were later produced and named "Production earrings or cufflinks #26" from 1947-1957. P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent LITERATURE Space, Light, Structure: The Jewelry of Margaret De Patta. U. Ilse-Neuman and J. M. Muñiz. 2012. 113.

$2,000–3,000

168 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1947 Signed and inscribed “Sterling” 1.25" x 2.25" x .375" P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent

$5,000–7,000

169 MARGARET DE PATTA Cufflinks (2)

Studio, designed c. 1935 One with impressed artist’s cipher and inscribed “Sterling” .625" x .625" x 1" P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,500–3,500


170 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1960 Stamped with the artist’s name 2.25" x 3.75" x .625" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent LIT E RAT URE Space, Light, Structure: The Jewelry of Margaret De Patta. U. Ilse-Neuman and J. M. Muñiz. 2012. 97 for a similar example illustrated.

$7,000–10,000

171 MARGARET DE PATTA Ring

Studio, designed c. 1945 Signed with impressed artist’s cipher and inscribed “Sterling” to band 1.125" x .875" x 1.125" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent LIT E RAT URE Space, Light, Structure: The Jewelry of Margaret De Patta. U. Ilse-Neuman and J. M. Muñiz. 2012. 113 for a similar example illustrated from her production line.

$3,000–5,000

172 MARGARET DE PATTA Belt buckle

Studio, designed c. 1930 Impressed with artist’s cipher twice 1.75" x 5.625" x .25" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$3,000–5,000

125


173 MARGARET DE PATTA Cuff bracelet

Studio, designed c. 1930 1" x 2.375" x 1.75" P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,000–3,000

174 MARGARET DE PATTA Wedding bands (2)

Studio, designed c. 1946 One with impressed artist’s cipher and inscribed “14K”; one stamped with artist’s name .375" x .75" x .875" .125" x .75" x .75" These examples were wedding bands created by De Patta's for her own use. P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000

175 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1930 2.25" x 1.625" x .25" P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,500–3,500


176 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1930 Impressed with artist’s cipher 1.625" (diameter) x .375" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,000–3,000

177 MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1945 1.375" x 2.875" x .5" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,500–3,500

177A MARGARET DE PATTA Pin

Studio, designed c. 1940 1.5" x 3.75" x .375" P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,000–3,000

127


Herbert Bayer Beginning his artistic career as an architect in 1919, Austrian-born artist Herbert Bayer would go on to produce a rich body of work populated by diverse media and materials. Having become enamored with the newly formed Bauhaus manifesto of integrating and synthesizing all forms of art and design into the everyday systems of modern life, Bayer enrolled at the Weimar Bauhaus in 1921. There he enjoyed the mentorship of the school’s robust faculty, which included Wassily Kandinsky and László Moholy-Nagy, and experimented with mural painting and graphic composition. During his time as a Bauhaus student, Bayer worked to develop a “universal” typeface. Out of aesthetic frustration with what he saw as the unnecessarily ornate style of standard German typeface, Bayer crafted his font to reflect the clarity and ease-of-use touted by the Bauhaus method. While Bayer’s typeface never became truly universal, it was adopted as the Bauhaus’ trademark font and today often appears on digital platforms as Bayer Universal. In 1925, Bayer began teaching design at the Bauhaus and offered one of the school’s earliest courses on typography. Bayer was eventually appointed the school’s director of printing and advertising by Walter Gropius and it was during this period that Bayer began working intently in photography. Shortly after, in 1928, Bayer left the Bauhaus for a position at Vogue magazine’s Berlin office as their director of art. The following decade saw the maturation of Bayer’s “broad approach to art,” as he cultivated a multimedia style for a variety of practical applications. With the rise of the Nazi party, Bayer, like many of his contemporaries, began seeking international opportunities. On an invitation from the Museum of Modern Art’s founding director, Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Bayer left Europe for New York in 1938. Upon his arrival, Bayer designed the display for MoMA’s exhibition, “Bauhaus: 1919–1928,” and oversaw its installation. In the following years, Bayer established relationships with the publishers of Life and Fortune magazines and was commissioned by General Electric for print advertising. In 1946, Bayer moved to Aspen, Colorado, where in addition to becoming the chairman of the department of design at the Container Corporation of America and design consultant for Aspen Development, the artist developed a lifelong

friendship with Robert O. Anderson. Bayer’s influence is credited with igniting Anderson's “insatiable passion” for art collecting. When Anderson founded the Atlantic Richfield Company in 1966, he brought Bayer on to not only design all corporate branding related to the company, including their logo, but to oversee ARCO’s art collection. Through Bayer’s direction, ARCO amassed a collection of 15,000 works, granting the company the distinction of holding the world's largest corporate art collection. In 1972, Bayer relocated to California, where he oversaw the artistic direction of the newly built ARCO Plaza in Los Angeles, which was to house ARCO’s new corporate headquarters. In the midst of the project, Anderson commissioned Bayer to design the fountain sculpture Double Ascension (1973) (originally titled Stairway to Nowhere), which still stands in what is now the City National Plaza at 515 South Flower Street. Throughout his career, Bayer was regarded as a “major artistic innovator” by many of America’s most influential corporate leaders, but his works were all too often neglected by art critics and academics. However, as the longstanding barrier between commercial art, design, and fine art continues to dissolve, Bayer’s impressive body of work has become the subject of eager reevaluation. While Bayer’s corporate ties once cast him outside of serious art circles, they are increasingly read as a beacon of the Bauhaus gospel which “embraced industry and the machine” as channels for collective enrichment. Alongside only a small handful of designers, such as Saul Bass and Raymond Loewy, Bayer sought to elevate everyday visual consumption. When once questioned during an interview on his interest in contemporary art, Robert O. Anderson insisted that it was “beneficial to society” because “it inspires you to think outside the box and use your imagination.” This was precisely Bayer’s prescription for the masses as he delivered functional design to a wide consumer audience. Abbaspour, Mitra. “Herbert Bayer.” Museum of Modern Art, 2014, www.moma.org/ artists/399. “Herbert Bayer.” Cary Graphic Arts Collection, RIT Archive Collections, 1 Jan. 1990, library.rit.edu/gda/designers/herbert-bayer. Chanzit, Gwen F. Herbert Bayer: Early Purveyor of Modernist Design in America. (Volumes I and II), 1985.


178 HERBERT BAYER

Yellow (Chromatic) Center 1970 Varnished acrylic on paper Signed, dated, and inscribed “21” in red paint lower right in composition; signed, dated, and inscribed “21/acrylic varnished 14 3/4” x 14 3/4”” in graphite lower right edge of sheet; titled and inscribed “For my friend George with many thanks from Herbert Bayer” in graphite lower left edge of sheet Composition: 14.75" x 14.75" Sheet: 22.5" x 21.875" Frame: 25.25" x 23.5" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (gifted directly by the artist, 1970)

$8,000–12,000

179 HERBERT BAYER

Model for ARCO Dallas Mural SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM LABEL

1980 Acrylic on cardboard Retains Denenberg Fine Arts label and The Santa Barbara Museum of Art exhibition label frame verso Composition: 3.25" x 4.75" Frame: 10.375" x 13.375" E XHIBIT E D “Diverse Directions,” Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, December 12, 1987-February 7, 1988 LIT E RAT URE Diverse Directions: A Collector’s Choice, Selections from the Charles Craig Collection. Santa Barbara Museum of Art exh. cat. 1987. 64.

$3,000–4,000

129


180

181

HERBERT BAYER

ELLSWORTH KELLY

Edition Domberger Stuttgart Portfolio 1968 The complete portfolio of six color screenprints on paper, justification page, and original portfolio case #32 of 85 Published by Edition Domberger, Stuttgart Each signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Images each: 17.625" x 17.625" Sheets each: 19.625" x 19.625" Frames each: 20" x 20" Portfolio case: 21" x 19.875" x .75"

$3,000–5,000

Spectrum

1973 14-color screenprint on Arches 88 paper #8 of 34 Published and printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains Gemini G.E.L. blind stamps lower right edge of sheet Gemini G.E.L. #28.66 Image: 17.5" x 67.25" Sheet (vis.): 33.5" x 83.25" Frame: 34.125" x 83.75" L I T E RAT U R E The Prints of Ellsworth Kelly: A Catalogue Raisonné, 19491985. R. H. Axsom. 1987. #90.

$8,000–12,000


ARTIST'S LABEL

182 FREDERICK HAMMERSLEY Black for more #3, 1972 Oil on linen Signed and dated lower center; retains artist’s label and John Simon Guggenheim Foundation label frame verso Linen: 44.75" x 44.75" Frame: 45.75" x 45.75" LAMA would like to thank the Frederick Hammersley Foundation for their assistance in cataloguing this work P ROV E NANC E L.A. Louver Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, London, United Kingdom (acquired directly from the above, 1978) E XHIBIT E D “Frederick Hammerlsey: A Retrospective Exhibition," University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque, October 10-November 16, 1975

$60,000–80,000

131


183 LELLA & MASSIMO VIGNELLI

Saratoga sofa and lounge chairs (3) Poltronova, designed 1964 Comprised of a sofa and two lounge chairs Sofa: 24.5" x 82.875" x 35.5" Chairs each: 23.625" x 35.25" x 35.375" LITERATURE Sourcebook of Modern Furniture. 3rd ed. J. Habegger and J. Osman. 2005. 578.

$2,500–3,500


ALTERNATE VIEW

184 PETER GHYCZY

Garden Egg chair VEB Synthesewerk Schwarzheide, designed 1968; this example produced 1968-1975 39.25" x 28.125" x 32.75" (open) 17.75" x 28.125" x 32.75" (closed)

$2,000–3,000

185 ETTORE SOTTSASS Lotorosso table

Poltronova, designed 1965 27.25" x 47.25" diameter LIT E RAT URE Ettore Sottsass, Jun.: Designer, Artist, Architect. H. Höger. 1993. 80.; Ettore Sottsass: Furniture and a Few Interiors. G. Sambonet, ed. 1985. 41, 52.; Sourcebook of Modern Furniture. 3rd ed. J. Habegger and J. Osman. 2005. 282.

$7,000–10,000

133


186 MEL BOCHNER Head Honcho

2012 Monoprint with collage, engraving, and embossment on hand-dyed Twinrocker handmade paper Published by Two Palms, New York Signed and dated in graphite lower center edge of sheet; retains Two Palms label frame verso Image/sheet: 63" x 43" Frame: 67.625" x 47.75" P ROVENA NC E Two Palms, New York, New York; Galerie Maurice, Palm Beach, Florida; Private Collection (acquired directly from the above, 2012); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above through Sotheby’s, New York, New York, March 5, 2015, lot 320)

$35,000–45,000


187 SOL LEWITT

Plates from Lines in Two Directions & In Five Colors on Five Colors with All Their Combinations (4) 1981 Screenprints on Arches 88 paper Each: Trial proof aside from the edition of 10 Published and printed by Multiples, Inc., New York Each signed with edition in graphite lower right Comprised of Plate #3, #42, #60, and #71 Sol Lewitt Catalogue RaisonnĂŠ #1981.02 Images each: 20" x 20" Sheets each: 21.875" x 21.875" Frames each (3): 22.25" x 22.25" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000

135


188 SOL LEWITT Untitled

2001 Gouache on cardstock Signed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 11.25" x 7.25" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$6,000–8,000

189 SOL LEWITT Untitled

2001 Gouache on cardstock Signed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 11.25" x 7.5" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$6,000–8,000


137

190 SOL LEWITT

Wavy Lines on Gray 1998 The complete set of three woodcuts on Awa-Kozo Japanese paper #2 of 5 trial proofs aside from the edition of 60

191

Published by Edition Schellmann, New York; printed by Watanabe Studio, Ltd., New York

SOL LEWITT

One signed with edition in graphite lower right Sol Lewitt Catalogue Raisonné #1998.06

Untitled

1997 Gouache on cardstock Signed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 14.875" x 11.25"

Sheets each: 19.625" x 15.75" PROVE N A N CE Private Collection, P ROV E N A NC E Private Collection, Los

Los Angeles, California (acquired

Angeles, California (acquired directly

directly from the artist); Thence by

from the artist); Thence by descent

descent

$8,000–12,000

$3,000–5,000


Joseph Marioni American artist Joseph Marioni is considered one of the most important figures to come out of the New York Radical Painting group. During the late-1970s the members of this small movement began testing the definition of the painting medium in response to the Minimalist and Conceptualist theoretical assertions of the preceding decade, which had attempted to divorce the fundamental nature of painting from the images it delivered. Marioni points out that the invention of the camera did for painting what the invention of the printing press did for writing; “it liberated the painter from historic obligations to record and document history.” Painters were then tasked, for the first time, with discerning the function of their craft independent of its contribution to social progress. The Radical Painting group, whose members included Olivier Mosset and Marcia Hafif, sought to uncover the “roots” and the “sensation” of painting. The artists within the collective each realized these roots differently and thus produced a diverse body of work under the “radical painting” label. For Marioni, color stood out as the primary root of painting. With this conclusion, he strayed from minimalist thought by rejecting the primacy it placed on the painting’s two-dimensionality. Marioni argued that painting’s specificity rests in its sensory experience rather than the physicality examined by minimalist theory. While “painting involves the articulation of color on a flat plain, that merely describes the playing field,” he explained. ‘Flatness’ is still a tactile qualification and is thus shared with sculptural media as well. According to Marioni, painting alone is experienced exclusively through the sense of sight, and therefore the medium’s “game is light.” As color is the perception of specific wavelengths of light, the actual sensation of a painting is “the seeing of that color.”

When Marioni began painting, the medium had become, in his words, “an old-fashioned art form” that “was going out of favor.” Regardless, the artist felt “nourished” by color and was compelled to examine it. While his paintings are often described as monochromatic, he rejects this characterization. The process that Marioni developed during his years with the Radical Painting Group involved a repetitious layering of paint on his canvas. While Untitled (c. 1968) and Opus 15: Birth of Yellow Light #5 (1971) predate Marioni’s involvement with the Radical Painting group, his interest in color was evident from very early on in his career. Marioni says that over the course of his forty-year career, his works have transformed from “more aggressive objects” with all the frontality and opaqueness of a thirty-fiveyear-old man’s demeanor into mature demonstrations of transparency and internal light. Art critic Michael Fried, whose famous 1967 essay “Art and Objecthood” railed against minimalism, gratuitously praised Marioni. Fried regarded Marioni as “one of the foremost painters” of the present moment, saying that his works “transcend all previous limitations of the monochrome” and should be “considered paintings in the fullest and most exalted sense of the word.”

Fried, Michael. "Joseph Marioni." Artforum International, Sept. 1998, p. 149. Lodermeyer, Peter. “Joseph Marioni: Conversation with Peter Lodermeyer.” 12 Mar. 2008. Morgan, Robert C. "Joseph Marioni: Eye to Eye." The Brooklyn Rail, Feb. 2012, p. 55.


192 JOSEPH MARIONI Untitled

c. 1968 Acrylic on canvas Signed in graphite canvas verso Canvas: 56.5" x 68.625" Frame: 57.75" x 69.75"

$15,000–20,000

139

193 JOSEPH MARIONI

Opus 15: Birth of Yellow Light #5 (First Performance) 1971 Colored pencil on silkscreened Color-Aid paper mounted to board Signed, titled, and dated in black felt-tip marker backing board verso Composition/sheet: 18" x 18" Frame: 26.25" x 26.25"

$4,000–6,000


194 ALBERTO BIASI

Colori Cullati Dal Vento Aquilone 2000 PVC strips mounted to board Signed, titled, and dated verso; stamped “Alberto Biasi/Reg no.” and inscribed “OC.499” 61.625" x 50" P ROVENA NC E Tornabuoni Arte, Italy; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2014) ILLUSTRAT E D Alberto Biasi: Rilievi Ottico-Dinamici. A. Zanchetta. 2013. #441.

$20,000–30,000


195 CRAIG ELLWOOD

Canto Di Novembre 1979 Acrylic on canvas Initialed and dated canvas verso; retains unknown information label canvas stretcher verso 84.875" x 84.875" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Manhattan Beach, California (acquired directly from the artist, c. 1979)

$5,000–7,000

141


143 196 VARIOUS ARTISTS

Artists Against Torture 1993 The complete portfolio of 19 prints in various mediums, title page, statement page, information page, and cardboard portfolio box #39 of 150 Published by the Association for the Prevention of Torture, Geneva

Edition inscribed to title page; each sheet signed with edition in graphite; some dated Comprised of works by Georg Baselitz, Max Bill, Eduardo Chillida, Rupprecht Geiger, Raimund Girke, Gotthard Graubner, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Jannis Kounellis, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Robert Mangold, Nicola de Maria, Giulio Paolini, David Rabinowitch, Emil Schumacher, Antoni Tàpies, Günther Uecker, and Not Vital Sheets each: Various dimensions Portfolio box: 33.5” x 25.5” x 1"

$12,000–18,000


Kenneth Noland’s Chevrons Kenneth Noland first began painting his chevron patterns in 1963. This new hard-edge composition is read by many as a reaction to the painterly tendencies of his contemporaries who composed the second generation of Abstract Expressionists. By inverting the classical perspectival pyramid, the artist created a radiating depth that draws the viewer up and into his painting. Through the stark structure of the shape, Noland increasingly tested the tension and balance between color and space. Throughout the 1960s, Noland experimented with swathes of untreated canvas surrounding the central chevron and asymmetrical manipulations of the image’s base. Through these variations, however, Noland discovered that the destabilizing force of asymmetry added a heightened sense of drama to his paintings and distracted from his primary investigation of color. Noland returned to the chevron form in his 1980s Songs series, in which the works take their titles from oldies such as “Pennies from Heaven” and “Indian Love Call.” As a part of this series, Songs: Yesterdays (1985), presents a ‘re-stabilization’ of the chevron, with bands symmetrically expanding from a centered point in the lower quadrant of the painting. This move foregrounded Noland’s use of color that had evolved distinctly. In his earlier chevrons paintings, Noland had most often delivered flat plains of hyper-saturation. In Songs: Yesterdays (1985) and the other examples in the series, Noland’s bands are visibly textured and host gradients of opaqueness. The thinning and thickening of paint in different areas of each band unveils the complexity and multidimensionality of Noland’s pigments. By re-centering the chevron, Noland not only made space for examining inter-color relationships, but was able to showcase the dynamic interactions and contrasts that forge a single color. “Trans Shift.” Guggenheim, 28 Nov. 2018, www.guggenheim.org/artwork/3247.


197 KENNETH NOLAND Songs: Yesterdays 1985 Acrylic on canvas Signed, titled, dated, and inscribed “85-22” in graphite canvas verso; retains Ameringer Yohe Fine Art and Gallery One labels canvas stretcher verso Canvas: 88.5" x 69.125" Frame: 89.5" x 70.125"

$100,000–150,000

145


DETAIL


198 JENNIFER BARTLETT Bayshore Walk

1976-1977 Enamel and screenprint on steel in 72 parts Panels each: 12" x 12" As illustrated: 36.5" x 293.75" P ROV E NANC E Paula Cooper Gallery, New York, New York; Private Collection; The Estate of Gerard L. Cafesjian (acquired directly from the above through Christie’s, New York, New York, January 10, 2006, lot 83) E XHIBIT E D “1977 Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Art,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, February 15-April 3, 1977 LIT E RAT URE 1977 Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Art. Whitney Museum exh. cat. 1977. 20.

$30,000–50,000


199 JOHN BALDESSARI Studio

1988 7-color lithograph and screenprint on torn Somerset paper with deckle #61 of 150 Published by Art/LA 88, Los Angeles; printed by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Image: 25" x 34" Sheet: 30.5" x 38.5" Frame: 32.375" x 40.5" LITERATURE John Baldessari: A Catalogue Raisonné of Prints and Multiples, 1971-2007. S. Coplan Hurowitz. 2009. #41.; Made in LA: Prints of Cirrus Editions. B. Davis. 1995. 190.

$6,000–8,000

200 JIM DINE

A Robe Made for the Graphic Arts Council of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art 1986 4-color lithograph on buff Arches Cover paper #22 of 50 Published by the Graphic Arts Council, LACMA, Los Angeles; printed by Angeles Press, Los Angeles Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower left margin beneath image; retains publisher’s blind stamp lower right edge of sheet Together with copy of print documentation sheets Image: 25.5" x 19" Sheet: 30" x 22.25" Frame: 33" x 25.25"

$2,000–3,000


201 BRUCE NAUMAN Untitled (Green)

1971 Lithograph on Arches paper #38 of 100 Co-published by Castelli Graphics, New York and Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles; printed by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower right edge of sheet; retains Cirrus Editions blind stamp lower left Image/sheet: 22.5" x 28" Frame: 25.5" x 31" LIT E RAT URE Bruce Nauman Prints 1970-89: A Catalogue Raisonné. C. Cordes. 1989. #8.

$2,000–3,000

202 JASPER JOHNS

Untitled (from Harvey Gantt Portfolio) 1990 3-color lithograph on Arches 88 paper #202 of 250 Published to benefit the campaign of Harvey Gantt; printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Signed and dated in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains Gemini G.E.L. blind stamps lower right edge of sheet Gemini G.E.L. #26.104 Image: 6" x 4.75" Sheet: 10.5" x 8" Frame: 17.75" x 15.25" LIT E RAT URE The Prints of Jasper Johns 1960-1993: A Catalogue Raisonné. R. Field. 1994. #252.

$2,000–3,000

149


203 ALEX KATZ

Gray Ribbon (From Alex & Ada Portfolio) 1990 22-color screenprint on Arches Roll Stock 100% Rag paper #47 of 150 Published by Gaultney-Klineman Art, New York; printed by Styria Studio, Inc., New York Signed with edition in graphite lower left edge of sheet in image Image/sheet: 27.5” x 36” Frame: 34” x 43.375”

$2,000–3,000

204 TOM WESSELMANN

Bedroom Face with Lichtenstein 1994 Color screenprint on Museum Board #8 of 8 artist’s proofs aside from the edition of 65 Signed in graphite with edition in Roman numerals lower right margin beneath image Together with copy of invoice from Puccio Fine Art dated October 22, 2012 Image: 33.25" x 39.75" Sheet (vis.): 34.75" x 41.25" Frame: 44.5" x 50.5" P ROVENA NC E Puccio Fine Art, New York, New York; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2012)

$8,000–12,000


205 ROY LICHTENSTEIN

Reverie (from 11 Pop Artists Portfolio, Vol. II) 1965 Color screenprint on smooth, white wove paper Proof aside from the edition of 200 Published by Original Editions, New York; printed by Knickerbocker Machine & Foundry, Inc., New York Signed in graphite lower right margin of sheet beneath image; erased dedication to Rosa & Aaron Esman lower center right Image: 27" x 23" Sheet: 30" x 24" Frame: 40.25" x 34.25" P ROV E NANC E Rosa & Aaron Esman, New York, New York (gifted directly by the artist); Jack Glen; Steve & Anne Marie Moses (acquired directly from the above, 1971); Jonathan Novak Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California; Clark Cierlak Fine Art & Auctioneers, Sherman Oaks, California (acquired directly from the above, 2009); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California LIT E RAT URE The Prints of Roy Lichtenstein: A Catalogue RaisonnĂŠ, 1948-1993. M. Corlett. 1994. #38.

$50,000–70,000

151


206 VARIOUS ARTISTS

Leo Castelli 90th Birthday Portfolio 1997; published 1998 The complete portfolio of nine prints in various mediums, colophon, dedication page, and cloth portfolio case #65 of 90 artist’s proofs aside from the edition of 90 Published by Jean-Christophe Castelli, New York Edition inscribed in Roman numerals to colophon; each sheet signed with edition in Roman numerals; some dated; Rosenquist titled Comprised of Leo (Jasper Johns); Blue (for Leo) (Ellsworth Kelly); Titled Quotation (for L.C.) (Joseph Kosuth); Interior with Chair (Roy Lichtenstein); Life Fly Lifes Flies (Bruce Nauman); Caucus (Robert Rauschenberg); The Flame Still Dances on Leo’s Book (James Rosenquist); “L.C.” (Ed Ruscha); Leo (Richard Serra) Sheets each: 37" x 27" (or alternate orientation) Portfolio case: 39" x 28.875" x 1.25"

$30,000–50,000

153


207 SUZANNE CAPORAEL Stray

1985 Oil on canvas Signed and dated in black crayon verso; retains Irit Krygier Contemporary Art label canvas stretcher verso Canvas: 78" x 108" Frame: 85.75" x 116.25" P ROVENA NC E AT&T Corporate Art Collection, New York, New York; Private Collection, Berkeley, California (acquired directly from the above) EXHIBITE D “Summer 1985: Nine Artists,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, June 26-September 29, 1985

$10,000–15,000


208 DONALD SULTAN

Squash (from Fruits and Flowers) 1991 Screenprint on Arches 88 paper #4 of 4 printer’s proofs aside from the edition of 125 Published by Parasol Press, Ltd., New York; printed by Watanabe Studio, New York Initialed, titled, and dated “April 1991” in graphite along left margin; edition lower right Image: 12" x 12" Sheet: 22.75" x 21.75" Frame: 25.75" x 24.875" LIT E RAT URE Donald Sultan: A Print Retrospective. B. Walker. 1992. N.pag.

$800–1,200

209 DONALD SULTAN

Untitled (Cards) (Hearts and Diamonds) 1989 Conté crayon and charcoal on paper in five sheets Each inscribed, dated, and initialed in graphite along the left edge of each sheet; retains Paul Kasmin Gallery label frame verso Sheets each: 11.5" x 8" Frame: 23.125" x 57.25"

$7,000–10,000

155


210 CARLOS ALMARAZ Untitled

1980 Watercolor, pastel, and gouache on paper Signed and dated lower right edge of sheet Composition/sheet: 10" x 13" Frame: 16.25" x 19.125"

$2,000–3,000

211 AMY ADLER

Basic Geometry 2003 Cibachrome print on paper Unique Signed and dated in black felt-tip marker verso; retains Casey Kaplan label verso Together with copy of invoice from Acme Gallery dated February 22, 2005 Image/sheet (vis.): 47.75" x 69.375" Frame: 49.125" x 71" P ROVENA NC E Acme Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Marina del Rey, California (acquired directly from the above, 2005)

$5,000–7,000


212 GUY DILL

Untitled (from Egalmah Series) 1982 Concrete 22.875" x 19.125" x 5" LAMA would like to thank the artist for his assistance in cataloguing this work P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, West Hills, California (acquired through MOCA Auction, Los Angeles, California, April 29, 2000, lot S 54)

$2,000–3,000

213 LINDA BESEMER Fold #80

2002 Acrylic paint on aluminum rod Together with copy of invoice from Angles Gallery dated October 14, 2003 32" x 78.25" P ROV E NANC E Angles Gallery, Santa Monica, California; Private Collection, Marina del Rey, California (acquired directly from the above, 2003)

$7,000–10,000

157


214 UTA BARTH

Together with copy of invoice from Acme Gallery dated May 27, 2005

Untitled (05.6)

Each: 20" x 21.125"

2005 Chromogenic print diptych

PROVE N A N CE Acme Gallery, Los

#5 of 6

tion, Marina del Rey, California

One signed and dated in black ink verso; each retains Acme Gallery label verso

215 PETER FISCHLI & DAVID WEISS Untitled

1998 Inkjet print #7 of 9 Signed and dated with edition in graphite verso; retains Angles Gallery and Matthew Marks Gallery labels frame verso Together with copy of invoice from Angles Gallery dated August 30, 2000 Image: 25.875" x 39" Sheet (vis.): 28.875" x 41.75" Frame: 29.375" x 42.375" P ROVENA NC E Angles Gallery, Santa Monica, California; Private Collection, Marina del Rey, California (acquired directly from the above, 2000)

$4,000–6,000

Angeles, California; Private Collec(acquired directly from the above, 2005)

$3,000–5,000


216 OLIVER BOBERG Spielplatz

2000 Chromogenic print on Kunstoff paper #7 of 20 Signed, titled, and dated with edition in black ink frame verso; retains Angles Gallery label frame verso Together with copy of invoice from Angles Gallery dated August 30, 2000 Image: 8.75" x 13.875" Sheet (vis.): 15.375" x 19.375" Frame: 16.125" x 20" P ROV E NANC E Angles Gallery, Santa Monica, California; Private Collection, Marina del Rey, California (acquired directly from the above, 2000)

$1,000–1,500

159

217 JAMES CASEBERE Pink Hallway #3

2000 Cibachrome print mounted to Plexiglas #2 of 5 Signed in black ink verso; retains Sean Kelly label verso Together with copy of invoice from Marc Selwyn Fine Art dated January 13, 2005 60" x 48" P ROV E NANC E Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Marina del Rey, California (acquired directly from the above, 2005) LIT E RAT URE James Casebere: The Spatial Uncanny. C. Chang, J. Eugenides, and A. Vidler, eds. 2001. Cover, 159.

$20,000–30,000


218 GEORGE RICKEY Quadrilateral VIII 1978-1993 Stainless steel #5 of 5 Etched signature, date, and edition to base 20.375" x 20.5" x 1.625" (maximum overall dimensions)

$20,000–30,000


161

219 ALEXANDER CALDER Flags

1964 Gouache and ink on paper Signed and dated lower right edge of sheet; inscribed “263.64” in graphite sheet verso; retains Perls Galleries label frame verso

E XHIBIT E D “Alexander Calder: A

Calder Foundation #A00583

Made Sculpture Move,” Art Gallery

Together with photocertificate, original invoice from Perls Galleries dated April 13, 1967, and frame Composition/sheet: 29.375" x 43" P ROV E NANC E Perls Galleries, New York, New York; Private Collection, New Rochelle, New York (acquired

Retrospective Exhibition,” Guggenheim Museum, New York, November 6, 1964-January 31, 1965; “Mobiles and Stabiles by Calder, The Man Who of Toronto, Toronto, May 1-May 30, 1965; “Calder,” Museé National d’Art Moderne, Paris, July 8-October 15, 1965 ILLUST RAT E D Alexander Calder: A Retrospective Exhibition. Guggenheim Museum exh. cat. 1964. #270.; Calder. H. Arnason and P. Guerrero.

directly from the above, 1967);

1966. 146.

Thence by descent

$20,000–30,000


SOLD BY THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART TO BENEFIT ACQUISITIONS OF LATIN AMERICAN ART

220 ALEXANDER CALDER Black Pyramids

c. 1974 Color lithograph on wove paper #84 of 100 Signed in graphite lower right in image; edition lower left Image/sheet: 22.875" x 30.625" Frame: 26.875" x 33.75"

$2,000–3,000

221 JOAN MIRÓ

Two pages from Derrière le Miroir 1970 Color lithograph on paper Unknown edition size Published by Maeght Éditeur, Paris; printed by Arte Adrien Maeght, Paris These pages were from issue no. 186, “Miró: Sculptures” Image/sheet: 14.875" x 21.875" Frame: 27.75" x 34.25" LITERATURE Joan Miró The Illustrated Books: Catalogue Raisonné. P. Cramer. 1989. #134.; Derrière le Miroir et Affiches: Catalogue 1. 1971. 142.

$300–500


222 MAN RAY

Natural Painting c. 1961 Acrylic on Masonite in artist’s frame Signed lower right Masonite: 39.5" x 15.75" Frame: 42" x 18.5" P ROV E NANC E The Estate of Juliet Man Ray, the Man Ray Trust, and the Family of Juliet Man Ray; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above through Sotheby’s, London, United Kingdom, March 23, 1995, lot 417); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above through Los Angeles Modern Auctions, Van Nuys, California, October 11, 2015, lot 31)

$20,000–30,000

163


223 SAM FRANCIS

Untitled (SF76-1104) 1976 Acrylic on paper Signed, dated, and inscribed “For Noel/with love/and thanks/Sam/ June 14, 1991” sheet verso Composition/sheet: 9.375" x 8" Frame: 14.5" x 13" This work is identified with the interim identification number of SF76-1104 in consideration for the forthcoming Sam Francis: Catalogue Raisonné of Unique Works on Paper. This information is subject to change as scholarship continues by the Sam Francis Foundation. P ROVENA NC E Noel Neill, Santa Monica, California (gifted directly by the artist, 1991); Private Collection, Tucson, Arizona (acquired directly from the above, 2016)

$10,000–15,000

224 MICHAEL GOLDBERG Untitled

1992 Mixed-media on paper Signed and dated in black ink lower right edge of sheet; retains Manny Silverman Gallery label frame verso Sheet: 27.875" x 25" Frame: 32.5" x 29.5" P ROVENA NC E Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above)

$4,000–6,000


225 EDWARD DUGMORE 23rd Street #2 1956 Oil on canvas Signed and dated “1956-A” canvas verso; retains two Manny Silverman Gallery labels to canvas stretchers verso Canvas: 69.75" x 94.25" Frame: 71.125" x 95.5" P ROV E NANC E The estate of the artist; Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above)

$40,000–60,000

165


VERSO MARKINGS

226 FERNANDO ZÓBEL San Ildefonso 1962 Oil on canvas Signed lower left edge of canvas; signed, titled, and dated canvas verso Canvas: 23.875" x 24" Frame: 26" x 26.125" Fernando Zóbel Catalog Number 62-22 (487) LAMA would like to thank Alfonso de la Torre and Rafael Pérez Madero, authors of the catalogue raisonné of the paintings of Fernando Zóbel, for their assistance in cataloguing this work P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California; Private Collection, Encino, California (acquired directly from the above)

$25,000–35,000


227 MANABU MABE

Untitled (No. A-H) 1961 Oil on canvas Signed and dated in blue paint lower left; signed, dated, and inscribed “No. A-H” in felt-tip marker verso Canvas (vis.): 19.75" x 23.75" Frame: 23.375" x 27.375"

$8,000–12,000

167


228 OSKAR FISCHINGER Eclipse

1960 Oil on canvas Retains Gallery 609 label frame verso Canvas (vis.): 41.5" x 49.375" Frame: 44" x 52" P ROVENA NC E Elfriede Fischinger, Los Angeles, California; Gordon Shwayder Rosenblum, Lakewood, Colorado (acquired directly from the above, c. 1982); Thence by descent EXHIBITE D "Fischinger: A Retrospective," Gallery 609, Denver, May-June 1981

$10,000–15,000


229 OSKAR FISCHINGER Perspective I 1961 Oil on canvas Numbered “#69” to canvas overlap verso Canvas (vis.): 47.25" x 39.25" Frame: 49.625" x 41.625" P ROV E NANC E Elfriede Fischinger, Los Angeles, California; Gordon Shwayder Rosenblum, Lakewood, Colorado (acquired directly from the above, c. 1982); Thence by descent

$6,000–9,000

169

Oskar Fischinger Celebrated for his transcendent and metaphysical articulations, Oskar Fischinger was a pioneer of modernism in Los Angeles. While he never received formal training, Fischinger was swept up by the avant-garde spirit of the Frankfurt art world in the 1920s. In his infant artistic explorations, Fischinger soon found that the film medium could more wholly extend the goals of prior abstractionists such as Wassily Kandinsky. Over the course of the following decade, Fischinger worked in both experimental and commercial film, most notably designing the special effects for Fritz Lang’s Woman in the Moon (1929). By the early 1930s, his work in avant-garde cinema and promotion of “non-objectivity” had garnered international attention. After having his practice labelled “degenerate art” by the Nazi regime, Fischinger emigrated to the United States where he secured a contract with Paramount Pictures in 1936. Fischinger produced astonishing visual effects in which brightly-colored, geometric shapes and spirals swooped, spun, and danced across the screen. With his innovative use of the medium, Fischinger is hailed for having popularized

abstract filmmaking in the United States. He was later employed by MGM and Disney, briefly directing Fantasia (1940) until Disney’s softening of the film’s abstraction triggered Fischinger’s decision to leave the project. Having grown frustrated at the realization that the studios only saw film as a medium for storytelling, Fischinger turned to painting as an outlet where his creativity could truly have free rein. Through painting, the artist sought to escape the earthly and to hint at the eternal. With a unique sense of cinematic movement, his forms resonate and pulse, move in waves, swell, and burst. Fischinger is admired for the stylistic dexterity of his oil paintings that so aptly explore human perception. As the art critic Esther Leslie wrote of Fischinger's work, he cerebrally illustrates "a consciousness of space that is not geographical but graphic,” representing “time as non-linear and convoluted." Leslie, Esther. Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory and the Avant-Garde. Verso, 2004.


230 OSKAR FISCHINGER Untitled

1963 Oil on canvas board Signed lower right; dated with artist’s cipher lower left 23.875" x 29.875" P ROVENA NC E Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bertoia, Barto, Pennsylvania (acquired directly from the artist); Private Collection, Pennsylvania; Thence by descent

$5,000–7,000

231 OSKAR FISCHINGER Untitled

c. 1963 Oil on paperboard Signed lower right; artist's cipher lower left; numbered “115-12/117-17” verso 11.625" x 8.625" P ROVENA NC E Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bertoia, Barto, Pennsylvania (acquired directly from the artist); Private Collection, Pennsylvania; Thence by descent

$3,000–5,000

232 CLAIRE FALKENSTEIN Drawing #2

1964 Gouache on black paper Signed and dated “12/64” in black ink lower left; retains Esther Robles Gallery label frame verso Composition/sheet (vis.): 25.75" x 19.875" Frame: 27.375" x 21.25" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

$3,000–5,000


233 LEE MULLICAN

Great and Magical Head 1978-1979 Oil on canvas Signed, dated, and inscribed “TAOS” verso 54" x 50" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California (acquired directly from the artist, 1991)

$10,000–15,000

171


234 ROBERT MOTHERWELL

French Revolution Bicentennial Suite II-V

Each signed with edition in Roman numerals lower right margin beneath image; each retains artist’s blind stamp lower right edge of sheet

1988 The complete suite of four aquatints with photoengraving and collage on Whatman paper, some with liftground etching

Images each: 9.875" x 13.75" Sheets each: 16.875" x 20.125" Frames each: 25" x 28.5"

Each: #7 of 7 artist’s proofs aside from the edition of 35

logue Raisonné. S. Engberg and J.

Published and printed by the artist

L I T E RAT U R E Robert Motherwell: The Complete Prints 1940-1991: CataBanach. 2003. #383-386.

$8,000–12,000


235 ROBERT MOTHERWELL

America - La France Variations V 1984 8-color lithograph with collage on TGL handmade paper #60 of 60 Published and printed by Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Bedford Village Signed with edition in graphite and retains Tyler Graphics blind stamp lower right Sheet: 46.125" x 31.75" Frame: 50.25" x 35.625" LIT E RAT URE Robert Motherwell: The Complete Prints 1940-1991: Catalogue Raisonné. J. Banach and S. Engberg. 2003. #333.; The Prints of Robert Motherwell: Catalogue Raisonné 1943-1990. D. C. Belknap. 1980. #301.; Tyler Graphics: Catalogue Raisonné, 1974-1985. K. E. Tyler. 1987. #447: RM66.

$3,000–5,000

173


236 EMERSON WOELFFER Forio #1

1957 Oil on canvas Signed lower right; titled in composition; signed, titled, and dated verso; retains Manny Silverman Gallery and Riverside Art Museum labels frame verso Canvas: 39.5" x 27.625" Frame: 41.75" x 30" P ROVENA NC E Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Private Collection, Maryland (acquired directly from the above); Private Collection, Portland, Oregon EXHIBITE D Paul Kantor Gallery, Beverly Hills, January 11-February 11, 1960; “Driven to Abstraction: Southern California and the Non-Objective World, 1950-1980,” Riverside Art Museum, Riverside, August 26-October 4, 2006; “Emerson Woelffer: Classic Works, 1947-1962,” Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles, September 12-October 31, 2009 ILLUSTRAT E D Driven to Abstraction: Southern California and the Non-Objective World, 1950-1980. Riverside Art Museum exh. cat. 2006. 33.

$10,000–15,000


237 EMERSON WOELFFER A Bird for John

1981 Torn paper collage on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower right; retains Manny Silverman Gallery and Il Gabbiano labels frame verso Composition: 45.25" x 32.125" Frame: 48" x 35" P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California

$5,000–7,000

175

238 EMERSON WOELFFER Mirror in Red Frame 1963 Oil on canvas Signed, titled, and dated canvas verso; retains David Stuart Gallery label verso 42" x 34"

$5,000–7,000


239 CRAIG KAUFFMAN

Teapot with Flowers 1952 Oil on canvas Initialed in composition lower right canvas Canvas: 30" x 25" Frame: 30.5" x 25.5" P ROVENA NC E The artist; Phyllis Kessel, California (acquired directly from the above)

$4,000–6,000

240 HANS BURKHARDT Abstract Still Life 1947 Oil on canvas Signed and dated lower right Canvas: 20" x 24" Frame: 21" x 25" P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California (acquired directly from the artist, 1986)

$5,000–7,000


177

241 ROBERT GRAHAM

Study for the Frieze I 1988 Cast bronze From an edition of 10 19.375" x 46.5" LIT E RAT URE Robert Graham: Statues. Galerie Neuendorf exh. cat. 1990. #76.

$18,000–25,000


242 PAUL KASPER Untitled

c. 1968 Welded steel 61.75" x 41.25" x 8.5" P ROVENA NC E Estate of Paul Kasper, California

$2,500–3,500


243 IBRAM LASSAW Jewelry (3)

Studio, executed 1956-1957 Comprised of a necklace, pendant, and ring Necklace: 4" x 5.875" Pendant: 3" x 3.75" Ring: .5" x .625" x .875" P ROV E NANC E James Byrnes, Los Angeles, California; Thence by descent ILLUST RAT E D Panel's Choice 1957 exh. cat. 1957. Cover illustration (pendant).

$6,000–9,000

179

244 AFRO BASALDELLA Ring

Studio, executed c. 1952 Signed "Afro" to interior Together with two wax molds .625" x .75" diameter P ROV E NANC E Barbara Byrnes (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1952); Thence by descent

$1,500–2,000


245 EUGÈNE DELACROIX Study of Male Nudes N.d. Brown ink on paper Retains stamped Delacroix estate mark in red ink lower right; retains two La Galerie “18” labels and Vincent Price Collection label frame verso Composition/sheet: 9.375" x 13.5" Frame: 14.5" x 18.125"

$5,000–7,000

246 JACK ZAJAC

Horn and Skull c. 1976 Bronze Retains etched signature 13.25" x 26" x 11" (including base)

$5,000–7,000


247 JACK ZAJAC Falling Water c. 1967 Bronze #5 of 6 Retains etched signature and edition 25.875" x 7" x 8.25"

$1,500–2,000

248 JACK ZAJAC Untitled c. 1970 Bronze 5.5" x 20" x 6"

$1,500–2,000

249 MAX FINKELSTEIN Fifth Day 1964 Bronze Signed and titled 16.875" x 26.5" x 10.5" (including base) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California; Private Collection, Sebastopol, California (acquired directly from the above)

$3,000–5,000

181


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to clearance before purchases can be collected. Buyers who

storage are not insured by MAI. Unless other arrangements

breach thereof between the bidder or buyer and Modern

have not purchased from Modern Auctions, Inc. (Los Angeles

are made and confirmed in writing, the buyer assumes sole

Auctions, Inc., the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover

Modern Auctions) previously are asked to provide a method

responsibility for shipping, packing, insurance, and storage

its attorney's fees and costs incurred in connection with

of payment and/or letter of reference from a bank or creditor

concerns. A list of shippers can be provided upon request. If a

such proceeding. This Agreement shall be governed by and

prior to the auction. Bank wire information is available

purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months

construed in accordance with California law, without reference

upon request. If payment is not received in full by February

of the auction, the buyer authorizes MAI, upon notice, to

to the conflicts of law rules and principles of such State.

27, 2019, collection and storage fees will begin occurring

arrange a resale of the item by auction or private sale, with

The parties agree that all actions or proceedings arising in

immediately. All lots are subject to a Buyer's Premium, this

estimates and a reserve set at MAI's reasonable discretion.

connection with this Agreement shall be litigated exclusively

amount is added to the hammer price and is calculated upon

The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for storage

in the Los Angeles Superior Court. This choice of venue is

when payment is received by MAI. Please see schedule below:

charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed

intended by the parties to be mandatory, thereby precluding

by the buyer to MAI and the remainder will be forfeited unless

the possibility of litigation between the parties with respect to

collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction.

or arising out of this Agreement in any other jurisdiction.

• 22.5% on the hammer price up to and including

BI DDI N G We encourage you to attend the sale in person.

GUA RA N TEE The authenticity of every item offered for

$500,000 if bids are placed directly with Modern

However, if you are unable to attend in person we offer

auction is guaranteed. MAI warrants only the authorship of

Auctions, Inc.;

an Absentee or Phone Bidding service. For this service fill

an item (as printed in the line directly below the lot number,

• 17.5% on the portion of the hammer price in excess

out and submit a Bid Form. To obtain this form please call

may be blue, pink, or white type) and does not guarantee the

of $500,000 up to $2,000,000 if bids are placed

323.904.1950 or go to our website. We will not execute

condition, age, or any identifying characteristic used by MAI

directly with Modern Auctions, Inc.;

Absentee or Phone bid orders unless a signed and completed

in any descriptions such as color, method of construction,

• 12.5% on the portion of the hammer price in

bid form has been received. All Bid Forms must be received

and type of materials. Any lot using the terms “attributed,”

excess of $2,000,000 if bids are placed directly with

by Saturday, February 16, 2019 by 5:00pm (PT) via fax to

“attribution,” “in the style of,” “in the manner of,” or “after”

Modern Auctions, Inc.

323-904-1954 or scanned and sent via email to shannon@

does not qualify for our guarantee. In addition, the buyer

lamodern.com. We encourage you to call after faxing to

assumes responsibility for reading all addendums and posted

BUYER’S PREMIUM**:

confirm we have received your form. We kindly ask that you

corrections to the catalogue prior to bidding.

PAYMENT RECEIVED AFTER FEBRUARY 27, 2019

do not call on the day of the auction to submit bids or to

• 25% on the hammer price up to and including

check if your bids were successful.

RESCI SSI O N Should the authenticity of an item be

$500,000 if bids are placed directly with Modern

disputed after a sale, the buyer has 90 days from the date of

Auctions, Inc.;

notified by phone or email as late as February 19, 2019. In

the auction to provide written documentation or conclusive

• 20% on the portion of the hammer price in excess

addition, the auction's Prices Realized will be posted the day

opinion of a mutually agreed upon independent expert,

of $500,000 up to $2,000,000 if bids are placed

after the auction on our website. Do not rely on any auction

retained at the buyer’s sole expense, that the item in question

directly with Modern Auctions, Inc.;

results (Prices Realized) unless published on www.lamodern.

is not as stated in the catalogue. In the event of an error, MAI

• 15% on the portion of the hammer price in excess

com or as provided directly by MAI.

will rescind the purchase contract. MAI will reimburse the

of $2,000,000 if bids are placed directly with

buyer for no more than the hammer price plus the Buyer’s

Modern Auctions, Inc.

first-served basis; thus, we encourage you to submit your

Premium and only after the item is returned to the original

Bid Form ASAP. If identical absentee bids are submitted, the

point of sale in the condition in which it was sold. Taxes,

**Payment by credit card carries a 3% processing fee

earliest received will take precedence. The number of phone

packing, shipping, and storage costs will not be reimbursed.

on the total invoice amount and requires a completion of

lines available are limited so please submit your phone requests

MAI is not liable for any costs, such as expert and attorney

LAMA's “Credit Card Authorization” form.

early. By registering for the Phone Bidding service you

fees. If the item is authentic, as stated in the auction catalogue

acknowledge and consent to allow MAI to record telephone

or lamodern.com, then the purchaser shall bear MAI’s expenses

CA LIFO R NIA SALES TAX Sales tax of 9.5% will

conversations. On all Bid Forms, please leave a valid credit

incurred in defense of the allegation, such as attorney fees

be collected on all purchases removed from our premises or

card number with expiration date; a deposit of 25% may be

and other costs. The limited right of rescission is only available

delivered within the state of California. Those holding a valid

required for all absentee and phone bids. The party responsible

to the original purchaser from MAI. Once the item is resold,

California State Resale License must register before each

for submitting the Bid Form is solely responsible for the payment

then all rights and liabilities of MAI regarding authenticity

auction and present their valid resale number. No purchases

in full of the total invoice, we will not make any changes to an

end. The Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy against MAI

will be released until all sales tax requirements are satisfied.

invoice.

for any reason is the limited right of rescission described in

this section. The purchaser shall not be entitled to damages,

PAY M E NT All sales are final. All sold lots are to be paid

BUYER’S PREMIUM**: PAYMENT RECEIVED BY FEBRUARY 27, 2019

All successful Absentee and Phone bidders may be

Absentee or Phone Bidding service is on a first-come,

Should a dispute arise after the auction, our records are

EST IMAT ES & R ES E RVES The estimates printed

conclusive. We are not responsible for failure to execute a bid

compensatory, incidental, consequential, nominal or punitive,

after each lot should be used as a guide only and should

and have the right to reject any bid. We reserve the right to

nor any expenses incurred during the proceedings, such as

not be relied upon as a prediction of final selling prices.

withdraw any property before the auction and shall have no

expert’s fees, attorney’s fees, and other costs.

Many of the lots offered for auction carry a reserve and are

liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. Should an item be

confidential. The reserve is a minimum price at which the

withdrawn, the auctioneer will make an announcement at the

RI GH TS TO PH OTO GRA PH S All images and text

seller has agreed to let the auctioneer sell the property.

time the lot would have been put up for sale. In addition, the

contained in this catalogue are the sole property of MAI, and

auctioneer may add lots not previously listed in the catalogue

may not be used or reproduced in any medium without the

CO NDIT ION Everything is sold in “As-Is” Condition. No

or addendum. If the buyer does not comply with all of the

expressed written permission of MAI.

statement regarding condition of any item, whether it is made

Conditions of Sale/Notices to Buyers, MAI reserves the right to

orally at the auction, or in writing, or printed in this catalogue,

cancel the sale, hold the defaulting buyer liable for the purchase

Modern Auctions, Inc.  |  Bond # 7900405194

or at any other time shall be deemed to be a warranty,

price and Buyer’s Premium, retain or process any deposit, and

Peter Loughrey, Principal Auctioneer

representation, or assumption of liability. It is the sole

resell the property privately or at auction without further notice.

Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA)

responsibility of the buyer to inspect all goods prior to the

In the latter, the defaulting buyer will be held responsible for

16145 Hart Street, Van Nuys, CA 91406

sale. We strongly encourage all bidders to request a condition

all incurred expenses, such as warehouse and transportation


Index A

Adler, Amy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Almaraz, Carlos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Anastasi, William. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Arneson, Robert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Arnoldi, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43-45

B

Baldessari, John. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Barth, Uta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Bartlett, Jennifer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Basaldella, Afro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Baughman, Milo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Bayer, Herbert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178-180 Bell, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134-136 Bengston, Billy Al. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52-53 Berlant, Tony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54-55 Bertoia, Harry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Besemer, Linda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Bezombes, Roger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Biasi, Alberto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Boberg, Oliver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Bochner, Mel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Bonevardi, Marcelo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Bradford, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107-108 Brogan, Jack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41-41 Brazier-Jones, Mark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Breuer, Marcel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Burkhardt, Hans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240

C

Calder, Alexander. . . . . . . . . . . . 219-220 Campana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105-106 Caporael, Suzanne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Casebere, James. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Chagall, Marc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Chihuly, Dale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92-95 Cohen, Larry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158-159 Corse, Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137-139 Cressey, David. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

D

Dal Fabbro, Mario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Dalí, Salvador . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78-79 Davies, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 De Patta, Margaret. . . . . . . . . . . 164-177A Delacroix, Eugène. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Diebenkorn, Richard. . . . . . . . . . . 155-156 Dill, Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Dine, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Disney, Walt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Doig, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-104 Dugmore, Edward. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 Dupré, André. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

E

Eames, Charles & Ray . . . . . . . . . . 32-34 Ellwood, Craig. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Evans, Paul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Eversley, Fred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Everts, Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

F

Falkenstein, Claire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Faure, Patricia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Ferebee, Chris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Finkelstein, Max . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Fischinger, Oskar . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228-231 Fischli, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Francis, Sam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Friedeberg, Pedro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84-85 Fujita, Kenji . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

G

Gehry, Frank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Ghyczy, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Gill, James. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Gilliam, Sam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115-117 Goldberg, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Goode, Joe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141-142 Graham, Robert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241

H

Hammersley, Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Haring, Keith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-26 Henningsen, Frits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Henningsen, Poul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Higgins, Michael & Francis. . . . . . . . . . 63 Hockney, David. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-57 Horowitz, Jonathan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

I

Irwin, Robert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Q

Quistgaard, Jens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

R

Ray, Man. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Rickey, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Rodrigues, Sergio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Rosa, Christian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Rosenquist, James. . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 Ruscha, Ed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143-147

S

Sarpaneva, Timo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Schlumbohm, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Schuyff, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Sottsass, Ettore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Sultan, Donald. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208-209

T

J

Johns, Jasper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202

Tackett, La Gardo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Tamayo, Rufino. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86-87 Thiebaud, Wayne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

K

V

Kagan, Vladimir. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Kasper, Paul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Katavolos, William. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Katz, Alex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Kauffman, Craig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Kelley, Douglas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Kelly, Ellsworth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Kersels, Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Kienholz, Ed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149-150 Klint, Kaare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Knoll, Florence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Koons, Jeff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99-100

L

Lalanne, François-Xavier. . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Lamb, Walter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58-60 Lassaw, Ibram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 LaVerne, Philip & Kelvin. . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Léger, Fernand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75-76 LeWitt, Sol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187-191 Lichtenstein, Roy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Littel, Ross. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Lukens, Glen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

M

Mabe, Manabu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Maloof, Sam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Marioni, Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192-193 McCobb, Paul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 McIntosh, Harrison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Miró, Joan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Moses, Ed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46-50 Motherwell, Robert. . . . . . . . . . . 234-235 Mullican, Lee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Murakami, Takashi . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96-98

N

Nakashima, George. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Nauman, Bruce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Nelson, George. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Nikravan, Amir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Noland, Kenneth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197

P

Perriand, Charlotte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Pettibone, Richard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Picasso, Pablo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-72 Pierzynski, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Valentine, De Wain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Venard, Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-82 Vieira da Silva, Maria Helena . . . . . . . 65 Vignelli, Lella & Massimo. . . . . . . . . . . 183 Voulkos, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

W

Warhol, Andy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-24,25 Weiss, David. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Wesselmann, Tom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Williams, Mason. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Woelffer, Emerson. . . . . . . . . . . . 236-238 Wood, Beatrice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129-132

Z

Zajac, Jack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246-248 Zóbel, Fernando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226


INFORMATION

DIRECTIONS TO LAMA AUCTION & PREVIEW

Auction

STAFF Peter Loughrey

Sunday, February 17, 2019

From Hollywood

Director,

12pm (PT)

• Make your way to the 101 Freeway

Art & Design

Proceed North on the 101 Preview

• Merge onto the 405 Freeway,

Shannon Loughrey

February 4 – 16, 2019

north

President

10am–6pm (PT)

• Take the 4th exit onto “Sherman Way, west”

Carolina Ivey

Address

• Proceed west on Sherman Way

Managing Director

16145 Hart Street

• Turn left at the 3rd light onto

Van Nuys, CA 91406

“Woodley”

Clo Pazera

• Take the first right onto “Hart”

Specialist

Telephone

street, which is a side street

323.904.1950

Joe Alascano From the Westside

Jose Ramirez

Website

• Take the 405 Freeway, north

Shipping

LAModern.com

Continue past the Getty Museum and the 101 Interchange

Jamie Shi

• Exit onto “Sherman Way,

Cataloguer

west” (this is 4 exits North of the 101)

Rokhsane Hovaida

• Proceed west on Sherman

Registrar

Way • Turn left at the 3rd light

Codie Barry

onto “Woodley”

Consignor Services

• Take the first right onto “Hart” street, which is a side

Laura Begley

street

Client Services Susan Einstein

LAMA MAP

Robert Wedemeyer Photographer

VAN NUYS AIRPORT

Kathryn Hanlon-Hall

SEPULVEDA BLVD

HART ST

Writer 405 FREEWAY

LAMA

WOODLEY AVE

VALJEAN AVE

SHERMAN WAY

101 FREEWAY WOODLAND HILLS HOLLYWOOD

N

GETTY MUSEUM


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Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA) February 17, 2019 Modern Art and Design Auction  

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